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Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2003

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Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2003 Film, Television, Radio, Theatre, Dance, Music, Cartoons and Pop Culture by

HARRIS M. LENTZ, III

McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers Jefferson, North Carolina, and London

Front cover, clockwise from top left: Katharine Hepburn, Bob Hope, June Carter Cash, Art Carney.

ISSN ¡087-96¡7 / ISBN 0-7864-¡756-0 (softcover : 50# alkaline paper)

©2004 Harris M. Lentz, III. All rights reserved No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Manufactured in the United States of America

McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers Box 6¡¡, Je›erson, North Carolina 28640 www.mcfarlandpub.com

To the memory of those friends and family lost during 2003 — Dallas Nelson, Ray Carpenter, Sid Jones John Fergus Ryan, Pat McCarver, Sister Mary Elise Groves, Ron Downey, and Jim Shoenberger and Beth Marion, Jack Elam, Robert Rockwell, Sheb Wooley, Warren Zevon

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I greatly appreciate the assistance of my good friend, Carla Clark, and my mother, Helene Lentz. Special thanks also go to my sister, Nikki Walker, and to Bob King at Classic Images, for granting permission to use information from my columns. Also, thanks to Rosa Burnett and the sta› at State Technical Institute library, Tom Weaver, Fred Davis, Andrew I. Porter, Forrest J Ackerman, Mike Fitzgerald, John Beifuss, Eric Rohr, Ray Neilson, John Whyborn, Boyd Magers, Larry Tauber, Andrew “Captain Comics” Smith, Jimmy Walker, Tony Pruitt, Greg Bridges, Bobby Mathews, Kent Nelson, Dale Warren, Dr. Mark He‡ngton, Anne Taylor, Andy Branham, John Nelson, Richard Allynwood, Frank de Azpillaga, Irv Jacobs, Bill Warren, Bob Cuneo, Alun

Jones, Marty Baumann, Rusty White of “Entertainment Insiders,” Russ Blatt of “Life in Legacy,” the folks at “VoyForums: Celebrity Obits,” Trinity Houston, Joy Martin, Denise Tansil, John Janovich, Jake Miller, Blaine Lester, Monica Whitsitt, Jay Morris, Louis and Carol Baird, Michael and Maggie Hernandez, “Doc,” Dave Ramsey, Ray and Judy Herring, Don and Elaine Kerley, Kira Christensen, Wallace Traylor, the fine folks at J. Alexanders and Willy Mo‡tt’s, the Memphis Film Festival, the gang at AOL’s Classic Horror Film Board, Teresa’s Italian Restaurant, Tommy Gattas, James Gattas, the University of Memphis Library and the Memphis and Shelby County public libraries.

vii

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgments vii Introduction ¡ Reference Bibliography 3 The 2003 Obituaries

ix

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INTRODUCTION toonists Al Hirschfeld and Bill Mauldin, The Ghost and Mrs. Muir leading lady Hope Lange, filmmakers John Schlesinger and Elia Kazan, Hitler's favorite director Leni Riefenstahl, The Gods Must Be Crazy Bushman star N!Xau, Evening Shade performer Michael Jeter, bobybuilding Samson star Gordon Mitchell, and Free Willy whale, Keiko. Gimme a Break star Nel Carter and What's Happening!!'s Rerun, Fred Berry died during the year, as did The Price Is Right announcer Rod Roddy, Exodus author Leon Uris, and Leave It to Beaver's buddy Whitey — Stanley Fafara. Two thousand three also saw the passing of Shrek! creator William Steig, Scarlett O'Hara's first husband Rand Brooks, and James Bond's M, Robert Brown. Songwriters Hank Ballard (“The Twist”) and Felice Bryant (“The Tennessee Waltz”) are within these pages as are country singer Johnny Paycheck, Iron Butterfly's Erik Braunn, and Jimi Hendrix's bass player Noel Redding. Two stars of television's Seaquest DSV died tragically — Royce D. Applegate in a house fire and former teen actor Jonathan Brandis by suicide. Actress-model Suzy Parker and B-movie starlet Lana Clarkson died in 2003 along with leading ladies Paula Raymond, Kathie Browne, Jeanne Crain, Janice Rule, Ellen Drew, Fay Helm, Vera Ralston, Andrea King, Vera Zorina, Beth Marion, Patricia Roc, Lynne Thigpen, Julie Parrish, Madlyn Rhue.

The entertainment world lost several legendary stars and a host of other men and women involved in film, television, stage and music in 2003. Comedian and humanitarian extraordinare Bob Hope died at ¡00, and Oscar-winning screen icons Katharine Hepburn and Gregory Peck passed on during the year. Other notables who died include country music legend Johnny Cash and his wife, June Carter Cash, television funnyman John Ritter, The Honeymooners’ Ed Norton — Art Carney and The Beverly Hillbillies’ Jed Clampett — Buddy Ebsen, veteran newsman David Brinkley, stage and screen star Hume Cronyn, The Untouchables’ Robert Stack, comedian Buddy Hackett, Hollywood tough-guy Charles Bronson and fellow Magnificent Seven Horst Buchholz. Other notable passings include The Real McCoys’ Richard Crenna, screen villain Jack Elam, rock stars Warren Zevon and Robert Palmer and the Bee Gees' Robin Gibb, tap dancing great Gregory Hines and actor-dancer Donald O'Connor, singers Nina Simone and Barry White, the Righteous Brothers’ Bobby Hatfield, Universal horror scream queen Anne Gwynne, British leading men Alan Bates and David Hemmings, Home Improvement's mysterious neighbor Earl Hindeman and everybody's favorite neighbor, Mr. Rogers, Blondie star Penny Singleton, Hong Kong pop icon Anita Mui, Elvis’ producer Sam Phillips, car-

1

Introduction The Wasp Woman leading man Anthony Eisley, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre's cook — Jim Siedow, and the ghastly grinning Mr. Sardonicus— Guy Rolfe join Cuckoo's Nest inmate Sidney Lassick and one of The Dirty Dozen— Tom Busby, in this volume, as are character actors Les Tremayne, Anthony Caruso, Wendy Hiller, Thora Hird, Graham Jarvis, Titos Vandis, Florence Stanley, Kay E. Kuter, Alan Tilvern, Robert Rockwell, Nedra Volz, Sean McClory, Tyler McVey, Cli› Norton. Tennis legend Althea Gibson and baseball great Warren Spahn also died during the year and the world of professional wrestling and sports entertainment lost such legendary names as “Classy” Freddie Blassie, Stu Hart, Road Warrior Hawk, Curt “Mr. Perfect” Hennig, Sailor Art Thomas, and Miss Elizabeth. The numerous entries in this year’s edition also include Hong Kong star Leslie Cheung, film producers Alex Gordon and Philip Yordan, soap opera star Terry Lester, singer Gisele Mackenzie, special e›ects wizards Wah Chang and Albert Nozaki, and the last of the Seven Little Foys— Irving Foy. This book provides a single source that notes the deaths of all major, and many minor, figures in the fields of film, television, cartoons, theatre, music and popular literature. The obituaries within this volume contain pertinent details of deaths including date, place and cause, of 962 celebrities. Biographical information and career highlights and achievements are also provided. I have also included a com-

2 plete-as-possible filmography for film and television performers. Most obituaries are followed by citations to major newspapers and periodical stories reporting the death. A photograph has been included for many of the individuals. I have been writing obituaries of film personalities for over 20 years, beginning with a column in Forry Ackerman’s Famous Monsters of Filmland in the late ¡970s. Many of the film obituaries in the present work are taken from my monthly column in Classic Images (P.O. Box 809, Muscatine, IA 5276¡), a newspaper devoted to classic films and their performers. Information on the passing of the individuals found in this volume has been gathered from a myriad of sources. Primary sources, as previously noted are listed in the individual bibliographies, including The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, Times (of London), The Washington Post, Variety, Time, People, TV Guide and Newsweek. Other sources include Boyd Mager’s Western Clippings, The Memphis Commercial Appeal, The Hollywood Reporter, The (Manchester) Guardian, The Comics Buyer’s Guide, Locus, Pro Wrestling Torch, Psychotronic Video, The Comics Journal and Facts on File. Several sources on the internet have also been helpful, including Celebrity Obits (http://www/voy.com/60649/), Life in Legacy (formerly Famous Deaths — Week in Review) (http://lifeinlegacy.com/), Enterainment Insiders (http://www.einsiders.com/features/columns/2003 obituaries), and the Internet Movie Database, Ltd. (http://us.imdb.com/).

REFERENCE BIBLIOGRAPHY The Academy Players Directory. Beverly Hills, Calif.: Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science, ¡978–200¡. The American Film Institute Catalog: Feature Films, ¡9¡¡–20. Patricia King Hansen, ed. Berkeley: University of California Press, ¡988. American Film Institute Catalog: Feature Films, ¡92¡–30. Kenneth W. Munden, ed. New York: R.R. Bowker, ¡97¡. The American Film Institute Catalog: Feature Films, ¡93¡–40. Patricia King Hansen, ed. Berkeley: University of California Press, ¡993. American Film Institute Catalog: Feature Films, ¡96¡–70. Richard P. Krafsur, ed. New York: R.R. Bowker, ¡976. Brooks, Tim. The Complete Directory of Prime Time TV Stars. New York : Ballantine Books, ¡987. Brown, Les. The New York Times Encyclopedia of Television. New York: Times Books, ¡977. Bushnell, Brooks. Directors and Their Films. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡993. Chilton, John. Who’s Who of Jazz. Philadelphia, PA: Chilton Book, ¡972. Contemporary Authors. Detroit: Gale Research, various editions. DeLong, Thomas A. Radio Stars. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡996.

Dimmitt, Richard Bertrand. An Actors Guide to the Talkies. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, ¡967. Two Volumes. Erickson, Hal. Television Cartoon Shows. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡995. Fetrow, Alan G. Feature Films, ¡940–¡949. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡994. _____. Feature Films, ¡950–¡959. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡999. _____. Sound Films, ¡927–¡939. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡992. Finch, Yolande. Finchy. New York: Wyndham Books, ¡98¡. Fisher, Dennis. Horror Films Directors, ¡93¡– ¡990. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡99¡. Hunter, Allan, ed. Chambers Concise Encyclopedia of Film and Television. New York: W & R. Chambers Ltd., ¡99¡. Katz, Ephraim. The Film Encyclopedia, 2d ed. New York: HarperPerennial, ¡994. Malloy, Alex G., ed. Comic Book Artists. Radnor, Penn.: Wallace-Homestead, ¡993. Maltin, Leonard, ed. Movie and Video Guide ¡995. New York: Signet Books, ¡994. Marill, Alvin H. Movies Made for Television. Westport, CT: Arlington House, ¡980. Mathis, Jack. Republican Confidential, Vol. 2: The Players. Barrington, IL: Jack Mathis Advertising, ¡992.

3

Introduction McNeil, Alex. Total Television. New York: Penguin Books, ¡996. Monaco, James. Who’s Who in American Film Now. New York: Zoetrobe, ¡988. Nash, Jay Robert, and Stanley Ralph Ross. The Motion Picture Guide. ¡0 vols. Chicago; Cinebooks, ¡985. Nowlan, Robert A. & Gwendolyn Wright Nowlan. The Films of the Eighties. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡99¡. Oliviero, Je›rey. Motion Picture Players’ Credits. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡99¡. Parrish, James Robert. Actors’ Television Credits ¡950–¡972. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, ¡973. _____. Film Actors Guide: Western Europe. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, ¡977. Ragan, David. Who’s Who in Hollywood, ¡900– ¡976. New Rochelle, NY: Arlington House, ¡976. Rovin, Je›. The Fabulous Fantasy Films. South Bunswick, NJ: A.S. Barnes, ¡977. Terrace, Vincent. Encyclopedia of Television Series, Pilots and Specials, ¡937–¡973. New York: Zoetrobe, ¡986. _____. Encyclopedia of Television Series, Pilots and Specials, ¡974–¡984. New York : Zoetrobe, ¡986. Walker, John, ed. Halliwell’s Filmgoer’s and Video Viewer’s Companion, ¡0th Edition. New York: HarperPerennial, ¡993. Watson, Elena M. Television Horror Movie Hosts. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡99¡.

4 Weaver, Tom. Attack of the Monster Movie Makers: Interviews with 20 Genre Giants. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡994. _____. Eye on Science Fiction. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, 2003. _____. I Was a Monster Movie Maker. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, 200¡. _____. Interviews with B Science Fiction and Horror Movie Makers. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡988. _____. It Came from Weaver Five: Interviews with 20 Zany, Glib and Earnest Moviemakers in the SF and Horror Traditions of the Thirties, Forties, Fifties and Sixties. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡994. _____. Monsters, Mutants and Heavenly Creatures. Baltimore, MD: Midnight Marquee Press, ¡996. _____. Science Fiction and Fantasy Film Flashbacks. Je›erson, NC.: McFarland, ¡998. _____. Science Fiction Stars and Horror Heroes. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡99¡. _____. They Fought in the Creature Features: Interviews with 23 Classic Horror, Science Fiction and Serial Stars. Je›erson, NC : McFarland, ¡994. Who’s Who in the World. Chicago: Marquis Who’s Who, various editions. Willis, John, ed. Screen World. New York : Crown Publishers, ¡958–200¡.

OBITUARIES IN THE PERFORMING ARTS, 2003

Obituaries • 2003

6

Abich, Hans German film producer Hans Abich died in Freiburg, Germany, on July 17, 2003. He was 84. Abich was born in Steinolsa, Germany, on August 4, 1918. He produced numerous films from the late 1940s. His many credits include Love ’47 (1948), Keepers of the Night (1949), A Day Will Come (1950), Primanerinnen (1951), His Royal Highness (1953), Sie (1954), Ingrid—Die Geschichte eines Fotomodells (1955), The Sins of Rose Bernd (1959), Confessions of Felix Krull (1957), The Glass Tower (1957), Mother of Pearl (1957), Resurrection (1958), Aren’t We Wonderful? (1958), The Restless Night (1958), All Bad (1958), People in the Net (1959), The Buddenbrooks (1959), The Man Who Sold Himself (1959), Agatha, Stop That Murdering! (1960), Tempest in a Water Glass (1960), and The Dear Augustin (1960). In 1960 Abich left films for radio, becoming director of radio Bremen in 1968.

Rosey Nix Adams

on October 24, 2003. She was 45. She was the daughter of June Carter and her second husband, Nashville police officer Edwin “Rip” Nix. Adams often accompanied her mother and sang background vocals on the 1999 album Press On. She also recorded with her husband, bluegrass musician Phillip Adams. She was found dead with bluegrass musician Jimmy Campbell. They had been collaborating on a musical project. People, Nov. 10, 2003, 125.

Addie, Robert

Hans Abich

Adams, Rosey Nix Country singer Rosey Nix Adams, the daughter of June Carter Cash and step-daughter of country legend Johnny Cash, was found dead of accidental carbon monoxide poisoning in a converted schoolbus near Clarksville, Tennessee,

British actor Robert Addie, who was best known for his role as the villainous Sir Guy of Gisburne in the Robin of Sherwood television series in the mid–1980s, died of lung cancer on November 20, 2003. He was 43. Addie was born in South London on February 10, 1960. He began his career on stage in the late 1970s and starred as Mordred in John Borman’s Excalibur in 1981. Addie was also seen in the films Absolution (1978), Friends and Other Lovers (1980), Another Country (1984), Dutch Girls (1985), Captain Jack (1999), and Intimacy (2001). He was featured in television productions of Barriers (1980), Stalky & Co. (1982), Midnight Feast (1982), All for Love (1983), The First Olympics: Athens 1896 (1984), Ladies in Charge (1986), I’ll Take Manhattan (1987), A Hazard of Hearts (1987), Lost Belongings (1987), Starlings (1988), The Endless Game (1990), Merlin (1988) as Sir Gilbert, A Knight in Camelot

7

2003 • Obituaries

Robert Addie

(1998) as Sir Sagramour, Mary, Mother of Jesus (1999) as Pontius Pilate, and Lorna Doone (2000) as King James II. He also appeared in episodes of The Return of Sherlock Holmes, Pulaski, Crossbow, Red Dwarf, Noah’s Ark, The New Adventures of Robin Hood, Bugs, and Monarch of the Glen.

Alexander, Bruce Bruce Cook, who, under the pen name Bruce Alexander, wrote historical mystery novels starring blind 18th century detective Sir John Fielding, died of a stroke in Los Angeles on November 18, 2003. He was 71. Cook was born in Chicago in 1932. He began his writing career as a journalist with such publications as the National Observer and The Los Angeles Daily News. He also served as a book editor for the Detroit News and USA Today, and was a senior editor at Newsweek. Cook’s first book, the non-fiction The Beat Generation, was published in 1971. He authored the biography Dalton Trumbo in 1977, and wrote Brecht in Exile in 1983. His first fiction novel, Sex Life, was published in 1978. Cook also created the fictional Hispanic detective Chico Cervantes, who was featured in the novels Mexican Standoff

Bruce Alexander

(1988), Rough Cut (1990), Death As a Career Move (1992), and The Sidewalk Hilton (1994). He began writing historical mysteries as Bruce Alexander with 1994’s Blind Justice. Sir John Fielding was the protagonist in ten novels, including Murder on Grub Street (1995), Watery Grave (1996), Person or Persons Unknown (1997), Jack, Knave and Fools (1998), Death of a Colonial (1999), The Color of Death (2000), Smuggler’s Moon (2001), An Experiment in Treason (2002), and 2003’s The Price of Murder. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 18, 2003, B11; New York Times, Nov. 16, 2003, 43.

Alexander, Julie British actress and model Julie Alexander died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in a London, England, nursing home on January 31, 2003. She was 64. Alexander was born in London on May 9, 1938. She began working as a model after winning a local beauty pageant. She began her film career in 1959 with a small role in Operation Bullshine. She appeared in several more

Obituaries • 2003

8

films including The Pure Hell of St. Trinian’s (1960), Dentist in the Chair (1960), The Terror of the Tongs (1961), and A Matter of WHO (1961) before giving up her acting and modeling career. She subsequently worked in sales for a lighting company before marrying accountant Robert Breckman in 1979. Alexander was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in the early 1990s.

Allen, Duane Duane Allen, a former professional football player and actor, died of a heart attack in a Pasadena, California, hospital, on May 7, 2003. He was 65. Allen was born in Alhambra, California, on October 21, 1937. He began playing football with the Los Angeles Rams in 1960. He

Lewis M. Allen

Duane Allen

left the Rams in 1964 and subsequently played with the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Chicago Bears. After leaving football, Allen played small roles in several films including Mandingo (1975), Ghostbusters II (1989), and Tango & Cash (1989). He was also seen in an episode of television’s Law & Order.

Allen, Lewis M. Stage and film producer Lewis M. Allen died in New York City of pancreatic cancer on

December 8, 2003. He was 81. Allen was born in Berryville, Virginia, on June 27, 1922. He produced several popular films in the 1960s including The Connection (1962), The Balcony (1963), Lord of the Flies (1963), Francois Truffaut’s adaptation of Ray Bradbury’s science fiction classic Fahrenheit 451 (1966), and The Queen (1968). Allen also produced the films Fortune and Men’s Eyes (1971), 1918 (1985), On Valentine’s Day (1986), Swimming to Cambodia (1987), O.C. and Stiggs (1987), End of the Line (1988), Miss Firecracker (1989), and the 1990 remake of Lord of the Flies. Allen received a Tony Award for producing the 1977 hit Broadway musical Annie. He also earned Tonys for Herb Gardner’s I’m Not Rappaport (1986) and Terrence McNally’s Master Class (1996). Survivors include his wife, Jay Presson Allen, who wrote such films as Alfred Hitchcock’s Marnie (1964), The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1969), and Cabaret (1972). New York Times, Dec. 10, 2003, A29; Variety, Dec. 22, 203, 64.

Allen, Rosalie Country singer Rosalie Allen died in California on September 24, 2003. She was 79. She was born Julia Marlene Bedra in Old Forge,

9

2003 • Obituaries

Tony Altomare (with his wife, Mollie)

Amamoto, Eisei Japanese character actor Hideyo “Eisei” Amamoto died in Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, Japan, of acute pneumonia on March 23, 2003. He was 77. Amamoto was born in Japan on January 2, 1926. He appeared in numerous films from the mid–1950s including Twenty-Four Eyes (1954), Rosalie Allen

Pennsylvania, on June 27, 1924. A popular singer in the 1940s and 1950s, Allen was known as the “Queen of the Yodelers.” She recorded such hit songs as “I Want to Be a Cowboy’s Sweetheart,” “Guitar Polka,” and “Quicksilver.” She was also a disc jockey on New York radio, hosting the program Prairie Stars from 1944 to 1956. She was inducted into the Country Music Disc Jockey Hall of Fame in 1999. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 19, 2003, B18; New York Times, Oct. 26, 2003, 29.

Altomare, Tony Tony Altomare, a leading professional wrestler in the 1960s, died of heart failure in a Stamford, Connecticut, hospital on February 18, 2003. He was 74. Altomare was born in Stamford on July 24, 1928. He teamed with Lou Albano as The Sicilians in the World Wrestling Federation, holding the tag team titles in 1967. After retiring from the ring, Altomare continued to work as a trainer with the WWF.

Eisei Amamoto (as Doctor Who)

Obituaries • 2003 Samurai Saga (1959), The Birth of Japan (1959), The Gambling Samurai (1960), The Secret of the Telegian (1960), Daredevil in the Castle (1961), Yojimbo the Bodyguard (1961), The Scarlet Man (1961), Gorath (1962), The Crimson Sky (1962), Attack of the Mushroom People (1963), The Lost World of Sinbad (1963), Atragon (1964), Dagora, the Space Monster (1964), Ghidrah, the ThreeHeaded Monster (1965), Sword of Doom (1966), Adventure in Kigan Castle (1966), Woody Allen’s What’s Up, Tiger Lily? (1966), Godzilla vs. the Sea Monster (1966), The Age of Assassins (1967), King Kong Escapes (1967) as the villainous Dr. Who, The Emperor and a General (1967), The Killing Bottle (1967), Kill! (1968), The Human Bullet (1968), Godzilla’s Revenge (1971), The Battle of Okinawa (1971), Message from Space (1978), Misuta, Misesu, Misu Ronri (1980), Hong Kong Paradise (1990), The Female Warriors (1991), The Fighting King (1993), Birth of the Wizard (1996), Hakata Movie: Chinchiromai (2000), and Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters AllOut Attack (2001). He also appeared in the Japanese television series Mighty Jack, Kamen Rider, and Nebula Mask Machine Man.

10 (1978), The Seniors (1978), Lovelines (1984), and The Garbage Pail Kids Movie (1987). Amateau also directed the tele-films Uncommon Valor (1983) and High School U.S.A. (1983), and episodes of the short-lived 1979 action series Supertrain. He also scripted and directed action sequences for 1975’s The Wilby Conspiracy, and served as a second unit director for Sam Peckinpah’s 1983 film The Osterman Weekend. Los Angeles Times, July 2, 2003, B13; New York Times, July 3, 2003, A20; Variety, July 14, 2003, 54.

Amies, Hardy British fashion designer Sir Hardy Amies died at his home in Langford, England, of a heart attack on March 5, 2003. He was 93. Amies was born in London, England, on July 17, 1909. He began working as a designer in the early 1930s with the Lachasse sportswear firm. He served in the British military’s Intelligence Corps during World War II. After the war he opened his own

Amateau, Rod Television director Rod Amateau died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Los Angeles on June 29, 2003. He was 79. Amateau was born in New York City on December 20, 1923. He began his career working in radio as a writer before entering films in the early 1950s as a dialogue director for such films as Born to Be Bad (1950), Cry Danger (1951), and Drums in the Deep South (1951). He made his directorial debut on the 1952 film The Bushwhackers, which he also scripted. He also directed the 1952 film Monsoon before turning to television. Amateau helmed episodes of numerous series including The Bob Cummings Show, The Lone Wolf, The Star and the Story, The George Burns Show, The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis, Mister Ed, Margie, Gilligan’s Island, My Mother the Car which he also produced, and O.K. Crackerby! He also produced and directed the television series The Dukes of Hazzard and Enos in the late 1970s. He returned to films with 1970’s Pussycat, Pussycat, I Love You, and also helmed the features The Statue (1971), Where Does It Hurt? (1972), The Money (1975), Drive-In (1976), Hitler’s Son

Hardy Amies

11 fashion house. He became official dressmaker for Queen Elizabeth II in 1955, and retained that position until the early 1990s. He also designed costumes for several films including The Grass Is Greener (1960), The Amorous Prawn (1962), The Alphabet Murders (1965), Two for the Road (1967), and Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. Amies was knighted for his service to the fashion industry in 1989. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 7, 2003, B13; New York Times, Mar. 6, 2003, C13; Time, Mar. 17, 2003, 17.

Anderson, Don “Ox” Professional wrestler Don “Ox” Anderson died of heart failure in Salk Lake City, Utah, on January 18, 2003. He was 71. Anderson was born on September 6, 1931. He was a leading professional wrestler for over 25 years beginning in the 1950s. He teamed with Killer Kowalski to hold the Pacific Coast Tag Team Title in Vancouver, Canada, in August of 1961.

2003 • Obituaries was best known for writing the best-selling novel, Bat-21. He also scripted the 1988 film version of the novel, which starred Danny Glover and Gene Hackman. Los Angeles Times, May 29, 2003, B14.

Andrews, Mary Todd Actress Mary Todd Andrews, the widow of leading actor Dana Andrews, died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Palm Springs, California, on January 17, 2003. She was 86. She was born in Santa Monica, California, in 1916. She began her career on stage as a comic actress with the Pasadena Playhouse in the 1930s. She met and married Andrews in 1939 and abandoned her career to raise a family. She later returned to the stage, where she often toured with her husband in productions of such plays as Mourning’s at Seven and Gaslight in the 1970s. Dana Andrews died in 1992. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 29, 2003, B11; Variety, Feb. 10, 2003, 57.

Anzell, Hy

Don “Ox” Anderson

Anderson, William C. Author William C. Anderson died of heart failure in Fairfield, California, on May 16, 2003. He was 83. Anderson, a former Air Force pilot,

Character actor Hy Anzell, who was featured as Woody Allen’s Uncle Joey Nichols in the 1977 film Annie Hall, died in a Fresno, California, hospital on August 23, 2003. He was 79. Anzell was born in New York City in 1923. He began his career on stage, making his Broadway debut in the 1946 Duke Ellington musical Beggar’s Holiday. He appeared in small roles in films from the mid–1950s including Bengal Brigade (1954), Party Girl (1958), and What’s So Bad About Feeling Good? (1968). He was featured in numerous Woody Allen films from the early 1970s including Bananas (1971), Annie Hall (1977), Radio Days (1987), Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989), and Deconstructing Harry (1997). His other film credits include The Stone Killer (1973), The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974), Death Play (1976), Ironweed (1987), Dead Bang (1989), Pacific Heights (1990), Crossing the Bridge (1992), and The Cemetery Club (1993). Anzell was also seen in the tele-films Lady Mobster (1988) and Legalese (1998), and episodes of such series as Tales of the Texas Rangers, Matlock,

Obituaries • 2003

12

Hy Anzell

The Famous Teddy Z, Law & Order, Veronica Clare, Sisters, and Just Shoot Me! Royce D. Applegate

Applegate, Royce D. Character actor Royce D. Applegate perished in a house fire at his home in Hollywood Hills, California, on January 1, 2003. He was 63. Applegate was born in Midwest City, Oklahoma, in 1939. Originally billed as Roy Applegate, he began appearing in films and television series in the late 1960s. His early film credits include They Only Kill Their Masters (1972), The Mad Bomber (1972), Fuzz (1972), Run, Stranger, Run (1973), American Raspberry (1977), and Harper Valley P.T.A. (1978). He also appeared frequently on television in episodes of such series as Mayberry R.F.D., Starsky and Hutch, Charlie’s Angels, Dallas, Vega$, CHiPs, Hart to Hart, Little House on the Prairie, Hill Street Blues, Roald Dahl’s Tales of the Unexpected, Matt Houston, and Houston Knights, and the tele-films Cry Panic (1974), Attack on Terror: The FBI vs. the Ku Klux Klan (1975), Brenda Starr (1976), the 1978 Centennial mini-series, Outside Chance (1978), and Hot Rod (1979). Applegate continued his film career in the features Loose Shoes (1980), Alligator (1980), Back Roads (1981), Mel Brooks’ History fo the World: Part 1 (1981), Splash (1984), Armed and Dangerous (1986), From the Hip (1987), Million Dollar Mystery (1987), Rampage (1988), White Sands (1992), Gettysburg (1993) as Brig Gen. James L.

Kemper, The Getaway (1994), Under Siege 2: Dark Territory (1995), Phoenix (1998), Doctor Dolittle (1998), O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000), Nothing but the Truth (2000), Artie (2000), The Rookie (2002), Talking in Your Sleep (2003), and Gods and Generals (2003) reprising his role as Brig. Gen. Kemper. He was also seen in the 1982 mini-series The Blue and the Gray (1982), and the tele-films A Day for Thanks on Walton’s Mountain (1982), The Gladiator (1986), Celebration Family (1987), The Town Bully (1988), Police Story: Cop Killer (1988), Mike Hammer: Murder Takes Al (1989), Murder in Mississippi (1990), Wild Card (1992), Poodle Springs (1998), and Inherit the Wind (1999). He starred as Chief Crocker in the 1993 television series SeaQuest DSV, and appeared in episodes of Designing Women, Paradise, Quantum Leap, Twin Peaks, Beverly Hills, 90210, Raven, Home Improvement, JAG, and C.S.I.: Crime Scene Investigation. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 3, 2003, B3; People, Jan. 20, 2003, 113; Variety, Jan. 13, 2003, 84.

Arbas, Derya Turkish-American actress Derya Arbas was found dead in her Los Angeles apartment of an

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2003 • Obituaries

Imperio Argentina Derya Arbas

apparent heart attack on October 21, 2003. She was 35. Arbas was born Derya Zerrin Berti in Santa Monica, California, on June 17, 1968, the daughter of actor Dehl Berti. She appeared in the Turkish films The White Bicycle (1986), and Dilan (1987), and the U.S. independent feature Hang Your Dog in the Wind (1997).

Argentina, Imperio Spanish actress and singer Imperio Argentina died of heart disease in Benalmadena, Malaga, Andalucia, Spain, on August 22, 2003. She was 92. She was born Magdalena Nile del Rio in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on December 26, 1910. She began her career on stage as a singer in Madrid in 1924. Argentina made her film debut in Florian King’s 1927 silent film Sister San Sulpicio. The following year she starred in the German film Herzen Ohne Ziel. She continued to appear in such films as El Profesor de mi Mujer (1930), Cinopolis (1931), Suburban Melody (1933), the 1934 talkie remake of Sister San Suplicio, Rustic Chivalry (1935), Dark and Bright (1936), Nights in Andalusia (1938), Song of Aixa (1939), Tosca (1941), Goyescas (1942), Bambu (1945), The Songstress (1946), Song of Dolores (1947), La Cigarra

(1948), Cafe Cantante (1951), Ama Rosa (1960), With the East Wind (1966), and Dear Nanny (1986). Variety, Sept. 29, 2003, 77.

Arguelles, Hugo Mexican playwright and author Hugo Arguelles died of prostate cancer in Mexico City on December 24, 2003. He was 71. He was known for his tales of black humor and social criticism. Many of his stories and plays were adapted into film including The Miracle Weaver (1962), La Amante Perfecta (1970), Una Mujer Honesta (1972), Hoy He Sonado Con Dios (1972), Dona Macabra (1972), Black Is Beautiful (1974), and Albur de Amor (1980).

Aris, Ben British stage and film character actor Ben Aris died in England on September 4, 2003. He was 66. Aris was born in London, England, on March 16, 1937. He trained at the Arts Education School in the 1940s and made his film debut at an early age as Tadpole in 1951’s Tom Brown’s Schooldays. Aris appeared often on stage in the

Obituaries • 2003

Hugo Arguelles

1950s, usually playing upper-middle class dandies and gentlemen. He became a popular film actor in the mid–1960s, appearing in such features as The Plague of the Zombies (1966), The Charge of

14 the Light Brigade (1968), Lindsay Anderson’s If… (1968), Lionheart (1968), Hamlet (1969) as Rosencrantz, Ken Russell’s The Music Lovers (1970), Get Carter (1971), Savage Messiah (1972), O Lucky Man! (1973), The Three Musketeers (1973), Digby, the Biggest Dog in the World (1973), Old Vampire (1974), Juggernaut (1974), Tommy (1975) as Reverend Simpson, Royal Flash (1975), Alfie Darling (1975), I’m Not Feeling Myself Tonight (1976), The Ritz (1976), Sir Henry at Rawlinson End (1980), Night Train to Murder (1983), King of the Wind (1989), U.F.O. (1993), and Up at the Villa (2000). He was featured as David Dodger in the 1971 television series Jamie, and was Julian DalrympleSykes in Hi-de-hi! from 1984 to 1988. He also appeared in television productions of The After-Dinner Joke (1978), Clouds of Glory: The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1978), The Assassination Run (1980), Star Quality (1985), A Hazard of Hearts (1987), Lady Chatterley (1992), and The King of Chaos (1998). His other television credits include episodes of Some Mothers Do ’Ave ’Em, Doctor Who, Secret Agent, Target, Hazell, The Famous Five, Bergerac, The Comic Strip Presents, Poirot, You Rang, M’Lord?, Boon, No Job for a Lady, Me, You and Him, and Eldorado.

Armen, Margaret Television writer Margaret Armen died of heart failure at her home in Woodland Hills, California, on November 10, 2003. She was 82. Armen was born in Washington, D.C., in 1921. She was one of the first women to write for television in the late 1950s, scripting episodes of such western series as The Rifleman, Lawman, The Rebel, and The Big Valley. Armen also scripted several episodes of Gene Roddenberry’s landmark science fiction series Star Trek in the 1960, including the episodes “The Cloud Minders,” “The Gamesters of Triskelion,” and “The Paradise Syndrome.” She also wrote for the series Mr. Novak, Marcus Welby, M.D., Cannon, The Mod Squad, Barnaby Jones, Name of the Game, Land of the Lost, Fantasy Island, The Six Million Dollar Man, The Bionic Woman, Wonder Woman, and Flamingo Road, and scripted the 1976 tele-film The New Daughters of Joshua Cabe.

Ben Aris

15

2003 • Obituaries his teens. Arnold served in the U.S. Army during World War II and joined Buddy Rich’s band after the war. He toured with Buddy DeFranco’s orchestra in the early 1950s until his addiction to drugs led to medical and legal problems. He recorded four albums before a relapse of drug use led to his conviction of forging prescriptions. Arnold was sentenced to seven years in prison in the early 1980s. After his early release he was instrumental in creating the Musician’ Assistance Program to aid musicians with drug and alcohol problems. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 11, 2003, B11.

Arnold, Robert

Margaret Armen

Arnold, Buddy Jazz saxophonist Buddy Arnold died of complications from open heart surgery in Los Angeles, California, on November 9, 2003. He was 88. Arnold was born Arnold Buddy Grishaver in New York City on August 11, 1915. He began performing with bandleader George Auld while in

British actor Robert Arnold died in Brighton, England, on February 4, 2003. He was born in Manston, Kent, England on June 26, 1931. He was 71. Arnold was a popular stage actor before joining the cast of the British police television series Dixon of Dock Green in 1964. He played PC Reginald Swain in the series until 1971. He had also starred in the 1958 television production of Cradlesong and appeared in a small part in the 1960 film Tunes of Glory. His other television credits include episodes of Armchair Theatre, General Hospital, Blake’s Seven, and Fawlty Towers.

Arthur, Jessica Pepper Broadway actress and model Jessica Pepper Arthur died at the Motion Picture and Television Fund Home in Woodland Hills, California, on May 16, 2003. She was 90. Arthur was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1913. She began her career on stage and was featured in such Broadway productions as Roberta and Red, Hot & Blue in the 1930s. She also appeared in Ziegfeld Follies and George White’s Scandals. Arthur was also a leading model in the 1930s, appearing on numerous magazine covers and on the 1936 Coca-Cola tray “The Hostess.” After moving to Hollywood, she appeared in numerous fashion featurettes opposite Van Johnson. She was married to film producer Art Arthur until his death in 1985. Buddy Arnold

Obituaries • 2003

Arthur, Zinn Big band leader Zinn Arthur died in Los Angeles on March 1, 2003. He was 90. He was born Abrasha Choosidman in Crimea, the Ukraine, on August 25, 1912. After coming to the United States, he changed his name to Zinn Arthur and formed his first band while still in high school. A big band leader before World War II, Arthur toured with Irving Berlin’s This Is the Army during the war. After the war Arthur gave up music to become a leading celebrity photographer. He photographed such stars as Elizabeth Taylor, Audrey Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart for magazine covers in the 1950s. He also served as a still photographer on the sets of numerous films. Arthur’s books of photographs, Shooting Superstars, was published in 1990. Los Angles Times, Mar. 15, 2003, B20; New York Times, Mar. 21, 2003, C11.

Aspillaga, Patricia Peruvian actress Patricia Aspillaga died of renal failure in Lima, Peru, on August 9, 2003.

Patricia Aspillaga

16 She was 47. A leading actress in South American films from the 1960s, her credits include Zapta (1970), Two Women and a Man (1971), Jory (1972) with Robby Benson, La Ley del Monte (1974), Acapulco 12-22 (1975), The General’s Daughter (1976), The Dynasty of Death (1977), and The Children of Sanchez (1978).

Atkins, Cholly Tap dancer and choreographer Cholly Atkins died of pancreatic cancer in Las Vegas, Nevada, on April 19, 2003. He was 89. Atkins was born Charles Sylvan Atkinson in Pratt City, Alabama, on September 30, 1913. He began working as a dancer and singer in vaudeville as half of the Rhythm Pals in the 1930s. He began performing solo later in the decade and worked at the Apollo Theater in Harlem from 1940 to 1942. Atkins played with the U.S. Army band during World War II. He teamed with dancer Honi Coles after the war, appearing in the Broadway production of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes in 1949. After breaking with Coles in the 1950s,

Cholly Atkins

17 Atkins worked as a choreographer for the June Taylor Dancers on television’s Jackie Gleason Show. He also worked as a choreographer for various vocal groups including the Heartbeats, the Cleftones, and Gladys Knight and the Pips. Atkins worked with Motown Records from 1965, choreographing stage movements for such talent as Aretha Franklin, the Supremes, and Marvin Gaye. Atkins returned to Broadway in 1988 to help choreograph the musical revue Black and Blue, and shared a Tony Award for his contributions. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 23, 2003, B10; New York Times, Apr. 23, 2003, B10; Time, May 5, 2003, 26; Variety, Apr. 28, 2003, 80.

Axelrod, George Playwright and screenwriter George Axelrod died in his sleep of heart failure at his Los Angeles home on June 21, 2003. He was 81. Axelrod was born in New York City on June 9, 1922, the son of silent film actress Betty Carpenter. He served in the Army Signal Corps during World War II. After the war he returned to New York to write for radio and early television. His first play

2003 • Obituaries was produced in 1949 and was unsuccessful. He subsequently wrote The Seven Year Itch, which became a Broadway hit in 1952. Axelrod worked with director Billy Wilder on the script for the 1955 film version starring Marilyn Monroe and Tom Ewell. Axelrod also scripted the film Phffft! (1954) and adapted William Inge’s Bus Stop for a Marilyn Monroe vehicle in 1956. His popular play Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? was filmed with Jayne Mansfield in 1957, though Axelrod disavowed the production. He subsequently scripted Blake Edwards’ 1961 film Breakfast at Tiffany’s and the 1962 psychological thriller The Manchurian Candidate. Having moved to Hollywood from New York in the early 1960s, Axelrod continued to write such films as Paris —When It Sizzles (1964) and How to Murder Your Wife (1964). His play, Goodbye Charlie, was filmed with Tony Curtis and Debbie Reynolds in 1964. He produced, directed and scripted the films Lord Love a Duck (1966) and The Secret Life of an American Wife (1968). Axelrod’s later films include The Lady Vanishes (1979), The Holcroft Covenant (1985), and The Fourth Protocol (1987). Los Angeles Times, June 22, 2003, B16; New York Times, June 23, 2003, A23; People, July 7, 2003, 83; Time, June 30, 2003, 18; Variety, June 30, 2003, 46.

Ayer, Harold

George Axelrod

British actor Harold Ayer died at the Motion Picture and Television Fund Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, of complications from a stroke on March 6, 2003. He was 86. Ayer was born in London on August 15, 1916. He began his career in a small role in the 1949 film The Third Man with Orson Welles. He was featured in several films in England before coming to the United States, where he was a popular performer in films and on television. Ayer’s film credits include Island of Desire (1952), The Gift Horse (1952), Desperate Moment (1953), River Beat (1954), Orders Are Orders (1954), The Blue Peter (1954), Checkpoint (1956), Maryjane (1968), A Time to Sing (1968), The Gentle People and the Quiet Land (1972), Tarzan, the Ape Man (1981) with Bo Derek, The Man Who Wasn’t There (1983), and Night of the Demons (1988). He also appeared in the 1986 mini-series Fresno, and the tele-film Glitz (1988), Killer Instinct (1988), The Knife and

Obituaries • 2003

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Harold Ayer

Gun Club (1990), The Whereabouts of Jenny (1991), and Dead Air (1994). His other television credits include episodes of Five Fingers, Playhouse 90, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Laredo, Green Acres, Daniel Boone, The Invisible Man, Ellery Queen, The Rockford Files, Quincy, Joanie Loves Chachi, Simon & Simon, Werewolf, T.J. Hooker, St. Elsewhere, the new Twilight Zone, Murder, She Wrote, Hunter, L.A. Law, Chicago Hope, and 7th Heaven.

Elaine Ayres

from the 1970s, Azarow was seen in the films Some Kind of Hero (1982), They Call Me Bruce? (1982), Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is Calling (1986), and The Jigsaw Murders (1988). He also appeared in the tele-films The Magnificent Magical Magnet of Santa Mesa (1977), Mae West (1982), Missing

Ayres, Elaine Character actress Elaine Ayres died of breast cancer in Seattle, Washington, on April 30, 2003. She was 89. Ayres began acting on stage and in commercials in the 1950s. She was featured in the 1971 tele-film Lefty, the Dingaling Lynx, and the 1976 feature Sweet Revenge. She was a familiar face as a little old lady on television commercials during the 1990s.

Azarow, Martin Film and television character actor Martin Azarow died in a Las Vegas hospital on September 8, 2003. He was 69. Azarow was born in Brooklyn, New York, on July 4, 1934. Onscreen

Martin Azarow

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2003 • Obituaries

Pieces (1983), and The Outlaws (1984). Azarow’s television credits also include episodes of Starsky and Hutch, Charlie’s Angels, Eight Is Enough, Big Foot, Wonder Woman, It’s a Living, Hill Street Blues, St. Elsewhere, Taxi, Remington Steele, The A-Team, V, Max Headroom, the new Twilight Zone, Hunter, L.A. Law, Hooperman, and Matlock.

Babak, Renata Renata Babak, a leading mezzo-soprano with the Bolshoi Opera before her defection to the United States in 1973, died of pancreatic cancer at her Silver Springs, Maryland, home on December 31, 2003. She was 73. Babak was born in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1930. She studied at the Rimsky-Korsakov Conservatory and performed with the Leningrad Opera from 1957. She was invited to join the Bolshoi in 1962 where she became a leading star for over a decade until she defected while the company was performing at La Scala in Milan, Italy. She made her debut in the United States two years later at Carnegie Hall in 1975. She continued to perform recitals and concerts. She made her last operatic appearance in a production of Tchaikovsky’s Iolanta in Washington, D.C., in 1997. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 5, 2004, B8.

Renata Babak

Bai, Pandari Leading Indian character actress Pandari Bai died in a Chennai, India, hospital after a long illness with kidney problems on January 29, 2003. She was 74. She was born in Bhatkal, Karnataka, India, in 1930. She made her debut in Tamil-

Pandari Bai

language films with 1949’s Vaazhkai, and starred in the 1952 film Parasakthi (The Goddess). She appeared in over 1000 films in Tamil, Telugu, Kananada, and Hindi over the next four decades as a leading lady and, later, a character actress. Her numerous credits include Manohar (1954), Hari Bhakta (1956), Bhakta Shabari (1960), Annapurna (1964), Laadla (1966), Gejje Pooje (The Mock Marriage) (1969), The Complete Ramayana (1971), Aval (1972), Worship of the Feet (1974), She Too Is a Woman (1974), Doctor Siva (1975), Colonel and Collector (1976), The Golden-Hearted Man (1976), Taxi Driver (1978), The Brave (1978), Kothapeda Rowdy (1980), Guru (1980), Justice Is Blind (1981), Radha My Darling (1982), Sree Raaghavendar (1985), Manikantana Mahime (1993), and Halunda Thavaru (1994).

Balani, Anant Indian film director Anant Balani died a massive heart attack in Mumbai, Maharashtra, India, on August 29, 2003. He was 41. Balani made his film debut helming the 1989 feature

Obituaries • 2003

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Anant Balani

Evidence. He also directed the film Flowers of Stone (1991), and the tele-film A Mouth Full of Sky. Three other films were completed and scheduled for release in 2003 —Joggers Park, Mumbai Matinee, and One Day. Variety, Sept. 8, 2003, 67.

Ballard, Hank Hank Ballard, who wrote the 1958 song that triggered a dance craze, “The Twist,” died of throat cancer at his Los Angeles home on March 2, 2003. He was 66. He was born John H. Kendricks in Detroit, Michigan, on November 18, 1936. Raised in Alabama, he began singing in church. He formed the group Hank Ballard and the Midnighters in 1954. They recorded the hit song “Work with Me Annie,” which became popular despite its sexually-themed lyrics. Ballard’s negative reputation for raunchy tunes led to “The Twist” being re-recorded by Chubby Checker before becoming a huge hit. Ballard wrote and recorded other novelty songs in the 1960s including “Finger Poppin’ Time,” “The Coffee Grind,” and “That Low Down Move.” He continued to perform and record through the 1990s,

Hank Ballard

and was inducted into the Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame in 1990. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 4, 2003, B12; New York Times, Mar. 4, 2003, C17; People, Mar. 17, 2003, 81; Time, Mar. 17, 2003, 17; Variety, Mar. 10, 2003, 49.

Banks, Homer Soul singer and songwriter Homer Banks died of cancer in a Memphis, Tennessee hospital on April 17, 2003. He was 61. Banks was born in Memphis on August 2, 1941. Banks was a member of the Soul Consolidators gospel group in the late 1950s. He recorded several songs but was better known as a songwriter from the 1960s with such hits as Johnnie Taylor’s “Ain’t That Lovin’ You (for More Reasons Than One)” and “Who’s Makin’ Love.” Banks other songs include “If You’re Ready (Come Go with Me)” for the Staple Singers, “If Loving You Is Wrong (I Don’t Want to Be Right)” for Luther Ingram, and “Woman to Woman” for Shirley Brown.

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Homer Banks

Barbato, Olga Actress Olga Barbato died in Brooklyn, New York, after a long illness on June 15, 2003. Barbato was born in Sciacca, Sicily, the daughter of Italian theatrical producer Ernesto Barbato and stage actress Emma Alba. Olga made her stage debut at the age of four and worked on the Italian stage for decades. She began working in America in the early 1970s, doing commercials for television and radio. She was featured in Woody Allen’s 1984 film Broadway Danny Rose, and appeared in 1997’s Destination Anywhere.

Barbieri, Fedora Italian opera singer Fedora Barbieri died in Florence, Italy, on March 4, 2003. She was 82. Barbieri was born in Trieste, Italy, on June 4, 1920. She became a leading mezzo-soprano on the Italian stage from her debut in Cimarosa’s The Secret Marriage in 1940. She appeared regularly with La Scala from the mid–1940s, and became known for her interpretations of the works of

2003 • Obituaries

Fedora Barbieri

Verdi. She performed with the Metropolitan Opera for ten seasons after her debut in 1950’s Don Carlo. She performed in productions of Il Travatore, Aida, and Norma at the Met. Barbieri was heard in the 1948 film Cenerentola (aka Cinderella), and film productions of the operas Rigoletto (1982) and Cavalleria Rusticana (1982). Los Angeles Times, Mar. 9, 2003, B16; New York Times, Mar. 7, 2003, C13; Variety, Apr. 21, 2003, 55.

Barbosa, Luisa Portuguese character actress Luisa Barbosa died of cancer in a Setubal, Portugal, hospital on August 21, 2003. She was 80. Barbosa was born in Ferreira do Alentejo, Portugal, on May 16, 1923. She began her career in the 1982 television soap opera Vila Faia. She continued to perform on stage, films and television for the next 20 years. Barbosa’s film credits include Lieutenant Lorena (1992), Family Portrait (1992), Off Season (1992), Sinais de Fogo (1995), Porto Santo (1997), Maigret et l’improbable Monsieur Owen (1997), Sweet Nightmare (1998), and Jaime (1999).

Obituaries • 2003

22 of Time (1997), The Uninvited (1997), Dr. Willoughby (1999), Ruth Rendell Mysteries: The Lake of Darkness (1999), Doomwatch: Winter Angel (1999), Anna Karenina (2000), Armadillo (2001), and The Jury (2002). She also appeared in episodes of such series as Van der Valk, All Creatures Great and Small, One Foot in the Grave, Lovejoy, Peak Practice, and Midsomer Murders. Barge was also featured in several feature films during her career including Laughterhouse (1984), Mesmer (1994), The Discovery of Heaven (2001), Charlotte Gray (2001), and 2003’s Love Actually.

Luisa Barbosa

Barge, Gillian British actress Gillian Barge died of cancer on November 19, 2003. She was 63. She was born in Hastings, Sussex, England, on May 28, 1940, and began performing on stage in the late 1950s. She starred in Peter Nichols’ play The National Health at the Old Vic in the early 1970s and reprised her role as Dr. Bird in the 1973 film version. She also appeared often on television, starring in productions of King Lear (1982), The Black Tower (1985), Poirot: The Mysterious Affair at Styles (1990), A Dangerous Man: Lawrence After Arabia (1990), Chimera (1991), Miss Marple: They Do It with Mirrors (1991), A Question of Guilt (1993), Eskimo Day (1996), A Dance to the Music

Gillian Barge

Barham, Debbie British radio and television comedy writer Debbie Barham died of heart failure due to anorexia nervosa in London on April 20, 2003. She was 26. Barham began writing for radio at the age of 16. She worked on such shows as Spitting Image, Bob Monkhouse, and The News Quiz. She also wrote for the British television series Rory Bremner, Who Else? (1993) and Planet Mirth (1997).

Debbie Barham

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2003 • Obituaries

Barrie, Elaine Elaine Barrie, the fourth wife of actor John Barrymore, died in New York City on March 1, 2003. She was 87. She was born Elaine Jacobs in New York City on July 16, 1915. She became infatuated with Barrymore while a teenager and arranged to meet the actor when she was 19. The two married in November of 1936. She appeared in several short films including How to Undress in Front of Your Husband (1937) and How to Take a Bath (1937), and was featured in the 1939 film Midnight. She also performed in a play with Barrymore, My Dear Children, in 1940. The couple divorced later that year and Barrymore died two years later. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 10, 2003, B9; New York Times, Mar. 4, 2003, C17; Variety, Mar. 31, 2003, 53.

Betty Barry

with Ethel Barrymore in 1944. She married actor Gene Barry later in the year, and the couple performed together in touring productions of such plays as Fiddler on the Roof. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 5, 2003, B13; Variety, Feb. 10, 2003, 57.

Baskcomb, Betty

Elaine Barrie (with husband John Barrymore)

Barry, Betty Stage actress Betty Barry died in Los Angeles on January 31, 2003. She was 79. She was born Betty Clair Kalb in 1923. She performed on Broadway in a production of The Corn Is Green

British actress Betty Baskcomb died in West Wratting, Cambridgeshire, England, on April 15, 2003. She was 88. Baskcomb was born in London on May 30, 1914, the daughter of comedian A.W. Baskcomb. She performed often on stage and with the BBC radio from the mid–1930s, where she was part of the BBC Drama Repertory from the 1940s through the 1970s. Baskcomb was also featured in a handful of films during her career including It Always Rains on Sunday (1948), Tread Softly (1952), Father Brown (1954), Alfred Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956), Your Money or Your Wife (1960), and Dr. Crippen (1962). She was also seen on television in episodes of such series as New Scotland Yard, Not on Your Nellie, and Doctor on the Go.

Obituaries • 2003

24

Bates, Alan Alan Bates, a leading British actor from the 1960s, died of cancer in a London hospital on December 27, 2003. He was 69. Bates was born in Allestree, Derbyshire, England, on February 17, 1934. He began his career on stage in 1955 after serving in the Royal Air Force. He was acclaimed for his performances in productions of John Osborne’s Look Back in Anger and Harold Pinter’s The Caretaker. Bates soon made his mark in films, starring in such features as Tony Richardson’s The Entertainer (1960), Whistle Down the Wind (1961), A Kind of Loving (1962), the 1963 film version of The Caretaker, Carol Reed’s The Running Man (1963), Nothing but the Best (1964), Zorba the Greek (1964) with Anthony Quinn, Once Upon a Tractor (1965), Georg y Girl (1966), the 1966 cult classic King of Hearts, and John Schlesinger’s Far from the Madding Crowd (1967). He received an Academy Award nomination for best actor for his role in John Frankenheimer’s The Fixer (1968), and starred with Oliver Reed in Ken Russell’s Women in Love (1969). Bates continued to appear in such films as Three Sisters (1970), The Go-Between (1970), A Day in the Death of Joe Egg (1972), Story of a Love Story (1973), Royal Flash (1975), In Celebration (1975), Butley (1976), Paul Mazurksy’s An Unmarried Woman (1978) with Jill Clayburgh, The Shout (1978), The Rose (1979), Nijinsky (1980) as Sergei Diaghilev, Quartet (1981), Very Like a Whale (1981), Hands Up! (1981), Britannia Hospital (1982), The Return of the Soldier (1982), The Wicked Lady (1983), Duet for One (1986), A Prayer for the Dying (1987), We Think the World of You (1988), Uncontrollable Circumstances (1989), Mister Frost (1990), Club Extinction (1990), Hamlet (1990), Unnatural Pursuits (1991), Shuttlecock (1991), Secret Friends (1991), Silent Tongue (1994), The Grotesque (1995), The Cherry Orchard (1999), Gosford Park (2001), The Mothman Prophecies (2002), The Sum of All Fears (2002), Evelyn (2002), and Hollywood North (2003). He also starred in television productions of The Collection (1976), The Mayor of Casterbridge (1978), The Trespasser (1981), A Voyage Round My Father (1982), Separate Tables (1983), An Englishman Abroad (1983), Dr. Fischer of Geneva (1985), Pack of Lies (1987), The Dog It Was That Died (1988), 102 Boulevard Haussmann (1991), Hard Times (1994), Oliver’s Travels (1995), Nicholas’ Gift

Alan Bates

(1998), St. Patrick: The Irish Legend (2000), In the Beginning (2000), The Prince and the Pauper (2000) as King Henry VIII, Love in a Cold Climate (2001), Bertie and Elizabeth (2002) as King George V, and Salem Witch Trials (2002). Bates also appeared in a 1988 adaptation of And So Died Riabouchinska on The Ray Bradbury Theatre. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 29, 3004, B9; New York Times, Dec. 29, 2003, B6; People, Jan. 12, 2004, 117; Time, Jan. 12, 2004, 23; Variety, Jan. 5, 2004, 62.

Battin, Skip Rock musician Clyde “Skip” Battin died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Silverton, Oregon, on July 13, 2003. He was 69. Battin was born in Gallapolis, Ohio, on February 18, 1934. He began playing the piano and guitar while in his teens and joined Earl Mock and the Mockingbirds in 1955. The following year Battin joined with Gary Paxton to form the Pledges. He and Paxton changed the bands name several times before becoming Skip & Flip in

25

2003 • Obituaries

Battley, David

Skip Battin

1959. They recorded over a dozen songs over the next two years including “Fancy Nancy” and “Hully Gully Cha Cha Cha.” He and Paxton split in the early 1960s and Battin continued to record and perform both as a solo artist and with various groups. Battin was invited to join the Byrds in late 1969, replacing guitarist John York. Battin was heard on the Byrds albums Chestnut Mare (1970), Byrdmaniax (1971), and Farther Along (1972), writing some of the album songs. He left the group in 1973. He recorded a solo album before joining the New Riders of the Purple Sage in 1974. Two years later he joined the Flying Burrito Brothers, remaining with that group until 1981. He embarked on a solo career for several years before reviving the Flying Burrito Brothers in 1985. They toured and released four live albums before disbanding in 1987. Battin joined Michael Clarke’s version of the Byrds in 1987. He left the group in 1991, returning for a new version, Byrds Celebration, in 1994. Battin played with the subsequent Rogers/Nienhaus Band before retiring in 1997. Los Angeles Times, July 10, 2003, B13.

British actor David Battley died of a heart attack in London on January 20, 2003. He was 67. Batley was born in London on March 9, 1935. He was best known for his role as Mr. Turkentine in the 1971 fantasy classic Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. He made his film debut in 1966’s Hotel Paradiso, and was seen in the films Crossplot (1969), The Waiters (1971), Up the Chastity Belt (1971), The Public Eye (1972), Up the Front (1972), That’s Your Funeral (1972), Rentadick (1972), Don’t Just Lie There, Say Something (1973), The Old Curiosity Shop (1975), The Omega Connection (1979), Krull (1983), Vigo (1998), and Out of Depth (2000). He was also featured in television productions of Alice in Wonderland (1966), Moll Flanders (1975), S.O.S. Titanic (1979), The Likes of Sykes (1980), and The Beiderbecke Tapes (1987). Battley’s other television credits include the series That’s Your Funeral, Thicker Than Water, The Climber, and Relative Strangers, and episodes of The Benny Hill Show, Bless This House, The Good Life, One Foot in the Grave, The Darling Buds of May, The Bill, Minder, Lovejoy, As Time Goes By, Mr. Bean, and Murder Most Horrid.

David Battley

Obituaries • 2003

26

Bauschulte, Friedrich

Baxt, George

German actor Friedrich W. Bauschulte died on May 28, 2003. He was 80. Bauschulte was born in Munster, Germany, on March 17, 1923. He began his career on the German stage in the late 1940s. He was best known for his numerous roles on German television from the 1960s. He was seen in television productions of Frontiers of Darkness (1979), A Fatal Assignment (1990), and Radetzky March (1994) as the Emperor. He was featured as Opa in the 1989 television series Hotel Paradies and was Franz in 1995’s Der Clan der Anna Voss. Bauschulte also worked often as a voice actor, dubbing English roles into German. He voiced Karl Malden’s role in the television series The Streets of San Francisco, and was Richard Attenborough’s dubber for the film Jurassic Park. He also performed the role of criminologist Dr. August van Dusen in 79 radio plays.

Screenwriter and novelist George Baxt died in New York City following heart surgery on June 28, 2003. He was 80. Baxt was born on June 10, 1923. He worked in films in England from the late 1950s, working on the script for Hammer’s 1958 horror film The Revenge of Frankenstein. Baxt scripted several other horror films including Circus of Horrors (1960), The City of the Dead (1960), Shadow of the Cat (1961), Burn, Witch, Burn! (1962), and Vampire Circus (1972), and wrote the original story for Horror of Snape Island (1972). Baxt’s other film credits include Payroll (1961), Thunder in Dixie (1964), Strangler’s Web (1965), and Male Bait (1971). He also wrote for the television series The Defenders in the early 1960s. In the 1960s Baxt created gay New York homicide detective Pharaoh Love, featured in the novels A Queer Kind of Death (1955), Swing Low, Sweet Harriet (1967), Topsy and Evil (1968), A Queer Kind of Love (1994), and A Queer Kind of Umbrella (1995). Baxt also created the character of Jacob Singer, a Los Angeles private detective from the 1940s whose mysteries include

Friedrich Bauschulte George Baxt

27

2003 • Obituaries

The Dorothy Parker Murder Case (1984), The Alfred Hitchcock Murder Case (1986), The Greta Garbo Murder Case (1992), The Bette Davis Murder Case (194), The Humphrey Bogart Murder Case (1995), and The Clark Gable and Carole Lombard Murder Case (1997), among others. Other novels include A Parade of Cockeyed Creatures; or, Did Someone Murder Our Wandering Boy? (1967) and “I!” Said the Demon (1969) featuring detectives Sylvia Plotkin and Max van Larsen, The Affairs at Royalties (1971), The Neon Graveyard (1979), and Who’s Next? (1988).

Beard, Ethel Radio and television actress Ethel Beard died of heart failure in Cape Coral, Florida, on October 15, 2003. She was 85. Beard performed with the Experimental Playhouse of the Air, a radio comedy company that also included Sid Caesar and Jonathan Winters, in the 1940s. Beard was also Merv Griffin’s hostess, Miss Y, on the game show Play Your Hunch from 1960 to 1962. Maureen Beck

Beck, Maureen British actress Maureen Beck died of complications from a stroke in London on June 21, 2003. She was 68. Beck made her film debut in the 1961 fantasy The Golden Rabbit. She was also seen in the films The Brides of Fu Manchu (1966) and The Disappearance (1977). She was featured in a 1964 television production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream and appeared in an episode of Ghost Squad.

Behrens, Manja German actress Manja Behrens died in Berlin, Germany, on January 18, 2003. She was 88. Behrens was born in Dresden, Germany, on April 12, 1914. She began her career on stage and appeared in several films in the 1930s including Susanne in the Bath (1936) and Stronger Than Paragraphs (1936). Problems with the Nazi minister of propaganda, Josef Goebbels, ended her film career until after World War II. Behrens remained a leading performer on stage and resumed

Manja Behrens

Obituaries • 2003 her film career in the 1950s. She was seen in Ehesache Lorenz (1959), The Fair (1960), Seilergasse 8 (1960), Carbide and Sorrel (1963), and Sun Seekers (2000).

Bell, Aaron Jazz musician Aaron Bell died on July 28, 2003. He was 81. Bell was born in Muskogee, Oklahoma, on April 24, 1922. He began his musical career in New Orleans as a bassist. After serving in the U.S. Navy, Bell returned to Oklahoma, joining Andy Kirk’s Twelve Clouds of Joy. He later performed with bands led by Lester Young and Cab Calloway before joining Duke Ellington’s band in 1960. He was heard on many of Ellington’s albums and on the soundtrack for the 1961 film Paris Blues. He left the band the following year, but continued to work with Ellington on occasions as a musician and arranger. Bell continued to perform and teach until his retirement in the 1990s. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 2, 2003, B20; New York Times, July 31, 2003, A20.

Aaron Bell

28

Bellamy, Earl Earl Bellamy, who directed scores of episodes of television series from the 1950s through the 1980s, died of a heart attack in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on November 30, 2003. He was 86. Bellamy was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on March 11, 1917. He began working at Columbia Studios as a messenger in the mid–1930s, and worked his way up to assistant director on such features as Arizona (1940), After Midnight with Boston Blackie (1943), Footlight Glamour (1943), The Chance of a Lifetime (1943), Klondike Kate (1943), The Return of the Vampire (1944), The Last Horseman (1944), Mr. Winkle Goes to War (1944), Rough Ridin’ Justice (1945), Counter-Attack (1945), Kiss and Tell (1945), Dangerous Millions (1946), Vacation Days (1947), Backlash (1947), Bulldog Drummond at Bay (1947), Jewels of Brandenburg (1947), Sport of Kings (1947), The Last Round-Up (1947), The Strawberry Roan (1948), The Loves of Carmen (1948), Black Eagle (1948), El Dorado Pass (1948), Shockproof (1949), The Big Sombrero (1949), The Crime Doctor’s Diary (1949), Laramie (1949), Desert Vigilante (1949), Johnny Allegro (1949), The Reckless Moment (1949), And Baby Makes Three (1949), A Woman of Distinction (1950), In a Lonely Place (1950), The Fuller Brush Girl (1950), Emergency Wedding (1950), Born Yesterday (1950), Sirocco (1951), Chain of Circumstance (1951), Ten Tall Men (1951), The Marrying Kind (1952), He Cooked His Goose (1952), Salome (1953), Let’s Do It Again (1953), From Here to Eternity (1953), It Should Happen to You (1954), and A Star Is Born (1954). Bellamy worked often in television from the early 1950s, directing episodes of numerous westerns and other series. His many credits include The Lone Ranger, Annie Oakley, Lassie, The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, The Lineup, Tales of the Texas Rangers, Jungle Jim, Crusader, Sergeant Preston of the Yukon, Mike Hammer, Tales of Wells Fargo, Bachelor Father, Wagon Train, M Squad, Perry Mason, Leave It to Beaver, Buckskin, The Donna Reed Show, The Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, U.S. Marshal, Rawhide, Laramie, My Three Sons, The Andy Griffith Show, The Best of the Post, The Virginian, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Our Man Higgins, McHale’s Navy, Arrest and Trial, Kraft Suspense Theatre, Broadside, The Munsters, Daniel Boone, Karen, The John Forsythe Show, I Spy, Laredo, Get Smart, The F.B.I., The Monroes, The Iron Horse, The Mod Squad, The Doris Day

29

2003 • Obituaries

Belle, Anne Documentary filmmaker Anne Belle died of a heart attack at her daughter’s Los Angeles home on June 18, 2003. She was 68. Belle was born in Santiago, Chile, in 1935. She studied ballet in London and worked as a writer and editor at House & Garden magazine in the 1960s. She subsequently produced and directed several documentary films for PBS including Baymen — Our Waters Are Dying and Henry. She was best known for her filmed portraits of New York City Ballet dancers including Dancing for Mr. B: Six Balanchine Ballerinas (1990) and the Oscar-nominated Suzanne Farrell: Elusive Muse (1996). New York Times, June 25, 2003, B8.

Bemiller, Ted Earl Bellamy

Show, Tarzan, Then Came Bronson, Marcus Welby, M.D., Medical Center, To Rome with Love, My Friend Tony, The Partridge Family, The Partners, The Sixth Sense, The Rookies, M.A.S.H, The Six Million Dollar Man, S.W.A.T., Isis, Starsky and Hutch, Matt Helm, Future Cop, Eight Is Enough, CHiPs, The San Pedro Beach Bums, The Love Boat, Fantasy Island, Hart to Hart, Trapper John, M.D., Code Red, Blue Thunder, V, and Lime Street. His other television credits include the tele-films The Pigeon (1969), The Desperate Mission (1969), The Trackers (1971), Flood! (1976), Fire! (1977), Desperate Women (1978), The Castaways on Gilligan’s Island (1979), and Valentine Magic on Love Island (1980). Bellamy also directed over a dozen feature films during his career including Seminole Uprising (1955), Blackjack Ketchum, Desperado (1956), The Toughest Gun in Tombstone (1958), Stagecoach to Dancers’ Rock (1962), Fluffy (1965), Gunpoint (1966), Munster, Go Home (1966), Incident at Phantom Hill (1966), Backtrack! (1969), Seven Alone (1974), Sidecar Racers (1975), Walking Tall Part II (1975), Against a Crooked Sky (1975), Speedtrap (1977), Sidewinder 1 (1977) and Magnum Thrust (1981). He retired in the mid–1980s. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 2, 2003, B10; New York Times, Dec. 3, 2003, C17; Variety, Dec. 8, 2003, 74.

Cinematographer Ted Bemiller died on October 26, 2003. He was 79. He began his career working on cartoons for Walter Lantz, working with his brother Bob Bemiller. Ted Bemiller subsequently formed the independent company Bemiller Camera Ent. He worked with Jay Ward on the Crusader Rabbit cartoon series in the late 1950s and was camera operator for Hanna-Barbera’s 1964 animated feature Hey There, It’s Yogi Bear. He was cinematographer for the films Santa and the Three Bears (1970), Shinbone Alley (1971), Fritz the Cat (1972), Heavy Traffic (1973), Wizards (1977), and The Plague Dogs (1982). He also served as a production manager on several animated Garfield television specials.

Benson, Lyric Aspiring actress Lyric Benson was shot to death by her ex-boyfriend, Robert Ambrosino, on April 25, 2003. He assailant subsequently turned the gun on himself and committed suicide. Benson (not the actress-daughter of actor Robby Benson of the same name) had recently completed filming an episode of television’s Law and Order: Criminal Intent. A graduate from Yale University, she appeared in numerous theatrical productions with the Yale Repertory Theater. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 26, 2003, A26; New York Times, Apr. 25, 2003, B3.

Obituaries • 2003

30 Chilmark, Massachusetts. He was 93. Benz was born in Haledon, New Jersey, in 1910. He began his career on stage as a singer, and was featured in the 1945 film The House on 92nd Street. Benz was also a film and television writer, scripting the 1937 film Her Wonderful Lie, and writing episodes of such television series as Armstrong Circle Theater and The Lux Video Theater. Benz was also active in local theatre on Martha’s Vineyard from the 1940s.

Berger, Fred

Lyric Benson

Benz, Hamilton

Emmy Award–winning television editor Fred Berger died in Los Angeles on May 23, 2003. He was 94. Berger was born in New York City on July 9, 1908. He began his career as an editor with Paramount Pictures on the Hopalong Cassidy film False Colors in 1943. His other screen credits include Colt Comrades (1943), Riders of the Deadline (1943), Lumberjack (1944), Mystery Man (1944), Fool’s Gold (1946), The Devil’s Playground (1946), Unexpected Guest (1947), Dangerous Venture (1947), The Marauders (1947), Hoppy’s Holiday (1947), Silent Conflict (1948), The Dead Don’t

Stage and film actor Hamilton Benz died on October 10, 2003 at his daughter’s home in

Hamilton Benz

Fred Berger

31 Dream (1948), Sinister Journey (1948), Borrowed Trouble (1948), False Paradise (1948), Strange Gamble (1948), An Innocent Affair (1948), CoverUp (1949), The Great Dan Patch (1949), The Black Whip (1956), Back from the Dead (1957), Ride a Violent Mile (1957), The Unknown Terror (1957), Trooper Hook (1957), Copper Sky (1957), Cattle Empire (1958), Desert Hell (1958), The Violent Ones (1967), Dayton’s Devils (1968), The Resurrection of Zachary Wheeler (1971), and The Hot Rock (1972) which earned him an Academy Award nomination. Berger also worked in television from the 1950s on such series as Gunsmoke, Zane Grey Theater, Have Gun Will Travel, M*A*S*H, Eight Is Enough, Dallas, and Walker, Texas Ranger. He earned an Emmy Award for his work on M*A*S*H in 1975. His final credit with the 1996 tele-film Dallas: J.R. Returns. Los Angeles Times, May 30, 2003, B13.

2003 • Obituaries hospital on May 27, 2003. He was 77. Berio was born in Oneglia, Italy, on October 24, 1925. His career as a pianist ended due to an injury to his hand when drafted into the Italian army in World War II. After the war he studied at the Milan Conservatory and began composing music. In the 1950s Berio became interested in experimental electronic music. His notable compositions include Laborintus II (1966), Sinfonia (1968), and the operas La Vera Storia and Un re in Ascolto, with librettos by Italo Calvino. Los Angeles Times, May 28, 2003, B10; New York Times, May 28, 2003, A21; Time, June 9, 2003, 24.

Berlitz, Charles

Italian composer Luciano Berio died of complications following spinal surgery in a Rome

Linguist and author Charles Berlitz died in a Tamarac, Florida, hospital, on December 18, 2003. He was 89. Berlitz was born Charles Frambach in New York City on November 20, 1914. His grandfather, Maximilian Berlitz, founded the Berlitz language school in 1878. Charles Berlitz, who spoke fluently over 30 languages, headed the

Luciano Berio

Charles Berlitz

Berio, Luciano

Obituaries • 2003 Belitz company’s publication department and wrote curriculums for langauge schools throughout the world. Berlitz also was a writer of popular books about the paranormal including The Bermuda Triangle (1974), which served as the basis of the 1978 film of the same name. His The Philadelphia Experiment: Project Invisiblity (1979), as adapted as a science fiction film, The Philadelphia Experiment, in 1984. Berlitz also wrote The Mystery of Atlantis (1969), Mysteries from Forgotten Worlds (1972), and Without a Trace (1977). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 1, 2004, B10; New York Times, Dec. 31, 2003, A19; Time, Jan. 12, 2004, 23.

Berry, Fred Rotund comic actor Fred Berry, who was best known for his role as Rerun in the 1970s television sitcom What’s Happening!!, was found dead in his bed at his Los Angeles apartment on October 21, 2003. He was 52. Berry was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on March 13, 1951. He was a member of the break-dance troupe, the Lockers, before donning a red beret and suspenders for the

Fred Berry

32 role of Rerun in What’s Happening!! in 1976. He remained with the show through 1979, and reprised the role in a follow-up series, What’s Happening Now!!, in 1985. Berry was also seen in the films Vice Squad (1982), In the Hood (1998), Big Money Hustlas (2000), and Burn Runner (2002). His other television credits include episodes of Alice, Martin, Linc’s, and Scrubs. He made a cameo appearance in David Spade’s 2003 comedy film Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star. New York Times, Oct. 24, 2003, A21; People, Nov. 10, 2003, 96; Time, Nov. 3, 2003, 24.

Bettger, Lyle Leading actor Lyle Bettger, who was known for his villainous roles in films and television from the 1950s, died at his home in Atascadero, California, on September 24, 2003. He was 88. Bettger was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on February 13, 1915. He attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City and began his career on stage in the 1930s. He made his film debut in 1950’s No Man of Her Own.

Lyle Bettger

33 Bettger also appeared in the films Union Station (1950), The First Legion (1951), Dear Brat (1951), Cecil B. DeMille’s The Greatest Show on Earth (1952), Hurricane Smith (1952), Denver and Rio Grande (1952), The Vanquished (1953), The Great Sioux Uprising (1953), Forbidden (1953), All I Desire (1953), Carnival Story (1954), Drums Across the River (1954), Destry (1954), The Sea Chase (1955), The Lone Ranger (1956), Showdown at Abilene (1956), Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957) as Ike Clanton, Guns of the Timberland (1959), Gundown at Sandoval (1959), Town Tamer (1965), Nevada Smith (1966), Johnny Reno (1966), Return of the Gunfighter (1967), The Fastest Guitar Alive (1967), The Hawaiians (1970), and The Seven Minutes (1971). Bettger starred as Sam Larson in the television drama series Court of Last Resort from 1957 to 1958, and was Harry Driscoll in the drama series The Grand Jury in 1959. He also guest starred in episodes of such series as Lux Video Theatre, TV Reader’s Digest, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, The 20th Century–Fox Hour, Tales of Wells Fargo, Wagon Train, Zane Grey Theater, Texas John Slaughter, The Rifleman, Law of the Plainsman, Laramie, The DuPont Show with June Allyson, The Deputy, The Tall Man, Bonanza, Grindl, Death Valley Days, Kraft Suspense Theatre, Gunsmoke, Rawhide, Combat!, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Burke’s Law, A Man Called Shenandoah, The Time Tunnel, Daniel Boone, Cimarron Strip, Hawaii Five-O, Police Story, and Barnaby Jones. Bettger moved to Maui, Hawaii, in the mid–1970s, and largely retired from the screen later in the decade. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 4, 2003, B19; New York Times, Oct. 9, 2003, C16; Variety, Oct. 13, 2003, 43.

2003 • Obituaries (1968), Five and the Spies (1969), The Echo of a Shot (1970), Famous Five Get in Trouble (1970), Father of Four in a Sunny Mood (1971), Lenin, You Rascal, You (1972), The Goldcabbage Family (1975), The Flaming Fire Chief (1976), The Office Party (1976), The Goldcabbage Family Breaks the Bank (1976), Mind Your Back, Professor (1977), The Golden Cauliflower Family Gets the Vote (1977), The Factory Outing (1978), Winterborn (1978), The Heritage (1978), Children of the Warriors (1979), Johnny Larsen (1979), Assassination (1980), The Moment (1980), The Parallel Corpse (1982), Kidnapping (1982), Three Angels and Five Lions (1982), Suzanne and Leonard (1984), American Commando (1985), The Misfit Brigade (1987), The Girl in a Swing (1988), Nobody’s Perfect (1989), And You Thought Your Parents Were Weird (1991), A Day in October (1991), and Three Days in August (1992).

Bhaskar Bhaskar, who starred in the 1971 cult horror film I Drink Your Blood, died in New York City on August 4, 2003. He was 73. He was born Bhaskar Burmin Roy Chaudhri, Jr., in India on

Betzer, Just Danish film producer Just Betzer, who’s 1987 film Babette’s Feast received the Academy Award for Best Foreign-Language film, died of a heart attack at his home in Denmark on November 6, 2003. He was 59. Betzer was born in Aarhus, Denmark, on June 11, 1944. He began working in films in the 1960s as an assistant producer to Bent Christensen. He produced such films as Epilogue (1963), Hagbard and Signe (1967), The Owlfarm Brothers (1967), Me and My Kid Brother (1967), What a Pity About Daddy

Bhaskar

Obituaries • 2003 Feb. 11, 1930. He came to the United States where he performed as a dancer from the 1950s. Bhaskar was cast as cult leader Horace Bones who goes on a killing rampage after eating meat pies infected with rabid dog blood in David Durston’s I Drink Your Blood. He also appeared in the stage show Blue Sextet, which was filmed by Durston in 1972. Bhaskar’s career on stage ended in the late 1970s when an injury from a fall left him in a wheelchair. He later worked as a painter. Bhaskar recorded an audio track for the I Drink Your Blood DVD shortly before his death.

34

Big DS Rap singer Big DS died of complications from cancer on May 22, 2003. He was a founding member of the rap group Onyx with Sticky Fingaz, Fredro Starr and Sonee Seeza in 1989. They recorded the album Bacdafu#up, which included the hit song “Slam,” before Big DS left the group in 1993.

Biette, Jean-Claude French film actor, director and writer JeanClaude Biette died of a heart attack in Paris on June 10, 2003. He was 60. Biette was born in Paris on November 6, 1942. He began his career in films as an actor in the early 1960s, appearing in Suzanne’s Career (1963), Othon (1971), The Mother and the Whore (1973), The Machine (1977), At the Top of the Stairs (1983), and A Winter’s Tale (1992). Biette also began writing and directing films in the early 1970s, helming La Soeur du Cadre (1973), Loin de Manhattan (1982), Le Champignon des Carpathes (1990), Chasse Gardee (1992), Le Complexe de Toulon (1996), and Saltimbank (2003) which he also appeared in.

Big DS

Binev, Nikolai

Jean-Claude Biette

Bulgarian character actor Nikolai Binev died in Sofia, Bulgaria, on December 8, 2003. He was 69. Binev was born in Sliven, Bulgaria, on July 5, 1934. He was featured in numerous Eastern European films from the early 1960s including The Steep Path (1961), Men (1966), Farewell, Friends!

35

2003 • Obituaries

Biswas, Anil Indian film musician Anil Biswas died in New Delhi, India, on May 31, 2003. Biswas was born in Barisal, East Bengal (now Bangladesh) on July 7, 1914. After working on theatrical production in Calcutta, Biswas moved to Bombay to work in Hindi films in 1934. He composed scores to over 100 films during his career including Religious Woman (1935), Victim of Love (1936), Eternal Music (1937), Landlord (1937), Gentleman Bandit (1937), 300 Days and After (1938), The Only Way (1939), Woman (1940), My Sister (1941), Fate (1943), High and Low Tides (1944), Tune (1951), Two Leaves and a Bud (1953), The Flame of Jallianwalla Baag (1953), Great Soul (1954), The Foreigner (1957), Four Faces of India (1959), and Sautela Bhai (1962). Biswas retired from films in the mid–1960s to work at All India Radio as director of the national orchestra. New York Times, June 4, 2003, C13; Variety, June 23, 2003, 56. Nikolai Binev

(1970), Don’t Turn Back (1971), There Is Nothing Finer Than Bad Weather (1971), Hitchhiking (1972), A Human Heart (1972), Affection (1972), Like a Song (1973), The Last Word (1973), The Great Boredom (1973), Where Have We Met? (1975), Memory of the Twin Sister (1976), Amendment to the Defense-of-State Act (1976), Stars in Her Hair, Tears in Her Eyes (1977), Sunstroke (1977), Hark to the Cock (1978, Boomerang (1979), The House (1979), Alone Among Wolves (1979), Fists in the Soil (1980), Autumn Sun (1982), The Worst Sin (1982), Constantine the Philosopher (1983), Third Side of the Coin (1983), Speaking Mildly (1983), The Poet and the Devil (1984), Day Is Not Obvious from the Morning (1985), Nights with the White Horses (1985), Love Is a Willful Bird (1990), Fatal Tenderness (1993), The Lot (1993), Sulamit (1997), East-West (1999), and Dogs’ Home (2000). In recent years Binev was featured in several English-language action films released to video including Sinbad: The Battle of the Dark Nights (1998), Bloodsport IV: The Dark Kumite (1998), Bridge of Dragons (1999), Derailed (2002), and Alien Hunter (2003) with James Spader.

Anil Biswas (right, with C. Ramchandra)

Bittle, Jerry Cartoonist Jerry Bittle died of a heart attack while vacationing in Honduras on April 7, 2003. He was 53. Bittle was the creator of the popular

Obituaries • 2003

36

Jerry Bittle

syndicated comic strips Shirley & Son and Geech. Bittle was editorial cartoonist for the Albuquerque Tribune before creating Geech in 1982. Shirley & Son made its debut in 2000.

Eric John Black

Black, Eric John Comedian and writer Eric John Black was killed near Hazel Park, Michigan, on September 21, 2003, when he was struck by a car. He was 36. Black was a member of Detroit’s Second City comedy troupe. He was also a writer and his play, Daft Buggers, was under consideration to become an animated series at the time of his death.

Blades, Brian British actor and dancer Brian Blades died in England on August 4, 2003. He was 84. Blades was born in Prescot, Lancashire, England, on July 15, 1919. He began performing as a dancer at an early age, and appeared on stage in London during the 1930s. He served in the British military during World War II, and resumed his career on stage after the war. Blades performed in theatrical productions of Oranges and Lemons

Brian Blades

37 (1948), Noel Coward’s Ace of Clubs (1950), and The Boy Friend (1957). He also danced in several films including Where’s Charlie (1952), Gentlemen Marry Brunettes (1955), and Fire Down Below (1957). He worked as a choreographer and writer in the 1960s, before taking a position with the Bank of England as an economic analyst.

Blake, Mervyn Canadian actor Mervyn “Butch” Blake died in Toronto, Canada, after a long illness on October 9, 2003. He was 95. Blake was born in Dehra Dun, India, on November 30, 1907, the son of a railroad executive. He was educated in England and began his career on stage in the early 1930s. He appeared in numerous productions and performed on radio. He was also seen in the 1937 Alexander Dumas film The Black Tulip. Blake served in the military during World War II. In the early 1950s he performed wit the Royal Shakespeare Company. Blake went to Canada later in the decade, joining the Stratford Festival Company. He appeared with them in over 130 productions from 1957 until his retirement in 1998.

Mervyn Blake

2003 • Obituaries

Blakeney, Ben Australia Aboriginal actor Ben Blakeney died at his home in Canberra, Australia, on December 23, 2003. He was 66. Blakeney was born in Sydney, Australia, in 1937. A former police officer, he played Bennelong at the opening of the Sydney Opera House in 1973. He also appeared with Mick Jagger in the 1970 film Ned Kelly, and was featured on television in episodes of Riptide, Homicide, Delta, and Silent Number in the 1970s.

Blassie, Freddie “Classie” Freddie Blassie, a leading wrestler and manager from the 1940s through the 1990s, died of heart and kidney failure in a Hartsdale, New York, hospital, on June 2, 2003. He was 86. He was born Fred Blassman in St. Louis, Missouri, on February 18, 1917. He wrestled in the Navy during World War II, holding the 7th Naval District championship. He began wrestling

Freddie Blassie

Obituaries • 2003 professionally after the war. He held various championships over the next two decades including the NWA Southern Title and the WWW Title in Los Angeles. He also held the NWA Georgia Title in 1970. A knee injury ended Blassie’s in-ring career, but he continued to work in the wrestling business as a leading manager of ring villains. Known as “Classie” Freddie Blassie, he was a top manager in the WWF in the 1970s and 1980s, calling wrestling fans “pencil necked geeks.” He managed the Iron Sheik during his title reign from late 1983, and managed the team of the Iron Sheik and Nikolai Volkoff when they won the WWF Tag Team Title in 1985. Blassie also appeared with Andy Kaufman in the semi-documentary 1983 film My Breakfast with Blassie. He was also seen in the films When Nature Calls (1985) and Body Slam (1987). He largely retired from ring action in 1986, though continued to make occasional appearances on WWE television programs through 2003. Los Angeles Times, June 9, 2003, B10; New York Times, June 8, 2003, 33; Time, June 16, 2003, 23.

38

Bloom, David NBC News correspondent David Bloom died of a pulmonary embolism while on assignment with the U.S. Army’s 3rd Infantry Division outside of Baghdad, Iraq, on April 6, 2003. He was 39. Bloom was born in Edina, Minnesota, on May 22, 1963. He began working as an investigative reporter with an NBC affiliate in Miami in the late 1980s. He joined NBC News in 1993 as a reporter in Chicago, and was transferred to Los Angeles two years later where he covered the O.J. Simpson trial. Bloom became an NBC White House correspondent in 1997. He became co-anchor of NBC’s Weekend Today program in March of 2000. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 7, 2003, B9; New York Times, Apr. 7, 2003, F7; People, Apr. 21, 2003, 74; Time, Apr. 21, 2003, 21; Variety, Apr. 14, 2003, 38.

Bliss, Imogene Character actress Imogene Bliss died in Cleveland, Ohio, on January 14, 2003. She was 84. Bliss was born in Cleveland on February 14, 1918. She began her career on stage and made her Broadway debut in the 1967 production of Marat de Sade. She continued to perform on stage over the next three decades, appearing in productions of Your Own Thing and a rock version of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. She was also seen in small roles in such daytime soap operas as The Doctors, Edge of Night, Search for Tomorrow and All My Children. Bliss also appeared in several films including The King of Marvin Gardens (1972), Richard (1972), Chapter Two (1979), and Heaven Help Us (1985), and the tele-films The Mating Season (1980), Stone Pillow (1985), and The Christmas Tree (1996). Variety, Feb. 10, 2003, 57.

David Bloom

Blumofe, Robert F. Film producer Robert F. Blumofe died in Los Angeles on July 22, 2003. He was 93. Blu-

39 mofe was born in New York City on September 23, 1909. He produced several films from the 1960s including Yours, Mine and Ours (1968), Pieces of Dreams (1970), and Bound for Glory (1976) which earned an Academy Award nomination. Variety, Sept. 1, 2003, 62.

Boardman, True Child actor turned screenwriter True Boardman died of pancreatic cancer in Pebble Beach, California, on July 27, 2003. He was 93. He was born True Eames Boardman in Seattle, Washington, on October 25, 1909, the son of silent film stars True Boardman and Virginia True Boardman. He made his stage debut performing with his parents while still an infant. Raised in Hollywood, Boardman appeared as a child actor in numerous silent films including Broncho Billy’s Heart (1912), The Reward for Broncho Billy (1912), Snakeville’s Fire Brigade (1914), Sophie’s Birthday Party (1914), When Macbeth Came to Snakeville (1914), The Hazards of Helen (1914), Shoulder Arms (1918), Daddy-Long-Legs (1919), Deliverance (1919), A Day’s Pleasure (1919), and The Flirt (1922). Boardman attended college at UCLA and soon began writing for radio. He made several more film appearances, playing small roles in Scareheads (1931), The Sign of the Cross (1932), and Below the Deadline (1936). He also worked as a writer or scripter on several films in early 1940s including Son of the Navy (1940), Keep ’Em Flying (1941), Ride ’Em Cowboy (1942), Pardon My Sarong (1942), Between Us Girls (1942), Arabian

True Boardman

2003 • Obituaries Nights (1942), and Hit the Ice (1943). He served in the U.S. Army during World War II and was instrumental in the development of the Armed Forces Radio Services. After the war Boardman continued to write for radio. He also scripted the 1951 Lassie film The Painted Hills. During the 1950s he began working in television, writing episodes of such series as Gunsmoke, Perry Mason, Bonanza, and The Virginian. He also appeared in small roles in several episodes of The Virginian and Perry Mason. He later wrote his memoirs, When Hollywood and I Were Young. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 3, 2003, B18; Variety, Sept. 29, 2003, 77.

Boggs, Haskell Cinematographer Haskell “Buzz” Boggs died of heart disease in a Burbank, California, hospital on May 30, 2003. He was 94. Boggs was born in Jones, Oklahoma, on April 17, 1909. He began his career in films as a camera operator in the late 1940s on such films as Sorrowful Jones (1949), The Heiress (1949), and No Man of Her Own (1950). He moved up to cinematographer in the mid–1950s on such films as The Leather Saint (1956), Williamsburg: The Story of a Patriot

Haskell Boggs

Obituaries • 2003 (1956), Jerry Lewis’ The Delicate Delinquent (1957), Short Cut to Hell (1957), Hear Me Good (1957), Fear Strikes Out (1957), Teacher’s Pet (1958), St. Louis Blues (1958), Rock-a-Bye Baby (1958), the 1958 science fiction classic I Married a Monster from Outer Space, The Geisha Boy (1958), As Young as We Are (1958), Don’t Give Up the Ship (1959), The Bellboy (1960), Cinderfella (1960), and Young Fury (1965). From the 1960s Boggs worked often in television for such series as Bonanza, The High Chaparral, and Michael Landon’s Little House on the Prairie and Highway to Heaven. He was also cinematographer for the tele-films Double Indemnity (1973), Maneater (1973), Little House: Bless All the Dear Children (1984), Us (1991), and Bonanza: The Return (1993).

Bondelli, Michael Film stunt driver Michael Bondelli died of a heart attack in Hawthorne, California, on October 14, 2003. He was 46. Bondelli worked on such films as Speed (1994), Top of the Wold (1997), Looking for Lola (1998), Daredevil (2003) and A

Michael Bondelli

40 Man Apart (2003), and the television series The West Wing. The founder of Bondelli Precision Driving Team, he was also the stunt coordinator for the 2002 film Stuart Little II. He was working on the Tom Cruise film Collateral at the time of his death. Variety, Oct. 27, 2003, 67.

Bonisolli, Franco Italian operatic tenor Franco Bonisolli died during the night of October 30, 2003, in Vienna Austria. He was 66. Bonisolli was born in Rovereto, Italy, on May 25, 1937. He made his operatic debut in a 1962 production of La Rondine in Spoleto, Italy. He debuted with the Vienna State Opera in 1968 and performed with Metropolitan Opera in New York in a production of Il Barbiere di Siviglia two years later. He starred in productions at the Met of such operas as Faust, Rigoletto, Tosca, and La Traviata. Bonisolli continued

Franco Bonisolli

41

2003 • Obituaries

to perform through the 1990s, singing in productions of Fedora and Il Trovatore in Vienna. New York Times, Nov. 2, 2003, 27.

Bookston, Alex Character actor Alex Bookston died of a brain tumor in Granada Hills, California, on January 21, 2003. He was 83. The Brooklyn, New York, native was featured in small roles several episodes of Perry Mason in the early 1960. He also appeared in episodes of The Wide Country, Batman, and Mission: Impossible. Bookston was also seen in the films Toys (1992) with Robin Williams, Bad Channels (1992), Murder in the First (1995), and Barb Wire (1996) with Pamela Anderson, and the tele-films Cooperstown (1993), The Heart of Justice (1993), Arthur Miller’s The American Clock (1993), The Barefoot Executive (1995), and The Sky’s on Fire (1998).

Borchert, Rudolph Television writer Rudolph Borchert died in Malibu, California, on March 29, 2003. He was 75. Borchert was born in Cleveland, Ohio, on March 27, 1928. He worked often in television from the mid–1970s, writing episodes of such series as Police Woman, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, Ellery Queen, Quincy, CHiPS, The Bionic Woman, The Greatest American Hero, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, and Hunter. He also scripted the 1980 film The Little Dragons.

Borden, Rosalyn Rosalyn Borden Shackley, who performed with her sister Marilyn as the Borden Twins, died of liver disease in Modesto, California, on January 23, 2003. She was 70. She was born in Hartford, Connecticut, on May 29, 1932. She and her sister began her career in show business at the age of three with an appearance on Ed Begley’s radio program The Kiddies Hour. They were best known for their appearance on the I Love Lucy television series in the 1950s, co-starring with Tennessee Ernie Ford as country girls, Teensy and Weensy. The Borden Twins also performed with such en-

Rosalyn Borden (left, with Lucille Ball, William Frawley, and sister Marilyn)

tertainers as Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, Bob Newhart, and Jimmy Durante, and were seen on television in episodes of Maude and CHiPs. They were working on a book about their life in show business at the time of Rosalyn’s death.

Bourne, Mel Mel Bourne, a three-time Academy Award nominated production designer, died of heart failure in a New York City hospital on January 14, 2003. He was 79. Bourne was born in Chicago, Illinois, on November 22, 1923. He began his career working in stage productions and was a designer for the Howdy Doody children’s television series in the 1950s. Bourne was working in commercials in the 1970s when he was asked by Woody Allen to serve as art director for the 1977 film Annie Hall. He continued to work was Allen on such films as Interiors (1978) which earned him an Oscar nomination, Manhattan (1979), Stardust Memories (1980), A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy (1982), Zelig (1983), and Broadway Danny Rose (1984). His other film credits include Windows (1980), Thief (1981), Still of the Night (1982), The Natural (1984) which earned him a second Oscar nomination, F/X (1986), Manhunter (1986), Fatal Attraction (1987), Cocktail (1988), Rude Awakening (1989), Reversal of Fortune (1990), The Fisher King (1991) which brought him another Academy Award nomination, Man Trouble

Obituaries • 2003

42

(1992), Indecent Proposal (1993), Angie (1994), Kiss of Death (1995), Something to Talk About (1995), Striptease (1996), Gloria (1999), and Eventual Wife (2000). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 17, 2003, B15; New York Times, Feb. 17, 2003, A19, Variety, Jan. 20, 2003, 81.

Bradley, Paul Canadian actor Paul Bradley died in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, in September of 2003. He was 58. Bradley was best known for costarring in Donald Shebib’s 1970 cult film Goin’ Down the Road as Joey, a sailor looking for fun in Toronto. He appeared often on Canadian television in the early 1970s as a regular performer in such series as The Hart & Lorne Terrific Hour, That’s Show Biz, This Is the Law, and The Whiteoaks of Jalna. Bradley also appeared in the films Wedding in White (1972), The Merry Wives of Tobias Rouke (1972), The Hard Part Begins (1973), Lions for Breakfast (1975), Stone Cold Dead (1979), American Nightmare (1983), Cross Country (1983), and Blindside (1986).

Booker Bradshaw

He was 62. Bradshaw began his career as a singer performing on The Ted Mack Amateur Hour in 1951. He later worked with Motown Records as a music producer and tour manager in the early 1960s. He began acting in the late 1960s, appearing in the recurring role as Dr. M’Benga in the Star Trek episodes “A Private Little War” and “That Which Survives.” Bradshaw was also seen in episodes of Tarzan, The Mod Squad, The F.B.I., and The Name of the Game. He also appeared in a handful of films in the early 1970s including Skullduggery (1970), The Strawberry Statement (1970), and Coffy (1973) with Pam Grier. He also worked as a television writer, scripting episodes of Columbo, Ellery Queen, Gimme a Break!, Sanford and Son, The Rockford Files, The Jeffersons, and Planet of the Apes. Paul Bradley

Bradshaw, Booker Actor Booker Bradshaw died of a heart attack in a Los Angeles hospital on April 1, 2003.

Bradt, Grayce Singer and radio actress Grayce Bradt died at her home in Casoli de Camaiore, Italy, on April 9, 2003. She was 93. She was born in Sherburn, Minnesota, in 1910, and began singing in

43 the late 1920s. She teamed with Herbert Nelson and Edward Heimberger (who later became better known as actor Eddie Albert), to form the singing group the Threesome. Billed as Grace Albert, she continued to team with Eddie Albert on the NBC radio program The Honeymooners — Grace and Eddie Albert, in New York City. She continued to perform on radio through the 1940s, in such series as Pepper Young’s Family. She abandoned her career following her marriage to Italian artist Rosario Murabito in 1948.

Brady, Ben Television writer and producer Ben Brady died at his home in Los Angeles on March 20, 2003. He was 94. Brady was born in New York City on July 7, 1908. He began his career in radio, writing daytime serials while attending law school. He continued to write for radio while practicing law, scripting for such series as Inner Sanctum, Mr. and Mrs. North, and The Thin Man. He moved to Hollywood after World War II, producing and directing radio programs for Steve Allen and Dinah Shore. He later worked as a writer and producer for the Perry Mason television

2003 • Obituaries series from 1957 to 1959, and produced the western Have Gun Will Travel from 1959 to 1960. Brady also produced second season of the classic science-fiction series The Outer Limits in 1964, and the western series Rawhide from 1965 to 1966. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 28, 2003, B15; Variety, Mar. 31, 2003, 50.

Braff, Ruby Jazz cornetist Ruby Braff died in North Chatham, Massachusetts, after a long illness on February 9, 2003. He was 75. Braff was born in Boston on March 16, 1927. He began performing professionally in the 1940s, playing with bands led by Pee Wee Russell and Edmond Hall. He moved to New York in 1953 and played with Vic Dickenson, Urbie Green, and others. He made a notable recording of a Billie Holiday tribute, Holiday in Braff, later in the decade. Braff continued to perform, joining George Wein’s Newport All Stars, and touring with trumpeter Alex Welsh. He formed a quartet with George Barnes, Wayne Wright and Michael Moore in 1973 which toured and recorded for several years. He teamed with sax player Scott Hamilton in 1982, and continued to record through the 1990s. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 12, 2003, B10; New York Times, Feb. 11, 2003, B9.

Ruby Braff (center) with Barney Kessel and George Wein

Ben Brady

Obituaries • 2003

Brakhage, Stan Experimental filmmaker Stan Brakhage died of cancer in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, on March 9, 2003. He was 70. Brakhage was born Robert Sanders in a Kansas City, Missouri, orphanage on January 14, 1933. He was adopted by the Brakhages soon after his birth, who changed his name to James Stanley Brakhage. He became interested in film in the early 1950s and made his first film, Interim, in 1952. He moved to New York two years later where he continued making avante-garde cinema. His works including Flesh of Morning (1956), Anticipation of the Night (1958), Window Water Baby Moving (1959), Mothlight (1963), Dog Star Man (1964), Eye Myth (1967), The Machine of Eden (1970), The Animals of Eden and After (1970), Fox Fire Child Watch (1971), The Text of Light (1973), Aquarien (1974), Burial Path (1978), The Garden of Earthly Delights (1981), Tortured Dust (1984), Kindering (1987), The Thatch of Night (1990), The Mammals of Victoria (1994), Black Ice (1994), In Consideration of Pompeii (1995), Polite Madness (1996), The Earthsong of the Cricket (1999), Water for Maya (2000), Rounds (2001), Max (2002), and Stan’s Window (2003). Brakhage made nearly 400

Stan Brakhage

44 films over five decades, many of them in 8mm or 16mm. His films ranged in length from nine seconds to four hours, and were usual without sound. Brakhage also taught film at the University of Colorado from 1981 until his retirement in 2002. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 12, 2003, B11; New York Times, Mar. 12, 2003, C23; Time, Mar. 24, 2003, 20; Variety, Mar. 17, 2003, 59.

Brandis, Jonathan Former child actor Jonathan Brandis, who was best known for his role as Lucas Wolenczek in Steven Spielberg’s underwater science fiction television series SeaQuest DSV in the mid–1990s, died of an apparent suicide in a Los Angeles hospital on November 12, 2003. Paramedics had been called to Brandis’ apartment the night before on a report that the actor had attempted suicide by hanging. He was 27. Brandis was born in Danbury, Connecticut, on April 13, 1976. He began his career at the age of six, appearing in commercials and the television soap opera One Life to Live. Relocating to California in the mid– 1980s, Brandis was seen in episodes of such tele-

Jonathan Brandis

45 vision series as Sledge Hammer!, L.A. Law, Full House, Who’s the Boss?, Murder, She Wrote, Alien Nation, The Flash, Gabriel’s Fire, The Wonder Years, Blossom, Pros and Cons, and Saved By the Bell: The College Years. He also appeared in the films Fatal Attraction (1987), The Wrong Guys (1988), and Stepfather II: Make Room for Daddy (1989), and the tele-film Poor Little Rich Girl: The Barbara Hutton Story (1987). Brandis starred as Bastian in the 1990 fantasy film The NeverEnding Story II: The Next Chapter, and was the young William Denbrough in the 1990 television miniseries adaptation of Stephen King’s It. He continued to appear in such films as Ladybugs (1992), Sidekicks (1992), Outside Providence (1999), Ride with the Devil (1999), A Fate Totally Worse Than Death (2000), Hart’s War, (2002), The Year That Trembled (2003), and Puerto Vallarta Squeeze (2003). He was also seen in the tele-films Our Shining Moment (1991), Good King Wenceslas (1994), Her Last Chance (1996), Born Free: A New Adventure (1996), Fall Into Darkness (1996), Two Came Back (1997), and 111 Gramercy Park (2003). Los Angeles Times, Nov. 21, 2003, B18; New York Times, Nov. 22, 2003, B7; People, Dec. 8, 2003, 133; Variety, Dec. 1, 2003, 70.

2003 • Obituaries

Bob Brandy (and his horse, Rebel)

Brandy, Bob Bob Brandy, who hosted the long-running Chattanooga children’s program The Bob Brandy Show, died on February 28, 2003. He was 72. Brandy and his horse, Rebel, began the show in Columbus, Georgia, in 1956 before coming to Chattanooga’s WTVC-TV in 1958. The show aired for the next 20 years before leaving the air in 1978. Brandy remained with the station as a sales manager until his retirement in 2001.

Braunn, Erik Rock musician Erik Braunn, who was guitarist with the 1960s band Iron Butterfly, died of cardiac arrest in Los Angeles on July 25, 2003. He was 52. Braunn was born in Pekin, Illinois, on August 11, 1950. He trained as a classical musician from an early age and joined Iron Butterfly at the age of 16. The group was best known for the classic rock song “In-a-Gadda-da-Vida” in 1968.

Erik Braunn

Braunn recorded and toured with the group until 1969. After leaving the band he worked as a musician and songwriter and would occasionally reunite with members of the group.

Obituaries • 2003 Los Angeles Times, July 28, 2003, B9; New York Times, July 30, 2003, C12; People, Aug. 11, 2003, 99; Variety, Aug. 11, 2003, 43.

Brewer, Arthur Film special effects director Arthur Brewer died of cancer on May 24, 2003. He was 57. Brewer was born on November 12, 1945. He worked on special effects on numerous films from the 1970s including Two Minute Warning (1976), Smokey and the Bandit (1977), The Blues Brothers (1980), Carny (1980), Swamp Thing (1982), The Hitcher (1986), Masters of the Universe (1987), Cherry 2000 (1987), Above the Law (1988), W.B., Blue and the Bean (1989), Chopper Chicks in Zombietown (1989), Delirious (1991), and Hero (1992). Brewer also worked on the tele-films The Winds of Kitty Hawk (1978), Donor (1990), and NetForce (1999), and the Baywatch television series.

Brewer, Jameson Film and television writer Jameson Brewer died in Thousand Oaks, California, on Septem-

Jameson Brewer

46 ber 11, 2003. He was 87. Brewer began scripting films in the early 1940s, writing such shorts as First Aid (1943), Tips on Trips (1943), and Home Maid (1944). He also scripted the features Sweet Genevieve (1947), Two Blondes and a Redhead (1947), French Leave (1948), Okinawa (1952), Ghost Town (1955), Jungle Heat (1957), Mary Had a Little (1961), Swingin’ Along (1961), The Incredible Mr. Limpet (1964) starring Don Knotts, A Lotus for Miss Quon (1967), Emma Hamilton (1968), The Kashmiri Run (1970), Arnold (1973), Terror in the Wax Museum (1973), Heidi’s Song (1982), and Alice Through the Looking Glass (1991). Brewer worked in television from the 1950s, writing episodes of such series as Jane Wyman Presents the Fireside Theatre, Staccato, Mr. Lucky, Checkmate, The Virginian, Branded, and the 1969 tele-film The Over-the-Hill Gang. Brewer also wrote and produced the U.S. version of the Japanese anime series Battle of the Planets in the late 1970s. Variety, Oct. 13, 2003, 42.

Brickell, Butch Stuntman William “Butch” Brickell died in his sleep at his Coral Gables, Florida, home on

Butch Brickell

47 October 13, 2003. He was 46. Brickell worked on such films as Mr. Nanny (1993), The Specialist (1994), The Crow (1994), Bad Boys (1995), Fair Game (1995), Two Much (1996), The Crew (2000), and 2Fast 2Furious (2002). He also worked on episodes of television’s SeaQuest DSV and CSI Miami.

Brinkley, David Veteran newscaster David Brinkley died of complications from a fall at his home in Houston, Texas, on June 11, 2003. He was 82. Brinkley was born in Wilmington, North Carolina, on July 10, 1920. Brinkley began writing for a local newspaper while still in high school. He briefly worked with UPI before serving in World War II. After his discharge in 1943, Brinkley was hired by NBC to serve as a White House correspondent. He was teamed with fellow newsman Chet Huntley in 1956, and the duo served as co-anchors of NBC’s evening news on The Huntley-Brinkley Report. Huntley retired in 1970 and died four years later. Brinkley continued to serve as evening anchor before leaving that position in 1971 to concentrate on news specials. He was returned to the NBC anchor desk in 1976, but was replaced in

2003 • Obituaries 1979. He hosted the NBC Magazine with David Brinkley program from 1980 to 1981, when he left NBC to join ABC. He hosted the Sunday morning public affairs program This Week with David Brinkley from 1982 until stepping down in 1996. He retired from ABC the following year. During his career Brinkley was the recipient of ten Emmy Awards and received the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Los Angeles Times, June 13, 2003, A1; New York Times, June 13, 2003, A30; People, June 30, 2003, 125; Time, June 23, 2003, 28; Variety, June 16, 2003, 44.

Brinkman, Paul Actor Paul Brinkman died in Santa Barbara, California, on October 1, 2003. He was 85. Brinkman was born in San Francisco on April 10, 1918. He had a brief career as an actor in the mid–1940s, appearing in the 1945 film Those Endearing Young Charms. He married actress Jeanne Crain in 1946 and was a successful businessman in California.

Paul Brinkman (with Jeanne Craine)

Broderick, Patricia

David Brinkley

Playwright Patricia Broderick, the mother of actor Matthew Broderick, died of cancer at her home in Greenwich Village, New York, on November 18, 2003. She was 78. Broderick began writing plays in the 1940s, several of which were produced for the stage. She wrote and produced

Obituaries • 2003 the 1996 film Infinity, based on the life of physicist Richard Feynman. Matthew Broderick directed and starred in the film. Patricia Broderick was married to actor James Broderick until his death in 1982. New York Times, Nov. 22, 2003, B87.

Brodsky, Jack Film producer Jack Brodsky died of a heart attack at his Sherman Oaks, California, home on February 17, 2003. He was 69. Brodsky was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1933. He began working in films as a publicist for Fox. His experiences as a publicist for the 1963 film Cleopatra were detailed in his book The Cleopatra Papers. Brodsky subsequently moved into film production, serving as a producer on such films as Little Murders (1972), Woody Allen’s Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex but Were Afraid to Ask (1972), Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams (1973), Romancing the Stone (1984), The Jewel of the Nile (1985), Dancers (1987), King Ralph (1991), Rookie of the Year (1993), Black Knight, and 2003’s Daddy Day Care.

Jack Brodsky

48 Los Angeles Times, Feb. 23, 2003, B18; New York Times, Feb. 21, 2003, A27; Variety, Feb. 24, 2003, 87.

Bromley, Sheila Actress Sheila Bromley died in Los Angeles on July 23, 2003. She was 95. Bromley was born in San Francisco, California, on October 31, 1907. Originally billed as Sheila Le Gay, and later Sheila Manners and Sheila Mannors, she starred in numerous films and serials from the early 1930s. Her credits include Call of the Desert (1930), The Canyon of Missing Men (1930), The Storm (1930), Playthings of Hollywood (1930), Ten Nights in a Barroom (1931), No Privacy (1931), Daddy Long Legs (1931), The Lawyer’s Secret (1931), Land of Wanted Men (1931), Girls About Town (1931), Working Girls (1931), Texas Gun Fights (1931), Lady with a Past (1931), Texas Pioneers (1931), Play-Girl (1932), One Hour with You (1932), Winner Take All (1932), Horse Feathers (1932) with the Marx Brothers, Tiger Shark (1932), Cowboy Counsellor (1932), Her First Mate (1933), Meet the Baron (1933), Only Yesterday (1933), King for a Night (1933), Woman Condemned (1934), Glamour (1934), The Hell Cat (1934), That’s Gratitude (1934), The Merry Widow (1934), Prescott Kid (1934), Behind the Evidence (1935), Carnival (1935), Danger Ahead (1935), Together We Live (1935), Westward Ho (1935), Moonlight on the Prairie (1935), Lawless Range (1935), The Pace That Kills (1935), Desert Phantom (1936), Kelly of the Secret Service (1936), Born to Fight (1936), Lady Be Careful (1936), Gold Diggers of 1937 (1936), The Boss Didn’t Say Good Morning (1937), West of Shanghai (1937), Idol of the Crowds (1937), The Luck of Roaring Camp (1937), Missing Witnesses (1937), Death Goes North (1938), Making the Headlines (1938), Midnight Intruder (1938), King of the Newsboys (1938), Accidents Will Happen (1938), Mystery House (1938), Reformatory (1938), Rebellious Daughters (1938), Girls on Probation (1938), Nancy Drew… Reporter (1939), Women in the Wind (1939), Waterfront (1939), Torchy Plays with Dynamite (1939), Torture Ship (1939), Thou Shalt Not Kill (1939), Calling Philo Vance (1940), A Fugitive from Justice (1940), Time to Kill (1943), The House on 92nd Street (1945), There’s Always Tomorrow (1956), World in My Corner (1956), A Day of Fury (1956), Spoilers of the

49

Sheila Bromley

Forest (1957), The Lawless Eighties (1957), Young Jesse James (1960), Judgment at Nuremberg (1961), For Those Who Think Young (1964), The Girls on the Beach (1965), Hotel (1967), and the 1973 horror film Terror Circus. Bromley was featured as Janet Tobin in the 1950s television sit-com I Married Joan. Her numerous television credits also include episodes of such series as Armstrong Circle Theatre, Climax!, You Are There, Your Play Time, Stage 7, Studio One, I Love Lucy, The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Perry Mason, Maverick, Rawhide, Checkmate, Guestward Ho!, 87th Precinct, Hawaiian Eye, My Favorite Martian, Lassie, Petticoat Junction, The Big Valley, Adam-12, and The Rookies.

2003 • Obituaries Force in the Pacific during World War II. After the war he went to Philadelphia, where he began performing on stage. He enrolled at the Pasadena Playhouse in 1949 and, as Charles Buchinsky, began his film career in the early 1950s in such features as You’re in the Navy Now (1951), The People Against O’Hara (1951), The Mob (1951), Red Skies of Montana (1952), The Marrying Kind (1952), My Six Convicts (1952), Pat and Mike (1952), Diplomatic Courier (1952), Battle Zone (1952), Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952), The Clown (1953), Torpedo Alley (1953), House of Wax (1953) as Vincent Price’s mute henchman, Igor, Miss Sadie Thompson (1953), Crime Wave (1954), Tennessee Champ (1954), Riding Shotgun (1954), and Vera Cruz (1954). He became known as Charles Bronson in 1954, and continued to appear in such films as Drum Beat (1954), Big House, U.S.A. (1955), Target Zero (1955), Jubal (1956), Run of the Arrow (1957), Showdown at Boot Hill (1958), Ten North Frederick (1958), When Hell Broke Loose (1958), Gang War (1958), and Never So Few (1959). His craggy features and rugged physique also led to leading roles in Roger Corman’s 1958 crime thriller Machine-Gun Kelly and as Mike Kovac in the 1958 television series Man with a Camera. Bronson starred as Bernardo O’Reilly in the popular 1960 western film The Magnificent Seven with Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. He starred with Vincent Price in the 1961 adaptation of Jules Verne’s Master of the World. Bronson continued to appear in such films as A Thunder of Drums (1961), X-15 (1961), Kid Galahad (1962) with Elvis Presley, This Rugged Land (1962), The Great Escape (1963) as the Tunnel King, and 4 for Texas (1963) with Frank Sina-

Bronson, Charles Leading actor Charles Bronson died of pneumonia and complications from Alzheimer’s disease at a Los Angeles hospital on August 30, 2003. He was 81. Bronson was born Charles Buchinsky in Ehrenfeld, Pennsylvania, on November 3, 1921. The son of a coal miner, he was one of 15 children living in poverty. Bronson also worked the mines when he was a teenager until he was drafted in 1943. He served in the U.S. Air

Charles Bronson

Obituaries • 2003 tra and Dean Martin. Bronson starred as Linc Murdock in the 1963 television series The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters, and was Paul Moreno in Empire in 1963. He soon returned to films, appearing in The Sandpiper (1965), Battle of the Bulge (1965), This Property Is Condemned (1966), The Dirty Dozen (1967), and Villa Rides (1968). Bronson was also featured often on television, guest starring in episodes of such series as Biff Baker, U.S.A., The Roy Rogers Show, The Doctor, Four Star Playhouse, The Joe Palooka Story, Medic, Stage 7, Treasury Men in Action, Crusader, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Gunsmoke, Studio 57, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Have Gun Will Travel, Colt .45, Suspicion, Playhouse 90, Sugarfoot, M Squad, Tales of Wells Fargo, U.S. Marshal, Yancy Derringer, Laramie, The Aquanauts, Riverboat, One Step Beyond, The Twilight Zone, Cain’s Hundred, The Untouchables, Dr. Kildare, Bonanza, Combat!, The Virginian, The Big Valley, Rawhide, The Legend of Jesse James, The Fugitive, Dundee and the Culhane, and The F.B.I. Though mainly considered a supporting actor during the 1960s, Bronson’s career escalated when he went to Europe to co-star with Alain Delon in the 1968 film Farewell, Friend. Bronson continued to appear in films in Hollywood and Europe, where he became a major star. His films include Guns for San Sebastian (1968), Once Upon a Time in the West (1968), Twinky (1969), Rider on the Rain (1970), You Can’t Win ’Em All (1970), The Family (1970), Cold Sweat (1970), Red Sun (1971), Someone Behind the Door (1971), Chato’s Land (1971), The Valachi Papers (1972), The Mechanic (1972), The Stone Killer (1973), and Chino (1974). Bronson became a leading box-office draw in the United States after his starring role as avenging vigilante Paul Kersey in the 1974 hit Death Wish. Bronson reprised the role in several sequels including Death Wish II (1982), Death Wish 3 (1985), Death Wish 4: The Crackdown (1987), and 1994’s Death Wish V: The Face of Death. Bronson also starred as similar rugged men fighting against hopeless odds in such films as Mr. Majestyk (1974), Breakout (1975), Hard Times (1975), Breakheart Pass (1975), From Noon Till Three (1976), St. Ives (1976), The White Buffalo (1977), Telefon (1977), Love and Bullets (1979), Capoblanco (1980), Borderline (1980), Death Hunt (1981), 10 to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), Murphy’s Law (1986), Assassination (1987), Messenger of Death (1988), Kinjite: For-

50 bidden Subjects (1989), and The Indian Runner (1991). Bronson was also seen in the tele-films The Bull of the West (1971), Raid on Entebbe (1977), Act of Vengeance (1986), Yes Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus (1991), The Sea Wolf (1993) as Captain Wolf Larsen, and Donato and Daughter (1993). He also starred as Paul Fein in the telefilm trilogy Family of Cops (1995), Breach of Faith: Family of Cops II (1997), and Family of Cops III (1999). Bronson was married to Harriet Tendler from 1949 until their divorce in 1967. The following year he married actress Jill Ireland, who starred with him in several films before her death from cancer in May of 1990. He married actress Kim Weeks in 1998. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 1, 2003, B13; New York Times, Sept. 2, 2003, C10; People, Sept. 15, 2003, 69; Time, Sept. 15, 2003, 29; Variety, Sept. 8, 2003, 66.

Brooks, Philip Australian documentary filmmaker Philip Brooks died in Paris of liver failure and complications from an HIV-related illness, on January 5, 2003. He was 49. Brooks was born in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, on July 2, 1953. He began his career as a journalist in the 1980s. Brooks and his partner, Laurent Bocahut,

Philip Brooks

51 founded the production company Dominant 7 in the early 1990s. They produced over a dozen documentaries over the next ten years including Drowning by Bullets (1992), Surfavela (1996), Johannesburg Stories (1997), Gay’ze in Wonderland (1997), Woubi Cheri (1999), My Own Priate Oz (1999), Madame Sata (2002), Gacaca, Living Together Again in Rwanda? (2002), and 6000 A Day: An Account of a Catastrophe Foretold (2002) about the AIDS epidemic.

Brooks, Rand Actor Rand Brooks, who was featured as Scarlett O’Hara’s first husband, Charles Hamilton, in the 1939 film classic Gone with the Wind, starred as Lucky Jenkins in the Hopalong Cassidy film series in the 1940s, and was Cpl. Randy Boone in the 1950s television series The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, died of cancer at his home in Santa Ynez, California, on September 1, 2003. He was 84. Brooks was born in Los Angeles on September 21, 1918. He began his film career in the late 1930s, appearing in such films as Love Finds Andy Hardy (1938), Dramatic School (1938),

Rand Brooks

2003 • Obituaries Thunder Afloat (1939), Dancing Co-Ed (1939), Babes in Arms (1939), The Old Maid (1939), and Balalaika (1939). After his role in Gone with the Wind Brooks continued to appear in supporting roles in such films as Laddie (1940), Northwest Passage (1940), Girl from Avenue A (1940), Florian (1940), The Son of Monte Cristo (1940), Jennie (1940), And One Was Beautiful (1940), Life with Henry (1941), Cheers for Miss Bishop (1941), Double Date (1941), The People vs. Dr. Kildare (1941), Lady Scarface (1941), Niagara Falls (1941), Cowboy Serenade (1942), The Affairs of Jimmy Valentine (1942), Fingers at the Window (1942), The Sombrero Kid (1942), Valley of Hunted Men (1942), Air Force (1943), High Explosive (1943), and Lady in the Dark (1944). Brooks starred as William Boyd’s younger sidekick Lucky Jenkins in over a dozen films in the Hopalong Cassidy western series in the late 1940s including Fool’s Gold (1946), The Devil’s Playground (1946), Unexpected Guest (1947), Dangerous Venture (1947), The Marauders (1947), Hoppy’s Holiday (1947), Silent Conflict (1948), The Dead Don’t Dream (1948), Sinister Journey (1948), Borrowed Trouble (1948), False Paradise (1948), and Strange Gamble (1948). Brooks’ other film credits include Kilroy Was Here (1947), Ladies of the Chorus (1948), Sundown in Santa Fe (1948), Joan of Arc (1948), The Wyoming Bandit (1949), Black Midnight (1949), The Vanishing Westerner (1950), Riding High (1950), Bunco Squad (1950), Heart of the Rockies (1951), Yukon Manhunt (1951), The Steel Fist (1952), The Cimarron Kid (1952), Waco (1952), Man from the Black Hills (1952), The Gunman (1952), Montana Incident (1952), Behind Southern Lines (1952), The Maverick (1952), Born to the Saddle (1953), The Charge at Feather River (1953), The Matchmaking Marshal (1955), To Hell and Back (1955), The Last Hurrah (1958), Stump Run (1959), Comanche Station (1960), Stagecoach to Dancer’s Rock (1962), Requiem for a Gunfighter (1965), and In Like Flint (1967). Brooks was also a familiar face on television from the 1950s, starring as Corporal Randy Boone in the popular series The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin from 1954 to 1959. He was also seen in episodes of The Lone Ranger, The Gene Autry Show, Rocky Jones, Space Ranger, The Range Rider, The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok, The Roy Rogers Show, The Cisco Kid, Sky King, Tales of the Texas Rangers, Circus Boy, Tales of Wells Fargo, Sergeant Preston of the Yukon, The Adventures of Kit Carson, Stories of the Century, Maverick,

Obituaries • 2003 Tombstone Territory, Jefferson Drum, Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, Zane Grey Theater, Hawaiian Eye, Gunsmoke, Checkmate, Perry Mason, The Munsters, Bonanza, My Three Sons, Combat!, Petticoat Junction, Twelve O’Clock High, and Adam-12. His final credits were in the tele-films Double Indemnity (1973) and The Sex Symbol (1974). Brooks largely retired from the screen in the late 1960s after forming the Professional Ambulance Service in Glendale, California. He sold the service and retired to his ranch in Santa Barbara County, California, in 1995. In recent years Brooks had been a popular guest at numerous film festivals. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 4, 2003, B12; New York Times, Sept. 3, 2003, A17; Time, Sept. 15, 2003, 29.

Brown, Fred J. Sound effects editor Fred J. Brown died in Northridge, California, on November 9, 2003. He was 68. Brown worked in films from the 1950s, serving as a sound effects editor on such features as The Delinquents (1957), Undersea Girl (1957), Elmer Gantry (1960), Popi (1969), Boxcar Bertha (1972), Hickey & Boggs (1972), The Exorcist (1973), The Killer Elite (1975), Grizzly (1976), Monkey Hustle (1976), Day of the Animals (1977), The Deep (1977), Ruby (1977), Convoy (1978), The

Fred J. Brown

52 Manitou (1978), The China Syndrome (1979), Steven Spielberg’s 1941 (1979), First Blood (1982), Risky Business (1983), The Last Starfighter (1984), Red Dawn (1984), Little Treasure (1985), Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) which earned him an Oscar nomination, Commando (1985), Cobra (1986), The Boy Who Could Fly (1986), Extreme Prejudice (1987), DeepStar Six (1989), The Dream Team (1989), Crazy People (1990), Thunderheart (1992), Mr. Jones (1993), Curse of the Starving Class (1994), and Highlander III: The Sorcerer (1994). Brown also worked in television on the sit-com Bewitched.

Brown, Jeff Children’s writer Jeff Brown, who created the popular Flat Stanley series, died of a heart attack in New York City on December 3, 2003. He was 77. Brown was born in New York City in 1926. He was an actor on radio and stage while in his teens. Brown subsequently moved to Hollywood, where he worked as an associate for producer Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. He also worked as a story consultant for Marlon Brando’s Pennebaker Productions. Brown created the character of Stanley Lambchop, a boy who became flat, in 1964. His and his family’s adventures were recounted in the books Flat Stanley, Stanley in Space, Stanley and the Magic Lamp, Stanley’s Christmas Adventure, and Stanley, Flat Again. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 6, 2003, B29; New York Times, Dec. 6, 2003, C16; Time, Dec. 15, 2003, 23.

Jeff Brown and his character, Flat Stanley

53

Brown, Robert Scottish actor Robert Brown, who was best known for his role as James Bond’s boss, M, in four Bond films in the 1980s, died in November 14, 2003. He was 85. Brown was born on the Hebrides Islands in Scotland on November 12, 1918. He made his film debut in a small role in 1949’s The Third Man with Orson Welles. Brown continued to appear in such films as Cloudburst (1951), Ivanhoe (1952), The Gambler and the Lady (1952), Time Gentlemen Please! (1952), Derby Day (1952), Death of an Angel (1952), Noose for a Lady (1953), The Long Rope (1952), The Warriors (1955), Passage Home (1955), Tears for Simon (1955), Helen of Troy (1956), The Man Who Never Was (1956), Hell in Korea (1956), The Abominable Snowman of the Himalayas (1957), The Steel Bayonet (1957), Kill Me Tomorrow (1957), Campbell’s Kingdom (1957), Passport to Shame (1958), Shake Hand with the Devil (1959), Ben-Hur (1959), Flight from Treason (1959), A Story of David (1960), Sands of the Desert (1960), It Takes a Thief (1960), The 300 Spartans (1962), Billy Budd (1962), Mystery Submarine (1963), The Double (1963), Edgar Allan Poe’s The Masque of the Red Death (1964), Escape by Night (1964), Operation Crossbow (1965), Private Road (1971), Fun and Games (1971), Demons of the Mind (1972), Mohammed, Messenger of God (1976), Warlords of At-

Robert Brown

2003 • Obituaries lantis (1978), The Passage (1979), and Lion of the Desert (1980). Brown was featured as Admiral Hargreaves in the 1977 James Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me with Roger Moore as 007. He returned to the series in 1983’s Octopussy, replacing the late Bernard Lee as M. He continued with the series in A View to a Kill (1985) with Moore, and Timothy Dalton’s two films as Bond, The Living Daylights (1987) and Licence to Kill (1989). Brown starred as Gurth in the Ivanhoe television series in 1958, and appeared regularly in the British series The Newcomers (1965) and King of the River (1966). He was also seen in television productions of Macbeth (1960), The Horse Without a Head (1963), The Scarecrow of Romney Marsh (1964), J.T. (1969), Henry IV, Part I (1979), Pilgrim, Farewell (1982), Brass (1985), Slow Burn (1989), and Merlin of the Crystal Cave (1992). His other television credits include guest roles in such series as Interpol Calling, The Saint, Ghost Squad, The Avengers, All Creatures Great and Small, and Danger UXB.

Browne, Kathie Actress Kathie Browne, who had survived a bout with breast cancer, died of natural causes in

Kathie Browne

Obituaries • 2003 Beverly Hills, California, on April 8, 2003. She was 63. Browne was born in San Luis Obispo, California, on September 19, 1939. She began her career on stage at an early age and moved to Hollywood in the 1950s. She was featured in such films as Murder by Contract (1958), City of Fear (1959), Studs Lonigan (1960), Cinderfella (1960), The Underwater City (1962), Man’s Favorite Sport? (1964), The Brass Bottle (1964), Brainstorm (1965), Blade Rider, Revenge of the Indian Nations (1966), Run, Stranger, Run (1973), and The Richard Petty Story (1974). Browne was best known for her roles on television, starring as Liz Andrews in the 1964 drama series Slattery’s People, and as Angie Dow in the 1967 western Hondo. She was also seen in the tele-film Berlin Affair, and in episodes of such series as Gunsmoke, Coronado 9, The Man from Blackhawk, Sea Hunt, Tombstone Territory, Two Faces West, Perry Mason, Wagon Train, Bonanza, Rawhide, Whispering Smith, Bronco, Hazel, Lawman, Ben Casey, Tales of Wells Fargo, 77 Sunset Strip, Surfside 6, Frontier Circus, Have Gun Will Travel, Laramie, The Real McCoys, Saints and Sinners, Redigo, The Virginian, My Favorite Martian, Temple Houston, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, The Smothers Brothers Show, Mr. Terrific, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., Wild Wild West, Branded, Felony Squad, Ironside, The Outsider, The Big Valley, The Name of the Game, Star Trek, Get Smart, The Evil Touch, Love, American Style, The Bold Ones, Mannix, Longstreet, Cade’s County, Police Story, Banacek, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, The Rockford Files, The Eddie Capra Mysteries, Fantasy Island, and The Love Boat. Browne was married to actor Darren McGavin from 1969 until her death. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 17, 2003, B12.

Bryant, Felice Lyricist Felice Bryant, who co-wrote the popular tune “Rocky Top” with her husband Boudleaux Bryant, died of cancer at her Gatlinburg, Tennessee, home on April 22, 2003. She was 77. She was born Matilda Genevieve Scaduto in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on August 7, 1925. She married Boudleaux Bryant in 1945 and they soon began writing songs together. They had their first hit when Little Jimmy Dickens recorded “Country Boy” in 1948. They wrote over 800 songs during their career, with Felice usually writing the lyrics to Boudleaux’s music. Other majors hits

54

Felice Bryant

include “Bye Bye Love” and “Wake Up Little Susie” recorded by the Everly Brothers, “Raining in My Heart,” “I Got a Hole in My Pocket,” “Sleepless Nights,” “Have a Good Time,” and “She Wears My Ring.” They wrote “Rocky Top” in 1968, which became one of Tennessee’s state songs. Boudleaux Bryant died on June 26, 1987. The couple were selected for the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1991. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 23, 2003, B10; New York Times, Apr. 24, 2003, A29; Time, May 5, 2003, 26; Variety, Apr. 28, 2003, 80.

Bryant, George British screenwriter George Bryant died in London on January 13, 2003. He was 93. Bryant was born in England on August 29, 1909. He worked in films from the 1940s, scripting such comedies as It’s Not Cricket (1949), The Huggetts Abroad (1949), Helter Skelter (1949), No Haunt for a Gentleman (1952), The Secret of the Forest (1955), and Rockets in the Dunes (1960). Bryant also directed several films including 1957’s Rock Around the World.

55

Buchholz, Horst German actor Horst Buchholz who costarred with Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen as one of The Magnificent Seven in 1960, died of pneumonia in Berlin, Germany, on March 3, 2003. He was 69. Buchholz was born in Berlin on December 4, 1933. He began his career on the Berlin stage in a production of Emil and the Detectives at the age of 15. He was soon appearing in such German films as Adventure in Berlin (1952), Marianne (1954), Sky Without Stars (1955), Regine (1955), Teenage Wolfpack (1956), The Girl and the Legend (1957), Confessions of Felix Krull (1957), King in Shadow (1957), Monpti (1957), A Piece of Heaven (1957), Two Worlds (1957), Wet Asphalt (1968), Resurrection (1958), Tiger Bay (1959), and Ship of the Dead (1959). He made his Broadway stage debut in a production of Cherie in 1959 and starred in The Magnificent Seven the following year. He was also seen in Billy Wilder’s One, Two, Three (1961) with James Cagney, Fanny (1961), Nine Hours to Rama (1963), The Empty Canvas (1963), That Man in Istanbul (1965), Marco the Magnificent (1965), Cervantes (1966), Johnny Banco (1967), How, When and Whom (1968), Ankle Bone (1968), The Savior (1971), Skyriders Attack (1971), The Great Waltz (1972), …But

2003 • Obituaries Johnny! (1973), The Catamount Killing (1974), Women in Hospital (1976), From Hell to Victory (1979), Avalanche Express (1979), Aphrodite (1982), Sahara (1983), Fear of Falling (1984), Code Name: Emerald (1985), And the Violins Stopped Playing (1988), Touch and Die (1991), Aces: Iron Eagle III (1992), Life Is Beautiful (1997), The Firebird (1997), Mulan (1998) as the voice of the Emperor, Minefield (1999), Brighter Than the Moon (2000), and The Enemy (2001). He also appeared in the tele-films The Savage Bees (1976), Raid on Entebbe (1977), Return to Fantasy Island (1978), The Return of Captain Nemo (1978), The French Atlantic Affair (1979), Berlin Tunnel 21 (1981), Crossings (1986), Escape from Paradise (1988), Voyage of Terror (1998), and Dunckel (1999). Other television credits include episodes of The Danny Thomas Hour, Logan’s Run, How the West Was Won, and Charlie’s Angels. He was also seen often on German television in such series as Derrick and Der Alte. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 4, 2003, B13; New York Times, Mar. 4, 2003, C17; Time, Mar. 17, 2003, 17; Variety, Mar. 10, 2003, 49.

Bukai, Rafi Israeli film producer and director died of cancer in Israel on December 9, 2003. He was 47. Bukai produced, directed and wrote the popular 1986 comedy Avanti Popolo. He subsequently produced the films Eddie King (1992) and Life According to Agfa (1992). Bukai produced and directed Marco Polo: Haperek H’aharon (1996) and helmed 2002’s Mabatim, Israel 2002. He also produced One Small Step for Man in 2003.

Bulychov, Kir

Horst Buchholz

Russian science fiction author and screenwriter Kir Bulychov died in Moscow of complications from diabetes on September 5, 2003. He was 68. He was born Igor Mozheiko in Moscow on October 18, 1934. The author of hundreds of novels and short stories from 1965, Bulychov also scripted over a dozen films, many adapted from his own stories. His film credits include The Mystery of the Third Planet (1981), To the Stars by Hard Ways (1982), Tears Were Falling (1982), Goldfishes

Obituaries • 2003

56

Patricia Burke (with David Farrar)

appeared on television in productions of The Public Defender and Gideon’s Way. Kir Bulychov

(1983), Kometa (1983), Shans (1984), Guest from the Future (1984), The Purple Ball (1987), Pereval (1988), The Kidnapping of a Wizard (1989), and The Witches Cave (1989).

Burr, Anne Stage, radio and television actress Anne Burr McDermott died of respiratory failure in Old Lyme, Connecticut, on February 1, 2003. She was

Burke, Patricia British stage and screen actress Patricia Burke died in England on November 23, 2003. She was 86. Burke was born in Milan, Italy, on March 23, 1917, the daughter of actress Marie Burke and opera singer Tom Burke. A stage entertainer in the 1930s, Burke was acclaimed for her role in the 1943 production of The Lisbon Story. She was also notable in productions of Stage Door (1946), Romance in Candlelight (1955), The Amorous Prawn (1963), and Dear Charles (1966). Though primarily a stage star, Burke also appeared in over a dozen films during her career including The Trojan Brothers (1946), Lisbon Story (1946), While I Live (1947), Forbidden (1948), The Happiness of Three Women (1954), The Desperate Man (1959), Marriage of Convenience (1960), The Impersonator (1960), Daylight Robbery (1964), Strangler’s Web (1965), The Day the Fish Came Out (1967), and Undercovers Hero (1974). She also

Anne Burr

57

2003 • Obituaries

82. Ms. Burr was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on June 10, 1920. She performed on Broadway and radio in the 1940s and became one of television’s first female doctors as Dr. Kate Morrow in the 1952 drama series City Hospital. She also starred in the short-lived 1954 daytime soap opera The Great Gift, and starred as the much-married Claire English Lowell Cassen Shea on As the World Turns from 1956 to 1959. Burr was also seen on television in episodes of The Philco Television Playhouse, Studio One, and Suspense. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 12, 2003, B11; New York Times, Mar. 3, 2003, A25; Variety, Feb. 24, 2003, 87.

She also appeared in the tele-films The New Original Wonder Woman (1975), Cover Girls (1977), Mary Jane Harper Cried Last Night (1977), Killer on Board (1977), and Like Normal People (1979). Her other television credits include episodes of A Touch of Grace, The New Dick Van Dyke Show, Love, American Style, The Odd Couple, Sanford and Son, The Rockford Files, Baretta, Harry O, Starsky and Hutch, What’s Happening!!, The Incredible Hulk, Quincy, The Facts of Life, The Golden Girls, Moonlighting, Hunter, Melrose Place, Sisters, Seinfeld, The Nanny, Platypus Man, and Friends. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 23, 2003, B15.

Burr, Fritzi

Burton, Devera

Comic actress Fritzi Burr died in Fort Myers, Florida, on January 17, 2003. She was 78. Burr was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1924. She began performing as a comedienne on the East Coast in the 1940s, performing on vaudeville with Smith & Dale, and appearing on Broadway in productions of I Can Get It for You Wholesale, Once Upon a Mattress, and Funny Girl. She moved to Hollywood in the early 1960s, where she appeared in such films as How Do I Love Thee? (1970), Frasier, the Sensuous Lion (1973), Chinatown (1974), and 3 Ninjas (1992).

Actress Devera Burton died in San Francisco on August 25, 2003. Burton starred in the

Fritzi Burr

Devera Burton film Omoo Omoo the Shark God

Obituaries • 2003 1949 supernatural adventure film Omoo Omoo the Shark God. She was also seen in the 1949 film The Threat.

Burton, Norman Character actor Norman Burton died in an automobile accident near the border of California and Arizona on November 29, 2003. He was 79. Burton was born in New York City on December 5, 1923. He was a graduate of The Actors’ Studio in New York and appeared in films from the mid–1950s. He was featured in Fright (1956), Pretty Boy Floyd (1960), Hand of Death (1962), Womanhunt (1962), Wild Seed (1965), Valley of the Dolls (1967), Planet of the Apes (1968), R.P.M. (1970), Simon, King of the Witches (1971), Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971), Jud (1971), the 1971 James Bond film Diamonds Are Forever as CIA operative Felix Leiter, Fuzz (1972), Save the Tiger (1972), Hit! (1973), The Towering Inferno (1974), The Terminal Man (1974), The Reincarnation of Peter Proud (1975), The Gumball Rally (1975), Scorchy (1976), Fade to Black (1980), Mausoleum (1983), Crimes of Passion (1984), Pray for Death (1985), Bad Guys (1986), Deep Space (1987), Bloodsport (1988), Live Wire (1992), and American Ninja V (1993). He was also seen in the tele-

Norman Burton

58 films They Call It Murder (1971), A Great American Tragedy (1972), Force Five (1975), Conspiracy of Terror (1975), Murder in Peyton Place (1977), The Ultimate Imposter (1979), Bogie (1980), To Race the Wind (1980), Shakedown on Sunset Strip (1988), and the 1988 mini-series War and Remembrance as Gen. George C. Marshall. Burton starred as Joe Atkinson in the 1976 cult super hero television series Wonder Woman, and was Burt Dennis in the comedy series The Ted Knight Show in 1978. His other television credits include episodes of such series as The Untouchables, Checkmate, Bewitched, Gunsmoke, I Dream of Jeannie, I Spy, Felony Squad, Land of the Giants, The Rockford Files, The Magician, Planet of the Apes, Kojak, Baretta, Harry O, The Rockford Files, Dog and Cat, Lou Grant, CHiPs, The Facts of Life, Simon & Simon, Knight Rider, Murder, She Wrote, & St. Elsewhere.

Busby, Tom Actor Tom Busby, who was best known for his role as Milo Vladek, one of The Dirty Dozen, in the 1967 war film, died of a heart attack in

Tom Busby (from The Dirty Dozen)

59 Glasgow, Scotland, on September 20, 2003. He was 67. Busby was born in Toronto, Canada, in 1936. He began his career on Canadian radio and television in the early 1950s. He made his film debut in the early 1960s and was seen in the films Never Take Sweets from a Stranger (1960), During One Night (1961), The War Lover (1962), and The Victors (1963). He largely retired from the screen after his performance in The Dirty Dozen. Busby returned to the screen for his last film role in 1985’s Heavenly Pursuits.

Byrd-Nethery, Miriam Character actress Miriam Byrd-Nethery died in Los Angeles on January 6, 2003. She was 73. Byrd-Nethery was born on May 17, 1929. She was featured in a handful of films from the mid–1970s including The Big Bus (1976), Bound for Glory (1976), Nickelodeon (1976), Lies (1983), Walk Like a Man (1987), The Offspring (1987), Summer Heat (1987), Stepfather II (1989), Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre III (1990), and Vic (1999). She was also seen in the tele-films Victory at Entebbe (1976), Deadly Game (1977), Just Me and You (1978), Steel Cowboy (1978), Like Normal People (1979), Angel Dusted (1981), Act II (1987),

2003 • Obituaries Dan Turner, Hollywood Detective (1990), Civil War Diary (1990), and In the Line of Duty: Ambush in Waco (1993). Byrd-Nethery appeared regularly as Miss Llewellyn in the 1976 television comedy series Mr. T and Tina. She was also seen in episodes of Starsky and Hutch, Barney Miller, Alice, The Dukes of Hazzard, Young Maverick, Charlie’s Angels, Quincy, Mr. Belvedere, and Highway to Heaven. Byrd-Nethery was married to actor Clu Gulager from 1952 until her death.

Cabrera, Hector Venezuelan ballad singer Hector Cabrera died of cancer in Caracas, Venezuela, on June 7, 2003. He was 71. Cabrera was born in Venezuela on February 13, 1932. He began his career as a singer in 1951. He was noted for popularizing Venezuelan folk music throughout the world. He recorded over 1,000 songs during his career including the popular “Rosario” and “El Pajaro Chogui.” He also appeared in several films during his career including Canta mi Corazon (1965).

Hector Cabrera

Cairns, Adrian Miriam Byrd-Nethery

British television announcer and actor Adrian Cairns died in Bristol, England, on March 23,

Obituaries • 2003

60

Adrian Cairns

2003. He was 78. Cairns was born in London on October 12, 1924. He began working in television as an announcer in the late 1950s. He was also seen in small roles in the films Kill Me Tomorrow (1957), Links of Justice (1958), and Innocent Meeting (1958). Cairns was featured in the 1975 film Diagnosis: Murder and the 1976 tele-film Machinegunner. He also appeared in the mini-series Kidnapped (1979) and the tele-films Jamaica Inn (1985) and Maigret (1988). He remained active in television through the 1990s, appearing in the mini-series The Guilty (1993) and Little Lord Fauntleroy (1994), and the tele-film On Dangerous Ground (1996) and Cider with Rosie (1998).

Camouflauge

Camoletti, Marc French playwright Marc Camoletti died in Paris on July 21, 2003. He was 79. Camoletti was

Camoflauge Rap singer Camoflauge was fatally injured in a shooting outside his Savannah, Georgia, recording studio on May 21, 2003. The rapper, who died in a Savannah hospital, was with his toddler son at the time of the shooting. He was 21. He was born Jason Johnson in Savannah in 1982. As the dread-locked Camoflauge, he was a local celebrity, recording his debut album, I Represent, in 2000. He was noted for such songs as “Cut Friends” and “Laying My Stunt Down.” He also recorded the albums Strictly 4 Da Streets: Sex, Drugs and Violence, Vol. 1, and 2002’s Keeping It Real.

Marc Camoletti

61 born in Geneva, Switzerland, on November 16, 1923. He was a painter before he began writing plays in the late 1950s, beginning with La Bonne Anna in 1958. Camoletti was best known for his 1960 comedy Boeing Boeing. The popular play was adapted into a film for Paramount in 1965 starring Jerry Lewis and Tony Curtis.

Campbell, Jimmy Bluegrass musician Jimmy Campbell was found dead of accidental carbon monoxide poisoning in a converted schoolbus near Clarksville, Tennessee, on October 24, 2003. He was 40. Campbell was a popular bluegrass fiddle player who spent three years with Bill Monroe’s Bluegrass Boys. He also played with Jim and Jesse McReynolds, the Osborne Brothers, and The Cumberland Highlanders. In recent years he had performed regularly with the Nashville group The Sidemen. He was found dead with Rosey Nix Adams, the daughter of June Carter Cash. They had been collaborating on a musical project.

Jimmy Campbell

2003 • Obituaries

Campbell, Marguerite Musician and actress Marguerite Campbell died of heart disease in Hollywood, California, on March 19, 2003. She was 75. Campbell was born in Winnipeg, Canada, on March 28, 1927. She began her career as a musician as a child with the Hollywood Baby Orchestra. She appeared in numerous films from the 1930s including Hello, Everybody (1933), Beauty for Sale (1933), Romance in the Rain (1934), The Silver Streak (1934), Smilin’ Though (1941), The Vanishing Virginian (1942), Best Foot Forward (1943), Meet Miss Bobby Socks (1944), Get Hep to Love (1944), Jam Session (1944), Beautiful but Broke (1944), Out of This World (1945), and The Horn Blows at Midnight. She joined Kay Kyser’s College of Musical Knowledge in 1945 and performed regularly with the band on the radio. She also continued to appear in such films as Concert Magic (1947), The Heiress (1949), Copper Canyon (1950), I’ll See You in My Dreams (1951), The Robe (19053), Gunslinger (1956), and Sorority Girl (1957). During the 1950s she also worked as a music coach at Warner Bros. Campbell was also seen on television in episodes of The Abbott and Costello Show, Happy Days, and Trapper John. She made her final film appearances in the 1980s in My Science Project (1985) and Golden Child (1986).

Marguerite Campbell

Obituaries • 2003

Campbell, Patrick Character actor Patrick Campbell died of respiratory failure in Covina, California, on May 30, 2003. He was 78. Campbell was born in Waukegan, Illinois, in 1925. He began his acting career on stage after service in the U.S. Army during World War II. From the 1960s he was featured on television in episodes of such series as Petticoat Junction, Mission: Impossible, Mayberry R.F.D., Sanford and Son, Mary Tyler Moore, Love, American Style, All in the Family, and Alice. Campbell was also seen in the films Enter Laughing (1967), The Culpepper Cattle Company (1972), Blazing Saddles (1974), Silent Movie (1976), Saturday the 14th (1981), Smokey Bites the Dust (1981), Off the Mark (1986), Critters 2: The Main Course (1988), Far Out Man (1990), and Body of Influence (1993), and the tele-films The Crooked Hearts (1972), Halloween with the New Addams Family (1977), Mad Bull (1977), Deadly Care (1987), and A Family for Joe (1990).

62 in 1923. A popular film and television star in the 1950s, Campos was best known for his role as the hero of the children’s science fiction television series Capitao 7 in 1954. He was also seen in the films Tambem Somos Irmaos (1949), Veneno (1952), Candinho (1954), Curucu, Beast of the Amazon (1956), and Love Slaves of the Amazon (1957).

Ayres Campos (as Capitao 7)

Cangey, Dick Stuntman Dick Cangey died on October 29, 2003. He had recently been hospitalized with complications from diabetes that resulted in the amputation of his right foot. He was 70. Cangey was born in Mahonington, Pennsylvania, on July 9, 1933. He worked in television often in the 1960s, appearing in small roles and doing stunt work for numerous episodes of Wild Wild West starring Robert Conrad. Cangey also contributed to episodes of Daniel Boone, Mission: Impossible, Gunsmoke, Branded, The Big Valley, Baretta, and Vega$, and the 1975 film Capone. He wrote and published a 1996 memoir, Inside the Wild Wild West. Patrick Campbell

Campos, Ayres Brazilian actor Ayres Campos died in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on July 6, 2003. He was 80. Campos was born in Uberaba, Minas Gerais, Brazil,

Canton, Robert Filmmaker Robert Canton died of heart failure in Los Angeles on October 3, 2003. He was 65. Canton was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1938. He worked as a studio story analyst, and produced, directed and scripted the 1961 documentary film Quetzacoatl. Canton also

63

2003 • Obituaries directed the exploitation films Org y Girls ’69 (1968) and The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful (1970). Variety, Oct. 20, 2003, 58.

Capstick, Tony British radio host and actor Tony Capstick died at his home in Hoober, South Yorkshire, England, on October 23, 2003. He was 59. Capstick was born in Mexborough, England, on July 27, 1944. He hosted programs on BBC Radio Sheffield from the early 1970s until early 2003. A comedian, folk singer and actor, Capstick appeared on British television in episodes of such series as All Creatures Great and Small, Heartbeat, Last of the Summer Wine, Coronation Street, The Cops, Comman As Muck, and Band of Gold. He also appeared in the 1989 film Resurrected. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 27, 2003, B9.

Dick Cangey (Compliments of Tom Weaver)

Tony Capstick

Cardona, Rene, Jr.

Robert Canton

Mexican film producer, director and writer Rene Cardona, Jr., died of cancer in Mexico City on February 5, 2003. He was 63. Cardona was born in Mexico City on May 11, 1939, the son of film director Rene Cardona. The younger Cardona began directing in the early 1960s, helming such films as Las Hijas de Elena (1963), El Ras-

Obituaries • 2003 pado (1964), The Treasure of Montezuma (1966), SOS Conspiracion Bikini (1966), Operacion 67 (1966), Juan Pistolas (1966), Night of the Bloody Apes (1968), Twenty-Four Hours of Pleasure (1968), Robinson Crusoe (1969), Fray Don Juan (1970), Vanessa (1970), OK Cleopatra (1970), Bang Bang… Right in the Hole (1971), The Night of a Thousand Cats (1972), La Tigresa (1972), Fantastic Balloon Voyage (1976), Tintorera (1977), Cyclone (1977), The Bermuda Triangle (1978), Guyana: Cult of the Damned (1980), Hostages! (1980), The Treasure of the Amazon (1985), Beaks: The Movie (1987), A Woman’s Revenge (1995), and Siete Millones (1999).

Cardoso, Rogerio Brazilian actor Rogerio Cardoso died of a heart attack in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on July 23, 2003. He was 66. Cardoso was born in Mococa, Sao Paulo, Brazil, on March 7, 1937. A popular television performer in the 1990s, he appeared regularly on such series as Escolinha do Professor Raimundo, Explode Coracao, Malhacao, Hilda Furacao, Zorra Total, Brava Gente, and A Grande Familia. Cardoso also appeared in several films including The Barber of Rio (1996), Boleiros (1998), Love and Co. (1998), Bossa Nova (2000),

Rogerio Cardoso

64 A Dog’s Will (2000), Samba Chanson (2002), and Cristina Wants to Get Married (2003).

Carlin, Steve Television producer Steve Carlin died of pneumonia and complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Manhattan, New York, on February 4, 2003. He was 84. Carlin was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1918. He began his career in radio before moving to television in the early 1950s. He created the popular children’s puppet television series Rootie Kazootie for NBC in 1950. He was also executive producer of the television quiz show $64,000 Question in the mid–1950s. Carlin was involved in the investigation later in the decade about the rigging of game shows which resulted in the networks canceling all quiz shows offering cash prizes. Carlin subsequently went to Europe, where he created numerous game shows including the popular Italian series Love Me, Love Me Not. He later returned to the United States to work on an American version of the show. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 7, 2003, B12; New York Times, Mar. 2, 2003, 25; Variety, Mar. 3, 2003, 79.

Steve Carlin

65

2003 • Obituaries

Carlisle, Bill

Carlmar, Edith

Country musician and comic Bill Carlisle died of complications from a stroke at his home in Goodlettsville, Tennessee, on March 17, 2003. He was 94. Carlisle was born in Wakefield, Kentucky, on Dec. 19, 1908. He began his career in the 1930s, performing with his brother, Cliff, as the Carlisle Brothers. Bill often leaped around the stage and audience during their performances, which earned him the nickname “Jumpin’ Bill.” Bill continued with a solo career in the late 1940s and was noted for his numerous country novelty hit recordings including 1953’s “No Help Wanted.” He joined the Grand Ole Opry later that year and remained for the next 50 years. His numerous hits also include the tunes “Gone Home,” “Too Old to Cut the Mustard,” “What Kinda Deal Is This?,” and “Is Zat You, Myrtle?.” Carlisle was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2002. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 19, 2003, B11; New York Times, Apr. 20, 2003, B8; Variety, Apr. 14, 2003, 38.

Norwegian film director Edith Carlmar died in Oslo, Norway, on May 17, 2003. She was 91. Carlmar was born in Oslo on November 15, 1911. She became Norway’s first female film director in the late 1940s, helming over ten films produced by her husband, Otto Carlmar. She was best known for directing the 1959 film The Wayward Girl, featuring Liv Ullman in her first starring role. Carlmar also appeared in a handful of Norwegian films in character roles from the 1960s through the 1990s, including 1973’s Lina’s Wedding and 1990’s Svampe.

Edith Carlmar

Carlos, Francisco

Bill Carlisle

Brazilian singer Francisco Carlos died of cancer in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on August 19, 2003. He was 76. Carlos was born in Rio de Janeiro on April 5, 1927. He began singing professionally in the mid–1940s, recording such popular songs as “Meu Brotinho” and the samba “Me Deixa em Paz.” He was also seen often in films from the late 1940s including Carnaval no Fogo (1949), Carnaval Atlantida (1952), Malandros em

Obituaries • 2003

66

John Carlyle Francisco Carlos

Quarta Dimensao (1954), Colegio de Brotos (1955), Vamos con Cama (1956), Guerra ao Samba (1956), Canjere (1957), Virou Bagunca (1960), Tudo Legal (1960), and Interpool Ilamando a Rio (1961). Carlos attempted a comeback in the 1980s, but met with little success.

Carlyle, John Actor John Carlyle died of lung cancer in his West Hollywood home on May 27, 2003. He was 72. Carlyle was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on January 5, 1931. A popular stage performer on the West Coast, Carlyle also appeared in the films Dangerous Mission (1954), Untamed (1955), Daddy Long Legs (1955), The Rack (1956), The Spirit of St. Louis (1957), and The Monster That Challenged the World (1957). He was also featured in the 1976 television mini-series Rich Man, Poor Man, and the 1980 tele-film Portrait of a Rebel: The Remarkable Mrs. Sanger. Carlyle’s other television credits include the Hallmark Hall of Fame production of Edgar Allan Poe at West Point and episodes of General Electric Theater, Mike Hammer, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Northwest Passage, Mr. Lucky, Bourbon Street Beat, One Step Beyond, King of Diamonds, Hawaiian Eye, General Hospi-

tal, 1985’s The Twilight Zone, Steven Spielberg’s Amazing Stories, thirtysomething, and Sunset Beach.

Carney, Art Art Carney, who co-starred with Jackie Gleason on the classic television comedy series The Honeymooners, died in Chester, Connecticut, after a long illness on November 9, 2003. He was 85. Carney was born in Mount Vernon, New York, on November 4, 1918. He appeared in amateur productions on stage before joining Horace Heidt’s band as a comedy act in 1937. He had a small part in Heidt’s 1941 film Pot o’ Gold. He subsequently worked in radio, where he did impersonations of world leaders on the program Report to the Nation. Carney served in the U.S. Army during World War II, suffering a serious leg injury during the Normandy landing on D-Day. After the war he resumed his career on radio comedy shows. In 1947 he moved to television guest starring on The Morey Amsterdam Show. In the early 1950s Carney was a regular performer on such variety series as Cavalcade of Stars and Henry Morgan’s Great Talent Hunt. He subsequently joined the cast of The Jackie Gleason Show, starring in The Honeymooners segment as Ed Norton, Ralph Kramden’s dimwitted sewer worker neigh-

67

Art Carney

bor and pal. He won several Emmy Awards for Best Supporting Actor for his work on the series, which ended in 1956. Carney remained active in television from the 1950s, guest starring in such series as Lux Video Theatre, The Kate Smith Evening Hour, Studio One, Danger, Suspense, Kraft Television Theatre, The Best of Broadway, Climax!, Playhouse 90, The DuPont Show of the Month’s 1958 production of Harvey as Elwood P. Dowd, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, The Andy Williams Show, Batman as the villainous Archer, The Carol Burnett Show, Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In, The Virginian, Alice, Fame, The Snoop Sisters, and Uncle Buck. Carney was featured in the films The Yellow Rolls-Royce (1964) and A Guide for the Married Man (1967). In 1974 he received the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role as Harry Coombes in the comedy Harry and Tonto. He continued to appear in such films as W.W. and the Dixie Dancekings (1975), Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976), The Late Show (1977), Scott Joplin (1977), House Calls (1978), Movie Movie (1978), Ravagers (1979), Sunburn (1979), Going in Style (1979), Steel (1980), Roadie (1980), Defiance (1980), Take This Job and Shove It (1981),

2003 • Obituaries St. Helens (1981), Better Late Than Never (1982), Firestarter (1984), The Muppets Take Manhattan (1984), The Naked Face (1984), Night Friend (1987), The Emperor’s New Clothes (1987), and Last Action Hero (1993). Carney starred as Police Chief Paul Lanigan in the 1976 detective series Lanigan’s Rabbi, and was Saundan in 1978’s The Star Wars Holiday Special. He also appeared as James “The Weasel” Cavanaugh in the 1986 series The Cavanaughs. Carney was also featured in the tele-films Death Scream (1975), Katherine (1975), Christmas in Disneyland (1976), Ringo (1978), You Can’t Take It with You (1979), Letters from Frank (1979), Alcatraz: The Whole Shocking Story (1980), Fighting Back (1980), Bitter Harvest (1981), Terrible Joe Moran (1984), A Doctor’s Story (1984), The Night They Saved Christmas (1984) as Santa Claus, The Undergrads (1985), Izzy and Moe (1985) with Jackie Gleason, The Blue Yonder (1985), Miracle of the Heart: A Boys Town Story (1986), and Where Pigeons Go to Die (1990). Los Angles Times, Nov. 12, 2003, A1; New York Times, Nov. 12, 2003, C13; People, Nov. 24, 2003, 68; Variety, Nov. 17, 203, 58.

Carpenter, Johnny Character actor Johnny Carpenter, who appeared in numerous western films in the 1940s and 1950s, died of cancer in Burbank, California,

Johnny Carpenter

Obituaries • 2003

68

on February 27, 2003. He was 88. He was born Jasper Carpenter in Debinsville, Arkansas, in 1914. He moved to Hollywood in the early 1940s, where he worked as a stuntman and actor in such films as Thundering Trails (1943), National Velvet (1944), The Navajo Trail (1945), Santa Fe Saddlemates (1945), Trail of Kit Carson (1945), Song of Old Wyoming (1945), Northwest Trail (1945), The El Paso Kid (1946), Romance of the West (1946), Colorado Serenade (1946), The Stranger from Ponca City (1947), Larceny (1947), Comanche Territory (1950), Undercover Girl (1950), Badman’s Gold (1951), and The Yellow Haired Kid (1952). Carpenter wrote and produced, as well as starred in, several films in the 1950s including Son of the Renegade (1953), The Lawless Rider (1954), Outlaw Treasure (1955), and I Killed Wild Bill Hickock (1956). He also appeared in Ed Wood’s 1959 cult classic Night of the Ghouls. Carpenter was seen on television in several episodes of Judge Roy Bean, 26 Men, Wild Bill Hickock, Sergeant Preston of the Yukon, and The Rifleman. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 6, 2003, B14.

Carruthers, Bill Television director Bill Carruthers died of heart failure in Los Angeles on March 2, 2003. He was 72. Carruthers began working in local television in Detroit in the 1950s where he became director of The Soupy Sales Show. He went to Hollywood in the late 1950s where he directed such series as The Ernie Kovaks Show and The Steve Allen Show. Carruthers produced and directed Chuck Barris’ Dating Game and Newlywed Game shows in the 1960s. He was also the longtime director for The Emmy Awards presentations and helmed such television specials as Milton Berle: A Tribute to Mr. Television, Norman Lear’s I Love Liberty, and Frank Sinatra: The Main Event. Carruthers also produced several television game shows including Give-N-Take, Whodunnit?, and Press Your Luck. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 13, 2003, B15; Variety, Mar. 17, 2003, 59.

Carter, Benny Jazz musician Benny Carter died of complications from bronchitis in a Los Angeles hospital

Benny Carter

on July 13, 2003. Carter was born in New York City on August 8, 1907. He began performing at an early age and made his recording debut with Charlie Johnson’s Orchestra in 1928. He subsequently joined Fletcher Henderson’s group as an arranger. Carter accompanied Willie Lewis’ orchestra to Paris in 1935 and subsequently joined the BBC Dance Orchestra as an arranger. He returned to the United States in 1938 and formed his own band. Carter was featured in the 1943 film Stormy Weather, and remained in Los Angeles to work in films. He performed in the films Thousands Cheer (1943), Jivin’ in Be-Bop (1946), The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1952), and The View from Pompey’s Head (1955). Carter also composed such popular songs as “Blues in My Heart,” “Everybody Shuffle,” “When Lights Are Low,” “Harlem Mood,” and “Poor Fool.” Carter continued to work in Hollywood as a composer and arranger on such films as An American in Paris (1951), The Five Pennies (1959), The Guns of Navarone (1959), A Man Called Adam (1966),

69 Buck and the Preacher (1972), and People, People, People (1976). He also worked on such television series as M Squad, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, Ironside, The Name of the Game, It Takes a Thief, and Night Gallery. He resumed performing in the mid–1970s and was honored with a Grammy lifetime achievement award in 1987. His later compositions include “Peaceful Warrior,” dedicated to Martin Luther King, Jr., and “Echoes of San Juan Hill.” Los Angeles Times, July 14, 2003, B9; New York Times, July 14, 2003, A19; Time, July 28, 2003, 22; Variety, July 21 2003, 70.

Carter, James James Carter, a retired shipping clerk whose 1959 rendition of the song “Po’ Lazarus” was featured on the Grammy Award–winning soundtrack album O Brother, Where Art Thou?, died of a stroke in Chicago on November 26, 2003. He was 77. Carter was working on a Mississippi State Penitentiary chain gang in Parchman when musicologist Alan Lomax recorded the song in 1959.

James Carter

2003 • Obituaries After the album was released, Carter was tracked down and presented with a royalty check for $20,000. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 8, 2003, B9; New York Times, Dec. 4, 2003, B9; Time, Dec. 15, 2003, 23.

Carter, Nell Nell Carter, the heavy-set actress and singer who starred in the 1980s television sit-com Gimme a Break!, died of complications from diabetes in Beverly Hills, California, on January 23, 2003. She was 54. Carter was born in Birmingham, Alabama, on September 13, 1948. Carter starred as housekeeper Nell Harper on the Gimme a Break! series from 1981 to 1987, earning two Emmy nominations for her role in the series. She also received a Tony Award for her performance in the Broadway musical Ain’t Misbehavin’ in 1978, and an Emmy Award for a 1982 television broadcast of the musical. Carter was seen as Ethel Green in the television soap opera Ryan’s Hope in 1978 and 1979, and starred as Sgt. Hildy Jones in television series The Misadventures of Sheriff Lobo in 1980. She also appeared in the 1978 tele-film Cindy and the 1979 film version of the hit musical Hair. Her other film credits include Modern Problems (1981) with Chevy Chase, The Grass

Nell Carter

Obituaries • 2003

70

Harp (1995), The Crazysitter (1995), The Proprietor (1996), Fakin’ Da Funk (1997), Special Delivery (1999), and Back by Midnight (2002). She also starred as Nell Kirkland in the short-lived sit-com You Take the Kids in 1990, and was P.J. Moore in Hangin’ with Mr. Cooper from 1993 to 1995. She was also seen in the tele-films Maid for Each Other (1992), Final Shot: The Hank Gathers Story (1992), and Sealed with a Kiss (1999), and was a voice actor for the 1992 animated film Bebe’s Kids and the 1994 animated series Spider-Man. Her other television credits include episodes of Amen, Dolly, 227, Jake and the Fatman, Blue’s Clues, Can’t Hurry Love, Brotherly Love, Sparks, Touched by an Angel, Seven Days, Reba, and Ally McBeal. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 24, 2003, B14; New York Times, Jan. 24, 2003, C19; People, Feb. 10, 2003, 69; Time, Feb. 3, 2003, 17.

Caruso, Anthony Veteran character actor Anthony Caruso died after a long illness at his Los Angeles home on April 4, 2003. He was 86. Caruso was born in Frankfort, Indiana, on April 7, 1916. He began his career performing on stage with the Pasadena Playhouse. He made his film debut in 1940’s Johnny Apollo. Often in villainous roles, Caruso appeared in over 100 films during the next 50 years. His numerous credits include Northwest Mounted Police (1940), Isle of Missing Men (1940), The Bride Wore Crutches (1940), The Corsican Brothers (1941), You’re in the Army Now (1941), Tall, Dark and Handsome (1941), Always in My Heart (1942), Across the Pacific (1942), Lucky Jordan (1942), Sunday Punch (1942), The Ghost and the Guest (1942), Jitterbugs (1943), Above Suspicion (1943), Watch on the Rhine (1943), The Girl from Monterrey (1943), The Phantom (1943), Whistling in Brooklyn (1943), The Story of Dr. Wassel (1944), The Racket Man (1944), U-Boat Prisoner (1944), Maisie Goes to Reno (1944), The Conspirators (1944), And Now Tomorrow (1944), Objective, Burma! (1945), The Crime Doctor’s Courage (1945), The Last Installment (1945), Don Juan Quilligan (1945), Pride of the Marines (1945), A Gun in His Hand (1945), That Night with You (1945), Star in the Night (1945), The Story Club (1945), Tarzan and the Leopard Woman (1946), Night Editor (1946), The Blue Dahlia (1946), Don’t

Anthony Caruso

Gamble with Strangers (1946), The Last Crooked Mile (1946), The Catman of Paris (1946), Monsieur Beaucaire (1946), My Favorite Brunette (1947), They Won’t Believe Me (1947), News Hounds (1947), Wild Harvest (1947), Where There’s Life (1947), Devil Ship (1947), Escape Me Never (1947), To the Victor (1948), The Undercover Man (1949), Incident (1949), Bride of Vengeance (1949), Illegal Entry (1949), Anna Lucasta (1949), Scene of the Crime (1949), Song of India (1949), The Threat (1949), The Asphalt Jungle (1950), Tarzan and the Slave Girl (1950), Prisoners in Petticoats (1950), According to Mrs. Hoyle (1951), His Kind of Woman (1951), Pals of the Golden West (1951), Boots Malone (1952), Desert Pursuit (1952), The Iron Mistress (1952), Blackbeard the Pirate (1952), The Man Behind the Gun (1953), Desert Legion (1953), Raiders of the Seven Seas (1953), Fort Algiers (1953), The Steel Lady (1953), The Boy from Oklahoma (1954), Phantom of the Rue Morgue (1954), Saskatchewan (1954), Drum Beat (1954), Passion (1954), Cattle Queen of Montana (1954), Santa Fe

71 Passage (1955), City of Shadows (1955), Jail Busters (1955), Tennessee’s Partner (1955), The Toughest Man Alive (1955), The Magnificent Matador (1955), Hell on Frisco Bay (1955), When Gangland Strikes (1956), A Cry in the Night (1956), Walk the Proud Land (1956), The Big Land (1957), The Oklahoman (1957), The Lawless Eighties (1957), Omar Khayyam (1957), Joe Dakota (1957), Baby Face Nelson (1957), Fort Massacre (1958), The Badlanders (1958), Legion of the Doomed (1958), Never Steal Anything Small (1959), The Wonderful Country (1959), The Most Dangerous Man Alive (1961), Escape from Zahrain (1962), Where Love Has Gone (1964), Sylvia (1965), Young Dillinger (1965), Never a Dull Moment (1968), Flap (1970), Brother, Cry for Me (1970), Eye for an Eye (1971), The Legend of Earl Durand (1974), Zebra Force (1976), Mean Johnny Barrows (1976), Father Kino, Padre on Horseback (1977), Claws (1977), Savage Harbor (1987), and The Legend of Grizzly Adams (1990). Caruso starred as Chief Blackfish in the 1960 Disney television mini-series Daniel Boone, and appeared in the 1969 telefilm The Desperate Million. His numerous television credits also include episodes of The Adventures of Superman, Stories of the Century, The Lone Ranger, Fury, The 20th Century–Fox Hour, Circus Boy, The Adventures of Jim Bowie, Broken Arrow, Have Gun Will Travel, Gunsmoke, The Restless Gun, Suspicion, Thriller, Favorite Story, Tombstone Territory, Zorro, Death Valley Days, Buckskin, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Wagon Train, Sugarfoot, Bonanza, Laramie, The Untouchables, Tales of Wells Fargo, Wichita Town, Maverick, Riverboat, Rawhide, The Deputy, Tarzan, Tightrope, Hawaiian Eye, Sea Hunt, Gunslinger, The Detectives, Wyatt Earp, Laramie, Perry Mason, The Great Adventure, The Travels of Jamie McPheeters, Get Smart, The Addams Family, The Virginian, The Road West, Wild Wild West, The Time Tunnel, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., Rango, The High Chaparral, The Guns of Will Sonnett, Lancer, Star Trek, Green Acres, It Takes a Thief, The Girl from U.N.C.L.E., The F.B.I., The Name of the Game, Love, American Style, Mannix, Nanny and the Professor, Mission: Impossible, Longstreet, Medical Center, Ironside, The Streets of San Francisco, Police Story, Dirty Sally, Nakia, Baretta, The Incredible Hulk, and Hunter. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 7, 2003, B9; New York Times, Apr. 10, 2003, A25; Variety, Apr. 14, 2003, 38.

2003 • Obituaries

Carver, Sonora Sonora Webster Carver, who achieved fame as the first woman to ride the diving horses at Atlantic City’s Steel Pier in 1924, died in Pleasantville, New Jersey, on September 21, 2003. She was 99. Carver, along with her sister, Arnette Webster French, who died in 2000, and Josephine DeAngelis, who died the day before Carver, were part of the pier diving act until the early 1940s, despite Carver having lost her eyesight in a jumping mishap in 1931. He 1961 autobiography, A Girl and Five Brave Horses inspired the 1991 Disney film Wild Hearts Can’t Be Broken. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 25, 2003, B15; New York Times, Sept. 26, 2003, C12.

Sonora Carver

Carwithen, Doreen Mary British composer Doreen Mary Carwithen died in Norfolk, England, on January 5, 2003. She was 80. She was born in Haddenham, Buckinghamshire, England, on November 15, 1922.

Obituaries • 2003

Doreen Mary Carwithen

She studied piano and violin from an early age and began composing while in her teens. She studied film music under J. Arthur Rank in the late 1940s and went on to score over 30 films in England. Her credits include Harvest from the Wilderness (1948), To the Public Danger (1948), Boys in Brown (1949), The Stranger Left No Card (1952), Man in Hiding (1953), Teeth of the Wind (1953), Heights of Danger (1953), Men of Sherwood Forest (1954), East Anglian Holiday (1954), Break in the Circle (1955), Three Cases of Murder (1955), and On the Twelfth Day… (1955). She retired in 1961 and abandoned music until the death of her husband, composer William Alwyn, in 1985. She then resumed composing until she was paralyzed by a stroke in 1999. Variety, Feb. 3, 2003, 77.

72 in the early 1950s, Cash teamed with Luther Perkins and Marshall Grant. Cash recorded his first single in 1955 —“Hey Porter” for Sun Records. His recording of “I Walk the Line” became a major hit for Cash. During the 1950s and 1960s Cash appeared on such television variety shows as The Jackie Gleason Show, The Tennessee Ernie Ford Show, and The Andy Williams Show, and appeared in the western series The Deputy and The Rebel, for which he also sang the theme song. Cash also appeared in several films including Door-to-Door Maniac (1961), Night Rider (1962), Hootenanny Hoot (1963), and The Road to Nashville (1967). Cash’s numerous hit songs also include “Ring of Fire,” “Folsom Prison Blues,” and “A Boy Named Sue.” Cash’s abuse of drugs and alcohol damaged his career in the 1960s. Family and friends, including singer June Carter, helped him overcome his addictions and he and Carter were married in March of 1968. The following year he hosted the television variety series The Johnny Cash Show. He co-starred with Kirk Douglas in the 1971 western film A Gunfight. He produced and coscripted the 1973 religious film Gospel Road, which was distributed by Billy Graham’s organization. He wrote his autobiography, Man in Black, in 1975. Cash also appeared in the tele-

Cash, Johnny Country music legend Johnny Cash died in a Nashville, Tennessee, hospital of complications from diabetes on September 12, 2003. He was 71. Cash was born in Kingsland, Arkansas, on February 26, 1932. After serving in the U.S. Air Force

Johnny Cash

73 films Thaddeus Rose and Eddie (1978), Where Have All the Children Gone (1980), The Pride of Jesse Hallam (1981), Murder in Coweta County (1983), The Baron and the Kid (1984), the 1985 mini-series North and South as abolitionist John Brown, The Last Days of Frank and Jesse James (1986) as Frank James, the 1986 remake of Stagecoach, Davy Crockett: Rainbow in the Thunder (1988) as the older Davy Crockett, and All My Friends Are Cowboys (1998). He also appeared in episodes of Little House on the Prairie, The Muppet Show, Renegade, and several episodes of Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman as Kid Cole. He was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1980 and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992. Cash was honored with a Kennedy Center Award in 1996, and won 11 Grammys, including a Lifetime Achievement Award in 1999. He remained married to June Carter Cash until her death in May of 2003. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 13, 2003, A1; New York Times, Sept. 13, 2003, A1; People, Sept. 29, 2003, 78; Time, Sept. 22, 2003, 60; Variety, Sept. 22, 2003, 71.

Cash, June Carter Country music singer June Carter Cash died of complications from heart surgery in a Nashville, Tennessee, hospital on May 15, 2003. She was 73. She was born in Maces Springs, Virginia, on June 23, 1929. The daughter of country music legend Maybelle Carter, June began her

2003 • Obituaries career singing with the Carter Family in the 1940s. They recorded such hits as “Will the Circle Be Unbroken?” and “Keep on the Sunny Side.” In the 1950s she studied acting with Lee Strasberg and Elia Kazan. She appeared in several daytime soap operas and was featured in episodes of the western series’ Gunsmoke and The Adventures of Jim Bowie. She began touring with Johnny Cash in the early 1960s, and co-wrote Cash’s hit song “Ring of Fire.” She often performed duets with Cash, winning Grammy Awards for their songs “Jackson” (1967) and “If I Were a Carpenter” (1970). She and Cash married in 1968. She appeared in the 1973 film The Gospel Road as Mary Magdalene and was a regular in Cash’s 1976 television series Johnny Cash and Friends (1976). June was also featured in the tele-films Thaddeus Rose and Eddie (1978), Murder in Coweta County (1983), The Baron and the Kid (1984), The Last Days of Frank and Jesse James (1986), and Stagecoach (1986), and appeared with Johnny Cash in several episodes of the television series Little House on the Prairie and Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman. She was also seen in the films The Apostle (1997) and All My Friends Are Cowboys (1998). Los Angeles Times, May 16, 2003, B13; New York Times, May 16, 2003, A25; Time, May 25, 2003, 25; Variety, May 26, 2003, 64.

Cassar, Mario Special effects technician Mario Cassar died of natural causes while working on the Brad Pitt film Troy in Malta on June 25, 2003. He was 50. Cassar, who specialized in underwater effects and pyrotechnics, began working in films with 1984’s Final Justice. He worked on the 1985 television mini-series Christopher Columbus, and did effects works for such films as Kill Cruise (1990), Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (1992), Cutthroat Island (1995), and U-571 (2000).

Ceccaldi, Daniel

June Carter Cash

French character actor Daniel Ceccaldi died in Paris on March 27, 2003. He was 75. Ceccaldi was born in Meaux, Seine-et-Marne, France, on July 25, 1927. He appeared in over 100 films during his career from the late 1940s. His nu-

Obituaries • 2003

74 Tell Me You Love Me (1974), A Happy Divorce (1975), The Pink Telephone (1975), Incorrigible (1975), The Toy (1976), Maxim’s Porter (1976), Death of a Corrupt Man (1977), A Sea Urchin in the Pocket (1977), Holiday Hotel (1978), The Ballad of the Daltons (1978), These Sorcerers Are Mad (1978), Heart to Heart (1979), Charles and Lucie (1979), All Stars (1980), The Plouffe Family (1981), For a Cop’s Hide (1981), Love on the Quiet (1985), The Mad Monkey (1990), Barbara (1997), Only God Sees Me (1998), The Son of Francais (1999) and Ghislan Lambert’s Bicycle (2001). Ceccaldi was also a popular actor on French television.

Chadney, Bill

Daniel Ceccaldi

merous film credits include Judgment of God (1949), Love Story (1951), Oh No, Mam’zelle (1954), Queen Margot (1954), Nana (1955), The Grand Maneuver (1955), The Toy Wife (1955), The Light Across the Street (1955), The Son of Dear Caroline (1955), Marie Antoinette (1956), The Adventures of Arsene Lupin (1957), Witness in the City (1959), The Carmelites (1960), The Lions Are Loose (1961), Famous Love Affairs (1961), A Trip to Biarritz (1962), The Lucky (1962), Who Stole the Body? (1961), Girl’s Apartment (1963), That Man from Rio (1964), FX 18, Secret Agent (1964), The Soft Skin (1964), Friend of the Family (1965), The Real Bargain (1965), Fire at Will (1965), A Woman in White (1965), God’s Thunder (1965), Cloportes (1965), Espionage in Lisbon (1965), When the Peasants Pass (1965), The Big Swag (1965), How Not to Rob a Department Store (1965), Rififi in Panama (1966), The Postman Goes to War (1968), Stolen Kisses (1969), A Golden Widow (1969), Bed & Board (1970), The Song of the Balalaika (1970), Chloe in the Afternoon (1972), Too Pretty to Be Honest (1972), Not Dumb, the Bird (1972), The Conspiracy (1973), Fall of a Body (1973), Don’t Cry with Your Mouth Full (1973), A Love (1973), OK Patron (1974), The Four Charlots Musketeers (1974), France Inc. (1974), The Hot Rabbit (1974),

Jazz pianist Bill Chadney died at his home in Palm Desert, California, on December 8, 2003. He was 79. Chadney played Emmett, the piano player, in the 1958 television series Peter Gunn. He was also married to the series’ co-star, actress Lola Albright, from 1961 until their divorce in 1975. Chadney was the original owner of the popular Santa Monica and Burbank, California, steakhouses, Chadney’s. Los Angeles Times, Dec 14, 2003, B23.

Chang, Wah Academy Award–winning special effects artist Wah Chang died in Carmel, California, on December 22, 2003. He was 86. Chang was born in Honolulu, Hawaii, on August 2, 1917. He began his career as an artist and worked in films from the 1930s. Chang worked at Disney Studios, creating posable figures of such characters as Bambi and Pinocchio to assist artists with their animation. He subsequently worked on George Pal’s Puppetoon productions, and continued to work with Pal often during his career. Chang created effects for such films as Cat-Women of the Moon (1953), The Monster from Green Hell (1957), tom thumb (1958), The Time Machine (1960) which earned him an Oscar, Dinosaurus! (1960), Master of the World (1961), Journey to the Seventh Planet (1962), The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (1962), 7 Faces of Dr. Lao (1964), The Power (1968), and Voyage to the Planet of the Prehistoric Women (1968). Chang also worked often

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Wah Chang

in television, creating creatures for such series as The Outer Limits, Star Trek, and Land of the Lost. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 30, 2003, B13.

Chapin, Chouteau Broadway actress and director Chouteau Chapin died in Bath, Massachusetts, on June 15, 2003. She was 93. Chapin was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on February 2, 1910. She made her Broadway debut in 1936 and was featured in productions of “Merrily We Roll Along” and “Pride and Prejudice.” Chapin later taught acting to such students as Walter Matthau and Marlon Brando. She left New York in 1951 and settled in Woolwich, Massachusetts. She was a prominent social activist and directed numerous local productions in her later years.

Chouteau Chapin

Chapman, Constance British actress Constance Chapman died in England on August 10, 2003. She was 91. Chapman was born in Somerset, England, on March 29, 1912. She began her career on stage in a production of Noel Coward’s Hay Fever in 1938. She performed with the Rapier Players at Bristol’s Little Theatre from 1941 through the early 1950s. Chapman subsequently worked in radio and television. She was best known on stage for her role in David Storey’s In Celebration which debuted in 1969. Chapman was featured in over a dozen films from the early 1970s including The Raging Moon (1971), Say Hello to Yesterday (1971), A Day

Constance Chapman

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in the Death of Joe Egg (1972), Doomwatch (1972), O Lucky Man! (1973), Hedda (1975), In Celebration (1975), Lady Oscar (1980), and Clockwise. She was also seen in television productions of Hearts and Flowers (1970), Emma (1972), The School for Scandal (1975), The Georgian House (1976), The Three Hostages (1977), The Patricia Neal Story (1982), Our Winnie (1982), A Taste for Death (1988), Murder Being Once Done (1991), Mrs. Hartley and the Growth Centre (1996), and The Beggar Bride (1997). Chapman starred as Rose Tonsley in the 1978 television series Born and Bred. Her other television credits include episodes of The Avengers, All Creatures Great and Small, Bergerac, Rumpole of the Bailey, Only Fools and Horses, and Casualty.

Chaskin, Janis Film executive Janis Chaskin died of cancer in Los Angeles on November 13, 2003. She was 53. Chaskin worked at New Line Cinema from the 1980s, serving as executive director of creative affairs. She was an associate producer for Delta of Venus (1995) and the 1996 Sandra Bullock film In Love and War. She served as executive producer for Frequency (2000) and 2003’s Secondhand Lions. She was also involved in the productions of Blink (1994), Seven (1995) and The Island of Dr. Moreau (1996).

Chaviano, Olga Cuban exotic dancer and showgirl Olga Chaviano died in a Miami Beach, Florida, hospital of pneumonia on. She was 78. Chaviano was born in Havana, Cuba, on August 9, 1925. She made her professional debut at the age of 15 dancing at Havana’s Teatro America. She toured South and Central America, arriving in Mexico in the late 1940s. She was featured in several films there including The Magician (1949), Carta Brava (1949), and La Venenosa (1949). She remained one of Cuba’s leading entertainers through the 1950s until Fidel Castro’s overthrow of the government in 1959. Chaviano went into exile in the United States in 1966, where she continued to dance and perform.

Olga Chaviano

Cheung, Leslie Chinese actor Leslie Cheung committed suicide by jumping from the Mandarin Oriental hotel in Hong Kong on April 1, 2003. He was 46. Cheung was born in Hong Kong on September 12, 1956. He was educated in England before returning to Hong Kong in the mid–1970s to perform as a singer. He soon became a popular film star in such movies as Erotic Dream of the Red Chamber (1978), On Trial (1980), The Drummer (1980), Encore (1980), Teenage Dreamers (1982), Little Dragon Maiden (1982), Nomad (1982), Crazy Romance (1982), First Time (1983), Behind the Yellow Line (1984), Merry Christmas (1984), Double Decker (1984), Intellectual Trio (1984), For Your Heart Only (1985), Last Song in Paris (1986), John Woo’s A Better Tomorrow (1986), Rouge (1987), A Better Tomorrow II (1987), A Chinese Ghost Story (1987), Fatal Love (1988), Chatter Street Killer (1988), Aces Go Places V: The Terracotta Hit (1989), A Chinese Ghost Story Part II (1990), Once a Thief (1990), The True Story of Ah Fei (1991), The Banquet (1991), Arrest the Restless (1992), All’s Well, Ends Well (1992), Farewell My

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Susan Chilcott

Leslie Cheung

Concubine (1993), The Eagle Shooting Heroes (1993), All’s Well, Ends Well Too (1993), The Bride with White Hair (1993), Ashes of Time (1994), Long and Winding Road (1994), He Is a Woman, She Is a Man (1994), It’s a Wonderful Life (1994), The Phantom Lover (1995), The Chinese Feast (1995), Temptress Moon (1996), Viva Erotica (1996), Tristar (1996), All’s Well, Ends Well 1997 (1997), Happy Together (1997), Anna Magdalena (1998), Knock Off (1998), Ninth Happiness (1998), A Time to Remember (1999), Red Lovers (1998), Moonlight Express (1999), The Kid (1999), Double Tap (2000), And I Hate You So (2000), and Inner Senses (2002). Los Angeles Times, Apr. 3, 2003, B14; New York Times, Apr. 2, 2003, C18; People, Apr. 14, 2003, 105; Time, Apr. 14, 2003, 27; Variety, Apr. 7, 2003, 51.

Chilcott, Susan British operatic soprano Susan Chilcott died of breast cancer in England on September 4,

2003. She was 40. Chilcott was born on July 8, 1963, and raised in Somerset, England. She began her professional career with the Scottish Opera in a production of Carmen in 1991. Over the next several years Chilcott performed primarily in Europe in productions of Otello, Cosi Fan Tutte, and Turn of the Screw. She starred in Dvorak’s Rusalka with the English National Opera in 1995 and made her Metropolitan Opera debut with Midsummer Night’s Dream in 2002.

Chiquita Erna Segal, who performed as half of the Chiquita and Johnson dance team from the 1950s, died while awaiting a liver transplant at a Los Angeles hospital of lung and liver disease on April 5, 2003. She was 64. She was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, in 1938 and began dancing as a child. She teamed with John von Kralik to form the popular dance duo at the age of 12. She and von Kralik, who performed as Johnson, were married for several years from 1956 to 1960. The duo made numerous nightclub performances and appeared on television on The Ed Sullivan Show, The Colgate Comedy Hour and The Red Skelton Show. Chiquita was also featured in the 1956 film Jaguar. After her divorce in 1960 she continued to perform onstage as Chiquita Johnson and later, with new husband Daniel Segal, worked with a specialty film distribution company.

Obituaries • 2003

78

Chiquita

Los Angeles Times, Apr. 9, 2003, B10; Variety, Aug. 25, 2003, 109. Leela Chitnis (with Ashok Kumar in Kangan)

Chitnis, Leela Leading Indian actress Leela Chitnis died of complications from a broken hip in a Danbury, Connecticut, nursing home on July 14, 2003. She was 93. Ms. Chitnis was born in Dharwar, Karnataka, India, on September 9, 1909. A popular star in the 1930s, she was featured in numerous films opposite actor Ashok Kumar. Her numerous film credits include Holy Crime (1936), Beyond the Horizon (1937), Justice (1937), Jailor (1938), Sant Tulsidas (1939), The Bangle (1939), The Better Half (1940), Free (1940), Saiyan (1951), The Vagabond (1951), Jane Eyre (1952), Funny Man (1956), The New Age (1957), Post Box 999 (1958), Flowers of the Dusty (1959), Parakh (1960), The Black Market (1960), Barkha (1960), We Two (1961), The Confluence (1961), Married Woman (1964), Friendship (1964), The Guide (1965) the first English language film made in India, Bhai Bhai (1970), and Love Sublime (1978). Chitnis published her autobiography, Chanderi Duniyet, in 1981, and moved to the United States later in the decade. Los Angeles Times, July 17, 2003, B13; New York Times, July 17, 2003, C13; Variety, July 21, 2003, 70.

Chrystall, Belle British actress Belle Chrystall died in England on June 7, 2003. She was 93. Chrystall was born in Preston, Lancashire, England, on April 25, 1910. She began her career on stage in the late 1920s and made her film debut in a small part in 1930’s A Warm Corner. She continued to appear in films throughout the decade including Hobson’s Choice (1931) as Vicky Hobson, Hindle Wakes (1931), The Frightened Lady (1932), The Scotland Yard Mystery (1933), Friday the Thirteenth (1933),

Belle Chrystall

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Youthful Folly (1934), The Girl in the Flat (1934), Key to Harmony (1935), Michael Powell’s The Edge of the World (1937), Yellow Sands (1938), Follow Your Star (1938), Breakers Ahead (1938), Anything to Declare? (1938), Poison Pen (1939), and Castle of Crimes (1940). Chrystall also performed on British radio and was a model in the early 1940s before retiring to raise her daughter in 1946.

Chulack, Fred Film editor Fred A. Chulack died of complications from pneumonia in a Duarte, California, hospital on October 31, 2003. He was 77. Chulack was born in Los Angeles on October 1, 1926. He and his brother began producing industrial and commercial films in St. Louis, Missouri, in the early 1950s. He went to Hollywood in 1960 where he worked on Stanley Kubrick’s film Spartacus as an assistant editor. Chulack edited numerous films including The Ballad of Josie (1967), The Out-of-Towners (1970), Darker Than Amber (1970), C.C. and Company (1970), The Little Ark (1972), Jory (1972), Mitchell (1975), The Last Hard Men (1976), A Hero Ain’t Nothin’ but a Sandwich (1978), Dreamer (1979), Touched by Love (1980), Private Lesson’ (1981), A Time to Die (1982), Private School (1983), Dance of the Dwarfs (1983), Lovelines (1984), The Shrimp on the Barbie (1990), and Private Lessons II (1993). Chulack also worked on the Hawaii 5-O television series, and edited the tele-films Crime Club (1973), Mary White (1977), City in Fear (1980), Cry of the Innocent (1980), The Winter of Our Discontent (1983), Hollywood Wives (1985), Outrage! (1986), Case Closed (1988), and The Shell Seekers (1989).

Chumez, Chumy Spanish film writer and director Chumy Chumez died of liver cancer in Madrid, Spain, on April 10, 2003. He was 75. Chumez was born in San Sebastian, Spain, on May 8, 1927. An artist and humor writer, Chumez began making films in the mid–1960s. He wrote and directed Castillos de Castilla (1966), Torremolinos (1967), Marbella (1967), La Costa del Sol (1968), El Corazon de un Bandido (1970), God Bless Each Corner of This House (1977), and But Aren’t You Ever Going

Chumy Chumez

to Change, Margarita? (1978).

Claire, Bernice Light opera singer and actress Bernice Claire died of pneumonia in Portland, Oregon, on January 17, 2003. She was 95. Claire was born Bernice Janighen in Oakland, California, on March 22, 1907. She began singing at an early age and teamed with singer Alexander Gray in the late 1920s. She appeared in several operetta films with Gray including No, No, Nanette (1930), Spring Is Here (1930), The Song of the Flame (1930), The Red Shadow (1932), Moonlight and Pretzels (1933), and The Flame Song (1934). She was also seen in the films The Song of the Flame (1930), Numbered Men (1930), Top Speed (1930), Kiss Me Again (1931), The Love Department (1935), and Two Hearts in Harmony (1935). She subsequently retired from the screen, though she continued to perform on stage and radio.

Clapham, Peter British actor Peter Clapham died in England after a long illness in December of 2003. He was 78. Clapham was born in Exeter, England, in 1925. A chiropodist, he performed on stage in amateur productions in the 1960s and 1970s. He

Obituaries • 2003 made his professional stage debut with the Royal Shakespeare Company in the early 1970s. Clapham also appeared in a handful of films including The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea (1976), The Phantom of the Opera (1989), and Bullseye! (1990). He was also seen in the television mini-series Lillie (1978) and Edward and Mrs. Simpson (1980), and the 1985 production of Agatha Christie’s Thirteen at Dinner. His other television credits include epiodes of The Sweeney, Nanny, and Mulberry.

Clarkson, Lana Actress Lana Clarkson was found shot to death in the Alhambra, California, home of record producer Phil Spector on February 3, 2003. She was 40. Spector was arrested and charged with the murder. Clarkson was born in Long Beach California on April 5, 1962. She began working in films in the early 1980s with small roles in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982) and Scarface (1983). Clarkson starred in numerous low-budget action and science fiction films including Deathstalker (1984), Blind Date (1984), Barbarian Queen (1985), Amazon Women on the Moon (1987), Wizards of the Lost Kingdom II (1988), The Haunting of Morella (1990), Barbarian Queen II: The Empress Strikes Back (1992), Vice Girls (1996), Love in Paris (1997), and March (2001). She also appeared often on television, guest starring in such series as Three’s Company, The Jeffersons, Mike Hammer, Riptide, Knight Rider, Who’s the Boxx?, The A-Team, Night Court, Hotel, Steven Spielberg’s Amazing Stories, Wings,

80 Silk Stalkings, Land’s End, 18 Wheels of Justice, and Black Scorpion. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 5, 2003, A1; New York Times, Feb. 5, 2003, A13; People, Feb. 17, 2003, 57; Variety, Feb. 10, 2003, 57.

Claver, Queta Spanish character actress Queta Claver died of heart disease in Madrid, Spain, on May 3, 2003. She was 73. She was born in Valencia, Spain, on June 24, 1929, the daughter of actress Enriqueta Delas. A leading actress in the Spanish cinema since the early 1960s, she was featured in such films as Beautiful Mimi (1962), The Lonely Heart (1972), Love Doll (1973), El Chulo (1974), The Sins of a Nearly Decent Girl (1975), The Adolescents (1975), Let’s Leave the War in Peace (1976), Hidden Pleasures (1976), Binge (1976), Daddy’s War (1977), The Man Who Knew Love (1978), The Deputy and the Congressman (1978), Memoirs of Leticia Valle (1979), The Beehive (1982), El Pico (1983), The Turn of the Screw (1985), Voyage to Nowhere (1985), Time of Silence (1986), The Impeccable Sinner (1987), Sinatra (1988), Against the Wind (1990), and Prince of Shadows (1991).

Queta Claver

Claypool, Kathleen Lana Clarkson (from Deathstalker)

Actress Kathleen Claypool died of complications from hip surgery in Cornwall, Pennsylvania, on May 5, 2003. She was 85. Born in

81 Aylesworth, Indiana, in 1917, Claypool was featured in the radio series Jack Armstrong, the AllAmerican Boy in the 1930s. She appeared in numerous Off-Broadway stage productions during her career including the Obie-winning 1998 play Curtains. Claypool also appeared in several independent films including Palookavile, Dream and Memory and Kiss Me Guido. She also appeared in small roles in episodes of The Dana Carvey Show and Spin City on television.

Clayton, John Australian film and television actor John Clayton died of cancer in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, on September 25, 2003. He was 63. Clayton starred as Barney Boomer in the 1967 Australian television series and its sequel Upside Town/Swingaround in 1968. He appeared in numerous films from the mid–1970s including Sidecar Racers (1975), High Rolling (1977), The Irishman (1978), Newsfront (1978), Dawn! (1979), Palm Beach (1979), …Maybe This Time (1980), The Girl Who Met Simone de Beauvoir in Paris (1980), Freedom (1982), Far East (1982), Ginger Meggs (1982), With Prejudice (1982), Who Killed

John Clayton

2003 • Obituaries Baby Azaria? (1983), Midnite Spares (1983), Goodbye Paradise (1983), Silver City (1984), High Tide (1987), Warm Nights on a Slow Moving Train (1988), Viscous! (1988), The Everlasting Secret Family (1988), Breaking Loose (1988), Boundaries of the Heart (1988), Sebastian and the Sparrow (1989), Out of the Body (1989), Cappuccino (1989), Strangers (1990), Shotgun Wedding (1993), 976WISH (1997), Day of the Roses (1998), My Husband My Killer (2001), and Subterano (2003). He was featured in the television mini-series The Dismissal (1983), The Last Bastion (1984), Bodyline (1984), Winners (1985), The Challenge (1986), and Tracks of Glory (1991). Clayton starred as Sergeant Roy Harrison in the 1989 series E Street and was Insp. Bill Adams in 1990’s Police Rescue. He was Maurie Barnard in the 1995 series Echo Point and played Harry Bond in Grass Roots from 2000. His other television credits include episodes of Division 4, Shannon’s Mob, The Outsiders, Chopper Squad, The Flying Doctors, All Saints, and Farscape.

Clement, Hal Science fiction writer Hal Clement died at his Milton, Massachusetts, home on October 29, 2003. He was 81. Clement was born Harry Clement Stubbs in Somerville, Massachusetts, on May 30, 1922. He graduated from Harvard with a B.S. in astronomy in 1943 and served in the U.S. Air Force during World War II. His first story, Proof, was published in 1942. A high school science teacher in Massachusetts, Clement was known for his ability to make scientific facts an integral part of his stories. Clement’s novels include Needle (1950), Iceworld (1953), Mission of

Hal Clement (right, with the author)

Obituaries • 2003 Gravity (1954), Cycle of Fire (1957), Close to Critical (1964), Space Lash (1969), Starlight (1971), Ocean on Top (1973), Through the Eye of a Needle (1978), The Nitrogen Fix (1980), Still River (1987), Isaac’s Universe: Fossil (1993), and Half Life (1999). His most recent novel, Noise, was published earlier in 2003. New York Times, Oct. 31, 2003, A21.

Cloutier, Suzanne

82 ing year, and appeared together in the 1961 film Romanoff and Juliet. She and Ustinov had three children before divorcing in 1971. Cloutier made rare appearances on the stage and screen over the next several decades, with her final film role a cameo in 1997’s Whiskers. Variety, Jan. 12, 2004, 61.

Coffin, Frederick

Canadian actress Suzanne Cloutier died of liver cancer in Montreal, Canada, on December 2, 2003. She was 76. Cloutier was born in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, on July 10, 1927. She was best known for her role as Desdemona in Orson Welles’ Othello in 1951. She made her film debut several years earlier in 1946’s Temptation. She worked primarily on the stage in New York and Paris for the rest of the decade. She appeared in the 1950 French film Juliette, or Key of Dreams. She was featured in several films in the 1950s including Four Against Fate (1952) and Doctor in the House (1954). She co-starred with actor Peter Ustinov in a theatrical production of No Sign of the Dove in 1953. They were married the follow-

Actor Frederick Coffin died in Los Angeles of lung cancer on July 31, 2003. He was 60. Coffin was born on January 16, 1943. He worked in films and television from the early 1970s, appearing in such films as Dragonfly (1976), King of the Gypsies (1978), Dead Ringer (1981), Alone in the Dark (1982), Without a Trace (1983), Nothing Lasts Forever (1984), Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is Calling (1986), Blake Edwards’ A Fine Mess (1986), The Bedroom Window (1987), Shoot to Kill (1988), A Time of Destiny (1988), Out Cold (1989), Hard to Kill (1990), If Looks Could Kill (1991), V.I. Warshawski (1991), Wayne’s World (1992), There Goes My Baby (1994), James Michener’s Texas (1995), Memorial Day (1998), The Base (1999), View from the Top (2003), and Identity (2003). He was also seen in numerous tele-films

Suzanne Cloutier

Frederick Coffin

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including The Jilting of Granny Weatherall (1980), Muggable Mary, Street Cop (1982), An Invasion of Privacy (1983), Concealed Enemies (1984), Scandal Sheet (1986), Moonlighting (1986), Amos (1985), Under Siege (1986), The Deliberate Stranger (1986), Manhunt for Claude Dallas (1986), Private Eye (1987), Settle the Score (1989), Crash: The Mystery of Flight 1501 (1990), Secret Sins of the Father (1994), Dragstrip Girl (1994), A Streetcar Named Desire (1995), Andersonville (1996), Zenon: Girl of the 21st Century (1999), Rocket’s Red Glare (2000), and A Town Without Pity (2002). Coffin was Big Zwey in the 1989 western mini-series Lonesome Dove, and was Jim Lovejoy in the 1990 television series Glory Days. His other television credits include episodes of Kojak, Hill Street Blues, the new Twilight Zone, Remington Steele, Crime Story, L.A. Law, Steven Spielberg’s Amazing Stories, Hunter, The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd, Murder, She Wrote, Jake and the Fatman, Mancuso, FBI, The Young Riders, MacGyver, The Commish, Renegade, The X Files, The Adventures of Brisco County Jr., Walker, Texas Ranger, Murder One, Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, Night Man, The Invisible Man, The District, Providence, Family Law, American Family, and For the People.

Collins, Janet Leading ballerina Janet Collins died on May 28, 2003. She was 86. Collins was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, on March 2, 1917. She moved to Los Angeles at an early age and studied ballet and modern dance. She joined Katherine Dunham’s dance company and was featured with them in the all-black musical film Stormy Weather in 1943. Collins also performed a solo number in the 1946 film Thrill of Brazil. Collins performed on Broadway in Agnes de Mille’s production of the Cole Porter musical Out of This World. In the early 1950s she joined the Metropolian Opera as a principal dancer in productions of Aida, Carmen, and Samson et Dalila. She was a teacher and choreographer in the 1960s and 1970, working with the San Francisco Opera. She retired from dance to paint religious subjects in the early 1980s. Los Angeles Times, June 2, 2003, B9; New York Times, May 31, 2003, B17; Time, June 9, 2003, 24.

Janet Collins

Collis, June Australian actress June Collis died in Australia in May of 2003. She was 74. A leading actress on the Australian stage for over 30 years, she received acclaim for her roles in such productions as Blithe Spirit and Samuel Beckett’s Happy Days. Collis also appeared in several films including Shirley Thompson Versus the Aliens (1972) and The Night, the Prowler (1978), and the 1979 television production of Ride On Stranger.

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Conde, Eduardo Brazilian actor Eduardo Conde died of lung cancer in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on January 17, 2003. He was 56. Conde began his career as a singer, performing on stage in the musical Hair. He was a popular performer in Brazil in film and on television, appearing in Os Saltimbancos Trapalhoes (1981), Blame It on Rio (1984), The Emerald Forest (1985), Hell Hunters (1986), Stelinha (1990), Exposure (1991), Louco Por Cinema (1994), The Monk and the Hangman’s Daughter (1995), and the 2002 television series Kiss of the Vampire.

Peggy Conklin

Eduardo Conde

Conklin, Peggy Stage and film actress Peggy Conklin died in Naples, Florida, on March 18, 2003. She was 96. Conklin was born in Dobbs Ferry, New York, on November 2, 1906. She was a leading star on Broadway from the 1930s through the 1950s, ap-

pearing in such productions as The Petrified Forest, Mr. and Mrs. North, The Wisteria Tree, and Chekhov’s Cherry Orchard. Conklin also appeared in several films in the 1930s including The President Vanishes (1934), One-Way Ticket (1935), The Devil Is a Sissy (1936), Her Master’s Voice (1936), and Having a Wonderful Time (1938). She was also featured in dramatic productions in such early television anthology series as The Philco Television Playhouse, NBC Presents, Suspense, and Kraft Television Theatre. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 28, 2003, B15; New York Times, Mar. 25, 2003, A15; Variety, Mar. 31, 2003, 50.

Conley, Arthur Rhythm and blues singer Arthur Conley died of intestinal cancer in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on November 17, 2003. He was 57. Conley was born in McIntosh, Georgia, on Jan-

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Arthur Conley

uary 4, 1946. He began singing in the late 1950s as part of the only male member of the Gospel group The Evening Smiles. In the early 1960s he led Arthur and the Corvets, recording the singles “Poor Girl,” “I Believe” and “Flossie Mae.” Otis Redding was impressed with Conley’s performance of “I’m a Lonely Stranger” and helped him re-record the song at Stax in Memphis. Other popular songs include “Sweet Soul Music,” “Funky Street,” and “Shake Rattle and Roll.” Disillusioned with the American music industry, Conley moved to Europe in the 1970s, settling in the Netherlands in 1980, where he changed his name to Lee Roberts. He continued to perform and record, leading Lee Roberts and the Sweaters. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 18, 2003, B11; New York Times, Nov. 19, 2003, C15.

Connelly, Joe Television producer and writer Joe Connelly, who co-created the television sit-com classic Leave It to Beaver, died of complications from a stroke in Newport Beach, California, on February 14, 2003. He was 86. Connelly was born in New York City in 1917. He met long-time col-

Joe Connelly

laborator Bob Mosher when both men were working for an advertising agency in the early 1940s. They began working in radio together in 1942, writing for the Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy show. They also for the radio and early television versions of Amos ’n’ Andy. Connelly and Mosher also wrote the 1955 film The Private War of Major Benson. The duo also created and produced Leave It to Beaver in 1957. Other television credits include the series Bringing Up Buddy, Ichabod and Me, Calvin and the Colonel, The Munsters, and Pistols ’n’ Petticoats. Connelly also produced the 1966 film version of The Munsters, Munsters, Go Home, and the 1969 film Change of Habit, starring Elvis Presley. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 14, 2003, B14; New York Times, Feb. 17, 2003, A19; People, Mar. 3, 2003, 79; Time, Feb. 24, 2003, 17; Variety, Feb. 24, 2003, 87.

Conner, Nadine Operatic soprano Nadine Conner died in Los Alamitos, California, on March 1, 2003. She

Obituaries • 2003

86

Constantin, Michel

Nadine Conner

was 96. She was born Evelyn Nadine Henderson in Compton, California, on February 20, 1907. Conner began her career on radio singing on Vicks Open House. She made her debut with the Metropolitan Opera in December of 1941 in a production of The Magic Flute. She continued to perform with the Met for the next 18 seasons in such operas as Der Rosenkavalier, Gianni Schicchi, and Hansel and Gretel, which was recorded on stage in 1947. Conner also sang in several films including Blossoms in the Dust (1941), Luxury Liner (1948), Of Men and Music (1951), and The Stars Are Singing (1953). She performed the role of Micaela in a 1952 closed-circuit television production of the opera Carmen, and appeared in La Boheme on CBS-TV’s Omnibus. She was also heard often on radio in the 1940s and early 1950s, singing on The Railroad Hour and The Nelson Eddy Show. She made her farewell performance with the Met in 1960’s production of Faust. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 5, 2003, B13; New York Times, Mar. 10, 2003, A19.

French character actor Michel Constantin died in Draguignan, France, on August 28, 2003. He was 79. Constantin was born Constantin Hokloff in Paris on July 13, 1924. He worked as a sports reporter and was captain of France’s national volleyball team before embarking on a career as an actor in the 1950s. With a deep voice and bushy eyebrows, Constantin was often cast as gangsters and villains. He appeared in over 50 films during his career including Please Mr. Balzac (1956), The Night Watch (1964), A Man Called Rocca (1961), Law of Men (1962), Maigret Sees Red (1963), The Gorillas (1964), The Wise Guys (1965), Let’s Not Get Angry (1966), Second Breath (1966), Pillaged (1967), Law of Survival (1967), Dirty Heroes (1967), The Southern Star (1969), The Strangers (1969), A Very Curious Girl (1969), The Comeuppance (1969), Last Known Address (1970), Only the Cool (1970), The Family (1970), Cold Sweat (1970) with Charles Bronson, Vertigo for a Killer (1970), The Cop (1970), Take It Easy, It’s a Waltz (1971), The Lion’s Share (1971), There Was Once a Cop (1971), The Big Shots (1972), The Pariah (1972), The Outside Man (1972), Killing in the Sun (1973), Man in the Trunk (1973), OK Patron (1974), Special Killers (1974), The Beast (1974), Beyond Fear (1975), Gunman in the Streets (19785), Sahara Cross (1977), Inglorious Bastards (1977), Fear in the City

Michel Constantin

87 (1981), Quarter to Two Before Jesus Christ (1982), The Telephone Always Rings Twice (1985), La Baston (1985), City for Sale (1992), and Paris Melody (1994).

Cook, Fielder Film and television director Fielder Cook died of complications from a stroke at a Charlotte, North Carolina, hospital on June 20, 2003. He was 80. Cook was born in Atlanta, Georgia, on March 9, 1923, and raised in Tampa, Florida. He began directing for television in New York City after serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Cook helmed episodes of such early television series as Kraft Television Theatre, Lux Video Theatre, Playhouse 90, and the Kaiser Aluminum Hour. He made his film debut helming Rod Serling’s Patterns in 1956. He also directed the 1959 film Home Is the Hero. Cook worked primarily in television in the 1960s, directing episodes of such series as The Defenders, Ben Casey, Going My Way, The Eleventh Hour, and Espionage. He received

2003 • Obituaries an Emmy Award for directing a 1966 television production of the musical Brigadoon. He also helmed the films A Big Hand for the Little Lady (1966), How to Save a Marriage (And Ruin Your Life) (1968), Prudence and the Pill (1968), Eagle in a Cage (1971), From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (1973), and Seize the Day (1986). Cook also directed episodes of The Waltons and Beacon Hill, and numerous tele-films including Mirror, Mirror Off the Wall (1969), Sam Hill: Who Killed the Mysterious Mr. Foster? (1971), Arthur Miller’s The Price (1971) which earned him another Emmy Award, Goodbye, Raggedy Ann (1971), The Homecoming: A Christmas Story (1971), Neighbors (1971), Harvey (1972), The Hands of Cormac Joyce (1972), Miracle on 34th Street (1973), This Is the West That Was (1974), Valley Forge (1974), Miles to Go Before I Sleep (1975), The Rivalry (1975), Judge Horton and the Scottsboro Boys (1976), Beauty and the Beast (1976), A Love Affair: The Eleanor and Lou Gehrig Story (1978), Too Far to Go (1979), I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1979), Gauguin the Savage (1980), Family Reunion (1981), Will There Really Be a Morning? (1983), Why Me? (1984), Evergreen (1985), A Special Friendship (1987), and The Member of the Wedding (1997). Los Angeles Times, June 25, 2003, B13; New York Times, June 30, 2003, A19; Variety, June 30, 2003, 46.

Cook, Lawrence Actor Lawrence Cook died on December 27, 2003. He was 68. He was featured in films and television episodes from the early 1970s. Cook’s film credits include Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), The Man (1972), Trouble Man (1972), The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973), Lord Shango (1975), Colors (1988), Interceptor (1992), and Posse (1993). He also appeared in the tele-films Crosscurrent (1971), Hunter (1973), and Gambler (1988). Cook was featured as Paul Grant in the daytime soap opera Days of Our Lives from 1975 to 1976, and appeared in episodes of Search, Cannon, The Rookies, The Rockford Files, Harry O, Delvecchio, Kaz, Lou Grant, The White Shadow, CHiPs, Hill Street Blues, T.J. Hooker, and Family Matters. Fielder Cook

Obituaries • 2003

88

Lawrence Cook

Cook, Whitfield Screenwriter Whitfield Cook died in New London, Connecticut, on November 12, 2003. He was 94. Cook was born in Orange, New Jersey, on April 9, 1909. He graduated from the Yale Drama School and worked as a stage manager in New York. He began writing films in the mid– 1940s, scripting The Sailor Takes a Wife (1945), The Secret Heart (1946), High Barbaree (1947), and Big City (1948). Cook was best known for writing two films for director Alfred Hitchcock — Stage Fright (1950) and Strangers on a Train (1951). During the 1950s he also wrote for television, scripting episodes of Life with Father, Climax!, Front Row Center, and The 20th Century–Fox Hour. Cook also wrote numerous magazine articles and several novels including Roman Comedy and Taxi to Dubrovnik.

Vestale at La Scala in 1954, and made his debut at London’s Covent Garden in Norma in 1957. He performed opposite Leontyne Price in Verdi’s Trovatore at the Metropolitan Opera. Corelli also performed notably in productions of Tosca, Turandot, and Aida. He retired in 1976. New York Times, Oct. 30, 2003, C14; People, Nov. 17, 2003, 96; Time, Nov. 10, 2003, 28.

Corelli, Franco

Cornish, Cecil

Italian operatic tenor Franco Corelli died of heart problems in Milan, Italy, on October 29, 2003. He was 80. Corelli was born in Ancona, Italy, on April 8, 1923. After winning a singing competition in Florence, he made his debut on stage in Carmen at Spoleto in 1951. Corelli performed with Maria Callas in a production of La

Rodeo trick rider Cecil Cornish died in Enid, Oklahoma, on December 4, 2003. He was 94. He began his career in the early 1920s. He often rode his horse, Smokey, who could feign a broken leg. Cornish also trained Danger, a Brahma bull, who could leap over cars and through hoops of fire. According to his son,

Franco Corelli

89

2003 • Obituaries

Comacho Costa

Courvoisier, Sibylle Swiss actress Sibylle Courvoisier died in Zurich, Switzerland, on August 7, 2003. She was 60. She was born in Basel, Switzerland, in 1943. Courvoisier began her career on stage in the early 1980s and was featured in a television production of The Mikado in 1984. She was best known for her role as Letti Merian on the Swiss television series Luthi und Blanc from 2000 until her death.

Cecil Cornish (bust by Harold Holden)

Wayne, Cornish also worked with Roy Rogers’ horse, Trigger, and trained horses for the film Ben Hur. He was inducted into the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in 1992 and the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 2003. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 7, 2003, B25.

Costa, Camacho Portuguese actor Camacho Costa died of cancer in Lisbon, Portugal, on March 1, 2003. He was 56. Costa was born in Odemira on June 8, 1946. A popular performer in films and television from the 1980s, Costa was seen in the movies Morning Mist (1980), O Barao de Altamira (1986), A Estrela (1994), Todo o Tempo do Mundo (1995), Napomuceno’s Will (1997), Isle of Contempt (1999), and Telefona-Me (2000). He also starred in the Portuguese television series Os Malucos do Riso (1995), Xica da Silva (1996), and Caes Sem Coleira (1997).

Sibylle Courvoisier

Obituaries • 2003

90

Cox, “Bruiser” Brian Professional wrestler “Bruiser” Brian Cox was found dead of a heart attack in his Portland, Oregon, apartment on March 24, 2003. He was 32. Cox was a leading independent wrestler in the Pacific Northwest, holding several singles and tag team championships during his career.

Scott Craig

Crain, Jeanne

“Bruiser” Brian Cox

Craig, Scott Scott Craig, who was a Mousketeer on The New Mickey Mouse Club television series in 1977, died of a respiratory illness in a Las Vegas, Nevada, hospital on December 30, 2003. He was 39. Craig was born in Van Nuys, California, on February 9, 1964. He began his career in showbusiness at the age of six, appearing in commercials and as an entertainer on the Lily Tomlin Special and Dick Cavett’s Backlot, U.S.A.

Actress Jeanne Crain died of a heart attack at her home in Santa Barbara, California, on December 14, 2003. She was 78. Crain was born in Barstow, California, on May 25, 1925. A beauty contest winner in the early 1940s, she became a model and made her film debut in a small role 1943’s The Gang’s All Here. A popular pinup girl for soldiers during World War II, the lovely actress continued to appear in such films as Home in Indiana (1944), In the Meantime, Darling (1944), Winged Victory (1944), State Fair (1945), Leave Her to Heaven (1945), Centennial Summer (1946), Margie (1946), You Were Meant for Me (1948), Apartment for Pegg y (1948), A Letter to Three Wives (1949), and The Fan (1949). Crain earned an Academy Award nomination for her role as a black girl trying to pass for white in the controversial 1949 film Pinky. Crain also starred in the films Cheaper by the Dozen (1950), Take Care of My Little Girl (1951), People Will Talk (1951), The Model and the Marriage Broker (1951), Belles on Their Toes (1952), O. Henry’s Full House (1952) in The Gift of the Magi segment, Dangerous Crossing (1953), Vicki (1953), City of Bad Men (1953), Duel in the Jungle (1954), Man Without a Star (1955), Gentlemen Marry Brunettes (1955), The Second Greatest Sex (1955), The Fastest Gun

91

2003 • Obituaries Los Angeles Times, Dec. 15, 2003, B9; New York Times, Dec. 16, 2003, B10; Time, Dec. 29, 2003, 22; Variety, Dec. 22, 2003, 64.

Crean, Patrick Patrick “Paddy” Crean, who was fight director and fencing master for numerous films and theatrical productions, died in Stratford, Ontario, Canada, on December 22, 2003. He was 92. Crean was born in England on June 27, 1911. He began working as a fight choreographer in the early 1930s, and staged fight sciences for such films as The Master of Ballantrae (1953) and The Sword of Sherwood Forest (1960). He trained such actors as Laurence Olivier, Trevor Howard, Alec Guiness, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., and Errol Flynn, and often served as Flynn’s stunt double. He appeared in small roles in several films including War and Peace (1956), A Farewell to Arms (1957), Arriverderci Roma (1958), Tread Softly Stranger (1958), The Naked Maja (1959), and the 1968 television production of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Crean was fight director for theatrical productions at the Stratford Festival in the early 1960s.

Jeanne Crain

Alive (1956), The Tattered Dress (1957), The Joker Is Wild (1957), Meet Me in St. Louis (1959), Guns of the Timberland (1959), Twenty Plus Two (1961), Queen of the Nile (1961), Madison Avenue (1962), Pontius Pilate (1962), Daggers of Blood (1962), Hot Rods to Hell (1967), The Night God Screamed (1971), and Skyjacked (1972). Crain also appeared frequently on television, guest starring in such series as Ford Television Theatre, The Perry Como Show, Playhouse 90, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, I’ve Got a Secret, Goodyear Theatre, Riverboat, The U.S. Steel Hour, General Electric Theater, The Dick Powell Show, Burke’s Law, The Danny Thomas Hour, The Name of the Game, and Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law. She largely retired from the screen in the early 1970s. She was married to actor Paul Brinkman from 1946 until his death in October of 2003.

Patrick Crean

Obituaries • 2003

Creighton, Francis Film director and actor Francis Creighton died in California on November 24, 2003. He was 48. Creighton was born on March 21, 1955. He wrote, directed and starred in the 1991 horror film The Malibu Beach Vampires. He was also seen in the films Metropolitan (1990) and Barcelona (1994).

Creighton, Gordon Gordon Creighton, the former editor of The Flying Saucer Review, died in England on July 16, 2003. He was 95. Creighton was born on April 26, 1908. A foreign service officer with the British government, he became interested in UFOs in 1941 while stationed with the British Embassy in Chungking, China. He claimed to see “a white disc with a piercingly bright bluish light on top racing through the sky…” He was a regularly contributor to the Flying Saucer Review after it was started in 1955. He became editor of the mag-

Gordon Creighton

92 azine in 1982. Creighton claimed that the world’s governments, particularly the United States, were aware of alien visitors and lied to the public about the nature of UFOs.

Crenna, Richard Richard Crenna, who starred in the television series Our Miss Brooks and The Real McCoys, died of pancreatic cancer in a Los Angeles hospital on January 17, 2003. He was 76. Crenna was born in Los Angeles on November 30, 1926. He began his career in radio at the age of ten, appearing on such series as Burns and Allen and Our Miss Brooks with Eve Arden. He continued with the role of student Walter Denton when Our Miss Brooks moved to television in 1952. He remained with the show through 1956. Crenna was also seen in several films in the 1950s including Let’s Dance (1950), Red Skies of Montana (1952), The Pride of St. Louis (1952), It Grows on Trees (1952), and Over-Exposed (1956). He starred as Luke McCoy in the popular television comedy series The Real McCoys starring Walter Brennan from 1957 to 1963, and starred in the legal drama Slattery’s People from 1964 to 1965. His other television credits in the 1950s include episodes of I Love Lucy, Frontier, Cheyenne and The Deputy. Crenna continued his career in films in the 1960s, appearing in such features as Made in Paris (1966), The Sand Pebbles (1966), Wait Until Dark (1967), Star! (1968), Midas Run (1969), Marooned (1969), Doctors’ Wives (1971), The Devil’s Backbone (1971), Red Sky at Morning (1971), Catlow (1971), Dirty Money (1972), The Man Called Noon (1973), Jonathan Livingston Seagull (1973) as the voice of Father, Breakheart Pass (1975), and The Evil (1978). He was also featured in the tele-films Thief (1971), Footsteps (1972), Double Indemnity (1973), Nightmare (1974), Shootout in a One-Dog Town (1974), Honky Tonk (1974), Double Solitaire (1974), A Girl Named Sooner (1975), and The War Between the Tates (1977). He starred as Richard C. Barrington in the 1976 television comedy series All’s Fair with Bernadette Peters, and was Col. Frank Skimmerhorn in the 1978 mini-series Centennial. He was also seen in the tele-films Devil Dog: The Hound of Hell (1978), First, You Cry (1978), A Fire in the Sky (1978), Mayflower: The Pilgrims’ Adventure (1979), Fugitive Family (1980),

93

Richard Crenna (left, with Walter Brennan from The Real McCoys)

The Ordeal of Bill Carney (1981), and The Day the Bubble Burst (1982), and the films Stone Cold Dead (1979), Wild Horse Hank (1979), Death Ship (1980), Body Heat (1981) with William Hurt and Kathleen Turner, and First Blood (1982), as Colonel Sam Trautman, mentor to Sylvester Stallone’s Rambo character. He continued his film career in Table for Five (1983), The Flamingo Kid (1984), Summer Rental (1985), Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) and Rambo III (1988) reprising his role as Colonel Trautman, and Leviathan (1989). He starred as Dr. Sam Quinn in the 1982 comedy series It Takes Two, and was featured in the tele-films Passions (1984), Squaring the Circle (1984), The Rape of Richard Beck (1985), Doubletake (1985), A Case of Deadly Force (1986), the mini-series On Wings of Eagles (1986) as H. Ross Perot, The High Price of Passion (1986), Police Story: The Freeway Killings (1987), Plaza Suite (1987), Internal Affairs (1988) in the first of several films as Detective Frank Janek, The Case of the Hillside Stranglers (1989), Stuck with Each Other (1989), Murder in Black and White (1990), Montana (1990), Last Flight Out (1990), Murder Times Seven (1990), And the Sea Will Tell (1991), Intruders (1992), Terror on Track 9 (1992), A Place to Be Loved (1993), The Forget-Me-Not Murders (1994), Jonathan Stone: Threat of Innocence (1994), Janek: A Silent Betrayal (1994), In the Name of Love: A Texas Tragedy (1995), Race Against Time: The Search for Sarah (1996), Texas Graces (1996), 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1997), Deep Fam-

2003 • Obituaries ily Secrets (1997), Heart Full of Rain (1997), and the 1999 mini-series To Serve and Protect. Crenna starred as Mitch O’Hannon in the short lived 1991 television series Pros and Cons, and was seen in the films Hot Shots! Part Deux (1993), A Pyromaniac’s Love Story (1995), Jade (1995), Sabrina (1995), and Wrongfully Accused (1998) with Leslie Nielsen. Crenna appeared regularly as Jared Duff in the Judging Amy television series from 2000, and appeared in episodes of JAG and Chicago Hope. His later credits also include television productions of Murder, She Wrote: A Story to Die For (2000), The Real McCoys Reunion (2000), By Dawn’s Early Light (2000), and The Day Reagan Was Shot (2001) as Ronald Reagan. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 19, 2003, B16; New York Times, Jan. 20, 2003, C12; People, Feb. 3, 2003, 93; Time, Jan. 27, 2003, 19; Variety, Jan. 27, 2003, 43.

Crepax, Guido Italian erotic cartoonist Guido Crepax died in Milan, Italy, of multiple sclerosis on July 31, 2003. He was 70. Crepax was born in Milan on

Guido Crepax

Obituaries • 2003

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Cronyn, Hume

Guido Crepax’s cartoon creation “Valentina”

July 15, 1933. He worked as a graphic artist from the late 1950s, designing book covers and record covers. He was best known as the creator of the Valentina comic strip, depicting the sadomasochistic of Italian photographer Valentina. Crepax created the character in 1965 and drew the strip until retiring Valentina in 1995. His strip was the basis of the 1973 film Baba Yaga starring Isabelle De Funes as Valentina. An Italian television adaptation starring Demetra Hampton was produced in 1988.

Stage and screen actor Hume Cronyn, who often starred opposite his late wife Jessica Tandy, died of prostate cancer at his home in Fairfield, Connecticut, on June 15, 2003. He was 91. Born in London, Ontario, Canada, on July 18, 1911, Cronyn began his career on stage in Montreal in 1930, and made his Broadway debut in 1934’s Hippers’ Holiday. He was also featured in Broadway productions of There’s Always a Breeze (1938) and Chekhov’s Three Sisters (1939). Cronyn made his film debut in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1943 suspense thriller Shadow of a Doubt shortly after his marriage to Jessica Tandy the previous year. He also appeared in the films Phantom of the Opera (1943) with Claude Rains, The Cross of Lorraine (1943), and Hitchcock’s Lifeboat (1944). He earned an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor for his role in 1944’s The Seventh Cross starring Spencer Tracy. While continuing to appear on stage, Cronyn was also seen in numerous films over the next five decades including Blonde Fever (1944), Main Street After Dark (1945), The Sailor Takes a Wife (1945), A Letter for Evie (1945), Zeigfeld Follies (1946), The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946), The Green Years (1946), The Beginning or the End (1947) as atomic bomb pioneer

Croft, Elisabeth British character actress Elisabeth Croft died in London on January 13, 2003. He was 95. She was born in Windermere, Cumberland, England, on September 22, 1907. She began her career on stage in the 1930s, appearing in such productions as Romeo and Juliet and The Merry Wives of Windsor. She was best known for her role as Miss Tatum in the British ITV television soap opera Crossroads from 1966 to 1976. After leaving Crossroads Croft was often seen on television commercials and appeared in the 1984 short film The Dress before retiring. Hume Cronyn (from There Was a Crooked Man)

95 Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, Brute Force (1947), The Bride Goes Wild (1948), Top o’ the Morning (1949), People Will Talk (1951) and Crowded Paradise (1956). He was also seen on television in the 1954 series The Marriage as Ben Marriott, which co-starred Tandy, and hosted the Chrysler Festival in 1956. Other television credits include productions of The Moon and Sixpence (1959), A Doll’s House (1959), and Juno and the Paycock (1960), and episodes of The Ford Theatre Hour, The Chevrolet Tele-Theatre, Studio One, Suspense, The Philco Television Playhouse, The U.S. Steel Hour, Climax!, The Alcoa Hour, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Barbara Stanwyck Show, Naked City, and Hawaii Five-O. Cronyn remained a popular character actor in such films as Sunrise at Campobello (1960), Cleopatra (1963), Hamlet (1964), The Arrangement (1969), Gaily, Gaily (1969), There Was a Crooked Man (1970), The Parallax View (1974), Conrack (1974), Rollover (1981), Honky Tonk Freeway (1981), The World According to Garp (1982), Impulse (1984), and Brewster’s Millions (1985). He and Tandy starred in a 1981 television production of The Gin Game, and they, along with other veteran actors, became popular with a new generation with the 1985 lighthearted science fiction film Cocoon, and the 1988 sequel Cocoon: The Return. They also starred together in the 1987 tele-film Foxfire and the 1987 feature *batteries not included. Cronyn also appeared in the tele-films Day One (1989), Age-Old Friends (1989) which earned him an Emmy Award, Christmas on Division Street (1991), and Neil Simon’s Broadway Bound (1992) which earned him a second Emmy. Cronyn again received an Emmy Award, and Tandy a nomination, for the 1993 tele-film To Dance with the White Dog. Tandy died of ovarian cancer the following year in 1994. Cronyn was featured the 1993 film adaptation of John Grisham’s The Pelican Brief, and the films Camilla (1994) and Marvin’s Room (1996). His later credits include the tele-films 12 Angry Men (1997), Horton Foote’s Alone (1997), Seasons of Love (1998), Sea People (1999), and Santa and Pete (1999). He was nominated for Daytime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Performer in a Children’s Special for his roles in Yesterday’s Children (2000) and Off Season (2001). Los Angeles Times, June 17, 2003, B12; New York Times, June 17, 2003, A1; People, June 30, 2003, 125; Time, June 30, 2003, 18; Variety, June 23, 2003, 55.

2003 • Obituaries

Cruz, Celia Cuban singer Celia Cruz, who was known as “the Queen of the Salsa,” died of brain cancer in Fort Lee, New Jersey, on July 16, 2003. She was 78. Cruz was born in Havana, Cuba, on October 21, 1924. She began her career on radio after winning a singing contest and was a popular star in Cuba in the 1940s and 1950s. She performed in the 1957 film Affair in Havana. Cruz left Cuba in 1960 after Fidel Castro took power, and settled in the United States. With the help of Tito Puente, she became a leading performer in New York, and toured throughout the world. Cruz received three Latin Grammy Awards during her career and was featured in the films Salsa (1988), Fires Within (1991), The Mambo Kings (1992), and The Perez Family (1995). Los Angeles Times, July 17, 2003, B12; New York Times, July 17, 2003, C13; People, Aug. 4, 2003, 69; Time, July 28, 2003, 22; Variety, July 21, 2003, 70.

Celia Cruz

Obituaries • 2003

96

Cuesta, Henry Henry Cuesta, a musician with Lawrence Welk’s orchestra, died at his home in Sherman Oaks, California, on December 17, 2003. He was 71. Cuesta began performing in the early 1950s, appearing with such artists as Jack Teagarden, Bob Crosby and Mel Torme. He played the saxophone and clarinet with The Lawrence Welk Show from 1972 to 1982. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 22, 2003, B9.

Dick Cusak

New York Times, June 4, 2003, C13; People, June 16, 2003, 107. Henry Cuesta

Cusack, Dick Actor Dick Cusack, the patriarch of the acting family that includes John and Joan Cusack, died of pancreatic cancer in Chicago on June 2, 2003. He was 77. The older Cusack appeared in character roles in over a dozen films including My Bodyguard (1980), Class (1983), Eight Men Out (1988), Things Change (1988), The Package (1989), Crazy People (1990), The Fugitive (1993), While You Were Sleeping (1995), Chain Reaction (1996), High Fidelity (2000), and Return to Me (2000). He was also seen in the tele-films The Lost Honor of Kathryn Beck (1984), Overexposed (1992), Evil Has a Face (1996), and The Jack Bull (1999) which he also scripted. His other television credits include episodes of Sable and Early Edition.

Daigneault, Pierre Canadian actor, singer and author Pierre Daigneault died of a heart attack in Laval, Quebec, Canada, on December 17, 2003. He was 78. Daigneault was born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on March 25, 1925, the son of actor Eugene Daigneault. He was best known as a singer of French-Canadian folk songs, hosting numerous radio and television programs. He was also the author of numerous detective and spy novels from the 1940s. Under the pseudonym Pierre Saurel, he created the French-Canadian secret agent, IXE-13, who starred in many of his books. During the 1950s, Daigneault appeared in the television series Beau Temps, Mauvais Temps (1955), Les Belles Histoires des Pays-d’en-Haut (1956) as Father Ovide, and Le Survenant (1957). He also appeared in the films J.A. Martin Photographer (1977) and Cordelia (1980).

97

2003 • Obituaries 2003. He was 62. D’Alessandria was born in Rome on December 10, 1941. He worked in films from the 1960s as an assistant director and editor. He directed the 1978 film Mental Processes and 1980’s Passages. D’Allesandria also directed and scripted the films Emperor of Rome (1988), The Imaginary Friend (1994), and Queen Coeli (2001).

Dan, Reiko

Pierre Daigneault

D’Alessandria, Nico Italian film writer and director Nico D’Alessandria died in Rome, Italy, on December 22,

Leading Japanese actress Reiko Dan died of a heart attack in Tokyo on November 24, 2003. She was 68. Dan was born in Kyoto, Japan, on March 26, 1935. She began her film career in the 1950s, appearing in such features as The Last Pursuit (1957), A Holiday in Tokyo (1958), The Happy Pilgrimage (1958), All About Marriage (1958), The Young Beast (1958), The College Hero (1958), Three Dolls in College (1959), Magic Monkey Sky (1959), Three Dolls in Ginza (1959), Three Dolls from Hong Kong (1966), Three Dolls and Three Guys (1960), Daughters, Wives and a Mother (1960), The Dangerous Kiss (1960), Tell It to the Dolls (1960), Anything Goes Three Dolls’ Way (1960), The Masterless 47 (1960), When a Woman Ascends the Stairs (1960), Romance Express (1961), The Diplomat’s Mansion (1961), Bull of the Campus (1961), The Last of Summer (1961), Akira Kurosawa’s Sanjuro (1962), Pride of the Campus (1962), Star of Hong Kong (1962), Irresponsible Era of Japan (1962), Young Season (1962), The Wiser Age (1962), Ayako (1962), My Hobo (1963), Operation Mad Dog (1963), Wonderful Bad Woman (1963), The Call of Flesh (1964), Red Beard (1965), Fort Graveyard (1965), Crazy Adventure (1965), The Boss of Pickpocket Bay (1966), The Daphne (1966), This Is Youth! (1966), and The Age of Assassins (1967).

Daumier, Sophie

Nico D’Alessandria

French comedienne Sophie Daumier died of complications from Huntington’s Disease in France on December 31, 2003. She was 66. Daumier was born Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, on November 24, 1937. She made her film debut in the mid–1950s, appearing in such movies as On Foot, On Horse, and On Wheels (1957), When a

Obituaries • 2003

98

Elise Miller Davis

Sophie Daumier

Woman Meddles (1957), Honey, Scare Me (1958), Women Are Talkative (1958), A Dog, a Mouse, and a Sputnik (1958), Night Dance Hall (1959), Amelie of The Time to Love (1961), Sweet and Sour (1963), Carom Shots (1963), Love at Sea (1963), Do You Like Women? (1964), Crime on a Summer Morning (1965), How Not to Rob a Department Store (1965), For a Few Extra Dollars (1967), Thumbs Up (1971), Violette & Francois (1977), As the Moon (1977), Freddy (1978), and A Simple Story (1978). She performed often with French comic actor Guy Bedos, whom she married in 1965 and divorced in 1977.

Davis, Matthew Rock singer and musician Matthew Davis died in Normal, Illinois, on August 10, 2003 of

Davis, Elise Miller Author Elise Miller Davis died at her home in Dallas, Texas, on May 11, 2003. Davis wrote numerous articles for such magazines as Reader’s Digest and Women’s Day. While working on an article on Roy Rogers and Dale Evans for Reader’s Digest, she decided to write a book about the couple. Published in 1955, The Answer Is God became a best-seller.

Matthew Davis

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2003 • Obituaries

a suspected allergic reaction. He was 26. Davis was guitarist and singer with the rock band Ten Grand from Iowa City. The group had recently released their debut album This Is the Way to Rule, and were preparing for a United States tour at the time of Davis’ death.

Davy, Walter Austrian actor and director Walter Davy died in Vienna, Austria, on September 14, 2003. He was 78. Davy was born in Vienna on December 20, 1924. He studied at the Max Reinhardt Seminar in Vienna and began working as an assistant director for stage productions in the late 1940s. Davy worked for Austrian radio in the early 1950s and was a documentary film producer later in the decade. From the 1960s he was a director for numerous theaters throughout Europe. He also directed several tele-films including Tatort (1971) and Die Parade (1974), and the theatrical film Stationschef Fallmerayer (1975). As an actor Davy was best known as Paul Schremser, the one-legged police inspector, in the Austrian television series Kottan Ermittelt from 1976 to 1982. He was also seen in the films Kassbach — Ein Portrait (1979) and The Uppercrust (1981), and the 1995 tele-film Bliss by Installments.

Walter Davy

Ronnie Dawson

1939. Known as the Blonde Bomber, he began his career in the 1950s, singing such hits as “I Make the Love” and “Action Packed.” In the late 1950s he briefly performed as an R&B singer under the names Snake Munroe and Commonwealth Jones. He also played drums with the Western swing band the Lightcrust Doughboys. In the 1960s Dawson formed the Levee Singers, a folk act that toured and performed on such television programs as Hootenanny, The Danny Kaye Show, The Jimmy Dean Show, and Hollywood Palace. In the 1970s he led a country rock group called Steel Rail. He also performed on numerous commercial jingles and, in 1995, appeared on Late Night with Conan O’Brien. New York Times, Oct. 4, 2003, A11.

Dawson, Ronnie

Deane, Buddy

Rock singer Ronnie Dawson died of cancer in Dallas, Texas, on September 30, 2003. He was 64. Dawson was born in Dallas on August 11,

Television host Buddy Deane died of complications from a stroke in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, on June 16, 2003. Deane was born in Saint

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Buddy Deane

Charles, Arkansas, on August 2, 1924. A radio disc jockey, he was the host of the Baltimore, Maryland, dance-party television show The Buddy Deane Show from 1957 to 1964. He served as the inspiration for the character Corny Collins in John Waters’ 1988 film Hairspray and had a small cameo role in the film.

Brian de Benedictis

de Benedictis, Brian Actor Brian de Benedictis died of lung cancer in New York City on August 23, 2003. A New York stage performer and abstract artist, De Benedictis was featured in the films What Alice Found (2003) and As Luck Would Have It (2003). He also appeared in the television series 100 Centre Street.

de Jong, Dola Mystery writer Dola de Jong died in Laguna Woods, California, after a long illness on November 19, 2003. She was 92. De Jong was born in Arnhem, the Netherlands, on October 10, 1911. She came to the United States in the early 1940s after the Nazi invasion of the Netherlands. She received the Edgar Allan Poe Award for her 1964 mystery novel The Whirligig of Time. She was also the author of the children’s books The Level Land (1943) and Return to the Level Land (1947), And the Field Is the World (1947), the World War II novel The Tree and the Vine (1951), and the 1963 mystery The House on Charlton Street. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 22, 2003, B25; New York Times, Nov. 26, 2003, B8.

Dola de Jong

Delaney, Sean Rock songwriter and producer Prentice “Sean” Delaney died of a stroke in Orem, Utah, on April 13, 2003. He was 58. Delaney was born

101

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Joseph Della Sorte

Sean Delaney

in Tempe, Arizona, in 1944. He was instrumental in the early successes of the rock group KISS, serving as their first road manager and helping to implement their unique stage presence. He also co-wrote many KISS songs including “All American Man,” “Living in Sin,” and “Rocket Ride.” Delaney also recorded a solo album in 1979, Highway.

Della Sorte, Joseph Character actor Joseph Della Sorte died of pancreatic cancer in Los Angeles on July 20, 2003. Della Sorte began his career on stage and appeared on Broadway in productions of Ross (1961), Billy (1969), and Ari (1971). He was featured in the films The Godfather, Part II (1974), Las Vegas Lady (1975), Psychic Killer (1975), Starchaser: The Legend of Orin (1985), The Man from Elysian Fields (2001), and The 4th Tenor (2002). He was also seen in the tele-films A Sensitive, Passionate Man (1977), A Masterpiece of Murder

(1986), Jack Spanner, Private Eye (1989), and 83 Hours ’Til Dawn (1990). Della Sorte’s other television credits include episodes of The Rockford Files, The Blue Knight, The Fantastic Journey, CHiPs, Emergency!, Lottery!, Tales from the Darkside, Family Ties, Brimstone, and Baywatch.

Delmar, Frank Film and television costume designer Frank Delmar died of a heart attack at his home in West Los Angeles on March 13, 2003. He was 93. Delmar was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1909, and trained as an opera singer before emigrating to the United States. He began working in films as a wardrober with Western Costume Co. in the early 1940s. He worked on such films as Streets of Laredo (1949), Jeopardy (1953), The Ten Commandments (1956), From Hell It Came (1957), Tank Battalion (1957), and Little Big Man (1970). Delmar also worked often in television on such series as The Adventures of Jim Bowie, Gunsmoke, and The Untouchables. He was named head of CBS’s costume department in the mid–1960s, working on such shows as My Three Sons, Gilligan’s Island, Wild Wild West, and Hawaii Five-O. He retired in 1985. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 19, 2003, B11.

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DeLys, GoGo

Denis, Michaela

Singer GoGo DeLys died on February 19, 2003. She was 94. DeLys was born Marie Gabrielle Belanger in Canada in 1908. She performed with the Jimmy Grier Band and became one of the first female singers on radio’s Your Hit Parade. She retired from performing following her marriage to Robert Redd in the early 1940s.

British actress Michaela Denis who, with her husband, Armand, was a television wildlife program pioneer, died in Kikambala, Kenya, on May 8, 2003. She was 89. She was born Michaela Holdsworth in London on August 28, 1913. She worked as a fashion designer in New York before her marriage to Armand Denis in 1948. She was Deborah Kerr’s understudy for the 1950 film King Solomon’s Mines. She and her husband subsequently starred in several British wildlife television series including Filming Wild Animals (1954), Filming in Africa (1955), On Safari (1957 to 1959, and from 1961 to 1965), Michaela and Armand Denis (1955–1958), and Safari to Asia (1959–1961). They also made the 1954 feature film Below the Sahara, and Michaela wrote the books Leopard in My Lap (1957) and Ride on a Rhino (1960). She was widowed in 1971. Four years later she married the former Chief Justice of the Sudan, Sir William O’Brien Lindsay, who died several months after their wedding. Los Angeles Times, May 18, 2003, B19.

GoGo DeLys

DeMilo, Cardella Singer Cardella DeMilo died of an aneurysm in Los Angeles on January 5, 2003. She was 71. DeMillo was best known for her rendition of the song “Mama Tell Me What to Do.” She was seen in several films including Blackenstein (1973), Dolemite (1975), Rude (1982), and Street Wars (1994). She also appeared on television in several episodes of Sanford and Son, and was featured as Ella Fitzgerald in the 1999 cable film Pirates of Silicon Valley.

Michaela Denis

103

Deray, Jacques French film director Jacques Deray died at his home overnight in Boulogne-Billancourt, France, a suburb of Paris on August 10, 2003. He was 74. Deray was born Jacques Desrayaud in Lyon Rhone, France, on February 19, 1929. He studied acting before working in films as an assistant director in the 1950s. Deray made his directoral debut with 1960’s The Gigolo, which he also scripted. Best known for his crime dramas and thrillers, Deray helmed such features as Rififi in Tokyo (1962), The Corrupt (1963), Crime on a Summer Morning (1965), To Skin a Spy (1966), That Man George (1966), The Swimming Pool (1969), one of nine films he made with actor Alain Delon, Borsalino (1970), A Few Hours of Sunlight (1971), Easy Down There! (1971), The Outside Man (1973), Blood on the Streets (1974), Cop Story (1975), The Gang (1977), Butterfly on the Shoulder (1978), Three Men to Kill (1980), The Outsider (1983), He Died with His Eyes Open (1985), The Loner (1987), Malady of Love (1987), Dark Woods (1989), Netchaiev Is Back (1991), Against Oblivion (1991), A Crime (1991), The Teddy Bear (1994), 3,000 Scenarios to Combat a

Jacques Deray

2003 • Obituaries

Virus (1994), Clarissa (1998), and the 2001 television production Lettre d’une Inconnue. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 11, 2003, B9; New York Times, Aug. 12, 2003, A19; Variety, Aug. 25, 2003, 108.

Devereaux, Ed Australian actor Ed Devereaux, who was best known for his role as head ranger Matt Hammond in the Skippy the Bush Kangaroo television series in the mid–1960s, died in London of complications from heart problems and cancer on December 16, 2003. He was 78. Devereaux was born in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, in 1925. He appeared in numerous films from the mid–1950s including The Case of the Red Monkey (1955), The Shiralee (1957), Carry On Sergeant (1958), Floods of Fear (1959), The Captain’s Table (1959), The Savage Innocents (1959), Carry On Nurse (1959), There Was a Crooked Man (1960), Watch Your Stern (1960), Man in the Moon (1960), Bottoms Up (1960), A Coming-Out Party (1961), Carry On Regardless (1961), Carry On Cruising (1962), The Password Is Courage (1962), Mix Me a Person (1962), The Wrong Arm of the Law (1963), Heavens Above! (1963), Ladies Who Do (1963), Sing and Swing (1963), Never Put It in Writing (1964), Carry On Jack (1964), The Bargee (1964), They’re a Weird Mob (1966), Journey Out of Darkness (1967), The Intruders (1969), Nickel Queen (1971), Bless This House (1972), Barry McKenzie Holds His Own (1974), To the Devil … a Daughter (1976), Pressure (1976), Money Movers (1979), Claudia (1985), I Bought a Vampire Motorcycle

Ed Devereaux

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(1990), and Buddy’s Song (1990). Devereaux starred as Martin Borman in the 1973 tele-film The Death of Adolf Hitler. He was also seen in television productions of Come Back, Little Sheba (1977), Edward and Mrs. Simpson (1980), The Dismissal (1983), Reunion at Farnborough (1985), Robbery Under Arms (1985), Bon Voyage (1985), True Believers (1988), Tanamera — Lion of Singapore (1988), The Clean Machine (1988), The Saint: Fear in Fun Park (1989), Goldeneye: The Secret Life of Ian Fleming (1989), The Saint in Australia (1990), and The Preventers (1996). Devereaux’s other television credits include roles in the series My Brother Jack, Kings, Snakes and Ladders, The Saint, The Persuaders, Great Mysteries, The Zoo Gang, The Sweeney, The Duchess of Duke Street, The Professionals, Whoops Apocalypse, Cats Eyes, Worlds Beyond, and Absolutely Fabulous.

Di Leo, Fernando Italian film director and writer Fernando Di Leo died in Rome on December 2, 2003. He was 71. Di Leo was born in San Ferdinando di Puglia, Italy, in 1932. He began directing and writing films in the early 1960s with 1964’s I Tre Magnifici Eroi. Di Leo was a writer for Sergio Leone’s spaghetti westerns A Fistful of Dollars (1964) and

Fernando Di Leo

For a Few Dollars More (1965) starring Clint Eastwood. He also wrote The Return of Ringo (1965), Seven Guns for the MacGregors (1965), Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (1968), The Brute and the Beast (1966), A Dollar a Head (1967), Long Days of Vengeance (1966), Johnny Yuma (1967), Wanted (1967), Up the MacGregors (1967), Poker with Pistols (1967), Pecos Cleans Up (1967), Hate for Hate (1967), God Made Them … I Kill Them (1967), Death Rides Along (1967), Beyond the Law (1967), The Ruthless Four (1968), and And Then a Time for Killing (1968). He directed and wrote numerous action films from the late 1960s including Code Name, Red Roses (1968), A Woman on Fire (1969), Naked Violence (1969), The Cold-Blooded Beast (aka Slaughter Hotel) (1971), Caliber 9 (1972), Black Kingpin (1972), Seduction (1973), Wipeout! (1973), Shoot First, Die Later (1974), Loaded Guns (1974), Kidnap Syndicate (1975), The Big Boss (1976), Nick the Sting (1976), Being Twenty (1978), The Violent Breed (1984), and Death Commando (1985).

Dimopoulos, Dinos Greek film director Dinos Dimopoulos died in Athens, Greece, on February 28, 2003. He was

Dinos Dimopoulos

105 81. He appeared in several films in the late 1940s before he began directing. He helmed over 50 films during his career including The Shepherdess’ Lover (1955), Horse and Carriage (1958), The House on Stournara Street (1959), Amaryllis (1959), Madalena (1960), Lola (1964), The Rape (1965), The Asphalt Fever (1967), O Valtos (1972), and Trelos kai Pasis Ellados (1983).

DiNardo, Olimpia Italian actress Olimpia DiNardo died in Rome on May 29, 2003. She was 55. DiNardo was born in Naples, Italy, on February 28, 1948. She was a leading actress from the late 1970s featured in such films as Hit Squad (1977), Crime at Porta Romana (1980), Delitto al Ristorante Cinese (1981), Delitto in Formula Uno (1984), and Cop in Drag (1984).

Dissel, Werner

2003 • Obituaries

clude The Opportunists (1960), Naked Among the Wolves (1963), Architekten (1990), Mau Mau (1992), Lost Landscape (1992), The Mystery of the Amber Room (1992), The Visitor (1992), Live Shot (1998), and Anatomy (2002). He also appeared often on Germany television in the 1990s.

Dolabella, Carlos Eduardo Popular Brazilian television actor Carlos Eduardo Dolabella died of multiple organ failure in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on May 26, 2003. He was 65. Dolabella was born in Rio de Janeiro on June 11, 1937. He was best known for his roles in numerous Brazilian soap operas, known as telenovelas, from the 1960s. He was also featured in over a dozen films including Tarzan and the Great River (1967), Killed the Family and Went to the Movies (1967), The Night of My Love (1968), Motel (1974), The Claudia Case (1979), and O Misterio de Robin Hood (1990). Variety, July 21, 2003, 71.

Leading German character actor Werner Dissel died in Wildpark West, Germany, on January 22, 2003. He was 90. Dissel was born in Koln, Germany, on October 26, 1912. Featured in numerous films from the 1950s, his credits in-

Carlos Eduardo Dolabella

Donen, Peter

Werner Dissel

Special effects supervisor Peter Donen died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on December 31, 2003. He was 50. Donen was the son of film director Stanley Donen. He began working in films

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106

Donovan, Henry B. Film and television executive Henry B. Donovan died in Los Angeles on October 23, 2003. He was 89. Donovan began his career in films with RKO Pathé Studios in the early 1930s, where he worked as a cameraman and assistant director. He also worked as a prop master on numerous Hopalong Cassidy films starring William Boyd. After working with the U.S. Army Signal Corps during World War II, he headed Telemount Pictures, producing the documentary shorts Little Amigo, Cahuengo Pass, San Andreas Fault, Magic Lady, and Our Flag. Donovan wrote and produced the Western television series Cowboy G-Men starring Russell Hayden and Jackie Coogan from 1952 to 1953. Variety, Dec. 22, 2003, 64.

Donovan, Robert J. Peter Donen

in the late 1970s, serving as a production manager on such films as Superman (1978), More American Graffiti (1979), Altered States (1980), Jagged Edge (1985), and Clan of the Cave Bear (1986). He subsequently began working as a visual effects designer for music videos and commercials and created title designs for such films as Outland (1981), Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983), Gremlins (1984), and Blame It on Rio (1984). He continued to work as a visual effects supervisor on numerous films including Ladyhawke (1985), Spaceballs (1987), Who’s That Girl? (1987), Child’s Play (1988), Flatliners (1990), Mr. Destiny (1990), Dying Young (1991), Richie Rich (1994), The Quick and the Dead (1995), The Tie That Binds (1995), Steal Big, Steal Little (1995), Executive Decision (1996), L.A. Confidential (1997), U.S. Marshals (1998), The Horse Whisperer (1998), For Love of the Game (1999), U-571 (2000), The Gift (2000), The Bourne Identity (2002), and Ladder 49 (2004).

Journalist Robert J. Donovan, who wrote the best-selling book PT-109: John F. Kennedy in World War II, died of complications of a stroke in St. Petersburg, Florida, on August 8, 2003. He

Robert J. Donovan

107 was 90. Donovan was born in Buffalo, New York, on August 21, 1912. He began working with The New York Herald Tribune in the 1930s. Donovan served in World War II and reported for the armed services newspaper Stars and Stripes. After the war he was sent by the Herald Tribune to cover the United Nations. Donovan became head of the Washington desk for the newspaper in 1957. He was switched to the Los Angeles Times in 1963. He served as associate editor of the Times from 1970 until 1977. PT 109, his account of President John Kennedy’s wartime exploits, was published in 1961 and adapted for a film starring Cliff Robertson in 1963. Donovan also wrote the books Eisenhower: The Inside Story (1956), Conflict and Crisis: The Presidency of Harry S Truman, 1945– 1948 (1977) and Tumultuous Years: The Presidency of Harry S Truman, 1949–1953 (1982), The Second Victory: The Marshall Plan and the Postwar Revival of Europe (1987), and Unsilent Revolution: Television News and American Public Life, 1948– 1991 (1992). Los Angeles Times, Aug. 9, 2003, B21; New York Times, Aug. 10, 2003, 23; Time, Aug. 18, 2003, 21.

2003 • Obituaries

West Sussex, England, on April 20, 2003. He was 82. Douglas was born in London on June 19, 1920. He worked in British radio in the 1950s, hosting his own program, In the Still of the Night, on BBC. He also composed scores for over 30 films including The Day of the Triffids (1962), The Traitors (1963), The Hijackers (1963), The Bay of Saint Michel (1963), Gunfighters of Casa Grande (1964), Code 7, Victim 5 (1965), Mozambique (1965), Crack in the World (1965), City of Fear (1965), Kid Rodelo (1965), Dateline Diamonds (1965), Circus of Fear (aka Psycho-Circus) (1966), Company of Fools (1966), Run Like a Thief (1967), The Railway Children (1970), and Dulcina (1971). Douglas also worked in U.S. television, creating music for such animated series as G.I. Joe, SpiderMan and His Amazing Friends, The Incredible Hulk, Dungeons & Dragons, and Transformers.

Douglass, Charles Television sound engineer Charles Douglass died on April 8, 2003. He was 93. Douglas was born in Mexico, where his father worked as an

Douglas, Johnny British film and television composer Johnny Douglas died of prostate cancer in Bognor Regis,

Johnny Douglas

Charles Douglass (with his “laff-box”)

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electrical engineer, on January 2, 1910. He worked at CBS as a radio engineer before serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He worked in television after the war as a sound engineer. He was best known for his creation of the Laff Box, which added a laugh track during tapings of television comedies. For his contributions to th media, he was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Emmy in 1992. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 25, 2003, B12; New York Times, Apr. 26, 2003, C18; People, May 12, 2003, 181; Variety, Apr. 28, 2003, 79.

Downey, Ron Western book and magazine publisher and editor Ron Downey died in a Waynesville, North Carolina, hospital on November 8, 2003. He was 62. Downey and his wife, Linda, began publishing the magazine Under Western Skies in 1978. They later published and edited Cliff hanger and World of Yesterday. Downey’s World of Yesterday Publishing also published numerous important volumes on western films including The Life and Films of Buck Jones, The Films of the Cisco Kid, The Films of Hopalong Cassidy, The Tom Mix Book, and Those Great Cowboy Sidekicks.

Draper, Rusty Singer and actor Rusty Draper died of pneumonia in Bellevue, Washington, on March 28, 2003. He was 80. He was born Farrell H. Draper in Kirksville, Missouri, on January 25, 1923. He worked at an Iowa radio station in the early 1940s before moving to San Francisco. He recorded numerous hit songs from the early 1950s including “Gambler’s Guitar” (1953), “The Shifting, Whispering Sands” (1955), “Seventeen” (1955), “Are You Satisfied?” (1955), “Freight Train” (1957), “Mule Skinner Blues” (1960), “Two Little Boys” (1970), and “Harbor Lights” (1980). Draper also performed in stage productions of Oklahoma! and Annie Get Your Gun and sang the title song for the 1955 film The Last Frontier. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 4, 2003, B15; New York Times, Apr. 3, 2003, D9; Time, Apr. 14, 2003, 27.

Rusty Draper

Ron Downey

109

Drew, Ellen Ellen Drew, a leading actress from the 1940s, died of a liver ailment in Palm Desert, California, on December 3, 2003. She was 89. She was born Ester Loretta Ray in Kansas City, Missouri, on November 23, 1914. She went to Hollywood after winning a local beauty contest. She worked as a waitress before being discovered by actor and agent William Demarest, and was signed to a contract by Paramount. She had small parts in numerous films in the mid–1930s, often billed as Terry Ray. Her films include The Return of Sophie Lang (1936), Rhythm on the Range (1936), My American Wife (1936), Yours for the Asking (1936), Hollywood Boulevard (1936), Lady Be Careful (1936), Wives Never Know (1936), Murder with Pictures (1936), The Big Broadcast of 1937 (1936), Rose Bowl (1936), The Accusing Finger (1936), College Holiday (1936), Murder Goes to College (1937), The Crime Nobody Saw (1937), Interns Can’t Take Money (1937), Make Way for Tomorrow (1937), Mountain Music (1937), Hotel Haywire (1937), Turn Off the Moon (1937), Night of Mystery (1937), This Way Please (1937), The Buccaneer (1938), Scandal Street (1938), Dangerous to Know (1938), Bluebeard’s Eighth Wife (1938), Cocoanut Grove (1938), and You and Me (1938). She graduated to

2003 • Obituaries

larger roles with 1938’s Sing You Sinners starring Bing Crosby. Changing her name to Erin, then Ellen, Drew, she continued to appear in such films as If I Were King (1938), The Lady’s from Kentucky (1939), The Gracie Allen Murder Case (1939), Geronimo (1939), French Without Tears (1940), Women Without Names (1940), Buck Benny Rides Again (1940), Preston Sturges’ Christmas in July (1940) with William Powell, The Texas Rangers Ride Again (1940), The Mad Doctor (1941), The Monster and the Girl (1941), Reaching for the Sun (1941), The Parson of Panamint (1941), Our Wife (1941), The Night of January 16th (1941), The Remarkable Andrew (1942), My Favorite Spy (1942), Star Spangled Rhythm (1942), Ice-Capades Revue (1942), Night Plane from Chungking (1943), The Impostor (1944), That’s My Baby (1944), Dark Mountain (1944), China Sky (1945), Isle of the Dead (1945) with Boris Karloff, Man Alive (1945), Sing While You Dance (1946), Crime Doctor’s Man Hunt (1946), Johnny O’Clock (1947), The Swordsman (1948), The Man from Colorado (1949), The Crooked Way (1949), Davy Crockett, Indian Scout (1950), The Baron of Arizona (1950), Cargo to Capetown (1950), Stars in My Crown (1950), The Great Missouri Raid (1951), Man in the Saddle (1951), America for Me (1953), and Outlaw’s Son (1957). She also appeared often on television in the 1950s, guest-starring in episodes of The Ford Television Theatre, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, Lux Video Theatre, Science Fiction Theater, The Millionaire, Perry Mason, and The Barbara Stanwyck Show. She largely retired from acting in the early 1960s. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 6, 2003, B28; New York Times, Dec. 9, 2003, A29; Variety, Dec. 25, 2003, 57.

Dryden, Robert

Ellen Drew

Veteran actor Robert Dryden died after a long illness with Parkinson’s disease on December 16, 2003. He was 86. Dryden was a prolific performer on radio and was heard in hundreds of episodes of such series as The Shadow, Gangbusters, The FBI in Peace and War, and CBS Radio Mystery Theater. He also performed on Broadway and was seen in the films Four Boys and a Gun (1957), Taking Off (1971), Man on a Swing (1974), The Happy Hooker (1975), Fore Play (1975), and Prince of the City (1981). Dryden’s television ap-

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pearances include the daytime soap opera Edge of Night, and episodes of such series as The Aloca Hour, Suspicion, Naked City, The Jackie Gleason Show, Playhouse 90, The Nurses, The Defenders, and Kojak.

Dubois, Jean-Yves French actor Jean-Yves Dubois died in Paris on January 17, 2003. He was 44. Dubois was born in Chartres, Eure-et-Loir, France, on February 27, 1958. He performed with the ComedieFrancaise from the early 1980s, and was featured in numerous films including The Eyes of the Birds (1983), La Serva Amorosa (1994), The Proprietor (1996), Port Djema (1997), and A Big Girl Like You (2003).

Amram Ducovny

which was performed Off Broadway in 1967. He also authored the biography David Ben-Gurion in His Own Words. He wrote his first novel, Coney, about his childhood growing up in Coney Island, in 2000. Ducovny was the father of The X-Files star David Duchovny. New York Times, Sept. 2, 2003, C10.

Dudinskaya, Natalya

Jean-Yves Dubois

Ducovny, Amram Novelist Amram Ducovny died of heart disease in Paris, Francis, on August 23, 2003. He was 74. Born in New York City in 1929, Ducovny wrote the play The Trial of Lee Harvey Oswald,

Russian ballet dancer Natalya Dudinskaya died in St. Petersburg, Russia, on January 29, 2003. She was 90. She was born in Kharkov, Ukraine, on August 21, 1912. Trained in classical ballet style, Dudinskaya joined the Kirov Ballet in Lenningrad in 1931. She first played her signature role of Laurencia with Vakhtang Chabukiani in 1939. During the 1940s and 1950s Dudinskaya was the leading ballerina with the Kirov and was married to the artistic director, Konstantin Sergeyev. She starred in productions of Swan Lake, Cinderella (1946), and Path of Thunder (1957). She was also instrumental in Rudolf Nureyev’s career, chosing him for her leading man in a 1958 production of Laurencia. She retired from dancing in 1962 but continued to teach

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Natalya Dudinskaya

at the Kirov and the Vaganova Academy. Her husband died in 1992. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 2, 2003, B16; New York Times, Feb. 1, 2003, A16; Variety, Mar. 31, 2003, 53. Dave Dudley

Dudley, Dave Country singer Dave Dudley died of a heart attack in Danbury, Wisconsin, on December 22, 2003. He was 75. He was born David Darwin Pedruska in Spencer, Wisconsin, on May 3, 1928. He began his career in the 1950s as a radio disc jockey and performed with the Dave Dudley Trio. He had several popular songs in the early 1960s with “Maybe I Do” and “Under Cover of the Night.” He was best known as a pioneer of songs about track drivers with 1963’s “Six Days

on the Road.” He recorded over 40 hit songs over the next two decades including “Mad,” “Truck Drivin’ Son of a Gun,” “Vietnam Blues,” and “The Pool Shark.” New York Times, Dec. 24, 2003, A21.

Dunne, John Gregory Author John Gregory Dunne died of a heart attack at his Manhattan apartment on Decem-

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Durdik, Vladimir Slovakian actor Vladimir Durdik died on March 9, 2003. He was 53. Durdik was featured in several Czechoslovakian films in the 1980s including Navrat Jana Petru (1984), As Good as Poison (1985), Kohut Nezaspieva (1986) and Nemozna (1988). He appeared in the 1992 German-Canadian television mini-series By Way of the Stars, and was featured in 2000 film Dragonheart: A New Beginning.

John Gregory Dunne

ber 30, 2003. He was 71. Dunne was born in Hartford, Connecticut, on May 25, 1932. He began his career as a journalist, working for Time magazine. He married author Joan Didion in 1964, and the couple collaborated on several screenplays in the 1970s including The Panic in Needle Park (1971), Play It as It Lays (1972), and A Star Is Born (1976). He had previously authored a book about 20th Century–Fox, The Studio, in 1969. Dunne was best known as the author of the best-selling novel True Confessions, which he and Didion adapted for film in 1981 which starred Robert Duvall and Robert De Niro. He also wrote the popular novels Dutch Shea, Jr., The Red White and Blue, Harp, and Playland. Dunne scripted the 1995 tele-film Broken Trust. He and Didion also worked on a script about the life of reporter Jessica Savitch, which became the 1996 film Up Close and Personal starring Robert Redford and Michelle Pfeiffer. He was the brother of author Dominick Dunne and the uncle of actor Griffin Dunne and the late actress Dominique Dunne, who was murdered in 1982. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 31, 2003, A1; New York Times, Jan. 1, 2004; People, Jan. 19, 2004, 74; Time, Jan. 12 2004, 23; Variety, Jan. 5, 2004, 62.

Vladimir Durdik

Durniok, Manfred German film producer Manfred Durniok died of a heart attack in Berlin on March 7, 2003. He was 68. Durniok was born in Berlin on May 2, 1934. He began working in films in the late 1950s and was involved in over 500 productions throughout the world during his career. He was producer of Istvan Szabo’s 1981 Oscar-winning foreign film, Mephisto. Durniok also produced the films The Catamount Killing (1974), Avaete, Seed of Revenge (1985), Moments (1989) which he also directed, The Dancer (1989), The Last U-Boat (1990), Ich und Christine (1993), and Hotel Shanghai (1996).

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Manfred Durniok

Los Angeles Times, Mar. 27, 2003, B17; Variety, Mar. 24, 2003, 83.

Dusty, Slim Australian country singer Slim Dusty died of kidney cancer at his home in Sydney, Australia, on September 19, 2003. He was 76. He was born David Gordon Kirkpatrick in Kempsey, New South Wales, Australia, on June 13, 1927. A leading singer and songwriter, Dusty recorded over 100 albums during his career. His most popular song was 1957’s “The Pub with No Beer.” Dusty also had a hit with a recording of “Waltzing Matilda” in 1983. He played himself in the 1984 biographical film The Slim Dusty Movie. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 20, 2003, B20; New York Times, Nov. 20, 2003, A11; Variety, Sept. 29, 2003, 76.

Eben, Al Character actor Al Eben died in Los Angeles on July 24, 2003. He was 88. Eben was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on March 11, 1915. He was featured in numerous films from the early 1940s including Orson Welles’ Citizen Kane (1941), A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1945), Gangs of the Waterfront (1945), White Pongo (1945), Dead-

Slim Dusty

Al Eben (with George Reeves as Superman)

line at Dawn (1946), The Brasher Doubloon (1947), Body and Soul (1947), The Lady from Shanghai (1947), The Miracle of the Bells (1948), Lightnin’ in the Forest (1948), Arch of Triumph (1948), Black Eagle (1948), Shockproof (1949), City Across the River (1949), It Happens Every Spring (1949), Thieves’ Highway (1949), And Baby Makes Three (1949), No Sad Songs for Me (1950), Bowery Battalion (1951), Sirocco (1951), Harlem Globetrotters (1951), Korea Patrol (1951), Hold That

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114

Line (1952), Taxi (1953), The Juggler (1953), and The Big Heat (1953). Eben was also seen on television in episodes of Superman, Petticoat Junction, The Beverly Hillbillies, and Charlie’s Angels. He was Doc Bergman, a recurring character on Hawaii Five-O, from 1970 to 1976. In recent years Eben appeared in the film Corky Romano (2001) and an episode of television’s Everybody Loves Raymond.

Ebsen, Buddy Leading actor Buddy Ebsen, who was best known for his role as Jed Clampett in the longrunning television series The Beverly Hillbillies in the 1960s, died in a Torrance, California, hospital on July 6, 2003. He was 95. He had been admitted to the hospital several weeks earlier. Ebsen was born Christian Rudolph Ebsen in Belleville, Illinois, on April 2, 1908. Trained as a dancer by his father, he began his career in vaudeville and appeared on Broadway in the 1920s. Ebsen made his film debut in 1935’s Broadway Melody of 1936 and appeared in numerous films over the next 60 years. His film credits include Born to Dance (1936), Captain January (1936), Banjo on My Knee (1936), Broadway Melody of 1938 (1937), The Girl of the Golden West (1938), My Lucky Star (1938), Yellow Jack (1938), Four Girls in White (1939), and The Kid from Texas (1939). Ebsen was originally cast as the Tin Man in 1939’s The Wizard of Oz, but was forced to leave the production when he developed an extreme allergic reaction to the makeup. He was replaced in the role by Jack Haley. Ebsen continued to appear in such films as They Met in Argentina (1941), Parachute Battalion (1941), and Sing Your Worries Away (1942). He returned to the stage, but resumed his film career eight years later as a character actor, starring in Under Mexicali Stars (1950), Silver City Bonanza (1951), Thunder in God’s Country (1951), Rodeo King and the Senorita (1951), Utah Wagon Train (1951), Night People (1954), Red Garters (1954), Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier (1954) and the 1956 sequel Davy Crockett and the River Pirates as George Russel, Attack (1956), Between Heaven and Hell (1956), Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961), The Interns (1962), Mail Order Bride (1964), and The One and Only, Genuine, Original Family Band (1968). He was also featured in a handful of tele-films including The An-

Buddy Ebsen

dersonville Trial (1970), The Daughters of Joshua Cabe (1972), Horror at 37,000 Feet (1973), Tom Sawyer (1973), The President’s Plane Is Missing (1973) as the vice president, Smash-Up on Interstate 5 (1976), Leave Yesterday Behind (1978), The Bastard (1978), The Critical List (1978), The Paradise Connection (1978), Fire on the Mountain (1981), Stone Fox (1987), and Working Tra$h (1990). Ebsen starred as Sheriff Mat Brady in the 1955 television series Corky and White Shadow and was Sergeant Huk Marriner in 1958’s Northwest Passage. He starred as the Clampett patriarch, Jed, on The Beverly Hillbillies from 1962 to 1970, and played private detective Barnaby Jones from 1972 to 1980. He co-starred as Roy Houston in the detective series Matt Houston from 1984 to 1985. Ebsen reprised his role as Jed Clampett in the 1981 tele-film The Return of the Beverly Hillbillies and had a cameo as Barnaby Jones in the 1993 feature film version of The Beverly Hillbillies, which starred Jim Varney as Jed. Ebsen also appeared on television in episodes of The Chevrolet Tele-Theatre, Screen Directors Playhouse, Climax!, Maverick, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, Bonanza, The Barbara Stanwyck Show, Black Saddle, Rawhide, Tales of Wells Fargo, Johnny Ringo, Bronco, Riverboat, Gunsmoke, 77 Sunset Strip,

115 Twilight Zone, Gunslinger, Have Gun Will Travel, Bus Stop, The Andy Griffith Show, Adventures in Paradise, Checkmate, Hawaii Five-O, Rod Serling’s Night Gallery, Alias Smith and Jones, Cannon, Hardcastle and McCormick, The Yellow Rose, Finder of Lost Loves, 1994’s Burke’s Law, and voiced a role in the animated series King of the Hill in 1999. In 2001 Ebsen’s novel Kelly’s Quest was published. Ebsen also wrote an autobiography, The Other Side of Oz. Los Angeles Times, July 8, 2003, B12; New York Times, July 8, 2003, A25; People, July 21, 2003, 82; Time, July 21, 2003, 21; Variety, July 14, 2003, 52.

Edwards, Teddy Jazz saxophonist Teddy Edwards died in Los Angeles of prostate cancer on April 20, 2003. He was 78. Edwards was born in Jackson, Mississippi, on April 26, 1924. He began performing professionally by the age of 12, and relocated to Los Angeles in the mid–1940s. In 1946 he was believed to have recorded the first tenor saxophone bebop solo for “Up in Dodo’s Room.” Edwards recorded the hit jazz number “Blues in Tedddy’s Flat” in 1948. He played with bands led by musicians Milt Jackson, Ray Brown and Gerald Wilson, and also led several of his own groups. During the 1980s Edwards performed on tour with singer Tom Waite and was heard on

Teddy Edwards

2003 • Obituaries

the movie soundtrack for One from the Heart (1982). His most recent album, Smooth Sailing, was released earlier in 2003. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 22, 2003, B10; New York Times, Apr. 23, 2003, B10; Variety, Apr. 28, 2003, 79.

Eisley, Anthony Leading actor Anthony Eisley died of heart failure in Woodland Hills, California, on January 20, 2003. He was 78. Eisley was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on January 19, 1925. He began his career on stage, appearing in Broadway productions of Mr. Roberts, The Desperate Hours, and Picnic. Often billed as Fred Eisley early in his career, he starred as John Clinton in the short-lived 1953 television comedy series Bonino, and was Johnny Cassiano in the 1959 drama series Pete Kelly’s Blues. Eisley was also featured in the films Operation Secret (1952), Fearless Fagan (1952), Onionhead (1958), The Young Philadelphians (1959), Roger Corman’s The Wasp Woman (1960), and Portrait of a Mobster (1961). He also starred as Tracy Steele in the popular television detective series Hawaiian Eye from 1959 to 1962. He continued to appear in such films as The Naked Kiss (1964), One Way Wahini (1965), Frankie and Johnny (1966) with Elvis Presley, The Navy vs. the Night Monsters (1966), Lightning Bolt (1966), Journey to the Center of Time (1967), Star! (1968), and They Ran for Their Lives (1968). His numerous television credits also include episodes of The Real McCoys, The Dick Van Dyke Show, Perry Mason, The Farmer’s Daughter, Combat!, The Outer Limits, Honey West, The F.B.I., Wild Wild West, Run for Your Life, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., The Invaders, Dragnet, Mannix, The Virginian, The Flying Nun, Ironside, Marcus Welby, M.D., The Rookies, Project UFO, Emergency!, The Magician, The Streets of San Francisco, Cannon, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Ironside, S.W.A.T., The Blue Knight, A Man Called Sloane, Barnaby Jones, Bret Maverick, The Dukes of Hazzard, and Outlaws. From the late 1960s Eisley was largely seen in low-budget exploitation films including The Witchmaker (1969), The Mummy and the Curse of the Jackal (1969), The Mighty Gorga (1969), The Tormentors (1971), Dracula vs. Frankenstein (1971), The Doll Squad (1973), Half a House (1976), Monster (1979), Deep Space (1987), Evil Spirits (1990),

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116

Anthony Eisley

and Deadly Deception (1991). He was also featured in the tele-films Secrets (1977) and Nowhere to Run (1978). Eisley also starred as Charles Diedrich in the daytime television soap opera Bright Promise in 1971, and was Philip Dade in the soap opera Capitol in 1982. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 3, 2003, B9; New York Times, Feb. 5, 2003, B8; Variety, Feb. 10, 2003, 57.

by his wandering left eye, that the actor claimed to have lost during a childhood fight. He soon graduated to larger roles in such films The Sundowners (1950), Bird of Paradise (1951), Rawhide (1951), Finders Keepers (1951), The Bushwhackers (1952), Rancho Notorious (1952), The Battle at Apache Pass (1952), Montana Territory (1952), High Noon (1952), Lure of the Wilderness (1952), My Man and I (1952), Kansas City Confidential (1952), The Ring (1952), Count the Hours (1953), Ride, Vaquero! (1953), Gun Belt (1953), The Moonlighter (1953), Appointment in Honduras (1953), Ride Clear of Diablo (1954), Jubilee Trail (1954), Princess of the Nile (1954), The Far Country (1954), Vera Cruz (1954), Cattle Queen of Montana (1955), Man Without a Star (1955), Mickey Spillane’s Kiss Me Deadly (1955), Moonfleet (1955), Wichita (1955), The Man from Laramie (1955), Kismet (1955), Tarzan’s Hidden Jungle (1955), Artists and Models (1955), Pardners (1956), Jubal (1956), Thunder Over Arizona (1956), Dragoon Wells Massacre (1957), Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957) as Tom McLowery, Lure of the Swamp (1957), Night Passage (1957), Baby Face Nelson (1957), The Gun Runners (1958), Edge of Eternity (1959), The Girl in Lovers Lane (1959), The Last Sunset (1961), The Comancheros (1961),

Elam, Jack Veteran character actor Jack Elam, who starred in villainous roles in numerous Western films, died at his home in Ashland, Oregon, on October 20, 2003. He was 84. Elam was born in Miami, Arizona, on November 13, 1918. While working as an accountant in Hollywood in the late 1940s Elam appeared in small roles in such films as Trailin’ West (1949), She Shoulda Said No (1949), Key to the City (1950), Quicksand (1950), One Way Street (1950), A Ticket to Tomahawk (1950), American Guerrilla in the Philippines (1950), Love That Brute (1950), The Texan Meets Calamity Jane (1950), and High Lonesome (1950). Elam’s grizzled screen appearance was highlighted

Jack Elam

117 Pocketful of Miracles (1961), Four for Texas (1963), The Rare Breed (1966), The Night of the Grizzly (1966), The Way West (1967), The Last Challenge (1967), Firecreek (1968), Never a Dull Moment (1968), Sergio Leone’s spaghetti western classic Once Upon a Time in the West (1969), Support Your Local Sheriff! (1969), Sartana Does Not Forgive (1969), Cowboys of Calico County (1970), Dirty Dingus Magee (1970), Rio Lobo (1970), The Wild Country (1971), Support Your Local Gunfighter (1971), The Last Rebel (1971), Hannie Caulder (1971), Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973), A Knife for the Ladies (1974), Hawmps! (1976), The Winds of Autumn (1976), Pony Express Rider (1976), Creature from Black Lake (1976), Grayeagle (1978), The Norseman (1978), Hot Lead and Cold Feet (1978), The Apple Dumpling Gang Rides Again (1979), The Villain (1979), Ninja Champion (1980), The Cannonball Run (1981), Jinxed! (1982), Sacred Ground (1983), Lost (1983), Cannonball Run II (1984), The Aurora Encounter (1986), Hawken’s Breed (1987), Big Bad John (1990), Suburban Commando (1991), The Giant of Thunder Mountain (1991), Uninvited (1993), and Shadow Force (1993). Elam was also seen in numerous tele-films including The Over-the-Hill Gang (1969), Ride a Northbound Horse (1969), Cat Ballou (1971) as Kid Sheleen, The Daughters of Joshua Cabe (1972), The Red Pony (1973), Shootout in a One-Dog Town (1974), Sidekicks (1974), Huckleberry Finn (1975), The Ransom of Red Chief (1975), The New Daughters of Joshua Cabe (1976), Lacy and the Mississippi Queen (1978), The Sacketts (1979), The Girl, the Gold Watch and Dynamite (1981), Skyward Christmas (1981), Sawyer and Finn (1983), Louis L’Amour’s Down the Long Hills (1986), Once Upon a Texas Train (1988), and Where the Hell’s That Gold?!!? (1988). Elam was comic sidekick Toothy Thompson in the television western series Sugarfoot in the late 1950s, and was Deputy J.D. Smith in The Dakotas in 1963. He was featured as Ike Dalton in the 1963 television special The Slowest Gun in the West and was George Taggart in the western series Temple Houston from 1963 to 1964. He starred as Zack Wheeler in the comedy series The Texas Wheelers from 1974 to 1975, and was featured in the mini-series How the West Was Won (1977) and Black Beauty (1978). He was a comic Frankenstein monster in the short-lived 1979 series Struck by Lightning, and was Nick Turner in 1985’s Detective in the House. Elam was featured

2003 • Obituaries

as Uncle Alvin “Bully” Stevenson in the 1986 series Easy Street. He was also seen in the 1993 telefilm Bonanza: The Return, and the 1995 sequel Bonanza: Under Attack. Elam guest-starred in hundreds of television episodes including such series as Stories of the Century, The Lone Ranger, Frontier, Screen Directors Playhouse, Zane Grey Theater, Tales of Wells Fargo, The Restless Gun, Wagon Train, Zorro, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Jane Wyman Presents the Fireside Theatre, M Squad, Bronco, Lawman, The Rifleman, The Texan, Gunsmoke, Tombstone Territory, Have Gun Will Travel, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, The Untouchables, The Rebel, Tightrope, Mr. Lucky, Stagecoach West, Bonanza, Klondike, Death Valley Days, Cheyenne, The Twilight Zone, Outlaws, Target: The Corruptors, Ben Casey, Daniel Boone, The Legend of Jesse James, F Troop, Tarzan, The Guns of Will Sonnett, Wild Wild West, Hondo, Cimarron Strip, The High Chaparral, The Outcasts, Lancer, The Virginian, Nichols, Alias Smith and Jones, Kung Fu, The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams, Eight Is Enough, Fantasy Island, Father Murphy, Paradise, and Home Improvement. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 23, 2003, B15; New York Times, Oct. 23, 2003, C14; People, Nov. 10, 2003, 125; Time, Nov. 3, 2003, 24; Variety, Oct. 27, 2003, 67.

Eldeen, Alaa Wally Egyptian comedian Alaa Wally Eldeen died of complications from diabetes in a Cairo, Egypt,

Alaa Wally Eldeen

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118

hospital on February 11, 2003. He was 39. A popular performer in Egyptian films, he had his first starring role in 1999’s Aboud on the Borders. Variety, Mar. 31, 2003, 50.

Elizabeth, Miss Elizabeth Hulette, who, as Miss Elizabeth, was one of the premiere wrestling valet/managers of the 1980s and 1990s, died at the Atlanta, Georgia, home of her boyfriend, wrestler Lex Luger, reportedly due to a combination of drugs and alcohol, on May 1, 2003. She was 42. Hulette was born in San Antonio, Texas, on November 19, 1960. She married wrestler Randy “Macho Man” Savage in 1984 and began appearing with him at matches in the WWF the following year. She took part in many of Savage’s prominent feuds with such stars as George “the Animal” Steele, Ric Flair, and Hulk Hogan. Though already married, she and Savage “wed” during the WWF’s Summerslam ’91 pay-per-view event. She left the WWF in 1992 and split with Savage soon afterwards. Miss Elizabeth reemerged in World Championship Wrestling (WCW) in 1996, where she again worked in matches with Savage, Hulk

Miss Elizabeth

Hogan, Ric Flair and Lex Luger. She remained with the WCW until 1999.

Elliott, Marianna Stage and film costume designer Marianna Elliott died of cancer in Beverly Hills, California, on June 21, 2003. She was 72. She was born in China Grove, North Carolina, in 1931, and began her career designing costumes for theatrical productions in New York City. Elliott also worked in film and television, designing for the films The Big Bus (1976), Whose Life Is It Anyway? (1981), Blue Thunder (1983), American Flyers (1985), The Men’s Club (1986), and The Ballad of Sad Cafe (1991), and the tele-films When Hell Was in Session (1979), The Man Who Fell to Earth (1987), She Stood Alone (1991), The Burden of Proof (1992, Criminal Behavior (1992), Nurses on the Line: The Crash of Flight 7 (1993), and Rag and Bone (1997). Survivors include her husband, actor Alan Oppenheimer.

Ellis, Mary Veteran character actress and singer Mary Ellis died in London on January 30, 2003. She was 105. Ellis was born in New York City on June 15, 1897. She began her career as a singer with the Metropolitan Opera in the first production of Puccini’s Suor Angelica in 1918. She performed with the Met for four seasons before joining David Belasco’s repertory company. She was soon appearing on Broadway in such productions as The Merchant of Venice (1922) and Rose Marie. She subsequently began a long association and marriage with British actor Basil Sydney. She accompanied Sydney to England where she made her London debut in 1930’s Knave and Queen. She went to Hollywood to make her film debut in the 1934 musical All the King’s Horses. She appeared in several more films including Bella Donna (1934), Paris in Spring (1935), and Fatal Lady (1936). After divorcing Sydney, Ellis returned to the stage, performing with Ivor Novello in stage and film productions of Glamorous Night (1937). During World War II she worked at emergency hospitals and occasionally sang to entertain the troops. After the war she returned to the stage, appearing in productions of The Gay

119

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Jules Engel Mary Ellis

Pavillion, Mrs. Dane’s Defense, Hattie Stowe, and Terence Rattigan’s The Browning Version. She appeared in small roles in several more films including The Astonished Heart (1949), The Magic Box (1951), and The Three Worlds of Gulliver (1960). She continued to perform on stage until her retirement in 1970 following a production of Shaw’s Mrs. Warren’s Profession. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 1, 2003, B21; New York Times, Feb. 1, 2003, A16; Variety, Feb. 10, 2003, 57.

Engel, Jules Jules Engel, a co-creator of the animated characters Mr. Magoo and Gerald McBoing Boing, died in a Los Angeles hospital on September 6, 2003. He was 94. Engel was born in Budapest, Hungary, in 1909, and immigrated to the United States at the age of 13. He worked with animation pioneer Charles Mintz in the early years of his career and, in the late 1930s, joined Walt Disney Studios. Engel contributed to the dance se-

quences in Disney’s Fantasia and animated sequences of Bambi. After serving in the Motion Picture Unit of the Army Air Corps during World War II, Engel was a founder of United Prods. of America in 1944. He developed, with Robert Cannon, such animated character as Mr. Magoo, Gerald McBoing Boing and Madeline. Engel formed Format Films with Herb Klynn in 1959, working on the animated series The Alvin Show and The Lone Ranger. He was also producer of the 1962 Oscar-nominated short Icarus Montgolfier Wright, written by Ray Bradbury. Engel was later the founder of the animation department at CalArts and taught there for many years. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 12, 2003, B14; New York Times, Sept. 15, 2003, A17; Variety, Sept. 15, 2003, 54.

England, Hal Character actor Hal England died in Burbank, California, on November 6, 2003. He was 71. England was born in North Carolina in 1932. He appeared often on television from the 1960s, guest starring in episodes of such series as Dr.

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120

Hal England Robert Enrietto

Kildare, F Troop, My Favorite Martian, Dragnet, Bewitched, Here Come the Brides, Here’s Lucy, The Flying Nun, Cannon, Sanford and Son, Love, American Style, Barnaby Jones, McMillan and Wife, The Streets of San Francisco, Eight Is Enough, Tales of the Unexpected, Wonder Woman, Lou Grant, Charlie’s Angels, Fantasy Island, CHiPs, Manimal, Otherworld, Highway to Heaven, Beauty and the Beast, Quantum Leap, Knots Landing, Murder, She Wrote, Any Day Now, and Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue. England also starred as Lt. Douglas Merrill in the 1960 television soap opera The Clear Horizon, and was seen in the telefilms The Amazing Howard Hughes (1977), Sweet Bird of Youth (1989), and Our Sons (1991). He appeared in a handful of feature films during his career including Hang ’Em High (1968), The Dirt Gang (1972), Going Under (1990), and The Bonfire of the Vanities (1990). Los Angeles Times, Nov. 10, 2003, B9; Variety, Nov. 17, 203, 58.

Enrietto, Robert Television assistant director and production manager Robert F. Enrietto, Jr., died of a heart attack in Chicago on December 27, 2003. He was 62. Enrietto was born in Chicago in 1941. He worked in Hollywood from the 1960s, serving as

a set decorator for the exploitation films The Girl, the Body, and the Pill (1967), Just for the Hell of It (1968), and She-Devils on Wheels (1968). He later worked in television as an assistant director on such series as Hawaii Five-O, Little House on the Prairie, Tales of the Unexpected, and In the Heat of the Night. He was an associate producer for the 1979 mini-series Backstairs at the White House, and was production manager on the 1982 television series Remington Steele. Enrietto was also a second unit director for the film Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970), and an assistant director for Harold and Maude (1971), The Outside Man (1972), Phantom of the Paradise (1974), and the tele-film Something About Amelia (1984). He subsequently created Columbia College’s Semester in L.A. program, which included classes in screenwriting and animation.

Enright, Nick Australian playwright and screenwriter Nick Enright, who shared an Academy Award nomination for the script for the 1992 film Lorenzo’s Oil, died of cancer in Sydney, Australia, on March 30, 2003. He was 52. Enright was born in Maitland, New South Wales, Australia, on December 22, 1950. Enright adapted Tim Winton’s

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Howie Epstein Nick Enright

novel Cloudstreet for the stage in Australia. He also scripted the 1990 tele-film Come In Spinner, and the 1997 film Blackrock. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 1, 2003, B11; New York Times, Apr. 6, 2003, A23; Variety, Apr. 7, 2003, 51.

stein was the boyfriend of singer Carlene Carter, Johnny Cash’s stepdaughter, and produced two of her albums. Petty replaced Epstein as bassist for the Heartbreakers in May of 2002 with original bassist Ron Blair. New York Times, Feb. 27, 2003, B8; People, Mar. 10, 2003, 87.

Epstein, Howie

Erlandson, Erland

Musician Howie Epstein, bass player for Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, died of a heroin overdose in a Santa Fe, New Mexico, hospital on February 23, 2003. He was 47. Epstein was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on July 21, 1955. He played with John Hiatt from the late 1970s and was heard on the 1980 album Two Bit Monsters. He played with Del Shannon on 1981’s Drop Down and Get Me, and joined the Heartbreakers in 1982. He remained with Petty for the next two decades, working on the albums Long After Dark (1982) and Echo (1999). He also played with such artists as Roy Orbison, Bob Dylan and Stevie Nicks. He produced John Prine’s Grammy Award–winning album The Lost Years in 1991. Ep-

Danish actor Erland Erlandson died in Munich, Germany, on March 26, 2003. He was 90. Erlandson was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, on October 3, 1912. A leading stage and screen performer, Erlandson was featured as Albert Speer in the 1956 film Hitler: The Last Ten Days. He also appeared in the films Herr Puntila and His Servant Matti (1955), Song Without End (1960), The Good Soldier Schweik (1960), Crook and the Cross (1960), Black Flowers for the Bride (1970), Avalanche Express (1979), and The American Success Company (1980). Erlandson also appeared often on German television, guest starring in such series as Der Kommissar, Derrick, and Der Alte.

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Escoffier, Jean-Yves French cinematographer Jean-Yves Escoffier died of heart failure in Los Angeles on April 1, 2003. He was 52. Escoffier was born in Lyon, France, on July 12, 1950. He worked in films as a director of photography from the early 1970s. His numerous credits include Simone Barbes or Virtue (1980), Ulysse (1982), The Eyes of the Birds (1983), Boy Meets Girl (1984), Three Men and a Cradle (1985), Bad Blood (1986), and The Lovers on the Bridge (1989). Escoffier came to the United States in the early 1990s and continued his career on such films as Charlie and the Doctor (1993), Dream Lover (1994), Witch Hunt (1994), Jake and Sarah (1995), The Crow: City of Angels (1996), Grace of My Heart (1996), Escess Baggage (1977), Gummo (1997), Good Will Hunting (1997), Rounders (1998), Cradle Will Rock (1999), Nurse Betty (2000), 15 Minutes (2001), Possession (2002), Seville, Southside (2003), and The Human Stain (2003). He also filmed the Oscar-winning animated short, The Sand Castle, in 1978, and worked

Jean-Yves Escoffier

on numerous music videos and commercials. He was working on Wong Kar-wai’s science fiction drama 2046 at the time of his death. Variety, Apr. 21, 2003, 54.

Eshbach, Lloyd Arthur Science fiction writer Lloyd Arthur Eshbach died in Myerstown, Pennsylvania, on October 29, 2003. He was 93. Eshbach was born in Palm, Pennsylvania, in 1910. He began writing while in his teens and sold his first story, “The Voice from the Ether” to Amazing Stories in 1931. He continued to write stores for pulp magazines in the 1930s and 1940s and, in 1946, founded Fantasy Press, one of the first speciality publishing houses for fantasy. Several of his short stories were collected in the 1955 volume The Tyrant of Time. He began the Gates of Lucifer series of novels in 1984, including The Land Beyond the Gate (1984), The Armlet of the Gods (1986), The Sorceress of Scath (1988), and The Scroll of Lucifer (1990).

Lloyd Arthur Eshbach

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Estelle, Don Diminutive British comedian Don Estelle died after a long illness in Rochdale, Lancashire, England, on August 2, 2003. He was 70. Estelle was born in Manchester, England, on May 22, 1933. Best known for his role as Gunner “Lofty” Sugden in the British television comedy series It Ain’t Half Hot Mum in the 1970s, he also had a surprising hit record with co-star Windsor Davies with 1975’s Whispering Grass. Estelle was also featured in the films Not Now, Comrade (1976), A Private Function (1984), and Santa Claus (1985), and in television productions of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1981) and The Beggar’s Opera (1983). Other television credits include episodes of Dad’s Army, The Benny Hill Show, and The League of Gentlemen.

2003 • Obituaries

vant was born in Paris on December 30, 1922. She began her career in films after World War II, appearing in over 60 films over the next 50 years. Her numerous credits include Ladies of the Park (1945), Last Love (1949), Between Eleven and Midnight (1949), The Prize (1950), Alone in Paris (1951), Two Pennies Worth of Violets (1951), Topaze (1951), Jocelyn (1952), We Are All Murderers (1952), The Long Teeth (1952), The Love of a Woman (1954), Fly in the Ointment (1955), Black Dossier (1955), School for Love (1955), People of No Importance (1955), Crime and Punishment (1956), Dangerous Games (1958), The Horror Chamber of Dr. Fausutus (1960), The Carmelites (1960), The Old Guard (1960), The Bear (1960), The End of Belle (1961), War of the Buttons (1963), The Day and the Hour (1963), Graduation Year (1963), Marked Eyes (1964), Mata-Hari (1964), The War Is Over (1966), The Man in the Buick (1966), Je T’Aime, Je T’Aime (1968), State of Siege (1973), Les Miserables (1982), Le Bon Plaisir (1984), Love Unto Death (1984), Love on the Quiet (1985), State of Grace (1986), Diary of a Madman (1987), Emergency Kisses (1989), and Death in Therapy (1996).

Fabbri, Marisa Italian actress Marisa Fabbri died in Rome on June 10, 2003. She was 72. The Florence-born ac-

Don Estelle

Etievant, Yvette French character actress Yvette Etievant died in France on March 21, 2003. She was 80. Etie-

Marisa Fabbri

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124

tress appeared in films from the late 1960s. Her credits include The Black Sheep (1968), The Weekend Murders (1970), Four Flies on Grey Velvet (1971), Sacco and Vanzetti (1971), La Tosca (1973), Milarepa (1974), and Gli Astronomi (2002). She also performed often on the Italian stage and television.

Facey, Fred Television announcer Fred Facey died of cancer in New York City on April 13, 2003. He was 72. Facey worked with NBC from 1967, where he was the off-screen announcer on such television programs as Today, Meet the Press, NBC News and Saturday Night Live.

Stanley Fafara

September 20, 2003. He was 54. Fafara was born on September 20, 1949. He also appeared in the films Good Morning, Miss Dove (1955) and The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (1963), and episodes of the television series The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, Wanted: Dead or Alive, and Man Without a Gun. Fafara’s later years were plagued with battles with drug and alcohol addiction and legal difficulties. He spent time in jail for stealing drugs from pharmacies in California in the early 1980s. His addictions severely damaged his health, including contracting hepatitis C while using drugs. He spent some time in a drug rehab facility in the mid–1990s. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 27, 2003, B21; Variety, Oct. 6, 2003, 104.

Fred Facey

Fafara, Stanley Stanley Fafara, the former child who starred as Beaver’s pal, Whitey, on the popular television sit-com Leave It to Beaver in the late 1950s, died in Portland Oregon, of kidney and liver failure due to complications from intestinal surgery on

Faith, Adam British pop singer and actor Adam Faith died of a heart attack in Stoke-on-Trent, England, on March 8, 2003. He was 62. Faith was born in London, England, on June 23, 1940. He became a popular singer in England in the late 1950s, scoring a major hit with the 1959 song “What Do You Want.” He also appeared in several British films in the early 1960s including Never Let Go (1960), Beat Girl (1960), What a

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2003 • Obituaries

Barcelona, Spain, on January 21, 1919, Falkenburg was raised in Los Angeles. Fluent in Spanish, she was hired by Warner Bros. as an actress in the studio’s Spanish-language features. Falkenburg was seen in such films as The Singer of Naples (1935), El Carnaval del Diablo (1936), and Rose of France (1936). She also soon became a leading magazine cover model and was also seen in the films Strike Me Pink (1936), Big Brown Eyes (1936), Nothing Sacred (1937), There Goes My Heart (1938), Song of the Buckaroo (1938), and The Lone Ranger Rides Again (1939). She performed on stage in Al Jolson’s 1940 musical Hold On to Your Hat, and returned to Hollywood to appear in the films Two Latins from Manhattan (1941), Sing for Your Supper (1941), Sweetheart of the Fleet (1942), Lucky Legs (1942), Laugh Your Blues Away (1942), She Has What It Takes (1943), Two Senoritas from Chicago (1943), Nine Girls (1944), Cover Girl (1944), Tahiti Nights (1945), The Gay Senorita (1945), Meet Me on Broadway (1946), and Talk About a Lady (1946). Falkenburg married journalist and public relations man Tex McCrary in June of 1945, and the following year they became hosts of a New York City radio program, Hi Jinx. The couple were soon hosting the NBC television program At Home with Tex and Jinx, and the interview program The Swift Home Service Club. They also hosted the radio program Adam Faith

Whopper! (1961), No Place Like Homicide (1962), and Mix Me a Person (1962). Faith made his stage acting debut in the late 1960s production of Night Must Fall. He subsequently starred in the 1970 British television series Budgie, and was seen in the films Stardust (1974), Yesterday’s Hero (1979), Foxes (1980), McVicar (1980), and the 1985 telefilm Minder on the Orient Express. Faith also starred as Frank Carver in the 1992 series Love Hurts, and was Jack Squire in the 2002 series The House That Jack Built. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 9, 2003, B17; People, Mar. 24, 2003, 85; Variety, Mar. 17, 2003, 59.

Falkenburg, Jinx Pioneer radio and television talk show hostess Jinx Falkenburg died in Manhasset, New York, on August 27, 2003. She was 84. Born in

Jinx Falkenburg

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Meet Tex and Jinx in the late 1940s Falkenburg’s biography, Jinx, was published in 1951. They remained fixtures on television and radio during the 1950s, hosting Closeup from 1957 to 1958, and with Falkenburg a regular panelist on the Masquerade Party quiz show in 1958. She and McCrary later separated in the 1980s. He died the previous month on July 29, 2003. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 29, 2003, B13; New York Times, Aug. 28, 2003, A27; Time, Sept. 8, 2003, 19; Variety, Sept. 8, 2003, 66.

Farney, Cyl Brazilian actor Cyl Farney died of heart failure in a Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, hospital on March 21, 2003. He was 78. Farney was born Cilenio Dutra e Silva in Rio de Janeiro on September 14, 1925. He played drums for his brother, the late singer Dick Farney, before beginning a career in films. He appeared in numerous features from the late 1940s including Tocaia (1951), Carnaval Atlantida (1952), Colegio de Brotos (1955), Guerra ao Samba (1956), The Sputnik Man (1959), Cacareco Vem Ai (1960), Copocabana Palace (1962), River of Evil (1963), Incredible, Fantastic, Extraordinary (1969), Believe It or Not

Cyl Farney (with Eliana)

(1969), Um Virgem na Prace (1973), O Pai do Povo (1976), and Este Rio Muito Louco (1977).

Fast, Howard Radical author Howard Fast, whose popular novel Spartacus became a hit film in 1960, died at his home in Old Greenwich, Connecticut, on March 12, 2003. He was 88. Fast was born in New York City on November 11, 1914. He wrote the best-selling novels Citizen Tom Paine and The American in 1940s. His novel Rachel was adapted to film as Rachel and the Stranger in 1948. A member of the Communist Party from 1944 to 1957, Fast was imprisoned for several months and blacklisted for years after refusing to cooperate with the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1950. Fast was the recipient of the Stalin International Peace Prize in 1953. He was best known for his novel Spartacus, about a slave revolt in ancient Rome. The novel was adapted to film by director Stanley Kubrick in 1960, starring Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier and an all-star cast. Fast also wrote thrillers under the pseudonym E.V. Cunningham. Several of his other novels were adapted to film including The Winston

Howard Fast

127 Affair as Man in the Middle in 1964, and The Last Frontier as Cheyenne Autumn also in 1964. His novel Fallen Angel served as the basis for the films Mirage in 1965 and Jigsaw in 1968, his novels Sylvia (1965) and Penelope (1966) were also filmed. His novel Sally became the 1971 tele-film The Face of Fear and Shirley was adapted as a telefilm What’s a Nice Girl Like You…? in 1971. He wrote the 1976 tele-film 21 Hours at Munich and adapted his novel The Crossing for a tele-film in 2000. Other novels adapted for television include The Immigrants (1978), Freedom Road (1979), and April Morning (1988). Fast also wrote segments of the television series The Defenders and How the West Was Won. He authored his memoir, Being Red, in 1990. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 13, 2003, B15; New York Times, Mar. 13, 2003, C12; Time, Mar. 24, 2003, 20; Variety, Mar. 24, 2003, 81.

Fatyushin, Aleksandr Russian actor Aleksandr Fatyushin died in Moscow on April 7, 2003. He was 52. Fatyushin was born in Ryazan, Russia, on March 29, 1951.

2003 • Obituaries

A leading Soviet actor from the mid–1970s, he was featured in the films Autumn (1974), Spring Selection (1976), Guarantee Life (1977), The Cure Against Fear (1978), Do You Remember? (1979), Walk Worthy for the Man (1979), Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears (1979), Waiting (1980), Ladies Invite Gentlemen (1980), Faster Than Own Shadow (1980), The Guy Came Back… (1981), They Were Actors (1981), 34th Express (1981), Running Start (1982), You’re Happy, Zhenka! (1984), The Kidnapping (1984), Here Is My Village… (1985), Dancing on the Roof (1985), Solo Voyage (1985), Two Shores (1987), Braking in Heaven (1989), Knock on the Door (1989), The Code of Silence (1990), Cairo — 2 Calls Alpha (1990), Loaded with Death (1991), Wolf hound (1991), Tanks Are Running On Tanganka (1991), Blood for Blood (1991), Ticket to Red Theater, or Death of Coffin-Digger (1992), Russian Romance (1993), and Fatal Eggs (1996).

Fein, David B. Television gameshow producer David B. Fein died in a Los Angeles hospital on September 5, 2003. He was 67. He began his career in the late 1950s, producing the gameshow Pantomine Quiz, which later became Stump the Stars. He subsequently worked as a director and producer to television documentaries and specials including Guy Lombardo’s New Year’s Eve celebrations in New York. He moved to Los Angeles in the 1970s, where he produced such programs as Jokers Wild, Liars Club, Celebrity Bullseye, Anything for Money, Vicky!, That’s Hollywood, and the Live Aid Broadcast.

Ferber, Mel

Aleksandr Fatyushin

Television producer and director Mel Ferber died of heart disease in Los Angeles on June 19, 2003. He was 80. Ferber was born in New York City in 1922. He became involved with the television industry after serving in the military with distinction in World War II. Working with CBS, he directed Wonderful Town, the first two-hour live show, in the 1950s. Ferber also directed episodes of such series as Way Out, The Joey Bishop Show, My Favorite Martian, Mary Tyler Moore,

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128

The Odd Couple, Alias Smith and Jones, The Was the Week That Was, Happy Days, Beacon Hill, Alice, Quincy, C.P.O. Sharkey, Busting Loose, Flatbush, Archie Bunker’s Place, McMillan and Wife, Quincy, Diff ’rent Strokes, House Calls, Love, Sidney, Small & Frye, and Melba. Ferber produced the pilot episode of the long-running television news program 60 Minutes, and earned several Emmy nominations as executive producer and creator of Good Morning America. Variety, July 14, 2003, 54.

Fielder, Artie Actress Artie Fielder died of complications from viral pneumonia in San Antonio, Texas, on May 11, 2003. She was 50. Fielder was born in San Antonio on June 17, 1952. She moved to Los Angeles in 1980 to pursue an acting career. She appeared in small roles in the soap opera General Hospital and the sit-com Three’s Company. She was also seen in the tele-film The Fighter (1983), and the feature films Six Weeks (1982) and Daniel

Artie Fielder

(1983). She subsequently left Hollywood and returned to Texas.

Filatov, Leonid Russian actor Leonid Filatov died of pneumonia in Moscow on October 26, 2003. He was 56. Filatov was born in Kazan, Russia, on December 24, 1946. He starred in the 1980 Russian action film The Crew, and was seen in the films You Have Not Seen It Even in a Dream… (1980), Yaroslav the Wise (1981), The Voice (1982), From the Life of a Chief of the Criminal Police (1983), The Chosen One (1983), European Story (1984), Success (1984), Misty Shores (1986), Chicerin (1986), Enclosure (1987), Forgotten Melody for a Lonely Flute (1988), Message from the Future (1988), Zero City (1988), Sons of Bitches (1990), and Alice and the Bookseller (1992). Filatov was also the author of several books including The Tale of Fedot, the Shooter, which was adapted to film in 2002.

Leonid Filatov

129

2003 • Obituaries

Finch, Yolande

Finn, Mickey

Actress Yolande Finch, the widow of Oscarwinning actor Peter Finch, died in London on November 6, 2003. She was 67. She was born in South Africa on December 12, 1935. She appeared in films from the early 1960s including I Thank a Fool (1962), Five Miles to Midnight (1962), The Girl with Green Eyes (1964), The Limbo Line (1968), and Some Like It Sexy (1969). She was also seen on British television under the name Yolande Turner in episodes of The Saint, Crane, The Avengers, Department S, and Upstairs, Downstairs. She was married to actor Peter Finch from 1959 until their divorce in 1965. Peter Finch died in 1977 and Yolande wrote his biography, Finchy, several years later. She also scripted several films including Two to Tango (1988), Where Sleeping Dogs Lie (1992), and Bad Girls (1994).

British rock musician Mickey Finn died in a Croydon, England, hospital of complications from kidney and liver disease on January 11, 2003. He was 56. Finn was born on June 3, 1947. He joined the glam-rock band T-Rex in 1970 after original member Steve Took left the group. The band recorded such popular hits as “Get It On (Bang a Gong),” “Hot Love,” and “Children of the Revolution.” Finn appeared with the band in Ringo Starr’s 1972 documentary film Born to Boogie. He played bongos with the group until they disbanded in 1975. In recent years Finn revived

Yolande Finch (with Peter Finch)

Mickey Finn

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the band as Mickey Finn’s T-Rex, touring until shortly before his death. Variety, Jan. 20, 2003, 82.

in television from the 1980s, appearing in the 1997 series L’Avvocato Porta and the 2000 telefilm The Squad.

Fiorentini, Fiorenzo

Fisher, Doris

Italian character actor Fiorenzo Fiorentini died in Rome on March 27, 2003. He was 82. Fiorentini was born in Rome on April 10, 1920. A popular performer in Italian films from the late 1940s, Fiorentini was seen in Giovinezza (1952), Good Folk’s Sunday (1953), Paris, My Love (1962), The Shortest Day (1962), Carmen 63 (1963), The Monk of Monza (1963), Lo Scippo (1965), How We Robbed the Bank of Italy (1966), Make Love, Not War (1966), The Tiger and the Pussycat (1967), Man Only Cries for Love (1968), The Prophet (1968), Mattino (1968), The Black Sheep (1968), The Two Crusaders (1968), Zenabel (1969), Sweet Kisses and Languid Caresses (1969), Teresa the Thief (1972), La Tosca (1973), Franco & Ciccio: Superstars (1974), Farfallon (1974), Last Feelings (1978), History (1978), The Voyage of Captain Fracassa (1991), and Only You (1994). He also worked often

Songwriter Doris Fisher died in Los Angeles on January 15, 2003. She was 87. Fisher was born in New York City on May 2, 1915. She began writing songs in the 1930s and had her first hit with 1938’s “Tutti Frutti.” Other hit songs included “Whispering Grass,” “You Always Hurt the One You Love,” “Put the Blame on Mame,” “Into Each Life Some Rain Must Fall,” and “Tampico.” In the early 1940s Fisher sang with Eddy Duchin’s orchestra and also recorded with her own group, Penny Wise and Her Wise Guys. She went to Hollywood in 1945 and wrote music for films for several years. Her film credits include Gilda (1946), Perilous Holiday (1946), The Thrill of Brazil (1946), It’s Great to Be Young (1946), Betty Co-Ed (1946), Singin’ in the Corn (1946), Meet Me on Broadway (1946), Dead Reckoning (1947), Cigarette Girl (1947), The Corpse Came C.O.D. (1947), Down to Earth (1947), Sweet Genevieve (1947), Two Blondes and a Redhead

Fiorenzo Fiorentini

Doris Fisher

131 (1947), The Last Round-Up (1947), The Guilt of Janet Ames (1947), Little Miss Broadway (1947), Glamour Girl (1948), Mary Lou (1958), I Surrender Dear (1948), Challenge of the Range (1949), and Holiday in Havana (1949). She subsequently retired after marrying Charles Gershenson, a prominent real estate developer. New York Times, Jan. 25, 2003, A16; Variety, Feb. 3, 2003, 77.

Flanagan, Pauline Irish character actress Pauline Flanagan died in New York City on June 28, 2003. She was 77. Flanagan was born in County Sligo, Ireland, on June 29, 1925. She performed in hundreds of theatrical productions during her career and made her Broadway debut in Dylan Thomas’ Under Milkwood in 1957. Her numerous Broadway credits also include Step on a Crack (1962), Antigone (1971), The Crucible (1972), The Innocents (1976), Medea (1982), Corpse! (1986), Lost in Yonkers

Pauline Flanagan

2003 • Obituaries

(1991), and, her final, Philadelphia, Here I Come! (1994). She was also featured in British television productions of The White Steed (1959) and Juno and the Paycock (1960), and the 1977 mini-series The Best of Families. Flanagan also appeared in the tele-film Rage of Angels (1983) and Rage of Angels: The Story Continues (1986) and the 1998 film Night Train. She was a regular on the daytime soap opera Ryan’s Hope as Sister Mary Joel from 1984 to 1987. Variety, Aug. 4, 2003, 48.

Fleck, Jerry Television assistant director Gerald R. “Jerry” Fleck died at his home in Saugus, California, on September 14, 2003. He was 55. Fleck was born in Chicago in 1948. He began working in films and television as a production assistant with Sun Classic Pictures on such series as The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams. He also appeared in small roles in the films The Lincoln Conspiracy (1977) and Earthbound (1981). Fleck was first assistant director for the television series Hunter and MacGyver. He served as second assistant director on the films Beetlejuice (1988), Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers (1988), the 1989 tele-film Unconquered, and was first assistant director for Edward Scissorhands (1990) and the tele-films Fire in the Dark (1991) and Running Delilah (1994). Fleck worked at Paramount Studios on the Star Trek series as first assistant director from the early 1990s. He worked on the films Star Trek: First Contact (1996) and Star Trek: Insurrection (1998), and the series Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Voyager, and Enterprise.

Jerry Fleck

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132

Fleming, Erin Erin Fleming, comedian Groucho Marx’s companion and guardian in his final years, died in Los Angeles on April 15, 2003. She was 61. Fleming was born in Canada on August 13, 1941. She appeared in a handful of films in the 1960s and 1970s including The Legend of Blood Mountain (1965), Hercules in New York (1970) with Arnold Schwarzeneggar, Woody Allen’s Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex but Were Afraid to Ask (1972), and Sheila Levine Is Dead and Living in New York (1975).

Janine Fluet

Flynn, Herb Attorney and actor Herbert David Flynn died in a Hyannis, Massachusetts, hospital on

Erin Fleming

Fluet, Janine French-Canadian actress Janine Fluet died of lung cancer in St.-Lambert, Quebec, Canada, on May 8, 2003. She was 77. Fluet was born in Ottawa, Canada, in 1926. A character actress in Canadian films and television from the early 1950s, she was best known for her roles in the films Bingo (1974) and Agnes of God (1985). She was also seen in the Canadian television series 14, rue de Galais (1954), Les Belles Histoires des Paysd’en-Haut (1956), A la Branche d’Olivier (1970), La Petite Patrie (1974), and Semi-Detache (1987).

Herb Flynn

133 February 11, 2003. He was 85. Flynn was a war hero during World War II. He became an attorney after the war. A family friend of directors Peter and Bobby Farrelly, he began acting late in life appearing in small roles in the Farrelly brothers’ films Kingpin (1996), There’s Something About Mary (1998), Me, Myself & Irene (2000), and Shallow Hal (2001).

Fonaroff, Nina Ballet dancer and choreographer Nina Fonaroff died in a London hospital on August 14, 2003. She was 89. Fonaroff was born in New York City on March 3, 1914. She studied dance from an early age and joined Martha Graham’s dance company in 1936. She performed roles in Graham productions of American Document (1938), Every

Nina Fonaroff

2003 • Obituaries

Soul Is a Circus (1939), Punch and Judy (1944), and Appalachian Spring (1944). She also began working as a choreographer in the early 1940s and left the Graham group to work on her own in 1946. She formed her own troupe, Nina Fonaroff and Company, creating such works as The Feast, Lazarus, Mr. Puppet, Born to Weep, and Of Sundry Women. She disbanded her group in 1953 but continued to teach. In 1972 she became head of the department of choreography at the London School of Contemporary Dance. She retired from the school in 1990. She was working on a book on choreography at the time of her death. New York Times, Aug. 27, 2003, A27.

Formby, Margaret Margaret Formby, the initiator of the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame and Western Heritage Center, died of head injuries she received at her Hereford, Texas, home on April 10, 2003. She was 73. Formby was born in Van Horn, Texas, in 1929. She was the first woman elected to the Texas

Margaret Formby

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Tech Rodeo Hall of Fame. A collector of cowgirl artifacts, she spent two decades trying to establish the Cowgirl Hall of Fame. It was begun in Hereford in 1975 and moved to Fort Worth in 1994. Formby was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1994. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 17, 2003, B13; New York Times, Apr. 20, 2003, A24.

Forshay, Will Will Forshay, a professional skydiver who was part of the ten-man parachutist team known as the Flying Elvi, was killed in a airplane crash in Toledo, Ohio, on April 8, 2003. He was 37. Forshay and the other Flying Elvi perform aerial stunts while dressed as Elvis Presley. They were featured on Arts & Entertainment cable network’s Dream Chasers program in 2002.

Foss, Joe World War II fighter pilot and former governor of South Dakota Joe Foss died in a Scottsdale, Arizona, hospital of complications from a stroke on January 1, 2003. He had been in a coma for over a year. He was 87. Foss was born near Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on April 17, 1915. He joined the U.S. Marines in World War II and became a pilot. During the war he tied Eddie Rickenbacher’s World War I record with 26 kills. Foss was awarded the Medal of Honor and also served in the Korean War as a colonel. He returned to South Dakota after the war and was elected to the legislature. He became governor of South Dakota in 1955, serving until 1957. Foss was the first president of the American Football League from 1960 to 1966. Foss also hosted ABC television’s The American Sportsman from 1965 to 1967. He served as president of the National Rifle Association from 1988 to 1990. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 2, 2003, B11.

Joe Foss

Will Forshay

135

Fowler, Marjorie Film editor Marjorie Fowler died in Los Angeles on July 8, 2003. She was 83. She was born in Los Angeles on July 16, 1920, the daughter of leading producer-director-screenwriter Nunnally Johnson. She began her career at 20th Century– Fox, working as a contract player and, later, a story analyst. She began working as an editor in the 1940s, cutting such films as The Woman in the Window (1945), Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid (1948), Man Crazy (1953), Man in the Attic (1953), her father’s Three Faces of Eve (1957) and Oh, Men! Oh, Women! (1957), Stopover Tokyo (1957), Fraulein (1958), Separate Tables (1958), and The Man Who Understood Women (1959). She also worked in television in the 1950s, editing episodes of such series as Sky King and The New Adventures of China Smith. She continued to work in films for the next two decades, editing Elmer Gantry (1960), Lover Come Back (1961), The Outsider (1962), Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation (1962), 40 Pounds of Trouble (1963), Take Her, She’s Mine (1963), What a Way to Go! (1964), Dear Brigitte

Marjorie Fowler

2003 • Obituaries

(1965), Doctor Dolittle (1967) which earned her an Academy Award nomination, Once You Kiss a Stranger (1969), The Strawberry Statement (1970), Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (1972), and It’s My Turn (1980). During the 1970s, she also worked on the television series Doc Elliot and Eight Is Enough, and the tele-films The Homecoming: A Christmas Story (1971), The Girls of Huntington House (1973), The Blue Knight (1973), The Runaways (1975), Returning Home (1975), and The Prince of Central Park (1977), and The Marva Collins Story (1981). She was married to editor Gene Fowler, Jr., who died in 1998. Los Angeles Times, July 18, 2003, B13; Variety, July 28, 2003, 63.

Fox, Noel Noel Fox, a former bass singer with the Oak Ridge Boys, died in a Nashville, Tennessee, hospital of complications from surgery following a series of strokes on April 10, 2003. He was 63. Fox was born in Columbia, Tennessee, on October 31, 1939. He performed with the gospel groups the

Noel Fox

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Tennesseans Quartet and the Harvesters Quartet before joining the Oak Ridge Boys in 1967. He left the group in 1972 to work in the music business. In 1978 he became manager of the Oak Ridge Boys’ publishing house, Silverline/Goldlnie Music, Inc. He also was an executive with MCA Music/Nashville. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 14, 2003, B9; New York Times, Apr. 15, 2003, D9.

Foy, Irving Irving Foy, the youngest member and last survivor of the famed Seven Little Foys vaudeville act, died in an Albuquerque, New Mexico, assisted living center on April 20, 2003. He had fallen at the end of the previous month and broken his collarbone. He was 94. He was born in New Rochelle, New York in 1908, the youngest child of Eddie Foy, Sr. He made his vaudeville debut at the age of four in 1912 as part of Eddie Foy, Sr., and the Seven Little Foys. He and his siblings, Brynie, Charley, Richard, Mary, Madeleine, and Eddie Jr. performed throughout the country until his father’s death in 1928. Irving and several of his brothers and sisters continued their career into the 1930s. He later went to Texas and subsequently New Mexico, where he managed a movie theater chain. The Foy family was the subject of a 1955 film, The Seven Little Foys, starring Bob Hope as Eddie Sr. and Tommy Duran as Irving. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 28, 2003, B9; New York Times, Apr. 26, 2003, C18; Variety, Apr. 28, 2003, 79.

Irving Foy (far left, with Eddie Foy, Sr., and the other Seven Little Foys)

Francis, Cedric Oscar-nominated short film producer Cedric Francis died in London of complications from Alzheimer’s disease on April 7, 2003. He was 87. He began working in films in the 1930s as an assistant sound editor at Warner Bros. He subsequently served as an editor with the U.S. Air Force First Motion Picture Unit during World War II. After the war he returned to Warner, where he worked on numerous shorts. He was nominated for Academy Awards for his short films Winter Paradise (1953), Beauty and the Bull (1954), 24 Hour Alert (1955) and Time Stood Still (1956). Francis also produced the short films Chasing the Sun (1956), The Amazing Trader (1956), Deep Adventure (1957), and Manhunt in the Jungle (1958), and worked on many more. Francis also worked as a supervising producer on numerous Warner television productions including Colt .45, Maverick, 77 Sunset Strip, Hawaiian Eye, and Cheyenne. He produced the 1967 Rock Hudson film Darling Lili, and later served as a story editor for such television series as Mission: Impossible and Mannix.

Francis, Dai British signer and dancer Dai Francis died in England on November 27, 2003. He was 73. The son of a music hall performer, he was born in Swansea, England, in 1930. Francis joined the George Mitchell Singers in 1954 and continued with Mitchell when he formed the Black and

Dai Francis (center, with John Boulter and Kenneth Connor)

137 White Minstrels. He joined Tony Mercer and John Boulter as the three lead vocalists for the group. They made their debut on the BBC in 1957 and remained popular until their cancellation in 1978 when the lead singer’s black-face make-up was deemed racially offensive. The Minstrels recorded several hit albums and Francis was also a popular solo performer, known for his renditions of Al Jolson songs.

Francois, Jacques Leading French comedian and actor Jacques Francois died in a Paris hospital on November 25, 2003. He was 83. Francois was born in Paris on May 16, 1920. A leading performer on stage and screen, he was featured in over 100 films from the early 1940s. His numerous credits include Captain Fracasse (1943), Queen’s Necklace (1946), Just a Big Simple Girl (1948), The Barkleys of Broadway (1949), Pact with the Devil (1949), Edward and Caroline (1950), Skipper Next to God (1951), Encore (1952), Three Women (1952), The Golden Mask (1953), The Father of the Girl (1953), The Three Musketeers (1953), Affairs in Versailles (1954), At the Order of the Czar (1954), To Paris

2003 • Obituaries

with Love (1955), The Grand Maneuver (1955), Earth Light (1970), Eglantine (1971), The French Conspiracy (1972), Everybody He Is Nice, Everybody He Is Beautiful (1972), Me, I Want to Have Dough (1973), The Day of the Jackal (1973), The Mad Adventures of Rabbi Jacob (1973), Antoine and Sebastian (1973), Chinese in Paris (1974), Special Section (1975), Washington Square (1975), Cat and Mouse (1975), The Toy (1976), William Friedkin’s Sorcerer (1977), The Spat (1978), One Two Two (1978), Too Shy to Try (1978), Heart to Heart (1979), The Gendarme and the Extra-Terrestrials (1979), I’ve Got You, You’ve Got Me by the Chin Hairs (1979), Seven Days in January (1979), Out of Whack (1979), The Gift (1982), Never Play Clever Again (1982), The African (1983), Man, Woman and Child (1983), The Blood of Others (1984), Until September (1984), Led by the Nose (1984), Twist Again in Moscow (1986), The Debauched Life of Gerard Floque (1987), Triplex (1991), The Son of the Mekong (1991), The Myth That Wouldn’t Die (1992), My Wife’s Girlfriends (193), North Star (1996), My Man (1996), The Corridors of Time: The Visitors II (1998), Recto/Verso (1999), Actors (2000), The King Is Dancing (2000), and Fifi Martingale (2001). Francois was also a familiar face on French television, appearing in many tele-films and series.

Freeling, Nicolas

Jacques Francois

British crime novelist Nicolas Freeling died of cancer in Mutzig, France, on July 20, 2003. He was 76. Freeling was born in London on March 3, 1927. He was best known for his creation of Amsterdam detective Piet Van der Valk in 1962. Van der Valk was the hero of Freeling’s mystery thrillers Love in Amsterdam (1962), Because of the Cats (1963), Question of Loyalty (1963), DoubleBarrel (1964), Criminal Conversation (1965), The King of the Rainy Country (1966) which earned him an Edgar Allan Poe Award for best mystery of the year, The Dresden Green (1966), Strike Out Where Not Applicable (1967), Tsing-Boom! (1969), The Lovely Ladies (1971), and A Long Silence (1972), when he killed his leading character off. The detective’s widow, Arlette, was the star of the 1981 novel The Widow (1981). Barry Foster played Van der Valk in a long-running British television series from 1972 to 1992. Van der Valk was also played by Wolfgang Kieling in the 1968 film ver-

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138

Fred Freiberger (right, with Gerry Anderson)

Nicolas Freeling

sion of Amsterdam Affair, Bryan Marshall in the 1973 Dutch film version of Because of the Cats, and Frank Finlay in Van der Valk und das Madchen, a 1976 German adaptation of Gun Before Butter. Freeling also created the character of Belgian police detective Henri Castang, featured in the novels A Dressing of Diamonds (1974), The Bugles Blowing (1975), Sabine (1976), Wolfnight (1982), Lady Macbeth (1988), Flanders Sky (1992), The Seacoast of Bohemia (1994), A Dwarf Kingdom (1996) and others. His final book, The Janeites, was released in 2002. New York Times, July 23, 2003, A17.

Freiberger, Fred Television writer and producer Fred Freiberger died at his home in Bel Air, California, on March 2, 2003. He was 88. Freiberger was born in New York City on February 19, 1915. He began working in films after serving in the U.S. Air Force during World War II. He worked as a publicist and wrote dialogue for the 1946 film Susie Steps Out (1946). Freiberger also wrote such films

as Stork Bites Man (1947), The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953), War Paint (1953), Eg ypt by Three (1953), Big Chase (1954), Garden of Evil (1954), The Black Pirates (1954), The Big Bluff (1955), Massacre (1956), The Weapon (1957), Beginning of the End (1957), Blood Arrow (1958), and Crash Landing (1958). He became a leading television writer in the late 1950s, scripting episodes of such series as Climax!, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Have Gun Will Travel, Trackdown, Ford Theater, Zane Grey Theater, The Nine Lives of Elfego Baca, Rawhide, Bonanza, Overland Trail, and Hong Kong. Freiberger also produced and wrote the 1961 medical series Ben Casey. He wrote for the series The Fugitive, The Big Valley, The Beverly Hillbillies, and Laredo. He also served as producer for television’s Wild Wild West and Star Trek from 1968 to 1969. Freiberger was also producer on the series Space: 1999 and The Six Million Dollar Man in the late 1970s, and 1980’s Beyond Westworld. He also scripted episodes of such series as Petrocelli, S.W.A.T., Vega$, All in the Family, Emergency, Ironside, Starsky and Hutch, and The Dukes of Hazzard. Freiberger also wrote for various Hanna-Barbera cartoons, scripting Josie and the Pussycats in Outer Space, ScoobyDoo, Where Are You, and Super Friends, and creating the children’s live-action series Korg, 70,000 B.C. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 7, 2003, B12; Variety, Mar. 10, 2003, 49.

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French, Susan

Fresno, Maruchi

Veteran character actress Susan French died after a long illness in Santa Monica, California, on April 6, 2003. She was 91. French was born in Los Angeles in 1912, the daughter of show business lawyer Lloyd Moultrie. She began her career on stage, appearing in the Broadway production of Kaufman and Hart’s Merrily We Roll Along. She was featured in numerous theatrical productions and made her film debut in 1968’s The Impossible Years. She was also featured in the films Jaws 2 (1978), Somewhere in Time (1980) as the older version of Jane Seymour’s character, Elise, House (1986), The Verne Miller Story (1987), Flatliners (1990), Younger and Younger (1993), Mrs. Greer (1994), and Fist of the North Star (1995). French also appeared in the tele-films Captain America (1979), The Sky Is Gray (1980), The Executioner’s Song (1982), Bare Essence (1982), People Like Us (1990), and Family Reunion: A Relative Nightmare (1995). Other television credits include episodes of Cannon, Starsky and Hutch, Little House on the Prairie, Cagney & Lacey, Remington Steele, L.A. Law, Perfect Strangers, Moonlighting, Quantum Leap, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Grace Under Fire, and Picket Fences. French was also the founder of the Theater 40 theatrical group in Beverly Hills.

Spanish actress Maruchi Fresno died in San Lorenzo del Escorial, Madrid, Spain, on July 19, 2003. She was 87. She was born in Madrid on February 14, 1916, the daughter of actor Fernando Fresno. She was a leading actress in Spanish films from the mid–1930s, appearing in Water in the Ground (1934), Broken Lives (1935), Nostalgia (1942), The Prodigal Woman (1946), Spanish Serenade (1947), Loyola, the Soldier Saint (1952), Reckless (1951), Flight 971 (1954), La Lupa (1955), The Life of Christ: Mysteries of the Rosary Volume 2 (1957) as the Virgin Mary, The Night Heaven Fell (1957), King Vidor’s Solomon and Sheba (1969), El Camino (1963), Dialogues of Peace (1965), Gideon and Samson (1966), The Desperate Ones (1969), A Bullet for Rommel (1969), The Regent’s Wife (1974), Laura (1987), and Pecata Minuta (1999).

Maruchi Fresno

Frye, Dwight David Susan French (from Doctor Who)

Dwight David Frye, the son of leading Universal horror actor Dwight Frye, died in New

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Dwight David Frye

York City on March 27, 2003. He was 72. Frye was born in Spokane, Washington, in December of 1930. His father, who died in 1943, starred as the mad Renfield in the horror classic Dracula with Bela Lugosi, and appeared in such films as Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein and The Vampire Bat. The younger Frye also appeared as a child actor in the 1937 film The Man Who Found Himself. He later worked as a stage actor, appearing in a small role in the 1965 Broadway musical Man of La Mancha. He soon became as assistant to Albert Marre, the play’s director. He appeared in several documentaries about his father and was a frequent guest at horror conventions. He collaborated with Greg Mank and Jim Coughlin on the 1997 Midnight Marquee Press book about his father, Dwight Frye’s Last Laugh.

Fukasaku, Kinji Japanese film director Kinji Fukasaku died of prostate cancer in Tokyo on January 12, 2003. He was 72. Fukasaku was born in Mito, Japan, on July 3, 1930. He began working with Toei Studios in the early 1950s, where he directed numerous films in the Yakuza movie series War Without a Code in the 1970s. He was best known

Kinji Fukasaku

to American audiences for directing the 1968 science fiction film The Green Slime and as co-director of the 1970 depiction of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Tora! Tora! Tora! His numerous film credits also include Gyangu 7 (1963), Wolves, Pigs and People (1964), Otoshi (1966), Blackmail Is My Business (1968), Black Lizard (1968), Black Rose (1969), Japan Organized Crime Boss (1969), If You Were Young: Rage (1970), Gamblers in Okinawa (1971), Under the Flag of the Rising Sun (1972), Detective Doberman (1977), Message from Space (1978), Shogun Samurai (1978), The Fall of Ako Castle (1978), Virus (1980), Day of Resurrection (1980), The Gate of Youth (1981), Samurai Reincarnation (1981), Fall Guy (1981), Lovers Lost (1982), Legend of the Eight Samurai (1983), Theatre of Life (1983), Shanghai Rhapsody (1984), House on Fire (1986), Double Cross (1992), Crest of Betrayal (1994), The Geisha House (1998), and Battle Royale (2000). Variety, Jan. 20, 2003, 81.

Furuoya, Masato Japanese actor Masato Furuoya was found hanged in an apparent suicide in his Tokyo apart-

141

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Hiromichi Fuyuki

Masato Furuoya

ment on March 25, 2003. He was 45. Furuoya was born in Kanagawa, Japan, on May 14, 1957. He began his career in films in the late 1970s and appeared in such features as Disciples of Hippocrates (1980), Akuryo Island (1981), The Shootout (1982), Cabaret (1986), Lost in the Wilderness (1986), Wuthering Heights (1988), Universal Laws (1989), All Under the Moon (1993), Homeless Child (1994), Marks (1995), Endless Waltz (1995), Unlawful Stay (1996), The Jikembo of Young Kindaichi (1998), and Whiteout (2000).

Gaber, Giorgio Italian singer Giorgio Gaber died of cancer in Montemagno, Italy, on January 1, 2003. He

Fuyuki, Hiromichi Japanese professional wrestler and promoter Hiromichi Fuyuki died of liver cancer in Japan on March 19, 2003. He was 42. He began wrestling in the early 1980s, competing in Japan and the United States under such names as Kodo Fuyuki, Samson Fuyuki, and Ricky Fuyuki. He teamed with Toshiaki Kawada in a series of matches against Dan Kroffat and Doug Furnas with All Japan Pro Wrestling. He was later owner and promoter of Japan’s WEW promotion.

Giorgio Gaber

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was 63. Gaber was born Giorgio Gaberscick in Milan, Italy, on January 25, 1939. He began playing the guitar while in his teens and began his career as a singer in the late 1950s. He recorded “Cia Ti Diro” in 1961, and his first album, Il Signor G, was released in 1970. He appeared in several Italian films including Il Minestrone (1981) and Rossini! Rossini! (1991). He continued to record and perform until his death.

Gadd, Renee Actress Renee Gadd died in Hove, East Sussex, England, on July 20, 2003. She was 95. Gadd was born in Bahia Blanca, Argentina, on June 22, 1908. She accompanied her family to England in 1913 and studied dancing at the Royal Ballet School. She began performing on stage with a Shakespearean company in 1927 and made her film debut in 1932’s Money for Nothing. She was featured in numerous films over the next two decades including Aren’t We All? (1932), The Maid of the Mountains (1932), Josser Joins the Navy

Renee Gadd

(1932), His Wife’s Mother (1932), The Bad Companions (1932), White Face (1933), Skipper of the Osprey (1933), Letting in the Sunshine (1933), Happy (1933), Uncertain Lady (1934), The Love Captive (1934), David Copperfield (1936), Where’s Sally? (1936), Tomorrow We Live (1936), Man in the Mirror (1936), The Crimson Circle (1936), Under a Cloud (1937), The Man Who Made Diamonds (1937), Clothes and the Woman (1937), Brief Ecstasy (1937), Meet Mr. Penny (1938), Murder in Soho (1939), Unpublished Story (1939), They Came to a City (1933), Dead of Night (1945), Frieda (1947), Good Time Girl (1949), and The Blue Lamp (1950), after which Ms. Gadd retired from the screen.

Gampu, Ken South African character actor Ken Gampu died at his home in Vosloorus, South Africa, after a long illness on November 4, 2003. He was 74. Gampu was born in Germiston, South Africa, in 1929. He appeared in films in Hollywood and South Africa from the mid–1960s. His numerous credits include Dingaka (1965), The Naked Prey

Ken Gampu

143 (1966), Target of an Assassin (1976), King Solomon’s Treasure (1977), Slavers (1978), The Wild Geese (1978), Zulu Dawn (1979), A Game for Vultures (1979), Soul Patrol (1980), Chain Gang Killings (1980), The Gods Must Be Crazy (1980) as the president, Kill and Kill Again (1981), Claws (1982), City of Blood (1983), Flashpoint Africa (1984), Morenga (1985), King Solomon’s Mines (1985), Jake Speed (1986), Scavengers (1988), Act of Piracy (1988), Enemy Unseen (1989), The Emissary (1989), The Rutanga Tapes (1990), American Ninja 5: The Annihilation (1991), Lethal Ninja (1993), The Air Up There (1994), Cyborg Cop II (1994), Aristotle’s Plot (1996), and A Reasonable Man (1999). He also appeared in the tele-films Black Velvet Band (1997), Pride of Africa (1997), and Rhodes (1998). Gampu’s other television credits include episodes of Cowboy in Africa and Daniel Boone. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 15, 2003, B29.

Garcia Segura, Gregorio Spanish film composer Gregorio Garcia Segura died in Spain on December 4, 2003. He was 74. Garcia Segura was born in Cartagena, Spain,

2003 • Obituaries

on February 13, 1929. He worked as a composer or arranger in over 100 films from the late 1950s. His numerous credits include The Devil Made a Woman (1959), My Last Tango (1960), The Little Parade (1961), La Bella Lola (1962), The Son of Captain Blood (1962), Chaste Susan (1963), Lulu (1963), Sign of Zorro (1963), The Adventures of Scaramouche (1963), Backfire (1964), Samba (1965), The 317th Platoon (1965), The Woman from Beirut (1965), Marie-Chantal vs. Doctor Kha (1965), The Sweet Sound of Death (1965), The Drums of Tabu (1965), Woman for Ringo (1966), Seven Vengeful Women (1966), The Cup of St. Sebastian (1967), Great Friends (1967), Long-Play (1968), Madigan’s Millions (1969), Johnny Raton (1969), A Quiet Place to Kill (1969), Hurrah for Adventure! (1969), Transplant (1970), Carmen Boom (1971), Varieties (1971), The Chorus Girls (1973), Timid Bachelor (1974), The Protector (1974), Operation Commando (1980), Black Venus (1983), The Things of Love (1989), and Sister, What Have You Done? (1995).

Gardner, Herb Playwright Herb Gardner died of lung disease at his home in Manhattan, New York, on September 24, 2003. He was 68. Gardner was born in Brooklyn, New York, on December 28, 1934. Gardner wrote the hit 1962 play A Thousand Clowns, which he adapted for the screen in 1965. Milton Berle starred in the 1968 Broadway production of Gardner’s The Goodbye People. That play was adapted for film in 1984, with Gardner directing. Gardner also wrote and scripted the 1971 Dustin Hoffman film Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me?, and his play Thieves was made into a film in 1977. His Tony Award–winning play I’m Not Rappaport debuted on Broadway in 1985, and Gardner adapted and directed the film version in 1996. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 26, 2003, B12; New York Times, Sept. 26, 2003, A22; Time, Oct. 6, 2003, 25; Variety, Oct. 6, 2003, 104.

Garrido, Vicente Gregorio Garcia Segura

Mexican singer and songwriter Vicente Garrido, considered the father of the modern bolero,

Obituaries • 2003

144 died in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, on August 11, 2003, of complications from a respiratory ailment. He was 79. Garrido was born in Mexico city on June 22, 1924. From the 1950s Garrido wrote such popular songs as “No Me Platiques,” “El Verdadero Amor,” “Te Me Olvidas,” and “Todo y Nada.” His songs were heard in numerous Mexican films throughout the decade.

Garson, Henry

Herb Gardner

Comedy writer Henry Garson died at the Motion Picture and Television Home in Woodland Hills, California, on May 29, 2003. He was 91. Garson was born in New York City in 1911. He began his career as a dancer on stage in the 1920s. He moved to California in the early 1930s where he began writing for the radio series Junior Miss. Garson also scripted several films including The Reckless Moment (1949), Don’t Give Up the Ship (1959), Visit to a Small Planet (1960), and the 1960 Elvis Presley film G.I. Blues. He also worked often in television, scripting episodes of Make Room for Daddy, Family Affair, Mona McCluskey, The Mothers-in-Law, McHale’s Navy, My Three Sons, and Columbo. Los Angeles Times, June 7, 2003, B19.

Gast, Harold

Vicente Garrido

Television writer and producer Harold Gast died of complications from pneumonia at a Los Angeles hospital on December 28, 2003. He was 85. Gast was born in New York City in 1918. He served in the U.S. Army Signal Corps during World War II. He began writing for radio in the early 1950s, scripting for such series as Front Page Farrell and Real Stories from Real Life. He soon began writing for New York–based television series including Armstrong Circle Theater, U.S. Steel Hour, and The Defenders. Gast moved to Los Angeles in the mid–1960s, where he continued to write for television. He scripted episodes of such series as Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Untouchables, Dr. Kildare, Ben Casey, I Spy, The Nurses, The Trials of O’Brien, Felony Squad, and Casablanca. Gast also wrote and produced several series including Judd, for the Defense, The New People, Storefront Lawyers, and Cannon. He scripted

145 the 1975 tele-film Guilty or Innocent: The Sam Sheppard Murder Case and the 1979 mini-series From Here to Eternity. He also wrote the 1982 Emmy Award-winning tele-film A Woman Called Golda. Gast also wrote The Jesse Owens Story (1984), Guilty of Innocence: The Lenell Geter Story (1987), Shakedown on the Sunset Strip (1988), and Ironclads (1991). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 2, 2004, B11.

Gaylord, Edward Publishing tycoon Edward Gaylord died of cancer in Oklahoma City on April 27, 2003. He was 83. Gaylord was he editor and publisher of The Daily Oklahoman from 1974. He also was the owner of Gaylord Production Company which produced such syndicated television programs as Hee Haw and The Glen Campbell Show in the 1970s; in 1983 Gaylord purchased Opryland in Nashville, Tennessee, in a deal that included the cable channels the Nashville Network (TNN) and Country Music Television (CMT). He subsequently sold the channels to CBS. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 30, 2003, B11; Variety, May 5, 2003, 82.

Edward Gaylord

2003 • Obituaries

Gearon, Valerie British actress Valerie Gearon died in Bath, England, on July 9, 2003. She was 65. Gearon was born in Newport, Monmouthshire, England, on September 27, 1937. She starred in a handful of films from the early 1960s including Father Takes a Hand (1961), Nine Hours to Rama (1963), Invasion (1966), and Anne of a Thousand Days (1969) as Mary Boleyn. She was also seen in the television production of Vote, Vote, Vote for Nigel Barton (1965), and an episode of the British science fiction series Out of the Unknown. In the early 1970s she was featured in several British television mini-series including Persuasion (1971) and Casanova (1971).

Gelber, Jack Playwright Jack Gelber died of blood cancer in Manhattan on March 10, 2003. He was 70. Gelber was born in Chicago, Illinois, on April 12, 1932. He was best known for writing the play The Connection detailing the seamy life of drug addicts, which opened Off-Broadway in 1959. He

Jack Gelber

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adapted the play for the screen in 1961. Gelber’s other plays include The Apple, Barbary Shore, The Cuban Thing, and Square in the Eye. New York Times, May 30, 2003, A17; Time, May 19, 2003, 27; Variety, May 19, 2003, 52.

Genest, Emile Canadian actor Emile Genest died on March 19, 2003. He was 81. Genest was born in Quebec, Canada, on July 27, 1921. He began his career on Canadian television in the 1950s, starring as Napoleon Plouffe in The Plouffe Family in 1953, and as Inspector Taupin in CF-RCK in 1959. He made his film debut in 1960’s Walk Down Any Street. Genest was also seen in the films Nikki, Wild Dog of the North (1961), Lord Durham (1961), Big Red (1962), Rampage (1963), The Incredible Journey (1963), The Cincinnati Kid (1965), The King’s Pirate (1967), In Enemy Country (1968), The Hell with Heroes (1968), Don’t Just Stand There (1968), Kamouraska (1973), An Adventure for Two (1979), the 1981 film version of The Plouffe Family, Frankenstein and Me (1996), and A Day in a Life (2000). He also appeared in the tele-films The Scorpio Letters (1967), Istanbul Express (1968), and Kit Carson and the Mountain

Men (1977). Genest was a guest star in numerous television series including Checkmate, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Combat!, Laramie, Ben Casey, Gunsmoke, The Virginian, Perry Mason, Rawhide, Daniel Boone, The Rogues, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Twelve O’Clock High, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Laredo, The Rat Patrol, Mission: Impossible, The Road West, Garrison’s Gorillas, The Iron Horse, It Takes a Thief, and Family Affair. He worked primarily on Canadian television from the 1980s, starring in such series as Monsieur le Ministre, Mount Royal, Virginie, and Urgence.

Genus, Karl Television and stage director Karl Genus died of a heart attack at his home in Asheville, North Carolina, on May 29, 2003. He was 84. He was born Genus Carl Benson in Bridgeport, Connecticut, in 1919. He trained at the Pasadena Playhouse and began his career on stage in the early 1940s. Genus was the founding director of the Totem Pole Playhouse in Pennsylvania in the early 1950s. He also directed often for television in the 1950s, helming episodes of Studio One, Playhouse 90 and Great Ghost Tales. Los Angeles Times, June 7, 2003, 19; New York Times, June 6, 2003, 33.

George, Wally

Emile Genest

Controversial conservative talk show host Wally George died of pneumonia in Fountain Valley, California, on October 5, 2003. He was 71. George was born George Walter Pearch in Oakland, California, on December 4, 1931. He worked on radio as the producer and co-host of The Sam Yorty Show and hosted The Wally George Show in the early 1980s. His television talk show, The Hot Seat, debuted in 1983. Known for his combative manner toward his guests, George also made cameo appearances in several films including Grunt! The Wrestling Movie (1985), A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child (1989), Repossessed (1990), Club Fed (1990), and Squanderers (1996). George was the biological father of actress Rebecca De Mornay. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 7, 2003, B10; Variety, Oct. 13, 2003, 43.

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Wally George

Geraldy, Norma Norma Geraldy

Brazilian television actress Norma Geraldy died in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on December 2, 2003. She was 95. Geraldy was born Ione Sartini in Uberaba, Minas Gerais, Brazil, on December 30, 1907. A popular performer on Brazilian radio and television, Geraldy made her stage and film debut as a singer in the 1930s. She was featured in such movies as Favela Dos Meus Amores (1935) and O Simpatico Jeremias (1940). She was best known for her roles in numerous television soap operas from the 1980s including Sol de Verao (1982), Vereda Tropical (1984), O Slavador da Patria (1989), Vamp (1991), O Mapa da Mina (1993), Quem E Voce? (1996), Por Amor (1997), Uga Uga (2000), and A Casa das Sete Mulheres (2003)

Gerety, Anne Actress Anne Gerety died of a heart attack in a New York City hospital on October 25, 2003. She was 77. Gerety was born in New York City in 1926. She began her career on stage in

Anne Gerety

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148

Massachusetts and performed in community playhouses around the country. She was seen in the 1979 film Quintet with Paul Newman and the 1982 tele-film World War III. She was also seen on television in episodes of St. Elsewhere, Barnaby Jones and Benson. She was also the voice of Aunt Beru in National Public Radio’s Star Wars radio drama. Gerety went to Dallas in 1984 to join the Theater Center, where she performed in numerous plays over the next eight years.

Ghigliotto, Rebeca Chilean stage and television actress Rebeca Ghigliotto died of lung cancer in Santiago, Chile, on September 20, 2003. She was 48. Ghigliotto began her career on stage in the late 1970s in a production of Hamlet. She starred in over a dozen Chilean television dramas from the 1980s including Los Titeres (1984), Angel Malo (1986), Bravo (1989), Adrenalina (1996), Amandote (1998), Fuera de Control (1999), and Piel Canela (2001).

Maurice Gibb

a heart attack during an operation to remove an intestinal blockage in a Miami Beach, Florida, hospital on January 12, 2002. He was 53. Gibb was born on Douglas, Isle of Man, United Kingdom, on December 22, 1949. He and his brothers began their singing careers as the Brothers Gibb in the 1950s. Their numerous hits include the disco soundtracks for the popular films Saturday Night Fever (1977) and the 1983 sequel, Stayin’ Alive. Their numerous hit songs include “How Deep Is Your Love,” “Night Fever,” and “Stayin’ Alive.” The Bee Gees also starred in the 1978 film version of the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 13, 2003, B9; New York Times, Jan. 13, 2003, B7; People, Jan. 27, 2003, 65; Time, Jan. 20, 2003, 25; Variety, Jan. 20, 2003, 81.

Gibson, Althea Rebeca Ghigliotto

Gibb, Maurice Singer Maurice Gibb who, with his brothers Robin and Barry formed the popular 1970s singing group, The Bee Gees, died after suffering

Tennis legend Althea Gibson died of respiratory failure after a long illness at an East Orange, New Jersey, hospital on September 28, 2003. She was 76. Gibson was born in Silver, South Carolina, on August 25, 1927. She began her career as an amateur tennis player in the 1940s, and became the first black player to complete with the American Lawn Tennis league in

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Althea Gibson

1956. She soon captured the French and Italian tennis championships and won the Wimbledon title in 1957. She also won the Wimbledon doubles title and the U.S. Open several times during her career. Gibson was featured as Lukey, the maid, in John Ford’s 1959 film The Horse Soldiers. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 29, 2003, A1; New York Times, Sept. 29, 2003, A1; Time, Oct. 13, 2003, 25.

Gibson, Don Country singer and songwriter Don Gibson died in Nashville, Tennessee, on November 17, 2003. He was 75. Gibson was born in Shelby, North Carolina, on April 3, 1928. He began his career in the 1940s playing bass with the Sons of the Soil. He wrote and recorded the hit song “Oh, Lonesome Me” in 1958. Gibson wrote over 80 hit other songs from the mid–1950s to 1980 including “Blue Blue Day,” “Just One Time,” “Sweet Dreams,” “Any Day Now,” “Sea of Heartache,” and Ray Charles’ hit “I Can’t Stop Loving You.” Los Angeles Times, Nov. 19, 2003, B12; New

Don Gibson

York Times, Nov. 19, 2003, C14; People, Dec. 1, 2003, 177; Time, Dec. 1, 2003, 23.

Gibson, Lorne British singer Lorne Gibson died in Edinburgh, Scotland, of heart failure on May 12, 2003. He was 63. He was born Eric Brown in Edinburgh in 1940. He began performing on BBC radio in the early 1960s, forming the Lorne Gibson Trio. He recorded several successful songs including “Some Do, Some Don’t” (1963), “Don’t Go Near the Indians” (1964), and “Red Roses for a Blue Lady” (1965). Gibson sang the theme song for the 1963 Peter Sellers’ film Heavens Above! and played the title role in the 1966 musical comedy The Ghost Goes Gear. He largely retired from music in the mid–1970s, though he still performed on occasion.

Obituaries • 2003

150 Gideon was born in Tulsa on May 18, 1938. He appeared in small roles in the films D.O.A. (1988), Dark Before Dawn (1989), Necessary Roughness (1991), and Killing Device (1993). He was also seen in the tele-films Dallas: The Early Years (1986), Texas Justice (1995), and Dallas: J.R. Returns (1996). Gideon’s other television credits include episodes of Dangerous Curves and Walker, Texas Ranger.

Gilbert, Herschel Burke

Lorne Gibson

Gideon, Lee Character actor Lee Gideon died in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on October 7, 2003. He was 65.

Lee Gideon

Film and television composer Herschel Burke Gilbert died in Los Angeles of complications from a stroke on June 8, 2003. He was 85. Gilbert was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on April 20, 1918. A violinist, he studied composition at the Juilliard School of Music before going to Hollywood in the mid–1940s. Working as Columbia Pictures as an arranger and orchestrator, Gilbert’s numerous film credits include It’s a Wonderful Life (1946), Duel in the Sun (1946), It Had to Be You (1947), The Thirteenth Hour (1947), Mr. District Attorney (1947), King of the Wild Horses (1947), Open Secret (1948), The Return of the Whistler (1948), Thunderhoof (1948), The Lady from Shanghai (1948), The Fuller Brush Man (1948), My Dear Secretary (1948), An Old-

Herschel Burke Gilbert

151 Fashioned Girl (1948), There’s a Girl in My Heart (1949), Shamrock Hill (1949), Impact (1949), Mr. Soft Touch (1949), Prison Warden (1949), Three Husbands (1950), The Jackie Robinson Story (1950), The Scarf (1951), The Highwayman (1951), The Magic Face (1951), Models, Inc. (1952), Kid Monk Baroni (1952), Without Warning (1952), The Thief (1952) earning an Academy Award nomination for best score, No Time for Flowers (1952), The Rint (1952), The Moon Is Blue (1953) earning an Oscar nomination for best song, Vice Squad (1953), Sabre Jet (1953), Project Moonbase (1953), Riot in Cell Block 11 (1954), Witness to Murder (1954), Carmen Jones (1954) which earned him a third Academy Award nomination, It Came from Beneath the Sea (1955), The Naked Dawn (1955), The Bold and the Brave (1956), Nightmare (1956), While the City Sleeps (1956), The Naked Hills (1956), Comanche (1956), No Place to Hide (1956), Beyond a Reasonable Doubt (1956), Slaughter on Tenth Avenue (1957), Crime and Punishment, USA (1959), Geronimo (1962), Della (1964), Sam Whiskey (1969), The Secret of the Sacred Forest (1970), I Dismember Mama (1974), Gemini Affair (1974), and The Witch Who Came from the Sea (1976). Gilbert also worked in television from the 1950s, writing the theme and scoring the popular western series The Rifleman and Wanted: Dead or Alive. He subsequently worked with Four Star Television on such series as The Dick Powell Theatre, The Detectives, The Rogues, The Dupont Show, Johnny Ringo, Michael Shayne, The Westerner, Harrigan and Son, The Gertrude Berg Show, Burke’s Law, and The Loretta Young Show. He was also music supervisor for Gunsmoke from 1964 to 1965. Gilbert served as executive music director for CBS Television in the mid–1960s. After retiring from television in 1966 he began Laurel Records, which largely produced classical chamber music. Los Angeles Times, June 14, 2003, B22; Variety, June 30, 2003, 48.

Gillette, Edwin Cinematographer Edwin Gillette died in Los Angeles on September 30, 2003. He was 94. Gillette was the creator of the Syncro-Vox technique that inserted talking lips into animated figures. He worked on the cartoons Clutch Cargo and Space Angel, and his technique was often used

2003 • Obituaries

Edwin Gillette’s Syncro-Vox mouth for “Clutch Cargo”

in comedy routines on Late Night with Conan O’Brien. Gillette also worked as an underwater photographer on the 1957 film Undersea Girl.

Girotti, Massimo Italian actor Massimo Girotti died in Rome of a heart attack on January 5, 2003. He was 84. Girotti was born in Mogliano, Italy, on May 18, 1918. He began appearing in films in the late 1930s and was featured in over 100 films during his career. Girotti’s numerous film credits include Dora Nelson (1939), A Romantic Adventure (1940), The Story of Tosca (1941), The Iron Crown (1941), A Pilot Returns (1942), Knock Out (1942), Luchino Visconti’s Obsession (1943), Apparizione (1943), Woman (1943), Ten Commandments (1945), Shamed (1946), The Gate of Heaven (1946), Lost Youth (1947), The Tragic Hunt (1947), Christmas at Camp 119 (1949), The Street Has Many Dreams (1948), Difficult Years (1948), Ways of Love (1948), Fabiola (1949), In the Name of the Law (1949), Duel Without Honor (1949), Welcome Reverend (1949), Altura (1949), Story of a Love Affair (1950), Behind Closed Shutters (1951), Leathernose (1951), Sins of Rome (1952), Rome 11:00 (1952), Vortice

Obituaries • 2003

152 The French Revolution (1989), Rebus (1989), From the Other Side of the World (1992), The Monster (1994) with Roberto Benigni, and Sunset in Venice (1998). He had recently completed shooting a film for director Ferzan Ozpetek at the time of his death. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 8, 2003, B11; New York Times, Jan. 12, 2003, 32; Variety, Jan. 13, 2003, 83.

Giroud, Francoise French author and screenwriter Francoise Giroud died in a Neuilly, France, hospital of a head injury received in a fall several days earlier on January 19, 2003. She was 86. Giroud was born in Geneva, Switzerland, on September 21, 1916. She worked in films from the late 1930s, serving as a script girl on Jean Renoir’s 1937 film La Grande Illusion. She was an assistant director on several films including Hercule (1937), Barnabe (1938), and Narcisse (1940). She continued to work in films as a screenwriter from the early 1940s, with credits that include Promise to the Unknown One (1942), The Secret of Madame Clapain (1943), Destitute Mary (1945), Happy Go Lucky (1946), Fantomas (1947), Antoine and Antoinette Massimo Girotti

(1953), A Husband for Anna (1953), The Love of a Woman (1953), Livia (1954), Marguerite of the Night (1955), Road a Year Long (1957), It Happened in Rome (1957), Goddess of Love (1958), Herod the Great (1958), Asphalt (1958), Head of a Tyrant (1959), Wolves of the Deep (1959), The Cossacks (1959), Rita (1960), The Giants of Thessaly (1960), Duel of the Titans (1961), The Shortest Day (1962), Imperial Venus (1963), Gold for the Caesars (1963), Marco the Magnificent (1965) as Marco Polo’s father, The Mysterious Mr. Van Eyck (1966), The Witches (1966), Listen, Let’s Make Love (1967), Teorema (1968), Medea (1969), The Sisters (1969), The Red Tent (1971), Last Tango in Paris (1972) with Marlon Brando, Baron Blood (1972), The Voracious Ones (1972), Cagliostro (1974), The Kiss (1974), Stateline Motel (1975), Suspected Death of a Minor (1975), Mr. Klein (1976), The Innocent (1976), Passion of Love (1981), The Art of Love (1983), Christopher Columbus (1985), The Berlin Affair (1985), The Ox War (1987), La Boheme (1988), Mother’s Heart (1988),

Francoise Giroud

153 (1947), Least Love (1949), Days of Our Years (1949), Here Is the Beauty (1950), Les Petites Cardinal (1951), Love, Madame (1952), Julietta (1953), and Where the Hot Wind Blows! (1959). She was co-founder of France’s first weekly news magazine L’Express in 1953. Giroud served as French President Valery Giscard d’Estaing’s secretary of state for culture from 1976 to 1977. Her novel, Le Bon Plaisir, was adapted for film in 1984. Her biography, Marie Curie: A Life, was made into a television mini-series in 1990, and her novel Jenny Marx, la Femme du Diable, was adapted as a telefilm in 1993. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 22, 2003, B11; New York Times, Jan. 20, 2003, B7.

Glassman, Arnold Documentary filmmaker Arnold Glassman died at his Studio City, California, home after a brief illness on February 19, 2003. He was 56. Glassman began making films in the early 1990s, serving as co-director with Todd McCarthy and Stuart Samuels on the award-winning 1992 documentary Visions of Light. Glassman edited such documentaries as The Celluloid Closet (1995), The Good, the Bad and the Beautiful (1996), Sex, Censorship and the Silver Screen (1996), Frank Capra’s American Dream (1997), America’s Teenagers Growing Up on Television (1998), Dying to Tell the Story (1998), Warner Bros. 76th Anniversary: No Guts, No Glory (1998), Dial H for Hitchcock: The Genius Behind the Showman (1999), Forever Hol-

Arnold Glassman

2003 • Obituaries

lywood (1999) which he also co-directed, On Cukor (2000), Gene Kelly: Anatomy of a Dance (2002), and M*A*S*H: 30th Anniversary Reunion (2002). He also served as editor for the 2001 feature Frailty. Variety, Mar. 10, 2003, 51.

Glazer, Tom Folksinger and songwriter Tom Glazer died at his Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, home on February 21, 2003. He was 88. Glazer was born in Philadelphia on September 2, 1914. He worked with Alan Lomax, the founder of the Library of Congress’s Archive of American Folk Song in the 1930s. Glazer learned to play the guitar and made his professional debut in Manhattan in 1943. He hosted the ABC radio program Tom Glazer’s Ballad Box from 1945. He composed numerous popular ballads including “Melody of Love,” “A Worried Man,” “Skokiaan,” “More,” “Old Soldiers Never Die,” “A Dollar Ain’t a Dollar Any More,” “Mama Guitar,” “Ballad for the Babe,” and “Talking Inflation Blues.” Glazer composed songs for the Andy Griffith character to perform for the 1957 film A Face in the Crowd, and composed and sang the theme to the 1966 film Namu, the Killer Whale. He was perhaps best known for his novelty hit in 1963, “On Top of Spaghetti,” sung to the tune “On Top of Old Smoky,” and “Be Kind to Your Web-Footed Friends.” Los Angeles Times, Feb. 28, 2003, B14; New York Times, Feb. 26, 2003, A25; Time, Mar. 10, 2003, 18.

Tom Glazer

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Gmelin, Gerda German character actress Gerda Gmelin died in Hamburg, Germany, on April 14, 2003. She was 83. Gmelin was born in Braunschweig, Germany, on June 23, 1919, the daughter of actor Helmut Gmelin. She began her career on stage in the late 1930s. She also appeared often in films and television from the late 1950s. She was featured in such films as The Bordello (1971), Die Sundige Kleinstadt (1974), Girls Riot (1983), and Die Menschen sind Kalt (1998). She starred in numerous German television series including Loriot (1976), Immer Wieder Sonntag (1995), Drunter und Druber (1997), and Pfeifer (2000).

Trevor Goddard

Gerda Gmelin

Goddard, Trevor Australian actor Trevor Goddard, who was best known for his recurring role as Lt. Cmdr. Michael “Mic” Brumby in the JAG television series, was found dead at his North Hollywood,

California, home on June 8, 2003, a probable suicide by drug overdose. He was 37. Goddard was born in Perth, Western Australia, on October 14, 1965. A former professional boxer, Goddard began appearing in television and films in the late 1980s. His film credits include Men of War (1994), Mortal Kombat (1995), Illegal in Blue (1995), The Break (1995), Fast Money (1995), Prey of the Jaguar (1996), Yesterday’s Target (1996), Dead Tides (1997), First Encounter (1997), Deep Rising (1998), Some Girls (1998), She’s Too Tall (1998), Gut Feeling (1999), Gone in Sixty Seconds (2000), Dead Man’s Run (2001), Hollywood Vampyr (2002), Torture TV (2002), and 2003’s Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl. Goddard was seen often in JAG from 1998 through 2001. He was also featured in the telefilms Assault on Devil’s Island (1997), Legion (1998), and When Billie Beat Bobby (2001). His other television credits include episodes of Tour of Duty, Silk Stalkings, The Commish, Dark Justice, Renegade, Murphy Brown, Baywatch, Empty

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Nest, Murder, She Wrote, Nowhere Man, Babylon 5, The X Files, and 18 Wheels of Justice. Los Angeles Times, June 10, 2003, B4; New York Times, June 11, 2003, C17; Variety, June 23, 2003, 57.

Golland, Stuart British actor Stuart Golland died in Leeds, England, on September 11, 2003. He was 58. Golland was born in Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England, on August 3, 1945. He starred in the British television police drama Heartbeat as pub landlord George Ward from 1992 to 1996. Golland also appeared in the 1981 film Looks and Smiles, and guest starred in episodes of such television series as All Creatures Great and Small, The New Statesman, Emmerdale, In Suspicious Circumstances, Stay Lucky, The Darling Buds of May, and Rumpole of the Bailey.

Stuart Golland

Gonzalez, Eulalio “Piporro” Leading Mexican comedian, actor and singer Eulalio Gonzalez Ramirez, who was known as “Piporro,” died of a heart attack in Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, on September 1, 2003. He was 81. Gonzalez was born in Los Herreras,

Eulalio “Piporro” Gonzalez

Nuevo Leon, Mexico, on December 16, 1921. He began his career in radio, working as an actor in a soap opera in the early 1950s. He created his popular character El Piporro for the radio program Ahi Viene Martin Corona. Gonzalez would also compose parody songs for radio and films. He was seen in numerous films from the 1950s including La Muerte Enamorada (1951), Dancing (1952), Little Love of My Life (1952), El Enamorado (1952), Hotel Tropical (1953), La Infame (1953), White as an Angel (1954), Watch Out for Love (1954), Kid Tabaco (1955), Music School (1955), Los Gavilanes (1956), La Faraona (1956), Los Mujeriegos (1958), Los Tres Vivales (1958), Acapulquena (1959), The Ship of Monsters (1959), Calibre 44 (1960), Chip on the Shoulder (1960), El Tigre (1961), El Rey del Tomate (1963), Heroe a la Fuerza (1964), La Valentina (1965), El Tragabalas (1966), Los Hijos del Diablo (1978), Huevos Rancheos (1982), Viva el Chubasco (1983), El Diablo, el Santo y el Tonto (1987), and El Macho (1987). Gonzalez also scripted many of his films and directed the 1969 feature El Pocho.

Gonzalez, Ruben Cuban pianist Ruben Gonzalez died in Havana, Cuba, after a long illness on December 8,

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Ruben Gonzalez

2003. He was 84. Gonzalez was born in Santa Clara, Cuba, in 1919. He began performing professionally while in his teens. He studied medicine while working as a musician by night until 1941, when he left school to perform full time. During the 1940s he played in orchestras with such artists as Mongo Santamaria and Arsenio Rodriguez. He joined violinist Enrique Jorrin’s orchestra in the 1960s, performing in nightclubs throughout Latin America. In 1996 he was invited to join Juan de Marcos’ Afro-Cuban All Stars. He became internationally known late in his career after being featured in Ry Cooder’s 1999 film Buena Vista Social Club. Gonzalez recorded his first album A Toda Cuba Le Gusta (All Cuba Likes It) soon after. New York Times, Dec. 10, 2003, A29; Time, Dec. 22, 2003, 135; Variety, Dec. 15, 2003, 67.

Goodman, Vestal Gospel singer Vestal Goodman died in Celebration, Florida, on December 27, 2003. She was 74. Goodman was born in Fyffe, Alabama, on December 13, 1929. She and her husband Harold “Happy” Goodman formed the Happy

Vestal Goodman

Goodman Family singers in the late 1940s. The were regular performers on The Gospel Singing Jubilee syndicated television program, and appeared regularly with Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker’s The PTL Club television show in the mid–1980s. Vestal Goodman wrote her autobiography, Vestal!, in 1998. She and her husband were also inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame in 1998. Happy Goodman died in 2002. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 30, 2003, B12; New York Times, Jan. 1, 2004; Time, Jan. 12, 2004, 23.

Goodwin, Ron British film composer Ron Goodwin died of complications from asthma at his home in Brimpton Common, Reading, Berkshire, England, on January 8, 2003. He was 77. Goodwin was born in Plymouth, Devon, England, on February 17, 1925. He began working in films in the late 1950s, composing scores to such features as Man with a Gun (1958), The Witness (1959), Whirlpool (1959), The Trial of Oscar Wilde (1960), Village of the Damned (1960), In the Nick (1960), The Clue of the New Pin (1960), Partners in Crime (1961),

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1976 tele-film Beauty and the Beast, Ride a Wild Pony (1976), Candleshoe (1977), The Littlest Horse Thieves (1977), Force 10 from Navarone (1978), Unidentified Flying Oddball (1979), Clash of Loyalties (1983), and Valhalla (1992). From the early 1970s Goodwin also led his Concert Orchestra on tour throughout the world. He received the Ivor Novello Award for Lifetime Achievement in Music in 1994. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 12, 2003, B18; People, Jan. 27, 2003, 65; Variety, Jan. 20, 2003, 82.

Gopal, Ram

Ron Goodwin

Murder, She Said (1961), The Man at the Carlton Tower (1961), Johnny Nobody (1961), Invasion Quartet (1961), I Thank a Fool (1962), Kill or Cure (1962), Village of Daughters (1962), Postman’s Knock (1962), The Day of the Triffids (1962), Follow the Boys (1963), Sword of Lancelot (1963), Murder at the Gallop (1963), Ladies Who Do (1963), The Cracksman (1963), Children of the Damned (1963), Of Human Bondage (1964), Murder Most Foul (1964), Murder Ahoy (1964), A Home of Your Own (1964), Go, Kart, Go (1964), 633 Squadron (1964), Operation Crossbow (1965), Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines (1965), The Alphabet Murders (1965), The Early Bird (1965), The Trap (1966), That Riviera Touch (1966), Mister Ten Per Cent (1966), Those Fantastic Flying Fools (1967), The Magnificent Two (1967), Decline and Fall … of a Birdwatcher (1968), Where Eagles Dare (1968), Submarine X-1 (1968), Mrs. Brown, You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter (1968), Monte Carlo or Bust (1969), Battle of Britain (1969), The Executioner (1970), Alfred Hitchcock’s Frenzy (1972), The Little Mermaid (1973), Gawain and the Green Knight (1973), Diamonds on Wheels (1973), The Happy Prince (1974), Deadly Strangers (1974), One of Our Dinosaurs Is Missing (1975), Spanish Fly (1975), the

Leading Indian dancer Ram Gopal died in a London nursing home on October 12, 2003. He was believed to be in his early 90s. Gopal was born in Bangalore, India, and studied Indian classical dance. He performed in India in the 1930s and made his solo debut in New York in 1938. He toured throughout the world for the next two decades. In 1960 Gopal performed with British ballerina Alicia Markova in his choreographed work Radha Krishna. He also authored the 1957 autobiography Rhythm in the Heavens. Gopal also founded dance studios in London and Bangalore. New York Times, Oct. 15, 2003, C15.

Gordon, Alex Alex Gordon, a leading producer of science fiction and Western films in the 1950s, died of cancer in Los Angeles on June 24, 2003. He was 80. Born on September 8, 1922, Gordon was raised in Hampstead, England. He and his brother, film producer Richard Gordon, became fans of Hollywood Western films in general, and singing cowboy Gene Autry in particular. Alex Gordon formed the British Gene Autry Fan Club in the late 1930s. After serving in World War II, the Gordon brothers came to the United States. Alex went to Hollywood in the early 1950s, where he was introduced to future cult film director Ed Wood. Wood directed Gordon’s stories Jail Bait (1954) and Bride of the Monster (1955) starring Bela Lugosi in one of his final roles. Gordon also began working with Gene Autry as a publicist handling the cowboy star’s personal appearances. Gordon produced his first film, The Lawless

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Alex Gordon

1962 science fiction film The Underwater City, and two Westerns in 1965, Requiem for a Gunfighter and The Bounty Killer, before leaving film production. He soon became re-associated with his childhood hero, Gene Autry, becoming vice president of Autry’s Flying A Pictures. Gordon continued to help manage Autry’s music and film properties throughout his life. Los Angeles Times, June 28, 3004, B22; Variety, Sept. 1, 2003, 62.

Ram Gopal

Rider, starring Johnny Carpenter, in 1954. Working with American International Pictures, Gordon produced several films directed by Roger Corman including Apache Woman (1955), the science fiction classic The Day the World Ended (1956), and The Oklahoma Woman (1956). Gordon also produced the films The She-Creature (1956), Shake, Rattle and Rock (1956), Runaway Daughters (1956), Girls in Prison (1956), Voodoo Woman (1957), Dragstrip Girl (1957), Motorcycle Gang (1957), Flesh and the Spur (1957), Submarine Seahawk (1958), Jet Attack (1958), and The Atomic Submarine (1959). Gordon produced the

Gordon, Pamela Stage and screen actress Pamela Gordon died of pulmonary failure and complications of esophageal cancer in a Los Angeles hospital on September 21, 2003. She was 66. Gordon was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on April 8, 1937. She moved to California in 1961, where she appeared in numerous theatrical productions. Gordon also appeared in small roles in numerous films including Frances (1982), Weird Science (1985), Poltergeist II: The Other Side (1986), The Night Before (1988), Reckless Kelly (1993), Bloodstone: Subspecies II (1993), The Road Killers (1994), Bloodlust: Subspecies III (1994), Blue Skies Are a

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Pamela Gordon

Lie (1995), Another Day in Paradise (1998), My Favorite Martian (1999), Starry Night (1999), Deadtime (1999), Chuck and Buck (2000), Everything Put Together (2000), Freud and Darwin Sitting in a Tree (2000), Wrong Way to Sundance (2001), The Dogwalker (2002), Stealing Harvard (2002), and The Technical Writer (2003). She also appeared in the tele-films To the Moon, Alice (1990), Crazy from the Heart (1991), and Alien Nation: Body and Soul (1995), and in episodes of such series as Tales from the Crypt, the new Twilight Zone, The Wonder Years, Frasier, My SoCalled Life, ER, Buddy Faro, Freaks and Geeks, Time of Your Life, The X-Files, Charmed, The West Wing, That’s Life, and NYPD Blue. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 24, 2003, B10.

Gordon, Vic Australian comic actor Vic Gordon died in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, on December 2, 2003. He was 92. Gordon was born in England on March 4, 1911. He began his career in entertainment as a singer in England in the 1930s before turning to comedy. He came to Australia in 1959, where he appeared on television in such comedy series as The Happy Show with Happy Hammond and Princess Panda as Funnyface Gor-

Vic Gordon

don. He was best known for his role as desk sergeant Bert Kennedy in the detective series Matlock Police in the early 1970s. He was also see in the series Homicide, Bluey, The Bluestone Boys, Young Ramsay, Prisoner, Pugwall, and Good Vibrations. Gordon was featured in the 1984 television mini-series All the Rivers Run, and appeared in the films Next of Kin (1982), Lonely Hearts (1982), and Quigley Down Under (1990).

Goszcz, Waldemar Polish model and television star Waldemar Goszcs was killed in an automobile accident in Ostroda, Poland, on January 24, 2003. He was 28. Goszcz was born in Wolborz, Poland, on December 14, 1974. He starred as Adam Rozdrazewski in the popular Polish television series Adam i Ewa from 2000.

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Harry Goz (from Fiddler on the Roof ) Waldemar Goszcz

Gottesfeld, Gary Thriller writer Gary Gottesfeld died of pancreatic cancer at a Los Angeles hospital on September 5, 2003. He was 61. Gottesfeld’s novels include The Violet Closet (1989), Blood Harvest (1990), Ill Wind (1993), Tribal Shadows (1994), and White Angel (1995). Los Angeles Times, Sept. 8, 2003, B9.

Goz, Harry Stage actor Harry Goz died of cancer in a Manhasset, New York, hospital on September 6, 2003. He was 71. Goz was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on February 16, 1932. He began his career on stage and made his Broadway debut in a small role in Bajour in 1964. In 1966 he understudied Herschel Bernardi in the musical hit Fiddler on the Roof, replacing Bernardi in the role of Tevye in 1967. He also performed in Broadway productions of Two by Two, Prisoner of Second Avenue and Chess. Goz appeared in a handful of films including Marathon Man (1976), Looking Up (1977), Mommie Dearest (1981), Rappin’ (1985), and Dead Aim (1987). He was also featured in

the tele-films Bill (1981), Bill: On His Own (1983), and Darrow (1991). Goz was Phil Bernstein in the crime drama series Wiseguy in 1988 and was Saul Colbert in the television sit-com Ned and Stacey in 1995. Goz was also the voice of Captain Hank Murphy in the Sealab 2021 animated series from 2000. His other television credits include episodes of Kojak, Tales from the Darkside, Law & Order, Third Watch, and Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 6, 2003, B9; New York Times, Oct. 1, 2003, A21; Variety, Oct. 13, 2003, 43.

Graham, Winston British writer Winston Graham died in a London nursing home on July 10, 2003. He was 93. Graham was born in Victoria Park, Manchester, England, on June 30, 1910. He began writing as a young man and published over 40 novels during his career. He was best known for a series of historical novels that began with Ross Poldark in 1945. Graham wrote 12 books in the Poldark series, which were the inspiration for the popular British television mini-series in 1975. Several of his other novels were also adapted for

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Winston Graham

film including Night Without Stars (1951), Fortune Is a Woman (1957), Marnie (1964) directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and The Walking Stick (1970). Los Angeles Times, July 11, 2003, B13; New York Times, July 12, 2003, A21; Variety, July 21, 2003, 72.

Grant, Bob British comic actor Bob Grant was found dead at his home in Gloucestershire, England, on November 8, 2003. He was 71. Grant was born in Hammersmith, England, on April 21, 1932. He performed on stage from the early 1960s and was featured in the 1963 film Sparrows Can’t Sing. He was best known for his role as Jack Harper in the British television comedy series On the Buses from 1969 to 1974. He also played the role in several films based on the series including On the Buses (1971), Mutiny on the Buses (1972), and Holiday on the Buses (1973). He continued to perform on stage through the 1980s, but had lived largely in seclusion for the past decade.

Bob Grant

Grant, Paul Bodybuilding champion Paul Grant died of complications from a rare kidney disease in Wales on November 23, 2003. He was 60. Grant was born in Swansea, Wales, on June 26, 1943. He began bodybuilding while in his teens and held

Paul Grant

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several amateur championships including Mr. Wales, Mr. Britain, and Mr. Europe. He came to Venice Beach, California, in the early 1970s and defeated Lou Ferrigno, star of television’s The Incredible Hulk, for the Mr. Universe competition in 1973. He also trained with Arnold Schwarzenegger and appeared with him in the 1976 documentary Pumping Iron. Returning to Wales, he opened a gym and a health food store. He was soon struck down by a rare kidney ailment that resulted in a kidney transplant in 1985. He was forced to resume kidney dialysis in the late 1990s.

Gray, Ebony British actress Ebony Gray died of cancer in Liverpool, England, on August 8, 2003. She was 49. Gray was born Carole Williams in Liverpool on January 25, 1954. She came to the United States in 1974 and trained with the Watts Repertory Company. She returned to England in 1978 and over the next decade performed on stage and in clubs as a singer and actress. In the 1990s an unsuccessful foot surgery led to her becoming a member of the Arts Council’s Disability Moni-

toring Committee. She was a host and writer for the BBC television program From the Edge. Gray was best known for her role as Cassie Charlton on the television soap opera Brookside from 1996 to 1998.

Grean, Charles Composer and arranger Charles Randolph Grean died in a New York City hospital on December 20, 2003. He was 90. Grean was born in New York on October 1, 1913. He performed from the 1930s an worked as an arranger for such artists as Glenn Miller, Charlie Spivak, and Nat King Cole. Grean wrote the novelty hit song “The Thing,” which was recorded by Phil Harris in 1950. He was also the co-founder of the CsidaGrean Associates talent agency in the 1950s. He founded the Charles Randolph Grean Sounde in the late 1960s, recording the album “Quentin’s Theme,” featuring music from the Gothic television soap opera Dark Shadows. Greane also produced Leonard Nimoy’s album, The Two Sides of Leonard Nimoy, and wrote the single “The Ballad of Bilbo Baggins.” New York Times, Dec. 25, 2003, C10.

The Great Antonio Anton Barichievich, who was known as the Great Antonio due to his legendary feats of strength, died of a heart attack in Montreal, Canada, on September 7, 2003. He was 77. Barichievich was born in Zagreb, Yugoslavia, on October 10, 1925. The 6'4", 500 lb.+ strongman was honored by the Guinness Book of Records for pulling a 4-77 ton train along 65 feet of track in 1952, and for pulling four loaded buses in 1960. He was featured on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson several times in the 1960s and had a small part in the 1981 film Quest for Fire. The Great Antonio also competed as a wrestler in Japan against such stars as Rikidozan and Antonio Inoki. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 15, 2003, B9.

Ebony Gray

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zos en Contra (1984), Seguirdad Personal (1986), Tres Alegres Fugitivos (1988), La Garganta del Diablo (1991), and Son of the Bride (2002). He was best known for his role on Argentine television soap operas from the 1980s including Claudia Moran, Clave de Sol, Montana Rusa, Otra Vuelta, Primicias, Calientes, and Rebelde Way.

Greene, David

The Great Antonio

Green, Ruben Argentine actor Ruben Green died of cancer in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on April 7, 2003. He was 56. Green was born on July 31, 1946. He was featured in several films including The Knight of the Sword (1970), Mingo y Anibal, Dos Pelota-

Ruben Green

Emmy Award–winning television director David Greene died of pancreatic cancer in Ojai, California, on April 7, 2003. He was 82. Greene was born in Manchester, England, on February 28, 1921. He began his career as an actor on the London stage, and was featured in several films including The Hideout (1952), Daughter of Darkness (1948), The Golden Madonna (1949), The Wooden Horse (1950), and The Dark Light (1951). Greene began directing for television in the 1950s, helming episodes of such series as Shirley Temple’s Storybook, Pursuit, The Twilight Zone, Five Fingers, The Defenders, Sir Francis Drake, The Nurses, The Saint, Man of the World, Espionage, Coronet Blue, Ellery Queen, and Lucan. Greene received Emmy Awards for directing the tele-films The People Next Door (1970) and Friendly Fire (1979).

David Greene

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He also directed segments of the 1976 mini-series Rich Man, Poor Man, and the first segment of the landmark television mini-series Roots in 1977. He also directed the tele-films and mini-series Madame Sin (1972), The Count of Monte Cristo (1975), The Trial of Lee Harvey Oswald (1977), A Vacation in Hell (1979), The Choice (1981), World War III (1982), Rehearsal for Murder (1982), Take Your Best Shot (1982), Ghost Dancing (1983), Prototype (1983), The Guardian (1984), Sweet Revenge (1984), Fatal Vision (1984), Triplecross (1985), This Child Is Mine (1985), Murder Among Friends (1985), Guilt Conscience (1985), Vanishing Act (1986), Circle of Violence: A Family Drama (1986), Miles to Go… (1986), The Betty Ford Story (1987), After the Promise (1987), Inherit the Wind (1988), Red Earth, White Earth (1989), The Penthouse (1989), Small Sacrifices (1989), In the Best Interest of the Child (1990), the 1991 re-make of What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? starring Lynn and Vanessa Redgrave, Night of the Hunter (1991), …And Then She Was Gone (1991), Honor Thy Mother (1992), Willing to Kill: The Texas Cheerleader Story (1992), Beyond Obsession (1994), Spoils of War (1994), Frostfire (1994), Children of the Dust (1995), A Season in Purgatory (1996), Princess in Love (1996), Breach of Faith: Family of Cops II (1997), Bella Mafia (1997), and The Girl Next Door (1998). Greene also directed a handful of theatrical films in the 1960s including The Shuttered Room (1967), Sebastian (1968), The Strange Affair (1968), I Start Counting (1969), and Gray Lady Down (1978). Los Angeles Times, Apr. 9, 2003, B10; New York Times, Apr. 13, 2003, A36; Variety, Apr. 21, 2003, 54.

Greifer, Lewis British television writer Lewis Greifer died of complications from a stroke in London on March 18, 2003. He was 83. Greifer was born in London on December 19, 1919. He began his career as a journalist, working for various newspapers through the mid–1950s. From 1954 to 1956 Greifer wrote comedy radio sketches for such shows as Take It from Here and The Goon Show. He wrote a radio biography of singer Paul Robeson, This I Believe, and the television thriller serials Five Names for Johnny and Gentle Killers in 1957. His 1959 tele-play, The Man Who Finally Died, was adapted as a feature film in 1962.

Lewis Greifer

Greifer also wrote the science fiction serial The Voodoo Factor in 1959. He also wrote for the British drama anthology series Love Story, and scripted episodes of such series as Doctor Who, Crossroads, and the cult classic, The Prisoner.

Grenness, Signi Danish actress Signi Grenness died in Denmark on April 6, 2003. She was 83. Grenness was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, on August 21, 1919. A popular Danish film star from the 1940s, she was seen in such films as Det Bodes der For (1944), Hatten er Sat (1947), Dorte (1951), Husmandstosen (1952), Komtessen (1961), and Hooray for the Blue Hussars (1970).

Grieve, John Scottish actor John Grieve died in a Glasgow, Scotland, nursing home on January 21, 2003. He was 78. Grieve was born in Glasgow on June 14, 1924. Grieve performed on stage and in

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Signi Grenness

music halls before being cast as Dan McPhail in the 1959 television series Para Handy, and 1965’s The Vital Spark. He also appeared in the 1974 television series Doctor at Sea and the 1975 miniseries Sunset Song. Grieve was also seen in the films The Thirty-Nine Steps (1978) and Eye of the Needle (1981), and in episodes of Mystery and Imagination, All Creatures Great and Small, The High Life, and Hamish Macbeth.

Grigore Grigoriu

Guenette, Robert Documentary filmmaker Robert Guenette died of brain cancer in a Los Angeles hospital on October 31, 2003. He was 68. Guenette was born in Holyoke, Massachusetts, on January 12, 1935. He worked as a news producer for CBS in the

Grigoriu, Grigore Moldovan actor Grigore Grigoriu was killed in an automobile accident in Moldova on December 20, 2003. He was 62. Grigoriu was born in Kaushany, Moldova, on April 4, 1941. He began his career on stage in the late 1950s and made his film debut in the mid–1960s. Grigoriu starred in such films as Red Meadows (1966), Annychika (1968), Fiddlers (1971), Queen of the Gypsies (1975), Anton the Magician (1978), Pugachev (1978), A Hunting Accident (1978), Agent of the Secret Service (1978), The Morning Star (1987), and Maria si Mirabella in Tranzistoria (1989).

Robert Guenette

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early 1960s and was director various National Geographic specials. He scripted the 1966 film The Defector, and produced, directed and wrote 1969’s The Tree. He earned an Emmy for producing and co-writing They’ve Killed President Lincoln in 1971, and produced four segments for David L. Wolper’s television series Appointment with Destiny, including The Crucifixion of Jesus, The Plot to Murder Hitler, Cortez and Montezuma: Conquest of an Empire, and Peary’s Race to the North Pole. Guenette produced the 1976 tele-film Victory at Entebbe, and made several sensationalistic documentaries in the 1970s including Monsters! Mysteries or Myths? (1974), Bigfoot the Mysterious Monster (1975), The Amazing World of Psychic Phenomena (1977), and The Man Who Saw Tomorrow (1980) about Nostradamus. He also directed The Making of “Star Wars” (1977), SPFX: The Empire Strikes Back (1980), Great Movie Stunts: Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) which earned him an Emmy Award nomination, and Here’s Looking at You, Warner Bros. (1991). Los Angeles Times, Nov. 5, 2003, B12; New York Times, Nov. 6, 2003, A31; Time, Nov. 17, 2003, 21; Variety, Nov. 10, 2003, 60.

fection on July 23, 2003. He was 65. Guillen was born in Camaguey, Cuba, in 1938. He was a leading documentary film director in Cuba in the 1960s, helming the films En un Barrio Viejo (1963), Ociel del Toa (1965), Los del Baile (1965), Reportaje (1966), Coffea Arabiga (1968), Desde La Babana, 1969, Recordar (1969), and Nosotros en el Cuyaguateje (1972). His outspoken advocacy of human rights led to him being jailed by the Castro regime from 1980 to 1984. He was expelled from Cuba in 1989 and settled in Miami.

Gutierrez, Gerald Tony Award–winning director Gerald Gutierrez died of respiratory failure from the flu at his home in Brooklyn on on December 29, 2003. He was 53. Gutierrez was born in Brooklyn in 1950. He began his career directing in regional theater and Off-Broadway, staging productions of Rise and Rise of Daniel Rocket, Isn’t It Romantic and Meetings for Playwrights Horizons. Gutierrez earned consecutive Tony Awards for directing the plays The Heiress (1995) and Edward Albee’s A Delicate Balance (1996). He also di-

Guillen Landrian, Nicholas Cuban film director Nicholas Guillen Landrian died in Miami, Florida, of a pancreatic in-

Nicholas Guillen Landrian

Gerald Gutierrez

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rected television productions of Hyde in Hollywood (1991) and Kiss-Kiss, Dahlings! (1992). Los Angeles Times, Dec. 31, 2003, B11; New York Times, Dec. 31, 2003, A19; Time, Jan. 12, 2004, 23; Variety, Jan. 5, 2003, 62.

Gutierrez, Jose Maria Argentine actor Jose Maria Gutierrez died of a heart attack in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on January 8, 2003. He was 81. Gutierrez acted in films in Argentina for over 50 years. He was featured in such films as Alla en el Setenta y Tantos (1945), Albeniz (1947), La Fuerza Ciega (1950), Marinela (1955), La Procesion (1960), Todo sol es Amargo (1965), The Mafia (1972), Juan Manuel de Rosas (1972), Rebellion in Patagonia (1974), I Did Kill Facundo (1975), The Dead Man (1975), The Conquest of Paradise (1980), Nights Without Moons and Suns (1984), Sinfin (1988), and The Adventures of God (2000).

Gwynne, Anne Anne Gwynne, the lovely film actress who was best known for her leading roles in numerous Universal horror films in the 1940s, died of complications from a stroke following surgery at the Motion Picture Country Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on April 1, 2003. She was 84. Gwynne was born in Waco, Texas, on December 10, 1918. She and her family moved to California in the late 1930s, where she worked as a model and appeared on stage. She was soon placed under contract to Universal Pictures and made her film debut in the 1939 Baby Sandy comedy Unexpected Father. She continued to appear in such films as Oklahoma Frontier (1939) with Johnny Mack Brown, Charlie McCarthy, Detective (1939), Little Accident (1939), Honeymoon Deferred (1940), Framed (1940), Black Friday (1940) with Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi, the 1940 serial Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe as Emperor Ming the Merciless’ accomplice, The Man from Montreal (1940), Sandy Is a Lady (1940), Bad Man from Red Butte (1940), Give Us Wings (1940), Spring Parade (1940), Washington Melodrama (1941), The Black Cat (1941) with Basil Rathbone, Tight Shoes (1941), Nice Girl? (1941), Mob Town (1941), Melody Lane (1941), Road Agent

Anne Gwynne (with Ray “Crash” Corrigan in an ape suit from The Secret of Dr. RX )

(1941), Don’t Get Personal (1942), Jail House Blues (1942), Ride ’Em Cowboy (1942) opposite Abbott and Costello, The Strange Case of Dr. Rx (1942), You’re Telling Me (1942), Broadway (1942), Men of Texas (1942), Sin Town (1942), Keeping Fit (1942), We’ve Never Been Licked (1943), Frontier Badmen (1943), Top Man (1943), Ladies Courageous (1944), Weird Woman (1944) with Lon Chaney, Jr., Moon Over Las Vegas (1944), South of Dixie (1944), Babes on Swing Street (1944), Murder in the Blue Room (1944), the Universal monster free-forall House of Frankenstein (1944), I Ring Doorbells (1946), Fear (1946), The Glass Alibi (1946), The Ghost Goes Wild (1947), Killer Dill (1947), Dick Tracy Meet Gruesome (1947), Panhandle (1948), The Enchanted Valley (1948), Arson, Inc (1949), The Blazing Sun (1950), Call of the Klondike (1950), Black Tower (1950), King of the Bullwhip (1951), Breakdown (1952), Phantom of the Jungle (1955), and Teenage Monster (1957). Gwynne was also a popular pin-up girl during World War II, performing at numerous military bases during the war. She also starred in the 1947 television drama series Public Prosecutor, and was featured in episodes of Death Valley Days and Northwest Passage in the 1950s. She made her final film appearance in the 1970 film Adam at 6 A.M. as

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Michael Douglas’ mother. Survivors include a son, Gregory Gilford, and daughter, actress Gwynne Gilford, who is married to actor Robert Pine. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 8, 2003, B11; New York Times, Apr. 14, 203, F8.

Hackenthal, Joachim German character actor Joachim Hackenthal died in Munich, Germany, on January 26, 2003. He was 78. Hackenthal was born in Germany on November 7, 1924. In films from the 1960s, he was featured in Most Girls Will (1971), The Swinging Co-Eds (1972), Mark of the Devil II (1972), Swedish Playgirls (1973), Three Men in the Snow (1974), Around the World with Fanny Hill (1974), Strongman Ferdinand (1976), The Tin Drum (1979), and The Wonderful Years (1979).

Buddy Hackett

Joachim Hackenthal

Hackett, Buddy Veteran comedian Buddy Hackett died at his beach house in Los Angeles, California, on June 30, 2003. He was 78. Hackett was born in Brooklyn, New York, on August 31, 1924. He

began his career as a stand-up comic in the 1940s and was soon appearing on live television. Hackett starred in he DuMont variety television series School House in 1949, and starred as Stanley Peck in the short-lived television sit-com Stanley from 1956. Hackett made his Broadway debut in the 1954 comedy Lunatics and Lovers. He was also featured in a handful of films including Walking My Baby Back Home (1953), Fireman Save My Child (1954), God’s Little Acre (1958), All Hands on Deck (1961), Everything’s Ducky (1961) with Mickey Rooney, The Music Man (1962), The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (1962), It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (1963), Muscle Beach Party (1964), The Golden Head (1964), Disney’s The Love Bug (1968), and The Good Guys and the Bad Guys (1969). Hackett was a top comic on the night club circuit and a frequent guest on television variety and game shows including What’s My Line?, I’ve Got a Secret, The Tonight Show, The Jack Paar Show, The Jackie Gleason Show, The Andy Williams Show, Hollywood Squares, and Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In. He also appeared in comic roles in such series as The Rifleman, The Trials of O’Brien, The Big Valley, Get Smart, Quincy, The Love Boat, The Fall Guy, Murder, She Wrote, Ferris Bueller, L.A. Law, Space

169 Rangers, Boy Meets World, Sabrina, the Teenage Witch, and Just Shoot Me! Hackett starred as Lou Costello, with Harvey Korman as Bud Abbott, in the 1978 tele-film Bud and Lou. He was also seen in the films Hey Babe! (1980), Loose Shoes (1980), and Scrooged (1988), and the 1999 television series Action. He was a voice actor in the films Jack Frost (1979), The Little Mermaid (1989), and Paulie (1998), and the 1992 short-lived cartoon series Fish Police. Hackett made one of his last appearances as a celebrity judge on the series Last Comic Standing shortly before his death. Los Angeles Times, July 1, 2003, B11; New York Times, July 1, 2003, C16; People, July 14, 2003, 99; Time, July 14, 2003, 21; Variety, July 14, 2003, 52.

Hagen, Claire Actress Claire Hagen died of cancer in Woodland Hills, California, on December 3, 2003. She was born Claire Lynne Poland, but changed her name to Claire Polanski, and, later, Claire Plan, when she began modeling in the early 1960s. She married actor Ross Hagen in 1963, and appeared with him in a small part in the 1967 film The Sidehackers. She was also featured in an episode of the television series Here Come the Brides in 1970. She appeared with her husband in the action film Wonder Woman (1973) and Night Creature (aka Out of the Darkness) (1979), and produced and starred in 1988’s B.O.R.N. She and

Claire Hagen (with her husband, Ross Hagen)

2003 • Obituaries

her husband produced and directed the 1985 comedy compilation film Reel Horror with John Carradine and Catherine Bach. She was also seen in the films Action U.S.A. (1989), The Media Madman (1992) which she also produced, and Fugitive Rage (1996).

Hagen, Poul Leading Danish actor Poul Hagen died in Lange, Denmark, on May 20, 2003. He was 83. Hagen was born in Denmark on March 19, 1920. He was featured in over 100 films from the early 1950s. His numerous credits include Sonnen (1953), Arvingen (1954), Night Girls (1958), The Richest Girl in the World (1958), The Poet and the Little Mother (1959), Operation Camel (1960), Peters Baby (1961), Crazy Paradise (1962), The Girl and the Press Photographer (1963), How About Us? (1963), School for Suicide (1964), Summer in Tyrol (1964), It’s Nifty in the Navy (1965), The Girl and the Millionaire (1965), I, the Lover(1966), I, a Nobleman (1967), Story of Barbara (1967), Love Thy Neighbour (1967), Martha (1967), My Father’s Mistress (1968), Storm Warning (1968), Scandal in Denmark (1969), The Olsen Gang in a Fix (1969), The Song of the Red Ruby (1970), Tough Guys of the Prairie (1970), Bedroom Mazurka (1970), Revolution My A… (1970), Hooray for the Blue Hussars (1970), Gold for the Tough Guys of the Prairie (1971), Danish Dentist on the Job (1971), Highway Through the Bedroom (1972), Up and at ’Em, Amalie (1973), Between the Sheets (1973), The Girl

Poul Hagen (with Jytte Elga Olga)

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and the Dream Castle (1974), Come to My Bedside (1975), Girls at Arms (1975), The Olsen Gang on the Track (1975), Danish Escort Girls (1976), Bedside Sailors (1976), The Olsen Gang Outta Sight (1977), Agent 69 (1978), Assassination (1980), Denmark Closed Down (1980), A World of Difference (1989), Casanova (1990), and The Return (1992).

Haimsohn, George Writer George Haimsohn died of a massive aneurysm in front of his Greenwich Village, New York, home on January 17, 2003. He was 77. Haimsohn was born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1925. He began writing poetry after serving in the U.S. Navy in world War II. Haimsohn moved to Greenwich Village in the early 1950s where he worked as a professional photographer under the name Plato. Haimsohn was best known for cowriting the popular musical Dames at Sea with

George Haimsohn’s production Dames at Sea

Robin Miller. The spoof of Busby Berkeley–style musicals, Dames at Sea, debuted Off Broadway in 1968, and had a New York revival in 1985. Haimsohn also wrote the musicals Now, Zing! and Johnny American, and the books The Portable Hamlet, The Bedside Faust, and Inside Romeo and Juliet. New York Times, Jan. 25, 2003, A16; Variety, Feb. 3, 2003, 79.

Halftown, Chief Traynor Ora “Chief ” Halftown died in Brigantine, New Jersey, on July 5, 2003. He was 86. Halftown was born on an Indian reservation in upstate New York on February 24, 1917. Raised in Buffalo, New York, Halftown began working at WFIL-TV (later WPVI-TV) in 1950, hosting the local children’s television show. Dressed in full Indian regalia, Halftown introduced cartoons and instructed his audience on Indian folklore. He started each show saying “Ees da sa sussaway,” which meant “Let us begin” in Seneca. Chief

Chief Halftown

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Halftown retired from the show in 1999, ending the longest running local children’s show in history.

Hall, Bruce Edward Actor Bruce Edward Hall died of cancer in New York City on October 31, 2003. He was 49. Hall worked with Jim Henson on various Muppet projects during the 1980s, and was the voice of Masterson Rat and Beth Bear in the 1984 film The Muppets Take Manhattan. He also appeared in an episode of The Equalizer. He was also the author of several books including Tea That Burns: A Family Memoir of Chinatown and Diamond Street: The Story of the Little Town with the Big Red Light District.

Conrad L. Hall

Bruce Edward Hall

Hall, Conrad L. Oscar-winning cinematographer Conrad L. Hall died of complications of bladder cancer in a Santa Monica, California, hospital on January 4, 2003. He was 76. Hall was born in Papete, Tahiti,

in 1926. He began working as a cameraman in film and television in the late 1950s and was cinematographer on the 1958 film Edge of Fury. He worked on several 1960s television series including The Outer Limits, Stoney Burke, and ABC Stage ’67. Hall was nominated for Academy Awards as Best Cinematography for his work on the films Morituri (1965), The Professionals (1966), and In Cold Blood (1967), and won the Oscar for 1969’s Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. He received further Academy Award nominations for The Day of the Locust (1975), Tequila Sunrise (1988), Searching for Bobby Fischer (1993), and A Civil Action (1998), and received his second Oscar for 1999’s American Beauty. Hall was also director of photography for such films as Wild Seed (1965), the Esperanto-language horror film Incubus (1965), Harper (1966), Divorce American Style (1967), Rogues’ Gallery (1968), Hell in the Pacific (1968), Truman Capote’s Trilog y (1969), Tell Them Willie Boy Is Here (1969), The Happy Ending (1969), Fat City (1972), Electra Glide in Blue (1973), Catch My Soul (1974), Smile (1975), Marathon Man (1976), Black Widow (1987), Jennifer 8 (1992), Love Affair (1998), and 2002’s Road to Perdition. His son, Conrad W. Hall, also entered the film business as a cinematographer. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 6, 2003, B8; New

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York Times, Jan. 8, 2003, A21; People, Jan. 20, 2003, 113; Time, Jan. 20, 2003, 25; Variety, Jan. 13, 2003, 83.

Hall, Ruth Actress Ruth Hall died in Glendale, California, on October 9, 2003. She was 92. Hall was born in Jacksonville, Florida, on December 29, 1910. The niece of Victor Blasco Ibanez, author of The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, she came to Hollywood in the early 1930s. The dark-haired actress was best known for her role in the 1931 Marx Brothers comedy Monkey Business. She also appeared in the films Hell Harbor (1930), The Doorway to Hell (1930), Drums of Jeopardy (1931), Chances (1931), Local Boy Makes Good (1931), Her Majesty, Love (1931) with W.C. Fields, Union Depot (1932), Manhattan Parade (1932), A Fool’s Advice (1932), The Heart of New York (1932), Honeymoon Beach (1932), Dynamite Ranch (1932), Miss Pinkerton (1932), Crooner (1932), Ride Him, Cowboy (1932) with John Wayne, Blessed Event (1932), One Way Passage (1932), The Kid from Spain (1932), Gambling Sex (1932), Flaming Guns (1932), Between Fighting Men (1932), The Three Musketeers (1933), The Return of Casey Jones (1933), Laughing at Life (1933), The Man from

Ruth Hall

Monterey (1933), Strawberry Roan (1933), Murder on the Campus (1933), Beloved (1934), Badge of Honor (1934), and The Old Grey Mayor (1935). Hall married cinematographer Lee Garmes in 1933 and left Hollywood for England several years later. She and Garmes returned to California at the start of World War II. Hall resumed her film career with small roles in George White’s Scandals (1945), Desert Command (1946), Easter Parade (1948), Julia Misbehaves (1948), The I Don’t Care Girl (1953), The Farmer Takes a Wife (1953), and How to Marry a Millionaire (1953). After Garmes’ death in 1978, Hall became a popular guest at Western and nostalgia film festivals around the country.

Hallhuber, Erich German television actor Erich Hallhuber was found dead at his home in Munich, Germany, on September 17, 2003. He was 52. Hallhuber was born in Munich on July 14, 1951. A familiar face on German television from the 1980s, he was featured in the 1987 mini-series Captain James Cook (1987). He appeared in numerous tele-films including Just Another Secret (1989), Zimmer mit Fruhstuck (1999), Tatort— Viktualienmarkt (2000), Die Weibernest (2001), Amen (2002), and Unforgiven (2003). Hallhuber also starred in the German television series Regina on the Ladder to Success (1990), Cafe Meineid (1990), Salzburger Nockerlin (1993), and Der Millionenerbe (1993).

Erich Hallhuber

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Hanlon, Tommy Australian television star Tommy Hanlon died of cancer in Melbourne, Australia, on October 10, 2003. He was 80. Hanlon was born in Parkersburg, West Virginia, in 1923. He began his career with his family in vaudeville and later performed with Orson Welles’ Mercury Theatre in the 1940s. Hanlon was the host of the popular Australian daytime television series It Could Be You from 1960. He appeared in the 1969 film Age of Consent. He quit television in 1978 to serve as the master of ceremonies for the Silvers Circus until his retirement in 2001.

Don Hanmer

Tommy Hanlon

Hanmer, Don Actor Don Hanmer died in Monterey, California, on May 24, 2003. He was 83. Hanmer was born in Chicago, Illinois, on October 17, 1919. He began his career after military service during World War II, appearing on the New York stage. He also performed in productions on television programs from the late 1940s including

Actor’s Studio, The Chevrolet Tele-Theatre, Lights Out, The Web, Suspense, Armstrong Circle Theatre, Screen Directors Playhouse, Star Tonight, and Alfred Hitchcock Presents. His career was damaged during the 1950s when he was blacklisted for possible Communist affiliations. He resumed his career later in the decade, appearing in episodes of such series as Ben Casey, The Virginian, The Fugitive, Bewitched, Gunsmoke, Mission: Impossible, Mannix, Ironside, The Outsider, Here Come the Brides, Bonanza, The Young Lawyers, Cannon, McCloud, Kojak, Emergency!, Banacek, The Six Million Dollar Man, Kung Fu, The Waltons, Hill Street Blues, Father Dowling Mysteries and China Beach. Hanmer was also seen in the tele-films The Counterfeit Killer (1968), The Blue Knight, (1975), and The Hustler of Muscle Beach (1980). Hanmer also appeared in a handful of feature films in his career including Drive, He Said (1971), Papillon (1973), Newman’s Law (1974), St. Ives (1976), Rhinestone (1984), and Homer & Eddie (1989).

Hanna, Mark Mark Hanna, who scripted such cult sci-fi films of the 1950s as Not of This Earth and Attack of the Fifty Foot Woman, died of complications from a stroke at a Lake Worth, Florida, rehabilitation center on October 16, 2003. He was 86.

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174 episode of Boris Karloff ’s television horror anthology series Thriller in 1961.

Hansen, Else-Marie Danish actress Else-Marie Hansen died in Charlottenlund, Denmark, on August 11, 2003. She was 98. Else-Marie was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, on October 19, 1904. She began her career in films in the late 1920s and continued to perform for the next 50 years. Hansen’s numerous credits include the films When Roses Bloom (1931), Vagabonden (1940), The Girls Are Willing (1958), The Richest Girl in the World (1958), Eventryrrejsen (1960), Ullabella (1961), Operation Lovebirds (1965), I Belong to Me (1967), Pretty Boy and Rosa (1967), Me and My Kid Brother (1967), The Red Horses (1968), Stine and the Boys (1969), Five and the Spies (1969), The Key to Paradise (1970), Revolution My A… (1970), The Viking Who Came from the South (1971), The Solsen Gang Sees Red (1976), and The Heritage (1978). She also starred as Mrs. Holm in the 1978 Danish television series Matador. Mark Hanna’s Not of This Earth

Hanna began his career as an actor after serving in the navy during World War II. He was seen in a handful of films in the early 1950s including Border Saddlemates (1952), Flight to Tangier (1953), Southwest Passage (1954), King Richard and the Crusaders (1954), Sign of the Pagan (1954), Three Ring Circus (1954), Pirates of Tripoli (1955), Man Without a Star (1955), 5 Against the House (1955), and Chicago Syndicate (1955). Hanna began writing for films after suffering a broken leg while filming a movie. He wrote several films for director Roger Corman including the Western Gunslinger (1956), the fantasy The Undead (1957), and the science fiction classic Not of This Earth (1957). His other film credits include The Amazing Colossal Man (1957), Naked Paradise (1957), Flesh and the Spur (1957), Attack of the 50 Foot Woman (1958), Jet Attack (1958), Rebellion in Cuba (1961), Blood on the Arrow (1964), Slaughter (1972), and The Gatling Gun (1973). Not of This Earth was remade in 1988 and again in 1995, and Attack of the 50 Ft. Woman was remade for cable television in 1993. Hanna also wrote an

Else-Marie Hansen

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Haraldsson, Rurik Icelandic character actor Rurik Haraldsson died in Iceland on January 23, 2003. He was 77. Haraldsson was born on January 14, 1926. A stage and film actor, he was seen in the movies In the Shadow of the Raven (1988), Under the Glacier (1989), Children of Nature (1991), The Men’s Choir (1993), Movie Days (1994), The Viking Sagas (1995), Honour of the House (1999), and Regina! (2002). Christine Harbort

Hargate, Bill Emmy Award–winning costume designer Bill Hargate died of leukemia in Los Angeles on September 12, 2003. He was 68. Hargate began his career as an assistant to designer Donald Brooks. The winner of four Emmy awards, Hargate worked on such television series as Murphy Brown, Barbara Mandrell and the Mandrell Sisters and The Louie Show, and the television specials Neil Sedaka Steppin’ Out (1976), The 19th Annual Grammy Awards (1977), Happy Birthday, Las

Rurik Haraldsson

Harbort, Christine German character actress Christine Harbort died in Berlin on June 17, 2003. She was 54. Harbort was born in Oschersleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany, on April 27, 1949. She was featured in numerous films from the 1970s including Mephisto (1981), The Tango Player (1991), No More Mr. Nice Guy (1993), The Promise (1995), Sun Alley (1999), No Place to Go (2000), and The Tunnel: The Movie (2001).

Bill Hargate

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Vegas (1977), Once Upon a Brothers Grimm (1977), and Love and Curses … and All That Jazz (1991). He was also a costume designer for the 1989 film Back to the Future Part II. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 19, 2003, B11; Variety, Sept. 29, 2003, 76.

Hargrove, Marion Marion Hargrove, whose comic account of Army basic training See Here, Private Hargrove was a best-selling book in 1942 and a popular film two years later, died of complications from pneumonia in Long Beach, California, on August 23, 2003. He was 83. Hargrove was born in Mount Olive, North Carolina, on October 13, 1919. A features writer for The Charlotte News before induction in the Army, Hargrove wrote articles about life in the barracks for the newspaper. The articles were compiled into the bestselling book. A movie version was filmed in 1944 with Robert Walker starring as Hargrove. A se-

Marion Hargrove

quel, What Next, Corporal Hargrove?, was filmed the following year. Hargrove continued to write after the war, later scripting such films as Joe Butterfly (1957), Girl on the Run (1958), Cash McCall (1960), The Music Man (1962), Boys’ Night Out (1962), 40 Pounds of Trouble (1963), and The Brothers O’Toole (1973). Hargrove also worked often in television, writing episodes of such series as Maverick, 77 Sunset Strip, Destry, The Rogues, I Spy, The Rounders, My World and Welcome to It, Nichols, The Waltons, The Magician, Bert D’Angelo/Superstar, Eight Is Enough, Fantasy Island, and Bret Maverick. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 29, 2003, B12; New York Times, Aug. 28, 2003, A27; Time, Sept. 8, 2003, 19.

Harmon, Manny Orchestra leader Manny Harmon died in Century City, California, on March 5, 2003. He was 93. Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1909, Harmon was a big band leader from the 1930s. He appeared leading the orchestra in several films including Walking on Air (1936), When’s

Manny Harmon

177 Your Birthday? (1937), and From This Day Forward (1946). Harmon was orchestra manager for Howard Hughes’ RKO Studios from 1942 until the late 1950s. Harmon also was the band leader for the Republican National Convention from 1956 through 1992, striking up the music when the nominees from Dwight Eisenhower to Ronald Reagan would enter the hall. Harmon also played a bandleader in Peter Bogdanovich’s 1975 film At Long Last Love. Time, Mar. 24, 2003, 20.

Harris, Ann Lee Ann Lee Harris died at her home in Phoenix, Arizona, on August 19, 2003. She was 85. She was born Ann Lee in Amarillo, Texas, in 1918. She began her career on stage appearing on Broadway in productions of Lady in the Dark and O Mistress Mine in the early 1940s. Later in the decade she founded a professional theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and, later, Phoenix, Arizona. During the 1950s, Lee was featured in the 1955 film Trial, and guest starred on television in episodes

2003 • Obituaries

of such series as The Public Defender, Letter to Loretta, My Friend Flicka, Perry Mason, and Maverick. In the 1970s, she and her husband, Jack Harris, opened the Harris Ranch Restaurant.

Harris, John Independent film producer John C. Harris died in his sleep in a Honolulu, Hawaii, hospital on July 20, 2003. He was 85. Harris was born in Chemnitz, Germany, on May 4, 1918. He produced the 1970 John Carr film The Star Maker starring Troy Cory. He also produced Cory’s film Christmas Around the World.

John Harris

Harrower, Elizabeth

Ann Lee Harris

Veteran character actress Elizabeth Harrower died in Studio City, California, on December 10, 2003. She was 85. Harrower was born on May 28, 1918. She began her film career in the late 1940s and was featured in such films as The

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Hart, Stu

Elizabeth Harrower

Pilgrimage Play (1949), Two Gun Marshal (1953), Thunder Pass (1954), Teacher’s Pet (1958), Marjorie Morningstar (1958), Al Capone (1959), I Passed for White (1960), Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1962), Don’t Knock the Twist (1962), The Wild Westerners (1962), True Grit (1969) with John Wayne, The Sterile Cuckoo (1969), and Shoot Out (1971). She was also seen in the tele-films The Adventures of Nick Carter (1972), A Brand New Life (1973), and I Love You, Goodbye (1974). Her numerous television credits also include episodes of Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok, The Range Rider, Annie Oakley, Four Star Playhouse, The Gene Autry Show, The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp, Sky King, Tales of Wells Fargo, M Squad, Perry Mason, 77 Sunset Strip, Alfred Hitchcock Hour, The Smothers Brothers Show, The Dick Van Dyke Show, The Andy Griffith Show, The Twilight Zone, The Virginian, Batman, Mayberry R.F.D., The Immortal, and Gunsmoke. In later years she worked as a writer for daytime soap operas and played Charlotte Ramsey on The Young and the Restless in 2003. Survivors include her daughter, soap star Susan Seaforth Hayes.

Legendary Canadian wrestler, promoter and trainer Stu Hart died of complications from pneumonia and diabetes at a Calgary, Canada, hospital on October 16, 2003. He was 87. He was born in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, in 1916, and served in the Canadian Navy during World War II. He left the Navy in 1946 and entered the pro wrestling circuit in the Atlantic region. He returned to Canada in 1948, settling in Calgary. He invested in a wrestling promotion out of Montana, where he wrestled and promoted. He continued to purchase wrestling promotions and controlled most of Western Canada by the 1950s. He formed Stampede Wrestling in 1962. Shortly thereafter Hart quit wrestling completely to concentrate on the promotion and the training of younger wrestlers including his sons Brett, Owen, Bruce, Dean, Keith, Ross, Smith and Wayne Hart. His son, Owen, was killed in a tragic fall on a live wrestling pay-per-view event in 1999.

Stu Hart

Hartley, Al Comic artist Al Hartley, who illustrated Archie comics from 1966 through 1993, died of

179

Al Hartley

complications from heart surgery in Fort Myers, Florida, on May 27, 2003. He was 81. Hartley was born in Kearny, New Jersey, in 1922, the son of U.S. Representative Fred Hartley. He worked with Marvel Comics from the 1940s before joining Archie Comics in the mid–1960s. He worked there for three decades. After his retirement Hartley wrote children’s books and comics with a Christian theme. Los Angeles Times, May 29, 2003, B15.

Hartmann, Edmund Screenwriter Edmund Hartmann died at his home in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on Novem-

2003 • Obituaries

ber 28, 2003. He was 92. Hartmann was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on September 24, 1911. He began his career as a writer in the 1930s, and was best known for his works in comedies for such stars as Bob Hope, Jerry Lewis, the Three Stooges and Abbott and Costello. Hartmann’s numerous film credits include Don’t Get Personal (1936), The Big Noise (1936), Without Orders (1936), Wanted: Janet Turner (1936), The Man Who Found Himself (1937), China Passage (1937), Behind the Headlines (1937), Hideaway (1937), Law of the Underworld (1938), The Last Express (1938), Beauty for the Asking (1939), The Last Warning (1939), Two Bright Boys (1939), Black Friday (1940), Ma, He’s Making Eyes at Me (1940), Enemy Agent (1940), South to Karanga (1940), Diamond Frontier (1940), Time Out for Rhythm (1941), Sweetheart of the Campus (1941), San Francisco Docks (1941), The Feminine Touch (1941), Keep ‘Em Flying (1941), Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Weapon (1942), Lady Bodyguard (1943), Hi Diddle Diddle (1943), Hi’ya, Chum (1943), Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves (1944), The Scarlet Claw (1944), Ghost Catchers (1944) which he also produced, In Society (1944), Here Come the Co-Eds (1945), See My Lawyer (1945), Sudan (1945), Dangerous Partners (1945), The Naughty Nineties (1945), The Face of Marble (1946), Variety Girl (1947), Let’s Live a Little (1948), The Paleface (1948), Sorrowful Jones (1949), Fancy Pants (1950), The Lemon Drop Kid (1951), My Favorite Spy (1951), Here Come the Girls (1953), The Caddy (1953) and Casanova’s Big Night (1954). Hartmann served as president of the Writers Guild of America, West from 1955 to 1959. In the 1960s Hartmann worked primarily in television, creating and producing the Fred MacMurray comedy My Three Sons. He also worked on such series as The Smith Family, The Eve Arden Show, Family Affair and To Rome with Love. He also wrote an episode of Bus Stop and the films The Sword of Ali Baba (1965) and The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968). Hartmann retired to Santa Fe in 1988. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 2, 2003, B10; New York Times, Dec. 2, 2003, B8; Variety, Dec. 8, 2003, 74.

Hasenau, Beate Edmund Hartmann

German actress Beate Hasenau died of cancer in Hamburg, Germany, on October 1, 2003.

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180

Bobby Hatfield (right, with Bill Medley of the Righteous Brothers)

Beate Hasenau

She was 67. Hasenau was born in Germany on April 15, 1936. She began her career in films in the late 1950s and was featured in such movies as The Blue from the Sky (1964), The Gorilla of Soho (1968), Everyone Dies in His Own Company (1975), The Late Show (1977), Why the UFOs Steal Our Lettuce (1980), and Kiez (1983). She also appeared often on German television, starring as Hanna Dudek in the 1985 series The Adventures of Dr. Bayer.

Hatfield, Bobby Bobby Hatfield, who, with his partner Bill Medley entertained audiences for 40 years as the Righteous Brothers, died in Kalamazoo, Michigan, on November 5, 2003. He was 63. Hatfield was born in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, on August 10, 1940. He began performing with Medley in 1962, and produced their debut single “Little Latin Lupe Lu.” They had a major hit in 1964 with “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’.” The Righteous brothers also performed such hits as “(You’re My) Soul and Inspiration,” “Unchained Melody,” “Ebb Tide,” and “Just Once in My Life.” The were featured the films Beach Ball (1965) and A Swingin’ Summer (1965), and Hat-

field played Joe Bob in the 1969 tele-film The Ballad of Andy Crocker. The Righteous Brothers broke up in 1968, with Hatfield touring with Jimmy Walker as the Righteous Brothers. He and Medley reunited in 1974, recording the hit song “Rock and Roll Heaven.” Medley retired two years later, but again reunited in 1983. Hatfield made a cameo appearance in an episode of Cheers in 1991. Hatfield and Medley were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame earlier in 2003. They were still touring at the time of Hatfield’s death. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 6, 2003, B14; New York Times, Nov. 7, 2003, C10; People, Nov. 24, 2003, 105; Time, Nov. 17, 2003, 21.

Hathaway, Robert Film and television sound editor Robert Hathaway died after a long illness on January 1, 2003. He was 67. He worked in films from the 1950s, serving as a sound engineer on 1958’s Terror from the Year 5,000. Hathaway worked as a sound or music editor on such films as Oliver! (1968), Sisters (1973), The Slipper and the Rose (1976), Alien (1979), Superman II (1980), Victor/Victoria (1982), Tron (1982), Trail of the Pink Panther (1982), Better Late Than Never (1982), Trenchcoat (1983), Something Wicked This Way Comes (1983), Superman III (1983), Splash (1984), Country (1984), The Falcon and the Snowman (1985), Baby.. Secret of the Lost Legend (1985), Lifeforce (1985), Enemy Mine (1985), Labyrinth

181 (1986), The Name of the Rose (1986), Heat (1987), Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987), The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1987), Hansel and Gretel (1987), A Summer Story (1988), Crusoe (1988), Frankenstein Unbound (1990), The Inner Circle (1991), GoldenEye (1995), Restoration (1995), Something to Believe In (1998), Hilary and Jackie (1998), and Waking Ned Devine (1998). Hathaway appeared with his son, child actor Noah Hathaway, in an episode of the television science fiction series Battlestar Galactica in 1978. He was also seen in small roles in the 1973 tele-film Genesis II, and the 1986 film Troll.

Havelock-Allan, Anthony British film producer Anthony HavelockAllan died of heart failure in London on January 11, 2003. He was 98. Havelock-Allan was born in Darlington, Durham, England, on February 28, 1904. He began working in films as a casting director in the early 1930s. He was soon producing such films as The Village Squire (1935), Ticket of Leave (1935), School for Stars (1935), The Price of Wisdom (1935), Once a Thief (1935), The Mad

2003 • Obituaries

Hatters (1935), Lucky Days (1935), Jubilee Window (1935), Key to Harmony (1935), Gentlemen’s Agreement (1935), Expert’s Opinion (1935), Checkmate (1935), Cross Currents (1935), Two on a Doorstep (1936), Show Flat (1936), Wednesday’s Luck (1936), The Secret Voice (1936), The Scarab Murder Case (1936), Pay Box Adventure (1936), Murder by Rope (1936), Love at Sea (1936), House Broken (1936), Grand Finale (1936), The Belles of St. Clements (1936), Night Ride (1937), Museum Mystery (1937), Mr. Smith Carries On (1937), Missing, Believed Married (1937), The Last Curtain (1937), Lancashire Luck (1937), Incident in Shanghai (1937), Holiday’s End (1937), The Fatal Hour (1937), Cross My Heart (1937), Cavalier of the Streets (1937), This Man Is News (1938), A Spot of Bother (1938), Lightning Conductor (1938), A Stolen Life (1939), This Man in Paris (1939), The Silent Battle (1939), The Lambeth Walk (1940), In Which We Serve (1942), and Unpublished Story (1942). Havelock-Allan also produced and scripted Brief Encounter (1946) and Great Expectations (1946), both of which earned him Academy Award nominations for co-writing the screenplay. He continued to produce such films as Take My Life (1947), Blanche Fury (1947), Oliver Twist (1948), Hideout (1948), The Interrupted Journey (1949), Shadow of the Eagle (1950), Never Take No for an Answer (1950), Tonight at 8:30 (1952), Chance Meeting (1954), Orders to Kill (1958), The Quare Fellow (1962), Joseph Losey’s King and Country (1964), Othello (1965), Up the Junction (1967), The Mikado (1967), Franco Zeffirelli’s Romeo and Juliet (1968), and David Lean’s Ryan’s Daughter (1970). Havelock-Allan was married to actress Valerie Hobson from 1939 until their divorce in 1952. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 18, 2003, B21; New York Times, Jan. 16, 2003, B10.

Hawkesworth, John

Anthony Havelock-Allan

British television producer and writer John Hawkesworth died suddenly in England on September 30, 2003. He was 82. Hawkesworth was born in London on December 7, 1920. After serving in the British army during World War II, Hawkesworth began working in films as a set director for such movies as The Fallen Idol (1948), The Third Man (1949), The Great Manhunt (1950), and Pandora and the Flying Dutchman

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182 Angeles radio program Art Baker’s Notebook from 1942 until the early 1950s. Hawley worked for Walt Disney Studios from the late 1950s through the late 1960s, scripting episodes of the television series Zorro. He also wrote for the television series The Loretta Young Show and My Friend Flicka, and scripted the Disney films Swiss Family Robinson (1960), Babes in Toyland (1961), The Mooncussers (1962), In Search of the Castaways (1962), A Tiger Walks (1964), The Adventures of Bullwhip Griffin (1967), A Boy Called Nuthin’ (1967), The Young Loner (1968), and The One and Only, Genuine, Original Family Band (1968). Los Angeles Times, May 12, 2003, B9; Variety, May 19, 2003, 52.

Heilbrun, Carolyn

John Hawkesworth

Mystery writer and feminist scholar Carolyn Heilbrun committed suicide at her Manhattan, New York, apartment on October 9, 2003. She was 77. Heilbrun was born Carolyn Gold in East Orange, New Jersey, on January 13, 1926. She was a professor of modern British literature from the 1960s. She was the author of such scholarly works as Toward a Recognition of An-

(1951). He was art director for several films in the 1950s including Saadia (1954), Father Brown (1954), The Prisoner (1955), and The Man Who Never Was (1956). Hawkesworth was associate producer for 1957’s Windom’s Way, and wrote and produced the 1959 film Tiger Bay. He began working in television in the late 1960s, producing The Gold Robbers in 1969. Hawkesworth produced and wrote the popular television series Upstairs, Downstairs, The Duchess of Duke Street, Danger UXB, The Flame Tress of Thika, Q.E.D., and The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. He adapted Paul Gallico’s novel Mrs. ’Arris Goes to Paris for television in 1992. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 17, 2003, B13; New York Times, Oct. 18, 2003, A15.

Hawley, Lowell Screenwriter Lowell Hawley died in Los Angeles on May 6, 2003. He was 94. Hawley was born in Lynden, Washington, in 1908. He began his career as a writer in radio, working on the Los

Carolyn Heilbrun

183 drog yny (1973), Reinventing Womanhood (1979), The Representation of Women in Fiction (1983), and The Education of a Woman: The Life of Gloria Steinem (1995). Heilburn also wrote detective thrillers under the pseudonym Amanada Cross. She introduced the character of Kate Fensler in her 1964 novel In the Last Analysis. Her other mystery novels include The James Joyce Murder, Poetic Justice, The Theban Mysteries, The Question of Max, Death in a Tenured Position, and The Imperfect Spy. New York Times, Oct. 11, 2003, A13; Los Angeles Times, Oct. 15, 2003, B10; Time, Oct. 20, 2003, 22.

Helm, Fay Actress Fay Helm died at her home in Santa Monica, California, on September 27, 2003. She was 90. Helm was born in Bakersfield, California, on April 9, 1913. Helm appeared in numerous films in the 1930s and 1940s including Fury (1936), San Francisco (1936), Under Cover of Night (1937), Song of the City (1937), A Girl with Ideas (1937), Merry Go Round of 1938 (1937), Midnight Intruder (1938), Racket Busters (1938), I Am the Law (1938), Peck’s Bad Boy with the Circus (1938),

2003 • Obituaries

The Story of Dr. Jenner (1939), Sergeant Madden (1939), Dark Victory (1939), Our Leading Citizen (1939), Hollywood Cavalcade (1939), A Child Is Born (1939), and The Light That Failed (1939). She was featured as Mrs. Fuddle in the Blondie film series starring Penny Singleton including Blondie (1938), Blondie Brings Up Baby (1939), Blondie on a Budget (1940), and Blondie Has Servant Trouble (1940). She continued to appear in supporting roles in such films as Abe Lincoln in Illinois (1940), Little Orvie (1940), Women Without Names (1940), Dr. Kildare’s Strange Case (1940), Parole Fixer (1940), The Flag of Humanity (1940), Dancing on a Dime (1940), Untamed (1940), Kitty Foyle (1940), Life with Henry (1941), Ride, Kelly Ride (1941), The Wagons Roll at Night (1941), Million Dollar Baby (1941), There’s Magic in Music (1941), Blossoms in the Dust (1941), Two in a Taxi (1941), The Wolf Man (1941) with Lon Chaney, Jr., Wings for the Eagle (1942), Give Out, Sisters (1942), Night Monster (1942), Half Way to Shanghai (1942), Life Begins at Eight-Thirty (1942), You Can’t Escape Forever (1942), The Crystal Ball (1943), Young and Willing (1943), Hers to Hold (1943), Captive Wild Woman (1943), Honeymoon Lodge (1943), Calling Dr. Death (1943), Moonlight in Vermont (1943), Ladies Courageous (1944), Lady in the Dark (1944), Phantom Lady (1944), Mademoiselle Fifi (1944), One Body Too Many (1944), A Song to Remember (1945), Son of Lassie (1945), The Falcon in San Francisco (1945), Dangerous Intruder (1945), Sister Kenny (1946), The Locket (1946), and That Brennan Girl (1946). Helm subsequently retired from the screen.

Hemmings, David

Fay Helm

British actor David Hemmings, who gained international recognition for his role as the amoral photographer in the 1966 film Blow Up, died of a heart attack on the set of the film Samantha’s Child in Romania on December 4, 2003. He was 62. Hemmings was born in Guildford, Surrey, England, on November 18, 1941. He began his career as a boy soprano, performing the works of Benjamin Britten with the English Opera Group. He made his film debut in his early teens, appearing in such features as The Rainbow Jacket (1954), Saint Joan (1957), The Heart Within (1957), Five Clues to Fortune (1957), No Trees in the Street (1958), In the Wake of a Stranger (1958),

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184

Men of Tomorrow (1959), The Wind of Change (1961), Some People (1962), Play It Cool (1962), The Painted Smile (1962), West 11 (1963), Two Left Feet (1963), Sing and Swing (1963), The Girl-Getters (1964), and Be My Guest (1965). He was noted for his starring role in Michelangelo Antoninioni’s Blow Up in 1966, and continued to play rebellious young men in such films as Eye of the Devil, the film version of the musical Camelot (1967) as Mordred, The Charge of the Light Brigade (1968), The Long Day’s Dying (1968), Only When I Larf (1968), the science fiction spoof Barbarella (1968) with Jane Fonda, Alfred the Great (1969), The Best House in London (1970), Fragment of Fear (1970), Unman, Wittering and Zigo (1971), and The Love Machine (1971). He also appeared in episodes of the British television series’ Wednesday Play, Out of the Unknown, and Out of This World. Hemmings made his directoral debut on the 1972 film Running Scared, and helmed the 1973 feature The Wild Little Bunch (1973). He also continued to appear in such films as Voices (1973), Beyond Erotica (1974), Juggernaut (1974), Dario Argento’s 1975 Italian horror film Deep Red, The Old Curiosity Shop (1975), Islands in the Stream (1977), The Disappearance (1977), The Squeeze (1977), The Dope Way (1977), Swindle (1977), Blood Relatives (1978), Crossed Swords (1978), Power Play (1978), Murder by Decree (1979) as Scotland Yard Inspector Foxborough, Thirst (1979), Just a Gigolo (1979) which he also directed, the Australian supernatural thriller Harlequin (1980), Beyond Reasonable Doubt (1980), Prisoners (1981) which he also produced, Man, Woman and Child (1983), and The Rainbow (1989). He also directed the films The Survivor (1981) and Race of the Yankee Zephyr (1981). Hemmings was also seen on television in productions of A Dream of Living (1975), Clouds of Glory: The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1978) as Samuel T. Coleridge, A Deadly Game (1979), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1981) as Jekyll and Hyde, Calamity Jane (1984), Beverly Hills Cowgirl Blues (1985), The Key to Rebecca (1985), Harry’s Hong Kong (1987), Three on a Match (1987), Davy Crockett: Rainbow in the Thunder (1988) as President Andrew Jackson, The Turn of the Screw (1990), Passport to Murder (1993), and A Mind to Murder (1995). Hemmings was executive producer on the films Strange Behavior (aka Dead Kids) (1981) and Escape 2000 (1981). He worked often in television as a director in the 1980s, helming episodes of

David Hemmings

The A-Team, Airwolf, Murder, She Wrote, Stingray, Werewolf, In the Heat of the Night, Quantum Leap, Hardball, Raven, and Marker. He also directed the tele-films Ken Follett’s The Key to Rebecca (1985), Davy Crockett: Rainbow in the Thunder (1988), Dark Horse (1992), Passport to Murder (1993), and Christmas Reunion (1993). Hemmings also appeared as recurring villain Dr. Charles Henry Moffett in the Airwolf television series, and was seen in episodes of Magnum, P.I., Murder, She Wrote, Tales from the Crypt, L.A. Law, Northern Exposure, Kung Fu: The Legend Continues, Murder in Mind, and Waking the Dead. He returned to the screen as Cassius in the Oscarwinning epic Gladiator in 2000, and continued to appear in such features as Last Orders (2001), Spy Game (2001), Mean Machine (2001), Slap Shot 2: Breaking the Ice (2002), Equilibrium (2002), Gangs of New York (2002), The Night We Called It a Day (2003), and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (2003). Los Angeles Times, Dec. 5, 2003, B16; New York Times, Dec. 5, 2003, C11; Variety, Dec. 8, 2003, 76.

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Henderson, Luther

Hennig, Curt

Broadway conductor and arranger Luther Henderson died of cancer in a Manhattan, New York, hospice on July 29, 2003. He was 84. Henderson was born in Kansas City, Missouri, on March 14, 1919. He graduated from Juilliard in 1942 and served as an arranger for the Navy jazz band during World War II. He was an orchestrator for Duke Ellington after the war, working on Ellington’s Broadway musical Beggar’s Holiday. Henderson also worked in television from the 1950s, arranging music for The Ed Sullivan Show, and specials for Carol Burnett, Andy Williams and Victor Borge. Henderson worked on over 50 Broadway musicals during his career, including Flower Drum Song, Ain’t Misbehavin’, and the 1971 revival of No, No, Nanette. He earned Tony nominations for his work on the musicals Play On! and Jelly’s Last Jam, and an Emmy nomination for the 1982 television version of Ain’t Misbehavin’. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 2, 2003, B20; New York Times, Aug. 1, 2003, C11; Variety, Aug. 11, 2003, 43.

Leading professional wrestler Curt Hennig was found dead in a Tampa, Florida, hotel room on February 10, 2003. He was 44. The son of wrestler Larry “the Ax” Hennig, Curt was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on March 28, 1958, and was raised in Robinsdale, Minnesota. He began wrestling in 1980, often tag-teaming with his father during his early years in the ring. He held numerous tag team and singles titles and captured the AWA Heavyweight Championship in May of 1987. He lost the belt the following year in May of 1988. Hennig subsequently entered the WWF as Mr. Perfect, where he was managed by Bobby “the Brain” Heenan. He held several championships with the WWF before leaving the promotion over a contract dispute in 1997. Hennig then wrestled for several years with World Championship Wrestling (WCW), where he teamed with the West Texas Red Necks. He also appeared briefly in the 2000 wrestling comedy film Ready to Rumble. He briefly returned to the WWE in early 2002, but was soon released from his contract. He was competing with the NWA/ TNA at the time of his death.

Luther Henderson Curt Hennig

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186

Henshaw, Buck Television set designer and decorator George Herbert “Buck” Henshaw died in a Honolulu, Hawaii, hospital on August 20, 2003. He was 85. Working in television from the 1950s, he was a designer on such series as The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, Playhouse 90, and Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone. He also was set decorator for the 1966 film The Pad and How to Use It. The Emmy Award–nominated designer also worked for over a decade on the series Hawaii Five-O and Magnum, P.I. His other credits include the series Run Buddy Run and Tales of the Gold Monkey, the tele-films Welcome Home, Johnny Bristol (1972) and Blood & Orchids (1986), and the 1987 feature film Black Widow. Variety, Sept. 8, 2003, 67.

Michigan, in 1951. A stand-up comic and impressionist, Henson was featured in small roles in the films The Falcon and the Snowman (1985) and Kindergarten Cop (1990).

Betty Lu Henson

Hepburn, Katharine

Buck Henshaw

Henson, Betty Lu Comedienne Betty Lu Henson died after a long illness in Los Angeles on January 26, 2003. She was 51. Henson was born in Hamtramak,

Legendary screen actress Katharine Hepburn died after a long illness at her home in Old Saybrook, Connecticut, on June 29, 2003. She was 96. Hepburn was born to a prosperous family in Hartford, Connecticut, on May 12, 1907. She began her career on stage, appearing in amateur productions from the age of 12. She made her professional debut in Baltimore in 1928. Her performance in the Broadway production of Warrior’s Husband led to a career in films. She made her film debut in the 1932 RKO film A Bill of Divorcement opposite John Barrymore. Hepburn subsequently appeared in the film Christopher Strong (1933) before winning her first Academy Award for her performance as Eva Lovelace in 1933’s Morning Glory. She also starred as Jo March in the 1933 adaptation of Little Women, and was seen in the films Spitfire (1934), The Little Minister (1934), Break of Hearts (1935), Alice Adams (1935) which earned her another Oscar nomination, Sylvia Scarlett (1935), Mary of Scot-

187

Katharine Hepburn

land (1936) as Mary Stuart, A Woman Rebels (1936), Quality Street (1937), Stage Door (1937), Bringing Up Baby (1938) with Cary Grant, and Holiday (1938). Hepburn left Hollywood in 1938 after an exhibitor called her “box-office poison,” despite a run of successful films. After failing to win the part of Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind, Hepburn returned to the stage in the Broadway play The Philadelphia Story. She subsequently starred in the 1940 screen version of the play with Cary Grant and Jimmy Stewart, gaining another Academy Award nomination for her role as a spoiled heiress. With a contract from MGM, Hepburn continued to star in a string of popular films including Woman of the Year (1942), for which she again received an Oscar nomination. It also marked her first role opposite Spencer Tracy, who became her romantic partner in numerous films and in a 25-year personal relationship until his death in 1967. Hepburn also starred in Keeper of the Flame (1942), Dragon Seed (1944), Without Love (1945), Undercurrent (1946), The Sea of Grass (1947), Song of Love (1947), State of

2003 • Obituaries

the Union (1948), and Adam’s Rib (1949). Another Oscar nomination for best actress accompanied her role opposite Humphrey Bogart in John Huston’s 1951 classic The African Queen. Hepburn starred in a handful of films in the 1950s including Pat and Mike (1952), The Iron Petticoat (1956), Desk Set (1957), and Oscar-nominated roles in Summertime (1955), The Rainmaker (1956), and Suddenly, Last Summer (1959) with Elizabeth Taylor. She received critical acclaim and a best actress award at the Cannes Film Festival for her 1962 performance in Long Day’s Journey into Night. She was absent from the stage and screen for the next five years, helping to care for the ailing Spencer Tracy. The two reunited on the screen in 1967 for the ground-breaking film Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner. Their roles as the parents of Sidney Poitier’s fiancée earned Tracy, who died shortly after the film’s production, a posthumous Oscar nomination and Hepburn her second Academy Award for Best Actress. The following year she earned another Oscar for her role of Eleanor of Aquitaine in the 1968 historical drama The Lion in Winter. She appeared in the 1969 film The Madwoman of Chaillot and also returned to the Broadway stage in a production of Coco that year. During the 1970s she appeared in the films The Trojan Women (1971), A Delicate Balance (1973), Rooster Cogburn (1975) with John Wayne, and Olly, Olly, Oxen Free (1978). She was also seen in several tele-films including the 1973 adaptation of Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie, Love Among the Ruins (1975), and The Corn Is Green (1979). Hepburn received an unprecedented fourth Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in 1981’s On Golden Pond opposite Henry Fonda. She was seen in the 1984 black comedy The Ultimate Solution of Grace Quigley with Nick Nolte, and appeared in the tele-films Mrs. Delafield Wants to Marry (1986), Laura Lansing Slept Here (1988), The Man Upstairs (1992), This Can’t Be Love (1994), and One Christmas (1994). She made her final film appearance in 1994’s Love Affair. She published a popular memoir, The Making of “The African Queen”: Or, How I Went to Africa with Bogart, Bacall and Huston and Almost Lost My Mind in 1987. Another memoir, Me: Stories of My Life, followed in 1991. Suffering from failing heath in recent years, Hepburn lived in retirement in Connecticut. Los Angeles Times, June 30, 2003, A1; New York Times, June 30, 2003, A1; People, July 14,

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2003, 50; Time, July 14, 2003, 62; Variety, July 14, 2003, 51.

Herbert, Henry British film and television producer and director Henry Herbert, the 17th Earl of Pembroke and 14th Earl of Montgomery, died of cancer in England on October 7, 2003. He was 64. Herbert was born on May 19, 1939. He became interested in filmmaking in the mid–1960s and worked on the set of the 1965 film Heroes of Telemark. He subsequently worked with an independent documentary film company, making films about music figures of the time. He also directed a documentary about blind children entitled What Colour Is the Wind? He directed several feature films in the 1970s including Malachi’s Cove (1974), Forbidden Passion: Oscar Wilde (1976), and Emily (1977) with Koo Stark. He also began working in television, helming episodes of such series as Danger UXB, Q.E.D., Bergerac, Oscar, King & Castle, The Saint, By Sword Divided, and Shoestring. He later produced the films Feast of July (1995), The Girl with Brains in Her Feet (1997), and Lucia (1998), and directed 1999’s Crossmaheart. Variety, Oct. 20, 2003, 58.

Herbert, Jocelyn British stage and film designer Jocelyn Herbert died in Odiham, Hampshire, England, on May 6, 2003. She was 86. Herbert was born in London on February 22, 1917, the daughter of writer and humorist Alan P. Herbert. She began her career working with the Royal Court Theater as a scene painter in the 1950s. She soon began designing theatrical sets, notably Othello for the National in London in 1964 and John Osborne’s Luther at the St. James in Manhattan. She also designed sets and costumes for New York’s Metropolitan Opera in the 1970s. Herbert was a color consultant for the 1963 film Tom Jones, and worked as a production designer on several films including Lindsay Anderson’s If… (1968), Isadora (1968), Hamlet (1969), Ned Kelly (1970), O Lucky Man! (1973), The Hotel New Hampshire (1984), The Whales of August (1987), and Prometheus (1998). Variety, June 23, 2003, 55.

Jocelyn Herbert

Hill, Rose British character actress Rose Hill died in Hillingdon, Middlesex, England, on December 22, 2003. She was 89. Hill was born in London on June 5, 1914. She was best known for her role as the frail and bedridden Fanny La Fan in the British comedy television series Allo ’Allo, set during World War II with the French Resistance. She appeared in the series during its entire run from 1982 to 1992. Hill began her career as an opera singer, performing with the Saddler’s Wells Opera company. She also performed on stage and appeared in the 1958 film The Bank Raiders. She continued to appear in small roles in such films as A Shot in the Dark (1964) with Peter Sellers, Every Home Should Have One (1970), For the Love of Ada (1972), Tiffany Jones (1973), House of Whipcord (1974), and The Wildcats of St. Trinian’s (1980). She also appeared in the tele-films File It Under Fear (1973), Chance of a Lifetime (1980), The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby (1982), Past Caring (1985), On the Razzle (1986), Mister Skeeter (1986), and Murder East— Murder West (1990). She starred as Fay Bridge in the television comedy series Thingumybob in 1968 with Stanley Holloway, and was Anie Benge in the

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Rose Hill

1978 series Born and Bred. Her other television credits include guest roles in episodes of Steptoe and Son, Dad’s Army, Happy Ever After, and A Touch of Frost.

Hiller, Wendy Leading British stage and film actress Dame Wendy Hiller, who received an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the 1958 film Separate Tables, died in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England, on May 14, 2003. She was 90. Hiller was born Wendy Margaret Watkin in Bramhall, Cheshire, England, on August 15, 1912. She began her career on the English stage in the early 1920s, performing with the Manchester Repertory Theatre. Hiller received acclaim for her performance in Ronald Gow’s play Love on the Dole, attracting the attention of playwright George Bernard Shaw. Shaw invited her to appear in productions of his plays Pygmalion and Saint Joan at the Malvern Festival in 1936. She continued to perform on stage in productions by Gow (who became her husband), Shaw, Henrik Ibsen, and many others. Hiller also began appearing in films in the mid–1930s including Lancashire Luck (1937), Shaw’s Pygmalion (1938) as Eliza Doolittle, Major Barbara (1941), I Know Where I’m Going! (1945), Outcast of the Islands (1952), Sailor of the King (1953), Something of Value (1957), How to Murder a Rich Uncle (1957), Terrence Ratigan’s Separate Tables (1958) which earned her an Oscar, Sons and Lovers (1960), Toys in the Attic (1963), A Man for All Seasons (1966) as Thomas More’s wife, Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express (1974),

Wendy Hiller

Voyage of the Damned (1976), The Cat and the Canary (1979), The Elephant Man (1980), Making Love (1982), Attracta (1983), The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1987), and The Countess Alice (1992). She also appeared in television productions of David Copperfield (1969), When We Dead Awaken (1970), Peer Gynt (1972), Shakespeare’s Richard II, The Curse of King Tut’s Tomb (1980), Country (1981), Miss Morison’s Ghosts (1981), The Importance of Being Earnest (1981), Witness for the Prosecution (1982), Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors (1983), The Kingfisher (1983), The Death of a Heart (1985), Lord Mountbatten: The Last Viceroy (1986), All Passion Spent (1986), Anne of Green Gables: The Sequel (1987), A Taste for Death (1989), Ending Up (1989), and The Best of Friends (1991). Her other television credits include episodes of Studio One, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Profiles in Courage, and Roald Dahl’s Tales of the Unexpected. Throughout her career she also continued to perform on stage in London and the United States. She received acclaim for her performance in the Broadway production of The Aspern Papers in 1962. She was made a Dame of the Order of the British Empire in 1975. Hiller was married to playwright Ronald Gow from 1937 until his death in 1993. Los Angeles Times, May 17, 2003, B20; New York Times, May 17, 2003, A14; Time, May 26, 2003, 25; Variety, May 26, 2003, 64.

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Hindman, Earl Earl Hindman, who was best known for his role as Tim Allen’s seldom seen neighbor Wilson on the television comedy series Home Improvement, died of lung cancer in Stamford, Connecticut, on December 29, 2003. He was 61. Hindman was born in Bisbee, Arizona, on October 20, 1942. He was active on stage and films from the early 1970s, appearing in the films Who Killed Mary What’s ’Er Name? (1971), The Parallax View (1974), The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974), Shoot It Black, Shoot It Blue (1974), Greased Lightning (1977), The Brink’s Job (1979), Taps (1981), Silverado (1985), Three Men and a Baby (1987), Talk Radio (1988), The Ballad of Sad Cafe (1991), Fires Within (1991), and Final (2001). He also appeared in the tele-films Key West (1973), Pueblo (1973), A Memory of Two Mondays (1974), Murder in Coweta County (1983), Concealed Enemies (1984), One Police Plaza (1986), Kojak: The Price of Justice (1987), The Red Spider

Earl Hindman (as Home Improvement’s seldom-seen neighbor)

(1988), the 1988 mini-series War and Remembrance, Rising Son (1900), and Stay the Night (1992). Hindman starred as Lt. Bob Reid in the daytime soap opera Ryan’s Hope from its debut in 1975 through 1984. He was seen, often with his face largely obscured by a wooden fence, as Wilson W. Wilson, Jr., Tim Taylor’s wise neighbor, on Home Improvement from 1991 to 1999. His other television credits include episodes of Spenser: For Hire, The Equalizer, L.A. Law, Tales from the Darkside, Law & Order, Deadline, and Law & Order: Criminal Intent. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 31, 2003, B10; New York Times, Dec. 30, 2003, C12; Variety, Jan. 12, 2004, 60.

Hines, Gregory Gregory Hines, the actor and tap dancer who won the Tony Award for his role as Jelly Roll Morton in the 1993 musical Jelly’s Last Jam, died of cancer in Los Angeles on August 9, 2003. He was 57. Hines was born in New York City on February 14, 1946. He began his career as a member of the tap dancing team Hines, Hines, and Dad with his father, Maurice, and his brother, Maurice Jr. He continued to perform with his brother, and the duo were acclaimed for their dancing skills in the musical revue Eubie! in 1978 and the Broadway hit Sophisticated Ladies. He made his film debut in Mel Brooks’ 1981 comedy History of the World: Part I. He continued to appear in such films as Wolfen (1981), Deal of the Century (1983), The Muppets Take Manhattan (1984), The Cotton Club (1984), White Nights (1985) with Mikhail Baryshnikov, Running Scared (1986), Off Limits (1988), Tap (1989), Eve of Destruction (1991), A Rage in Harlem (1991), Renaissance Man (1994), Kangaroo Court (1994), Waiting to Exhale (1995), Mad Dog Time (1996), The Preacher’s Wife (1996), Good Luck (1997), The Tic Code (1998), Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her (2000), Once in the Life (2000), and 2003’s The Root (2003). Hines was also seen in television productions of Eubie! (1981), I Love Liberty (1982), the Faerie Tale Theatre version of Puss in Boots (1982), White Lie (1991), T Bone N Weasel (1992), Dead Air (1994), A Stranger in Town (1995), The Cherokee Kid (1996), Subway Stories: Tales from the Underground (1997), Color of Justice (1997), Who Killed Atlanta’s Children? (2000),

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Jerome Hines

Gregory Hines

Bojangles (2001), and The Red Sneakers (2002). Hines also starred as Ben Stevenson in the 1998 television series The Gregory Hines Show and was Big Bill in 1999’s Little Bill. He had a recurring role as Ben Doucette on the television sit-com Will & Grace from 1999 to 2000. He also starred as Jordan King in the 2003 television series Lost at Home. Hines’ other television appearances include episodes of Steven Spielberg’s Amazing Stories and Law & Order. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 11, 2003, B9; New York Times, Aug. 11, 2003, B8; People, Aug. 25, 2003, 140; Time, Aug. 25, 2003, 21; Variety, Aug. 25, 2003, 108.

Hines, Jerome Leading opera singer Jerome Hines died in a Manhattan, New York, hospital on February 4, 2003. He was 81. Hines was born in Hollywood, California, on November 8, 1921. He studied chemistry at the University of California before he began performing on stage in the late 1930s. He appeared in Rigoletto with the San Francisco Opera in 1941 and made his debut with the Metropolitan Opera in Boris Godunov in 1946. He continued to perform with the Met for the next

40 years, starring in productions of Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Verdi’s Aida, Gounod’s Faust, Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin, and Wagner’s Parsifal and Tristan and Isole. Hines also composed and performed the opera I Am the Way, about the life of Jesus, in 1968. Hines was also the author of several books including This Is My Story, This Is My Song (1968), Great Singers on Great Singing (1982), and The Four Voices of Man (1997). Los Angeles Times, Feb. 6, 2003, B14; New York Times, Feb. 5, 2003, A29; Time, Feb. 17, 2003, 22; Variety, Mar. 17, 2003, 60.

Hipp, Jutta German jazz pianist Jutta Hipp died at her home in Queens, New York, on April 7, 2003. She was 78. Hipp was born in Leipzig, Germany, on February 4, 1925. She began performing in Germany at an early age, playing in circuses and nightclubs. Jazz critic Leonard Feather arranged for Hipp to come to the United States in 1954. She performed for six months at the Hickory House in New York and recorded the records Jutta Hipp with Zoot Sims and Jutta Hipp at the Hickory House. She abandoned music in 1958 and lived in obscurity in Queens. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 12, 2003, B19; New York Times, Apr. 11, 2003, A23; Variety, Apr. 21, 2003, 55.

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192

Jutta Hipp

Magnet (1950), Once a Sinner (1950), The Galloping Major (1951), The Magic Box (1951), Time Gentlemen Please! (1952), The Big Frame (1952), The Long Memory (1952), The Frightened Man (1952), Emergency Call (1952), Both Sides of the Law (1953), Turn the Key Softly (1953), Personal Affair (1953), The Great Game (1953), A Day to Remember (1953), Background (1953), One Good Turn (1954), Cocktails in the Kitchen (1954), Don’t Blame the Stork (1954), The Crowded Day (1954), The Creeping Unknown (1955), Tiger by the Tail (1955), Simon and Laura (1955), The Love Match (1955), Lost (1955), Blonde Bait (1956), Women Without Men (1956), Sailor Beware! (1956), Home and Away (1956), The Good Companions (1957), These Dangerous Years (1957), Further Up the Creek (1958), The Entertainer (1960), Over the Odds (1961), A Kind of Loving (1962), Term of Trial (1962), Bitter Harvest (1963), Rattle of a Simple Man (1964), Some Will, Some Won’t (1969), The Nightcomers (1972), The Boys and Mrs. B (1977), Consuming Passions (1988), and Julie and the Cadillacs (1999). She appeared as Nurse in a 1967 television production of Romeo and Juliet, and was seen in productions of She Stoops to Conquer (1971), When We are Married (1975), Me! I’m Afraid of Virginia Woolf (1978), Afternoon Off

Hird, Thora Veteran British character actress Dame Thora Hird died of complications from a stroke in Twickenham, Middlesex, England, on March 15, 2003. She was 91. Hird was born in Morecambe, Lancashire, England, on May 28, 1911. She made her theatrical debut as an infant when carried on stage by her director father. She joined the Morecambe Repertory Theatre and made her London stage debut in 1940. She also began appearing in films, often in small roles as cooks or housekeepers. Hird was featured in such films as The Big Blockade (1940), The Black Sheep of Whitehall (1942), Next of Kin (1942), The Foreman Went to France (1942), 48 Hours (1942), Go to Blazes (1942), 2,000 Women (1944), The Courtneys of Curzon Street (1947), Corridor of Mirrors (1948), The Weaker Sex (1948), Portrait from Life (1948), Once a Jolly Swagman (1948), My Brother Jonathan (1948), Conspirator (1949), Madness of the Heart (1949), Maytime in Mayfair (1949), Fools Rush In (1949), Boys in Brown (1949), A Boy, a Girl and a Bike (1949), Cure for Love (1950), The

Thora Hird

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(1979), Intensive Care (1982), Uncle of the Bride (1985), Talking Heads (1987), Big Day at Dream Acres (1987), The Tailor of Gloucester (1989), Memento Mori (1992), Wide-Eyed and Legless (1994), Pat and Margaret (1994), The Queen’s Nose (1998), Talking Heads 2 (1998), and Lost for Words (1999). Hird was featured as Thora Blacklock in the 1964 television series Meet the Wife, and was Sarah Danby in The First Lady (1968). She was also seen as Thora Parker in the 1969 series Ours Is a Nice House, and starred in such series as In Loving Memory (1979), Flesh and Blood (1980), Hallalujah! (1981), She also hosted the British religious programs Your Songs of Praise and Praise Be! in the 1970s. Other television credits include episodes of The Adventures of Robin Hood, Bootsie and Snudge, All Creatures Great and Small, Perfect Scoundrels, Heartbeat, and Dinnerladies. Hird was perhaps best known for her role as Edie Pegden in the popular television series Last of the Summer Wine from 1986 until her death. She was married to James Scott from 1936 until his death in 1994 and leaves a daughter, actress Janette Scott. Hird was knighted as a Dame Commander of the British Empire (DBE) in 1993. Variety, Mar. 24, 2003, 83.

Hirschfeld, Al Legendary caricaturist Al Hirschfeld died in New York City on January 20, 2003. He was 99. Hirschfeld was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on June 21, 1903. He began drawing professionally in the 1920s. He often depicted show business personalities in his drawings for the New York Times and Holiday. He also drew nearly 40 covers for TV Guide magazine. Hirschfeld, who often hid his daughter’s name, Nina, in his drawings after her birth in 1945, collaborated with S.J. Perelman on the 1948 best-seller Westward Ha! Or, Around the World in 80 Cliches. They also collaborated with Ogden Nash and Vernon Duke on the unsuccessful musical Sweet Bye and Bye. Hirschfeld’s drawings were published in such collections as The World of Hirschfeld and The American Theatre as Seen by Hirschfeld, and he was the subject of the 1996 documentary feature The Line King. In the 1990s Hirschfeld also designed several postage stamps commemorating such film stars as Laurel & Hardy, Jack Benny, Edgar Bergen, Buster Keaton and Rudolph Valentino.

Al Hirschfeld self-portrait

Los Angeles Times, Jan. 21, 2003, A1; New York Times, Jan. 21, 2003, A1; People, Feb. 3, 2003, 89; Time, Feb. 3, 2003, 17; Variety, Jan. 27, 2003, 43.

Hobson, I.M. Character actor I.M. Hobson died in an automobile accident in Wyoming on December 29, 2003. A popular performer on the regional stage, Hobson toured in productions of Marat/Sade and Pippin in the 1960s and 1970s. He was featured in the Broadway productions of The Elephant Man (1979) and Amadeus (1980). He also appeared in over a dozen films during his career including Bob Fosse’s All That Jazz (1979), Annie (1982), Hello Again (1987), Heart of Dixie (1989), the 1989 tele-film version of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the Coen Brothers’ Bar-

Obituaries • 2003

194

I.M. Hobson

Joy Hodges

ton Fink (1991), Memoirs of an Invisible Man (1992), Newsies (1992), Hero (1992), Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992), Samantha (1992), Amos & Andrew (1993), Cabin Boy (1994), and The Hudsucker Proxy (1994). Hobson also appeared as Simon in the 1990 television series Molloy. His other television credits include episodes of Tales from the Darkside, Who’s the Boss?, Newhart, Saved by the Bell, Night Court, Sisters, Scorch, On the Air, and Seinfeld.

Foot Forward, I’d Rather Be Right, and Have You Met Miss Jones. She was instrumental in getting Ronald Reagan’s acting career off the ground in the late 1930s. The two had met when she sang on radio station WHO in Des Moines where Reagan was a sportscaster. He later visited her in Hollywood to get her advice on an acting career. She introduced him to her agent, which resulted in a Warner Bros. contract for Reagan. The two remained friends for the next 60 years. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 30, 2003, B13; New York Times, Feb. 1, 2003, A16; Variety, Feb. 24, 2003, 87.

Hodges, Joy Dancer and singer Joy Hodges died of complications from a stroke in Palm Desert, California, on January 19, 2003. She was 88. Hodges was born in Des Moines, Iowa, on January 29, 1915. She began appearing in films in the mid– 1930s, and was seen in Old Man Rhythm (1935), To Beat the Band (1935), Follow the Fleet (1936), Merry Go Round of 1938 (1937), Special Agent K7 (1937), Personal Secretary (1938), Service de Luxe (1938), They Asked for It (1939), Unexpected Father (1939), Boy Meets Joy (1939), Little Accident (1939), The Family Next Door (1939), Laughing at Danger (1940), and Margie (1940). She was also seen in an episode of Perry Mason on television, and on stage in Broadway productions of Best

Holleman, Boyce Actor Boyce Holleman died of cancer in a Houston, Texas, hospital on November 21, 2003. He was 79. Holleman was born in Wiggins, Mississippi, in 1924. A Gulfport, Mississippi, lawyer and former member of the Mississippi state legislature, Holleman began acting on stage in a 1975 production of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. He appeared in several films including The Beast Within (1982), Stone Cold (1991), Cries of Silence (1993), and A Simple Twist of Fate (1994). He was also seen in the tele-films The Secret Passion of Robert Clayton (1992) and The Ponder Heart (2001), and

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Boyce Holleman

episodes of I’ll Fly Away, America’s Most Wanted, and In the Heat of the Night. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 24, 2003, B9.

Holly, Crash Michael Lockwood, who wrestled in the WWE as Crash Holly, was found dead at a

Crash Holly

2003 • Obituaries

friend’s home in Florida on November 6, 2003. He was 32. Lockwood was born in Anaheim, California, on August 25, 1971. He wrestled as Erin O’Grady and the Extreme Leprechaun in All Pro Wrestling (APW) in California. O’Grady briefly competed in the ECW later in the year before being given a developmental deal with the WWE. He competed in Memphis’ Power Pro Wrestling, where he won the Power Pro Young Guns Title in November of 1998. Teaming with Vic Grimes he also captured the Power Pro Wrestling Tag Team Title in March of 1999. He moved up to the WWE as Crash Holly, “cousin” of Hardcore Holly. He and Hardcore held the tag team titles several times and Crash was a multiple WWE Hardcore Title holder in 2000. He also held the WWE European Championship and Light Heavyweight Title. Crash was released from the WWE earlier in 2003 and wrestled on the independent circuit as Mad Mikey.

Holt, David Former child actor David Holt died of congestive heart failure at his home in San Juan Capistrano, California, on November 15, 2003.

David Holt

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196

He was 76. He was born in Jacksonville, Florida, on August 14, 1927. He and his family moved to Hollywood in the early 1930s and appeared in small roles in the films Forgotten Babies (1933), Walls of Gold (1933), and The Cat’s-Paw (1934). A featured role in 1934’s You Belong to Me led to a contract at Paramount. He was cast as the lead in the 1935 adaptation of David Copperfield, but lost the role to Freddie Bartholomew. He was featured in such films as Shock (1934), Age of Indiscretion (1935), Men Without Names (1935), The Big Broadcast of 1936 (1935), The Last Days of Pompeii (1935), It’s a Great Life (1935), Kids on the Cuff (1935), Straight from the Shoulder (1936), The Big Broadcast of 1937 (1936), Trouble for Two (1936), The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1938) as Sidney Sawyer, Sons of the Legion (1938), Beau Geste (1939), Hero for a Day (1939), Military Academy (1940), Remember the Day (1941), What’s Cookin’? (1942), The Pride of the Yankees (1942), Top Man (1943), The Human Comedy (1943), Henry Aldrich, Boy Scout (1944), Reckless Age (1944), The Cheaters (1945), Hot Cargo (1946), Courage of Lassie (1946) as Elizabeth Taylor’s older brother, Affairs of Geraldine (1946), Sweetheart of Sigma Chi (1946), Command Decision (1948), Sky Liner (1949), Battleground (1949), She Shoulda Said No (1949), Second Chance (1950), Fearless Fagan (1952), and Combat Squad (1953). He also appeared on television in episodes of The Lone Ranger and Dragnet in the 1950s before retiring from the screen. Holt was also the composer of numerous jazz albums and co-wrote the Christmas song “The Christmas Blues.” Los Angeles Times, Nov. 21, 2003, B18; New York Times, Nov. 22, 2003, B7.

Holton, George George “Montague” Holton, III, died during his sleep at his Atlanta, Georgia, home of an accidental overdose of prescription medicine on May 12, 2003. He was 31. Holton was born in Signal Mountain, Tennessee, in 1972. He was guitarist and songwriter with the rock group The Woggles. Known as Montague the Human Metronome, he was a founding member of the Woggles in Athens, Georgia, in 1987. The group moved to Atlanta in 1997. He performed on such Woggles albums as Fractured, Live at the Star Bar, and the 2003 release Ragged but Right.

George Holton

Hood, Don Actor Don Hood died of heart failure at his home in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on March 20, 2003. He was 62. Hood was born in Marks, Louisiana, on November 25, 1940. He was a familiar face in numerous films including Obsession (1976), French Quarter (1977), Pretty Baby (1978), Absence of Malice (1981) as Paul Newman’s prosecuting attorney, Cat People (1982), The Toy (1982), The River (1984), Marie (1985) as Tennessee Governor Ray Blanton, The Morning After (1986), Disorderlies (1987), Alien Nation (1988), Fletch Lives (1989), Bad Girls (1994), Tim Burton’s Ed Wood (1994), Exit to Eden (1994), Cobb (1994), Lush (1999), and Love Liza (2002). Hood was also seen in the tele-films Dead Man on the Run (1975), The Savage Bees (1976), Murder at the Mardi Gras (1978), A Woman Called Moses (1978), Freedom Road (1979), Dixie: Changing Habits (1983), The Atlanta Child Murders (1985), Blackout (1985), An Early Frost (1985), Dreams of Gold: The Mel Fisher Story (1986), Murder Ordained (1987), Inherit the Wind (1988), Everybody’s Baby:

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Don Hood

The Rescue of Jessica McClure (1989), Wolf (1989), Fear (1990), Blind Vengeance (1990), The CourtMartial of Jackie Robinson (1990), A Seduction in Travis County (1991), Doublecrossed (1991), Wild Card (1992), Someone She Knows (1994), and Dean Koontz’s Mr. Murder (1998). His other television credits include episodes of Street Hawk, Hunter, The A-Team, Hill Street Blues, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Highway to Heaven, Hardball, Tales from the Crypt, The Flash, Quantum Leap, Swamp Thing, Renegade, Murphy Brown, and Sisters.

2003 • Obituaries

film debut in The Big Broadcast of 1938, where he sang the Oscar-winning song “Thanks for the Memory,” which became his theme song. He was seen in the films College Swing (1938), Give Me a Sailor (1938), Thanks for the Memory (1938), Never Say Die (1939), Some Like It Hot (1939), and the popular comedy mystery The Cat and the Canary (1939). In 1940 he teamed with Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour to make the first of seven Road pictures, Road to Singapore. The Road series continued for more than 20 years with Road to Zanzibar (1941), Road to Morocco (1942), Road to Utopia (1946), Road to Rio (1947), Road to Bali (1952), and The Road to Hong Kong (1962). Hope’s numerous film credits also include The Ghost Breakers (1940), Caught in the Draft (1941), Nothing but the Truth (1941), Louisiana Purchase (1941), My Favorite Blonde (1942), They Got Me Covered (1943), Let’s Face It (1943), The Princess and the Pirate (1944), Monsieur Beaucaire (1946), My Favorite Brunette (1947), Where There’s Life (1947), The Paleface (1948), Sorrowful Jones (1949), The Great Lover (1949), Fancy Pants (1950), The Lemon Drop Kid (1951), My Favorite Spy (1951), The Greatest Show on Earth (1952) in

Hope, Bob Legendary comedian and actor Bob Hope died of pneumonia in Toluca Lake, California, on July 27, 2003. He was 100. He was born Leslie Townes Hope in Eltham, England, on May 19, 1903. He came with his family to the United States at the age of four, settling in Cleveland, Ohio. He began performing in vaudeville in the 1920s, and made his Broadway debut in the 1933 musical Roberta. He was seen in a handful of comedy short films in the mid–1930s including Going Spanish (1934), Paree, Paree (1934), Watch the Birdie (1935), The Old Grey Mayor (1935), Double Exposure (1935), Shop Talk (1936), and Calling All Tars (1936). Hope made his feature

Bob Hope

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198

a cameo role, Son of Paleface (1952), Off Limits (1953), Scared Stiff (1953), Here Come the Girls (1953), Casanova’s Big Night (1954), The Seven Little Foys (1955) as Eddie Foy, That Certain Feeling (1956), The Iron Petticoat (1956), Showdown at Ulcer Gulch (1956), Beau James (1957) as New York City Mayor Jimmy Walker, Paris Holiday (1958), Alias Jesse James (1959), The Five Pennies (1959), The Facts of Life (1960), Bachelor in Paradise (1961), Critic’s Choice (1963), Call Me Bwana (1963), A Global Affair (1964), I’ll Take Sweden (1965), Boy, Did I Get a Wrong Number! (1966), Not With My Wife, You Don’t! (1966), Eight on the Lam (1967), The Private Nave of Sgt. O’Farrell (1968, How to Commit Marriage (1969), Cancel My Reservation (1972), and The Muppet Movie (1979). He was also seen in the tele-films Roberta (1969), Where Have All the Children Gone (1980), and A Masterpiece of Murder (1986). Hope also starred in a popular NBC radio program that ran for 18 years. He also appeared often on television from the 1950s, starring in the variety series Chesterfield Sound Off Time from 1951 to 1952, and Colgate Comedy Hour from 1952 to 1953. Hope also hosted the series Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre from 1963 to 1967, and performed in such series as The Jack Benny Show, What’s My Line?, I Love Lucy, The Frank Sinatra Show, The Lucille Ball Show, The Andy Williams Show, The Danny Thomas Hour, Get Smart, Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In, This Is Tom Jones, Julia, The Odd Couple, The Muppet Show, Highway to Heaven, The Golden Girls, The Jim Henson Hour, Roseanne, and as a voice on The Simpsons. He also starred in numerous television specials including a yearly Christmas program for NBC. Hope was also well known for his tireless work entertaining U.S. troops abroad. He made his first visit to the troops in 1941 and began his yearly Christmas show for servicemen in 1948. His performances for troops abroad began with World War II and continued through Korea and Vietnam. He made his final appearances before the servicemen in the Persian Gulf shortly before operation Desert Storm in the early 1990s. His numerous honors include the Presidential Medal of Freedom and Kennedy Center honors in 1985. A frequent host of the Academy Award presentations, he never received an Oscar for his acting, but was awarded five Special Academy Awards in 1940, 1944, 1952, 1959 and 1965 for his humanitarianism and contributions to the film industry.

Hope was also the author of numerous humorous books about his career including They Got Me Covered (1941), Have Tux, Will Travel (1954), The Last Christmas Show (1974), The Road to Hollywood: My 40-Year Love Affair with the Movies (1977), Confessions of a Hooker: My Lifelong Love Affair with Golf (1985), and Don’t Shoot, It’s Only Me (1990). Los Angeles Times, July 29, 2003, A1; New York Times, July 29, 2003, A1; People, Aug. 11, 2003, 48; Time, Aug. 11, 2003, 72; Variety, Aug. 4, 2003, 45.

Hope, Stephen A. Film music editor Stephen A. Hope died of heart and renal failure in Burbank, California, on June 8, 2003. He was 71. Hope was born in Hollywood on September 15, 1931. He began his career working as a film editor at Desilu Studios in the 1950s. He turned to music editing and received his first screen credit with 1976’s The Seven-Per-Cent Solution (1976). Hope was music editor on numerous films including Rollercoaster (1977), Scott Joplin (1977), Heroes (1977), House Calls (1978), Animal House (1978), Jaws 2 (1978), The Prisoner of Zenda (1979), Walk Proud (1979), Mr. Mom (1983), The Right Stuff (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), Moscow on the Hudson (1984), The Karate Kid (1984), The Bear (1984), Gotcha! (1985), The Protector (1985), F/X (1986), Big Trouble (1986), The Karate Kid, Part II (1986), The Boss’ Wife (1986), Masters of the Universe (1987), Happy New Year (1987), Baby Boom (1987), In the Mood (1987), The Trouble with Spies (1987), Arthur 2: On the Rocks (1988), Without a Clue (1988), Physical Evidence (1989), Lean on Me (1989), The Karate Kid III (1989), Ghost Dad (1990), Switch (1991), Son of the Pink Panther (1993), Sunset Grill (1993), The Stars Fell on Henrietta (1995), The Arrival (1996), and Dangerous Ground (1997). He also was music editor for the tele-films Circus (1988), Peter Gunn (1989), Bionic Showdown: The Six Million Dollar Man and the Bionic Woman (1989), Personals (1990), Fear (1990), Never Forget (1991), and A Season of Hope (1995), and the series Remington Steele.

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Horne, Victoria Actress Victoria Horne Oakie died in Beverly Hills, California, on October 10, 2003. She was 91. She was born in New York City on November 1, 1911, the daughter of director James W. Horne. She began working in films in the mid–1940s, appearing in supporting roles in Phantom Lady (1944), Men on Her Mind (1944), The Scarlet Claw (1944), San Diego I Love You (1944), Murder in the Blue Room (1944), Roughly Speaking (1945), The Unseen (1945), Pillow to Post (1945), That’s the Spirit (1945), Secret Agent X-9 (1945), Love, Honor and Goodbye (1945), Pillow Death (1945), The Scarlet Horseman (1946), Cinderella Jones (1946), To Each His Own (1936), She Wrote the Book (1946), In Old Sacramento (1946), Blue Skies (1946), Suddenly, It’s Spring (1947), The Guilt of Janet Ames (1947), The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947), The Crimson Key (1947), Key Witness (1947), Daisy Kenyon (1948), Forever Amber (1947), The Mating of Millie (1948), The Gentleman from Nowhere (1948), The Return of October (1948), The Snake Pit (1948), The Life of Riley (1949), Abbott and Costello Meet the Killer, Boris Karloff (1949), Mary Ryan, Detective (1949), The

2003 • Obituaries

Good Humor Man (1950), Joe Palooka in Humphrey Takes a Chance (1950), A Slip and a Miss (1950), Harvey (1950) with Jimmy Stewart, Never a Dull Moment (1950), Cuban Fireball (1951), Woo-Woo Blues (1951), Scandal Sheet (1952), Dreamboat (1952), Cuckoo on a Choo-Choo (1952), and Affair with a Stranger (1953). She married actor Jack Oakie in 1950 and retired from the screen several years later. After Oakie died in January of 1978, Horne wrote several books about their life together including Jack Oakie’s Oakridge. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 17, 2003, B12.

Hornicek, Miroslav Czech actor Miroslav Hornicek died in Praha, Czech Republic, on February 15, 2003. He was 84. Hornicek was born in Plzen, Czechoslovakia, on November 10, 1918. He began his career on stage, often playing comic roles. He was featured in such films as Music from Mars (1954), From My Life (1955), When the Woman Butts In (1959), Every Penny Counts (1961), and Don’t Take Shelter from the Rain (1962). Hornicek was also the host of a popular television talk show in Czechoslovakia.

Miroslav Hornicek

Victoria Horne (with husband Jack Oakie)

Obituaries • 2003

200

Hotter, Hans

Houck, Joy N., Jr.

German bass-baritone opera singer Hans Hotter died at his home in Grunwald, Germany, of complications from diabetes on December 6, 2003. He was 94. Hotter was born in Offenbach am Main, Germany, on January 19, 1909. He made his operatic debut in 1930 and performed in Breslaw, Prague and Hamburg over the next 15 years. He was known for his interpretations of Richard Strauss, appearing in Friedenstag (1938), Capriccio (1942), and Liebe der Danae (1944). He made his debut with the Metropolitan Opera as the Dutchman in 1950. He performed with the Met for four seasons, starring in as Wotan in Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen and as Hans Sachs in Die Meistersinger. In the early 1960s Hotter directed the Ring cycle at Covent Garden. He retired in 1972 after performing the Grand Inquisitor in Verdi’s Don Carlos in Vienna, but occasionally returned to the stage in small roles. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 13, 2003, B25; New York Times, Dec. 13, 2003, A17.

Filmmaker Joy N. Houck, Jr., died of heart failure at his Prescott, Arizona, home on October 1, 2003. He was 61. Houck was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, on January 26, 1942. He began his career in films in the late 1960s, producing, directing and scripting the 1969 horror film Night of Bloody Horror starring Gerald McRaney. Houck also directed 1972’s Night of the Strangler with ex–Monkee Micky Dolenz, Creature from Black Lake (1976) with Jack Elam, and the 1977 sci-fi film The Brain Machine. He also produced the 1985 exploitation film The Barbaric Beast of Bogg y Creek, Part II. Houck was featured as an actor in several films including The Shepherd of the Hills (1963), Bootleggers (1974), Creature from Black Lake (1976), The Shadow of Chikara (1977), Tightrope (1984), Down by Law (1986), The Big Easy (1987), and the 1991 telefilm Doublecrossed. He was also seen in episodes of Hill Street Blues and Highway to Heaven.

Hovis, Larry Actor and comedian Larry Hovis, who was best known for his role as Sgt. Carter in the 1960s

Hans Hotter

Larry Hovis

201 television comedy series Hogan’s Heroes, died of cancer in San Marcos, Texas, on September 9, 2003. He was 67. Hovis was born in Wapato, Washington, on February 20, 1936. He was featured as Pvt. Larry Gotschalk on the sit-com Gomer Pyle, U.S..M.C. from 1964 until joining the cast of Hogan’s Heroes in 1965. Hovis was also a creator and regular player on the comedy series Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In in the late 1960s. He appeared in a handful of films during his career including Wild in the Sky (1972), Shadow Force (1993), Yorick (2002), and Lone Star State of Mind (2002). He was also featured in the tele-films The New Daughters of Joshua Cabe (1976), Sex and the Married Woman (1977), and Another Pair of Aces: Three of a Kind (1991). His other television credits include episodes of The Andy Griffith Show, Shindig!, Ben Casey, The Leslie Uggams Show, The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, The New Dick Van Dyke Show, McMillan and Wife, Adam-12, Chico and the Man, and Alice. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 12, 2003, B15; People, Sept. 29, 2003, 76.

Hubbert, Cork

2003 • Obituaries

began his film career in the 1978 Portland, Oregon, independent film Property. He was featured in such films as Where the Buffalo Roam (1980), Caveman (1981) with Ringo Starr, Under the Rainbow (1981), Not for Publication (1984), Legend (1985), Nightforce (1987), Sinbad of the Seven Seas (1989), Criminal Act (1989), The Ballad of the Sad Cafe (1991), Little Suck-a-Thumb (1992), and The Ruby Princess Runs Away. He was also seen in the tele-films Lifepod (1993), The Santa Trap (2002), and Knee High P.I. (2003). Hubbert appeared regularly as Luther in the 1987 comedyfantasy television series The Charmings. His other television credits include episodes of The Fall Guy, Magnum P.I., the new Twilight Zone, Coach, The Drew Carey Show, Union Square, Sabrina, the Teenage Witch, ER, Caroline in the City, The Lot, and Charmed.

Hucko, Peanuts Michael Andrew “Peanuts” Hucko died in a Fort Worth, Texas, hospital after a long illness on June 26, 2003. He was 85. Hucko was born in Syracuse, New York, on April 7, 1918. He began performing in New York City in the late 1930s

Diminutive actor Cork Hubbert died of complications from diabetes at his home in Venice, California, on September 28, 2003. He

Cork Hubbert

Peanuts Hucko

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202

with bands led by Will Bradley, Joe Marsala, and Charlie Spivak. During World War II Hucko performed with Glenn Miller’s Army Air Force Band, exchanging his tenor saxophone for a clarinet. After the war Hucko continued to perform with such bandleaders as Benny Goodman, Jack Teagarden, and Eddie Condon. He was a studio musician for CBS and ABC in the early 1950s before briefly rejoining Goodman’s band. He also performed with Louis Armstrong’s All-stars from 1958 to 1960. He subsequently performed with the Ten Greats of Jazz, later known as the World’s Greatest Jazzband. Hucko appeared on television’s The Lawrence Welk Show in the early 1970s and also led the Glenn Miller Orchestra on tour during the decade. He continued to perform through the 1980s with the Pied Piper quintet. Los Angeles Times, June 21, 2003, B22; New York Times, June 24, 2003, A29; Time, July 7, 2003, 25.

Hudson, Fred Fred Hudson, writer and co-founder of the Frederick Douglass Creative Arts Center in New

York, died of heart failure at his Manhattan apartment on February 13, 2003. He was 74. Hudson was born in Miami, Florida, in 1928. He served in the Air Force during the Korean War and attended the University of California at Berkeley after his discharge. He soon began writing scripts before joining with screenwriter Budd Schulberg in 1965 in the Watts Writers Workshop. Hudson subsequently headed up the San Francisco branch of the workshop and, in 1971, joined with Schulberg to found the Frederick Douglass Creative Arts Center. Numerous performers attended the center early in their careers including Danny Glover, Samuel L. Jackson and Garrett Morris. Hudson also wrote the script for the 1974 film The Education of Sonny Carson, and authored the play The Legend of Deadwood Dick. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 25, 2003, B11; New York Times, Feb. 24, 2003, A19.

Hudson, Guy Film and television special effects supervisor Guy Hudson died in London of a brain hemorrhage on December 24, 2003. He was 45. Born in London in 1958, Hudson worked in films from the late 1970s. He was involved in special effects work for such films as Revenge of the Pink Panther (1978), Alien (1979), The Empire Strikes Back (1980), Dragonslayer (1981), The NeverEnding Story (1984), and Enemy Mine (1985). He moved to California in 1987, where he worked with Chris Walas Inc., Disney, Henson, and Industrial Light and Magic. He was a visual effects artist on the films Naked Lunch (1991), Disclosure (1994), Twister (1996), Mission: Impossible (1996), and the 2002 television series Dinotopia. He had returned to England and was working on the film Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban at the time of his death.

Hughes, Monica

Fred Hudson

Canadian science fiction writer Monica Hughes died of a stroke in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, on March 7, 2003. She was 77. Hughes was born Monica Ince in Liverpool, England, on November 3, 1925. She emigrated to Canada in 1952. She was best known for her science fiction stories geared towards young adults, particularly

203

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Dick Hutton Monica Hughes

the Isis trilogy that included The Guardian of Isis (1981), The Keeper of the Isis Light (1981), and The Isis Pedlar (1982). Her other novels include Crisis on Conshelf Ten (1975), Earth Dark (1977), The Tomorrow City (1978), Beyond the Dark River (1979), The Beckoning Lights (1982), Hunter in the Dark (1982), Ring-Rise Ring-Set (1982), Space Trap (1983), Devil on My Back (1984), Sandwriter (1985), The Dream Catcher (1986), Log Jam (1987), The Promise (1989), Invitation to the Game (1990), The Crystal Drop (1992), The Golden Aquarians (1995), and The Faces of Fear (1998).

Hutton, Dick Richard “Dick” Hutton, who held the NWA Heavyweight Wrestling Title in the late 1950s, died in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on November 25, 2003. He was 80. Hutton was a champion collegiate wrestler in Oklahoma before he began wrestling professionally in the 1950s. He won the NWA Heavyweight Title from Lou Thesz in Toronto, Canada, in November of 1957. He retained the belt until January of 1959, when he was defeated by Pat O’Connor in Chicago, Illi-

nois. He also held single and tag team titles throughout the country until his retirement in the mid–1960s.

Idelson, Ellen Television writer Ellen Idelson died in a Los Angeles hospital of cancer on September 19, 2003. She was 42. Idelson was born in Los Angeles on June 13, 1961, the daughter of writer Bill Idelson. As an actress, she was featured in the 1987 tele-film Eye on the Sparrow. She also appeared in several episodes of television’s Will & Grace, and the 2001 film Moose Mating. Idelson scripted episodes of such television series as Boy Meets World, The Nanny, Dream On, Suddenly Susan, Caroline in the City, Holding the Baby, Grosse Pointe, and Sixteen to Life, for which she also served as executive producer. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 23, 2003, B11; Variety, Sept. 29, 2003, 76.

Incrocci, Zoe Italian actress Zoe Incrocci died in Rome on November 6, 2003. She was 86. Incrocci was

Obituaries • 2003

204 born in Brescia, Italy, on September 21, 1917. She was a leading stage and film actor in Italy, appearing in such films as Toto Cerca Moglie (1950), Destination Piovarolo (1955), Hunchback Italian Style (1962), the 1971 television mini-series The Adventures of Pinocchio, High Crime (1973), Ugly, Dirty and Bad (1976), Towards Evening (1991), Screwloose (1999), and The Invisible Collection (2000).

Ingrassia, Ciccio

Ellen Idelson

Zoe Incrocci

Italian comic actor Ciccio Ingrassia, who was featured in numerous Italian films with his partner Franco Franchi, died of heart failure in Rome Italy, on April 28, 2003. He was 79. Ingrassia was born in Palermo, Sicily, on October 5, 1923. He was featured in over 100 films from the early 1960s including Hercules in the Vale of Woe (1961), The Last Judgment (1961), Those Two in the Legion (1962), The Masseuses (1962), The Shortest Day (1962), The Swindlers (1963), Wine, Whiskey and Salt Water (1963), The Maniacs (1964), Two Escape from Sing Sing (1964), 00-2

Ciccio Ingrassia

205 Most Secret Agents (1964), The Twelve-Handed Men of Mars (1964), Two Public Enemies (1964), Corpse for the Lady (1964), Primitive Love (1964), How We Got into Trouble with the Army (1965), Two Cosmonauts Against Their Will (1965), The Two Parachutists (1965), Sons of the Leopard (1965), I Kill, You Kill (1965), For a Fist in the Eye (1965), Two Idiots at Fort Alamo (1965), Two Gangsters in the Wild West (1965), The Amazing Doctor G (1965), Latin Lovers (1965), Two Gangsters Against Al Capone (1966), How We Robbed the Bank of Italy (1966), War Italian Style (1966), Dr. Goldfoot and the Girl Bombs (1966) with Vincent Price, How We Stole the Atomic Bomb (1967), The Tall, the Short, the Cat (1967), I’ll Try Tonight (1967), The World’s Gold (1967), Franco, Ciccio, and the Cheerful Widows (1967), Two R-R-Ringos from Texas (1967), The Handsome, the Ugly, and the Stupid (1967), The Nephews of Zorro (1968), The Two Crusaders (1968), Ciccio Forgives, I Don’t (1968), Caprice Italian Style (1968), Paths of War (1969), The Adventures of Pinocchio (1972), Two Sons of Trinity (1972), Fellini’s Amarcord (1973) as Uncle Teo, Dirty Weekend (1973), Franco & Ciccio: Superstars (1974), Farfallon (1974), Dracula in the Provinces (1975), The Exorcist: Italian Style (1975), White Horses of Summer (1975), Todo Modo (1976), Traffic Jam (1978), Kaos (1984), It’s Happening Tomorrow (1988), Captain Fracassa’s Journey (1991), Condominium (1991), Waiters (1995), Poor but Beautiful (1996), and Fatal Frames (1996). Ingrassia teamed with Franco Franchi in many films from the 1960s through the early 1980s. Franchi died in December of 1992.

Inoue, Yo

2003 • Obituaries

Yo Inoue

Isaacs, Frank H. Film special effects supervisor Frank H. Isaacs died of cancer in Burbank, California, on November 14, 2003. Isaacs began his career in films as a motion control coordinator for George Mather on the 1980 science fiction film Galaxina. He worked on visual effects for numerous science fiction films from the early 1980s including Metalstorm: The Destruction of Jared-Syn (1983), Evil Spawn (1987), Lady in White (1988), Get Smart, Again! (1989), Skeeter (1993), Alien Intruder

Japanese voice actress Yo Inoue died of lung cancer in Tokyo on February 28, 2003. She was 56. Inoue was born in Tokyo on December 4, 1946. A leading voice actress in Japanese anime, Inoue began her career as Alice in Kumanoko Jacky in 1977. She worked on numerous Gundam productions, often voicing Sayla Mass, and was the voice of Kanuka Clancy in Mobile Police Patlabor. Other credits include the series Those Obnoxious Aliens and Macross 7, and the 1998 film Tenchi Muyo: Midsummer’s Eve.

Frank H. Isaacs

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206

(1993), T-Force (1994), CyberTracker (1994), Cyber-Tracker 2 (1995), Storybook (1995), Steel Frontier (1995), The Power Within (1995), and Hologram Man (1995). Isaacs worked for many years with Gene Warren’s Fantasy 2 Effects, and was involved with the effects team for the Sci-Fi Channel’s mini-series adaptation of Frank Herbert’s Dune (2000) and Children of Dune (2003).

Iturbide, Rebeca Mexican actress Rebeca Iturbide died in Mexico City on April 15, 2003. She was 78. Iturbide was born in El Paso, Texas, on May 21, 1924. A leading actress in Mexican films from the early 1950s, her numerous film credits include Mark of the Devil (1950), El Revoltoso (1951), Mr. Photographer (1952), Reportaje (1953), The White Rose (1955), The Heart and the Sword (1956), The Last Rebel (1956), El Gavilan (1957), The Sun Also Rises (1957), Jet Over the Atlantic (1960), Of Love and Desire (1963), Empire of Dracula (1967), Victoria (1972), and El Buscabullas (1974).

Rebeca Iturbide

Ivers, Bob Actor Bob Ivers died of cancer of the esophagus at his home in Yakima, Washington, on February 13, 2003. He was 68. Ivers was born in Seattle, Washington, on December 11, 1934. He began his career in Hollywood in the early 1950s, appearing in over a dozen films including Broken Lance (1954), Ten Wanted Men (1955), Violent Saturday (1955), A Kiss Before Dying (1956), The Delicate Delinquent (1957), Short Cut to Hell (1957), I Married a Monster from Outer Space (1958), G.I. Blues (1960) with Elvis Presley, The Errand Boy (1961), Cattle King (1963), The Young and the Brave (1963), The Patsy (1964), and Town Tamer (1965). Ivers also appeared regularly as Clarence McGrew in the 1959 western television series Pony Express, and had a small role in the 1965 series Mister Roberts. His other television credits include episodes of 77 Sunset Strip, Gunsmoke, The Untouchables, Tombstone Territory, Bat Masterson, Hawaiian Eye, Batchelor Father, Stoney Burke, Frontier Circus, The Virginian, The Double Life of Henry Phyfe, Twelve O’Clock High, The Fugitive, and The F.B.I. In the mid–1960s Ivers began working as a television weatherman in Phoenix, Arizona. He worked as a news anchor at local stations in Lansing, Michigan, and Fargo, North Dakota, before settling in Yakima, Washington, in 1972. He became news anchor and di-

Bob Ivers

207 rector at station KAPP, where he also hosted an early morning children’s show.

Jackson, Chubby Jazz bassist Chubby Jackson died of cancer at his home in Rancho Bernardo, California, on October 1, 2003. He was 84. Jackson was born Greig Stewart Jackson in New York City on October 25, 1918. He began performing with dance bands in the mid–1930s, and played with Charlie Barnet and Woody Herman’s groups in the early 1940s. He played with Woody Herman’s Herd from 1943 until 1946, co-writing the popular song “Northwest Passage.” Jackson subsequently led several groups and returned to play with Herman’s band frequently. In the early 1955 he moved to Chicago where he began hosting a local children’s television program. He continued

Chubby Jackson

2003 • Obituaries

to tour and perform, playing with Lionel Hampton’s all-star band in the late 1970s. New York Times, Oct. 4, 2003, A11.

Jackson, Donald G. Filmmaker Donald G. Jackson, who produced, directed and scripted such cult classics as Hell Comes to Frogtown and Roller Blade Warriors, died after a long bout with leukemia in Los Angeles on October 20, 2003. He was 60. Jackson was born in Tremont, Mississippi, on April 24, 1943. Jackson began his career making the 1976 horror film The Demon Lover with Jerry Younkins. That film’s creation was the subject of a 1980 documentary, Demon Lover Diary. Jackson directed the 1985 wrestling documentary film I Like to Hurt People, and helmed the science fiction action film Roller Blade (1985). He made Hell Comes to Frogtown in 1987, starring Rowdy Roddy Piper as Sam Hell. Several sequels were also made, without Piper, including Frogtown II (1993), Toad Warrior (1996), and Max Hell Comes to Frogtown (2002). Jackson made over 20 other films, primarily science fiction and action features released

Donald G. Jackson

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208

direct to video. His credits include Roller Blade Warriors: Taken by Force (1989), The Roller Blade Seven (1991), The Legend of the Rollerblade Seven (1992), Return of the Roller Blade Seven (1993), Carjack (1993), Kill, Kill Overkill (1994), The Devil’s Pet (1994), Raw Energ y (1994), Big Sister 2000 (1995), Baby Ghost (1995), Shotgun Boulevard (1996), Pocket Ninjas (1997), Guns of El Chupacabra (1997), Lingerie Kickboxer (1998), Armageddon Boulevard (1998), Ghost Taxi (1999), Ride with the Devil (1999), and Blade Sisters (1999). Variety, Nov. 3, 2003, 50.

Jackson, Leigh British television writer Leigh Jackson died of cancer in Devon, England, on March 27, 2003.

Leigh Jackson

He was 52. Jackson was born in Shortlands, South London, on July 15, 1950. He began his writing career in the theater in the late 1980s. In the 1980s he moved to television, where he scripted BBC adaptations of Joanna Trollope’s Other People’s Children and Drowning in the Shallow End, and the 1991 mini-series Downtown Lagos. He collaborated with director Peter Kosminsky for the award winning BBC docudrama Warriors in 1999, and again worked with Kosminsky on 2002’s The Project. He was working on an adaptation of William Golding’s trilogy To the Ends of the Earth at the time of his death. Variety, Apr. 21, 2003, 54.

Jackson, Tony British rock musician Tony Jackson died in a Nottingham, England, hospital after a long ill-

Tony Jackson

209 ness with liver disease on August 18, 2003. He was 63. Jackson was born in the Liverpool suburb of Dingwall, England, on July 16, 1940. Bass player Jackson joined with guitarists John McNally and Mike Pender and drummer Chris Curtis to form the Liverpool band The Searchers in 1960. The Searchers were known for their early 1960s hits “Sweets for My Sweet,” “Sugar and Spice,” and “Needles and Pines.” They toured the United States in April of 1964, appearing on The Ed Sullivan Show. Jackson left the group later in the year and soon formed Tony Jackson and the Vibrations. Jackson left the music industry later in the decade. In the early 1990s Jackson was unsuccessful in starting up a Searchers revival band. Variety, Nov. 3, 2003, 51.

Jamison, Marshall Television producer, director and writer Marshall Jamison died of congestive heart failure in Orlando, Florida, on September 2, 2003. He was 85. Jamison was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1918. He served as executive producer of the anthology television series The U.S. Steel Hour from 1956 to 1959. He produced and directed the

Marshall Jamison

2003 • Obituaries

satirical news show That Was the Week That Was in 1964, and directed the daytime soap opera A World Apart in 1970. Jamison also directed the television productions of Anyone for Tennyson? The Master Poets Collection (1976) and The Trial of Standing Bear (1988). New York Times, Sept. 22, 2003, A15; Variety, Sept. 29, 2003, 76.

Jankidas Veteran Indian actor Jankidas died of heart failure at his home in Judu, India, on June 8, 2003. He was 93. Jankidas began his career in films in the silent era, and appeared in over 1000 Hindi films. His numerous credits include Khazanchi (1941), Duniya (1949), Babul (1950), The Impossible (1952), Footpath (1953), The Division (1953), In Front of Your House (1963), Leader (1964), Teen Deviyan (1965), After Midnight (1965), Padosan (1968), The Festival of Colours Has Come (1970), Our Dreams (1971), The New World (1971), Elaan (1971), Story (1972), The Runaways (1975), Khalifa (1976), An Oath on Your

Jankidas

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210

Head (1978), Ram Kasam (1978), Anachal (1980), and Dharam Sankat (1991). Jankidas as also the first production designer to work in the Indian film industry, designing several films including Pathar aur Payal and Warrant.

Japrisot, Sebastien French screenwriter and director Sebastien Japrisot died in a Vichy, France, hospital on March 4, 2003. He was 71. Japrisot was born Jean-Baptiste Rossi in Marseille, France, on July 4, 1931. He directed and wrote the 1961 French film La Machine a Parler d’Amour. He scripted the films A Trap for Cinderella (1965), Farewell, Friend (1968), Rider on the Rain (1969), And Hope to Die (1972), the erotic thriller The Story of O (1975), One Deadly Summer (1983), Juillet en Septembre (1988) which he also directed, The Children of the Marshland (1999), and A Crime in Paradise (2000). Several of Japrisot’s novels were also adapted to film including The Sleeping Car Mur-

Sebastien Japrisot

ders (1965) and The Lady in the Car with Glasses and a Gun (1970). Los Angeles Times, Mar. 26, 2003, B10; Variety, Mar. 24, 2003, 83.

Jarvis, Graham Veteran character actor Graham Jarvis died of multiple myeloma at his Pacific Palisades, California, home on April 16, 2003. He was 72. Jarvis was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on August 25, 1930. He began performing on stage in Canada before moving to New York City in the early 1950s. He continued to perform on stage and also began appearing in films and television productions. Jarvis was featured in numerous films including Bye Bye Braverman (1968), Alice’s Restaurant (1969), End of the Road (1970), The Out-of-Towners (1970), R.P.M. (1970), The Traveling Executioner (1970), Move (1970), Cold Turkey (1971), The Organization (1970), A New Leaf (1971), What’s Up, Doc? (1972), The Hot Rock (1972), Russian Roulette (1975), Prophecy (1979), Middle Age Crazy (1980), The Amateur (1981), Mr. Mom (1983), Deal of the Century (1983), Silkwood (1983), The Chain (1984), Doin’ Time (1985), One Magic Christmas (1985), Mischief (1985), Weekend Warriors (1986), Tough Guys (1986), Parents (1989), Misery (1990), Son in Law (1993), and Trial by Jury (1994). A frequent television per-

Graham Jarvis

211 former, Jarvis was featured as Charles Eiler on the television soap opera The Guiding Light from 1971 to 1972. He was best known for his role as Charlie Haggars on the television comedy series Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman in 1976, and the subsequent Forever Fernwood in 1977. He also starred as Jack Felspar in the 1982 comedy series Making the Grade and was Bob Dyrenforth in Fame from 1985 to 1987. He also appeared regularly as Charles Jackson in the series 7th Heaven from the late 1990s. He also appeared in the telefilms Men of Crisis: The Harvey Wallinger Story (1971), Your Money or Your Wife (1972), Witches of Salem: The Horror and the Hope (1972), It Couldn’t Happen to a Nicer Guy (1974), The New Maverick (1978), Blind Ambition (1979) as John Ehrlichman, The Two Lives of Carol Letner (1981), Splendor in the Grass (1981), A Piano for Mrs Cimino (1982), Carpool (1983), Pigs Vs. Freaks (1984), Draw! (1984), Vanishing Act (1986), Dance ’Til Dawn (1988), A Cry for Help: The Tracey Thurman Story (1989), Do You Know the Muffin Man? (1989), Back to Hanibal: The Return of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn (1990), T Bone n Weasel (1992), Love, Honor & Obey: The Last Mafia Marriage (1993), and The Sports Page (2001). His other television credits include episodes of Naked City, All in the Family, The Odd Couple, M*A*S*H, Maude, Gunsmoke, Starsky and Hutch, The Bob Newhart Show, The Love Boat, Alice, It’s a Living, Hart to Hart, Father Murphy, Bring ’Em Back Alive, Condo, Rags to Riches, Mama’s Family, Charles in Charge, Married … With Children, Murder, She Wrote, Murphy Brown, Get a Life, Paradise, Tales from the Crypt, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Coach, In the Heat of the Night, L.A. Law, The X Files, The John Larroquette Show, ER, The Five Mrs. Buchanans, The Drew Carey Show, Good Behavior, The Munsters Today, Home Improvement, Working, Strange World, Dead Man’s Gun, JAG, and Six Feet Under. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 19, 2003, B17.

Jeffries, Matt Matt Jeffries, who designed the original Starship Enterprise for Gene Roddenberry’s landmark science fiction television series Star Trek in the mid–1960s, died of congestive heart failure on July 21, 2003. He was 81. Jeffries was born in

2003 • Obituaries

Matt Jeffries

Lebanon, Pennsylvania, on August 12, 1921. He served in the U.S. Air Force during World War II and worked as an illustrator after the war. He became a set designer at Warner Bros in the 1950s. In honor of his work on Star Trek, the crawl spaces aboard the Enterprise are called “Jeffries Tubes.” Jeffries also worked as an art director on the Mission: Impossible television pilot in 1966. New York Times, July 28, 2003, A19; Variety, Sept. 8, 2003, 67.

Jeter, Michael Character actor Michael Jeter, who was best known as football coach Herman Stiles on Burt Reynolds’ television sit-com Evening Shade in the early 1990s, was found dead of natural causes at his home in Hollywood Hills, California, on March 30, 2003. He was 50. Jeter was born in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee, on August 26, 1952. He began his career on stage and made his film debut in the 1979 version of the musical Hair. Jeter also appeared in such films as Ragtime (1981), Soup for One (1982), Woody Allen’s Zelig (1983),

Obituaries • 2003

212 Court, Designing Women, Crime Story, Picket Fences, Chicago Hope, Suddenly Susan, Murphy Brown, Duckman, Second Noah, Veronica’s Closet, Touched by an Angel, Chicken Soup for the Soul, and Hey Arnold! Jeter starred as Mr. Noodle’s brother, Mr. Noodle, in the children’s television series Sesame Street from 2000. Jeter also won a Tony Award for the 1990 Broadway production of Grand Hotel. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 2, 2003, B11; New York Times, Apr. 2, 2003, C18; People, Apr. 14, 2003, 105; Time, Apr. 14, 2003, 27; Variety, Apr. 7, 2003, 51.

Johnson, “Bullwhip” Danny

Michael Jeter

The Money Pit (1986), Dead Bang (1989), Tango & Cash (1989), Miller’s Crossing (1990), Just Like in the Movies (1990), The Fisher King (1991), Bank Robber (1993), Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit (1993), Drop Zone (1994), Waterworld (1995), Air Bud (1997), Mouse Hunt (1997), Race for Atlantis (1998), Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998), The Naked Man (1998), Thursday (1998), Zack and Reba (1998), Patch Adams (1998), True Crime (1999), Jakob the Liar (1999), Stephen King’s The Green Mile (1999), South of Heaven, West of Hell (2000), The Gift (2000), Kid Quick (2000), Jurassic Park III (2001), Welcome to Collinwood (2002), and Open Range (2003). He was working on the film The Polar Express at the time of his death. Jeter also starred as Art in the shortlived 1988 television series Hothouse, and appeared in the tele-films My Old Man (1979), the 1980 mini-series From Here to Eternity, The Mating Season (1980), Alice at the Palace (1982), the 1993 mini-series Tales of the City, When Love Kills: The Seduction of John Hearn (1993), Gypsy (1993), The Boys Next Door (1996), Mrs. Santa Claus (1996), The Ransom of Red Chief (1998), and the 2002 mini-series Taken. His other television credits include episodes of Lou Grant, Night

Canadian wrestler “Bullwhip” Danny Johnson died of a liver ailment in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, on July 20, 2003. He was 49. Johnson was born in Hamilton on January 6, 1954, the son of wrestler Bull Johnson. The younger Johnson followed in his father’s footsteps and became a professional wrestler while still in his teens. He teamed with his brother, Randy Johnson, early in his career. He wrestled as Danny Johnson and Danny Sharpe before dressing in leather and a cowboy hat and calling himself “Bullwhip.” Johnson held the NWA world tag team titles in Los Angeles in the early 1980s. He continued to compete, primarily in Canada, through the 1990s.

“Bullwhip” Danny Johnson

213

Johnson, Martin British film and television production designer Martin Johnson died in England on October 9, 2003. He was 64. Johnson was born in Lambeth, South London, England, on June 14, 1939. He worked as a designer with the BBC in the 1960s on such television series as Steptoe and Son, Not Only, but Also and Doctor Who. He also designed the tele-film Days of Hope in 1972. Johnson worked in films from the late 1970s, serving as production designer for Black Jack (1979), The Gamekeeper (1980), Prostitute (1980), Looks and Smiles (1981), Fatherland (1986), Hidden City (1988), Hidden Agenda (1990), Riff-Raff (1990), Raining Stones (1993), Ladybird, Ladybird (1994), Land and Freedom (1995), Carla’s Song (1996), My Name Is Joe (1998), Bread and Roses (2000), The Navigators (2001), and Sweet Sixteen (2002).

2003 • Obituaries

a data capture system. Johnson many film credits include effects work on Lifeforce (1985), Spaceballs (1987), Ghost Dad (1990), Broken Arrow (1996), Titanic (1997), Face/Off (1997), The X Files (1998), T-Rex: Back to the Cretaceous (1998), Star Trek: Insurrection (1998), Fight Club (1999) and Panic Room (2003).

Paul Douglas Johnson (left, with Al Miller)

Jones, Philip J. Martin Johnson

Johnson, Paul Douglas Special effects technician Paul Douglas Johnson died of colon cancer in California on August 12, 2003. He was 54. Johnson was born in Hollywood on February 2, 1949. A co-founder of Lynx Robotics, with partner Al Miller, Johnson was the recipient of three Academy Awards for Science and Technology for defining and controlling motion in film, for developing the C-50 camera motor system, and for the development of

Exploitation film producer and director Philip J. Jones died of cancer in Los Angeles on March 9, 2003. He was 39. Jones was born in Farmington, Michigan, in 1963. He began producing B-movies in the late 1980s. He oversaw production of such films as Princess Warrior (1989), Time Barbarians (1990) and Getting Lucky (1990). Jones produced and directed the 1991 telefilm Cause of Death and produced the features Molested (1992) and Demolition Highway (1996). He produced and directed Wish Me Luck (1995) and Backflash (2001), and directed Gettin’ Up (1997) and Hellborn (2003).

Obituaries • 2003

214

Philip J. Jones

Jones, Sid Sid Jones died at his home in Memphis, Tennessee, after a long illness on July 4, 2003. He was 49. Sid had been in charge of the video rooms at the Memphis Film Festival over the past 20 years. Sid had also been involved in science fiction fandom since the early 1970s and had worked with the Mid-South Con during the decade. Sid was also an avid modeler and had organized a modeling convention several years ago. Despite failing health, he and his wife, Kay, continued to run the video room at the Memphis Film Festival through the 2003 event several weeks before his death.

Family, The New Dick Van Dyke Show, Cade’s County, Love, American Style, Mary Tyler Moore, That’s My Mama, Harry O, Kojak, Apple’s Way, The Streets of San Francisco, The Rockford Files, Starsky and Hutch, Switch, The Bionic Woman, McMillan and Wife, City of Angels, Alice, The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries, Baa Baa Black Sheep, Lou Grant, Good Times, The Incredible Hulk, Diff ’rent Strokes, Night Court, Amazing Stories, Simon & Simon, The Golden Girls, Murder, She Wrote, Who’s the Boss?, Baywatch, Empty Nest, Caroline in the City, Married … with Children, Seinfeld, and Mike Hammer, Private Eye. Jump starred as Chief of Police Tinkler in the Soap comedy series in 1977, and was Arthur Carlson on WKRP in Cincinnati from 1978 to 1982. Jump appeared as Ed Malone in the sit-com Growing Pains from 1986 to 1991. He was Lucas Underwood in the 1989 television comedy series Sister Kate, and reprised his role as Arthur Carlson in The New WKRP in Cincinnati from 1991 to 1993. He also appeared in a handful of films during his career including Flareup (1969), Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (1972), Trouble Man (1972), Skateboard (1978), The Fury (1978), House Calls (1978), Evidence of Power (1979), Making the Grade (1984), Moving (1988), Honeymoon Academy (1990), Bad Lie (1998), A Dog’s Tale (1999), and The Singles Ward (2002). Jump also appeared

Jump, Gordon Actor Gordon Jump, who was best known for his role as Mr. Carlson, the radio station owner in the WKRP in Cincinnati sit-com, died of complications of pulmonary fibrosis at his home in Coto de Caza, California, near Los Angeles, on September 23, 2003. He was 71. Jump was born in Dayton, Ohio, on April 1, 1932. He began his career on local television in the Midwest, hosting the WIB the Clown children’s television show. He moved to Los Angeles in the early 1960s, where he was featured in such television series as Daniel Boone, Get Smart, T.H.E. Cat, Green Acres, Here Come the Brides, The Outsider, The Brady Bunch, Mannix, The Partridge

Gordon Jump

215 in the tele-films Rolling Man (1972), A Cry for Help (1975), The Return of Joe Forrester (1975), Sybil (1976), Ruby and Oswald (1978), Goldie and the Boxer (1979), Midnight Offerings (1981), For Lovers Only (1982), Just a Little More Love (1983), On Fire (1987), Justin Case (1988), and Bitter Vengeance (1994). Jump replaced Jesse White as the lonely Maytag repairman in television commercials in 1989. He retired from the role several months before his death. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 24, 2003, B10; New York Times, Sept. 24, 2003, C17; People, Oct. 6, 2003, 117; Time, Oct. 6, 2003, 25; Variety, Sept. 29, 2003, 75.

Jupp, Eric Australian film and television composer Eric Jupp died in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia, of complications from a blood clot on January 2, 2003. He was 80. Jupp was born in Brighton, England, on January 7, 1922. He began working as an arranger for orchestras led by Stanley Black and Ted Heath after serving in the Royal Air Force during World War II. He worked formed his own orchestra for the BBC in the early 1950s. Jupp came to Australia in the 1960s where he and his orchestra performed on a weekly radio series. He also worked as a composer on such films as Tim (1979), Attack Force Z (1982), and Highest Honor (1982). He also wrote music for the Aus-

2003 • Obituaries

tralia television series Skippy (1966), Bailey’s Bird (1977), and The Adventures of Skippy (1991).

Jympson, John British film editor John Jympson died in London of complications from diabetes on June 3, 2003. He was 72. Jympson was born in London on September 16, 1930, the son of film critic Jympson Harman. He began working as at Ealing Studios while in his teens, where he was an assistant editor on such films as Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949), The Cruel Sea (1953), The Ladykillers (1955), I Was Monty’s Double (1958), and Suddenly, Last Summer (1959). He received his first credit as editor for the 1960 film A French Mistress, and continued to work on films for the next 40 years. Jympson’s credits include The Risk (1961), The Secret of Monte Cristo (1961), A Prize of Arms (1962), Stork Talk (1962), The Man Who Finally Died (1962), The Dream Maker (1963), Zulu (1964), The Beatles’ A Hard Day’s Night (1964), The Bedford Incident (1965), Dingaka (1965), The Sands of Kalahari (1965), Kaleidoscope (1966), Maroc 7 (1966), The Bobo (1967), Where Eagle’s Dare (1968), The Walking Stick (1970), Kelly’s Heroes (1970), Flight of the Doves (1971), Alfred Hitchcock’s Frenzy (1972), Night Watch (1973), The Optimists (1973), The Dove (1974), The Old Curiosity Shop (1975), Crime and Passion (1975), The Incredible Sarah (1976), A Little Night Music (1977), A Meeting with Remarkable Men (1979), Riding High (1981), Beyond the Reef (1981), Green Ice (1981), Bad Medicine (1985), Little Shop of Horrors (1986), A Fish Called Wanda (1988), Honor Bound (1988), The Mighty Quinn (1989), King Ralph (1991), HouseSitter (1992), Splitting Heirs (1993), Circle of Friends (1995), Haunted (1995), In & Out (1997), and Mad Cows (1999). He also edited the 1984 television mini-series The Far Pavilions, and the tele-films Gulag (1985) and Women and Men: Stories of Seduction (1990). Jypson suffered a stroke in the 1990s, and diabetic complications led to the amputation of both of his legs in 1999.

Kaatrasalo, Sebastian Eric Jupp’s album No Strings Attached

Finnish child actor Sebastian Kaatrasalo died of a brain tumor in Tammisari, Finland, on

Obituaries • 2003

216

Kamen, Michael

Sebastian Kaatrasalo

October 20, 2003. He was 29. Kaatrasalo was born in Tornio, Finland, on April 27, 1974. He was a ballet dancer before he began acting in the 1980s. He starred in the 1986 film The Snow Queen.

Kahan, Saul Film publicist Saul Kahan died of heart failure in Los Angeles on October 30, 2003. He was 65. Kahan was a foreign correspondent for Cinema magazine in Europe in the 1960s when he appeared in a small role in the 1965 science fiction film The Tenth Victim. He subsequently became a film unit publicist, working on such productions as Thank God It’s Friday (1978), Animal House (1978), Hardcore (1979), The Muppet Movie (1979), Steven Spielberg’s 1941 (1979), The Blues Brothers (1980), Blade Runner (1982), Lost in America (1985), Into the Night (1985), Three Amigos! (1986), Spaceballs (1987), Life Stinks (1991), Hero (1992), and Robin Hood: Men in Tights (1993). Kahan starred as Detective Sergeant Wino in John Landis’ Schlock in 1973. He also had small roles in the films The Kentucky Friend Movie (1977), and Into the Night (1985).

Film music composer, conductor and arranger Michael Kamen died in London hospital on November 18, 2003, after a long battle with multiple sclerosis. He was 55. Kamen was born in New York City on April 15, 1948. Kamen was a founder of the New York Rock ’n’ Roll Ensemble in the late 1960s. The classical pop group recorded five albums before disbanding. Kamen was musical director for David Bowie’s Diamond Dogs tour in the 1970s and began working in films. He was a composer on such films as The Next Man (1976), Stunts (1977), Between the Lines (1977), Boardwalk (1979), John Waters’ Polyester (1981), Venom (1982), Angelo My Love (1983), The Dead Zone (1983), Brazil (1985), Lifeforce (1985), Highlander (1988), Mona Lisa (1986), Shanghai Surprise (1986), Rita, Sue and Bob Too (1986), Lethal Weapon (1987), Adventures in Babysitting (1987), Someone to Watch Over Me (1987), Suspect (1987), Action Jackson (1988), For Queen and Country (1988), Die Hard (1988), Homeboy (1988), The Raggedy Rawney (1988), The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988), Rooftops (1989), Dead Bang (1989), Crusoe (1989), Road House (1989), Renegades (1989), Licence to Kill (1989), Die Hard 2 (1990), The Krays (1990), Cold Dog Soup (1990), Nothing but Trouble (1991), Hudson Hawk (1991), Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991) which earned him an Academy Award nomination for the song “(Everything I Do) I Do It for You,” Company Business (1991), Let Him Have It (1991), The Last Boy Scout (1991), Shining Through (1992), Lethal Weapon 3 (1992), Blue Ice (1992), Splitting Heirs (1993), Last Action Hero (1993), Wilder Napalm (1993), The Three Musketeers (1993), Circle of Friends (1995), Don Juan DeMarco (1995) which earned him a second Oscar nomination for the song “Have You Ever Really Loved a Woman,” Die Hard: With a Vengeance (1995), Stonewall (1995), Mr. Holland’s Opus (1995), Jack (1996), 101 Dalmatians (1996), Inventing the Abbotts (1997), Remember Me? (1997), Event Horizon (1997), The Winter Guest (1997), Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998), Lethal Weapon 4 (1998), What Dreams May Come (1998), The Iron Giant (1999), Frequency (2000), X-Men (2000), and Open Range (2003). He also composed music for the tele-films and mini-series S*H*E (1970), Edge of Darkness (1986), Shoot for the Sun (1986), The Heart Surgeon (1997), From

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Alexis Kanner (from The Prisoner)

DC Stone in the 1966 British television series Softly Softly, and guest starred in an episode of U.F.O. He produced, directed, scripted and starred in the 1981 film Kings and Desperate Men. Kanner was last seen in the 1988 science fiction film Nightfall.

Kaplan, Jessica Michael Kamen

the Earth to the Moon (1998), Band of Brothers (2001), and Mr. Dreyfuss Goes to Washington (2001), and for episodes of such television series as Steven Spielberg’s Amazing Stories and Tales from the Crypt. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 19, 2003, B13; New York Times, Nov. 20, 2003, C19; Time, Dec. 1, 2003, 23; Variety, Nov. 24, 2003, 49.

Kanner, Alexis Alexis Kanner, who was best known for his roles as The Kid and Number 48 in Patrick McGoohan’s cult television series The Prisoner in 1968, was found dead at his London home on December 13, 2003. He was 61. Kanner was born in Bagneres du Luchon, France, on May 2, 1942. He was featured as Alex in the French-Canadian television series Beau Temps, Mauvais Temps in the late 1950s. He also appeared in the films Reach for Glory (1962), The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders (1965), The Ernie Game (1967), Crossplot (1969), Connecting Rooms (1970), Goodbye Gemini (1970), and Mahoney’s Estate (1972), which he also produced and wrote. Kanner also starred as

Screenwriter Jessica Kaplan was killed when the private plane she was aboard crashed into a Los Angeles apartment building on June 6, 2003. She was 24. Kaplan made her first script sale at the age of 16 when New Line bought her spec script The Powers That Be. It is scheduled to begin filming under the title Havoc later in 2003. She also wrote a screen adaptation of Daniel Handler’s novel The Basic Eight and a television pilot with Jamie Hawkins entitled Telegraph Hill. Los Angeles Times, June 8, 2003, B1.

Karas, Sam Sam Karas died in a Monterey, California, hospital on February 26, 2003. He was 81. Karas was born in Chicago on February 7, 1922. He moved to California in the 1940s, where he was a sucessful businessman. He served on the Monterey County Board of Supervisors from 1983 to 1995, and was a good friend of actor Clint Eastwood. Eastwood cast him as Thirsty Thurston in the 1992 Oscar-winning Western The Unforgiven.

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218

Dale Kassel

Sam Karas

Karp, Beverly Producer Beverly Bailis Karp died of emphysema at her New York City home on May 10, 2003. She was 72. Karp was born in Manhattan in 1930 and began working in films as a script reader for 20th Century–Fox. She subsequently returned to New York, where she wrote for magazines and produced plays. Karp also produced Louis Malle’s 1981 film My Dinner with Andre and was associate producer for his 1994 film Vanya on 42nd Street. Los Angeles Times, June 13, 2003, B13; New York Times, June 12, 2003, A31; Variety, June 23, 2003, 55.

Kassel, Dale Character actor Dale Kassel died in Dallas, Texas, after a short illness on January 25, 2003. He was 72. Kassel was born in St. Louis, Mis-

souri, on November 18, 1930. He appeared in numerous commercials and industrial films. He was also featured in several movies including The Dirt Bike Kid (1986), It Takes Two (1988), and Harley (1990).

Katz, Lee Screenwriter and director Lee Katz died of heart failure in Rancho Palos Verdes, California, on May 29, 2003. He was 89. Katz was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1914. He began working in films in the early 1930s, serving as an assistant director on such features as Mystery of the Wax Museum (1933), Upperworld (1934), Dr. Monica (1934), Living on Velvet (1935), Oil for the Lamps of China (1935), Miss Pacific Fleet (1935), Snowed Under (1936), China Clipper (1936), Sing Me a Love Song (1937), Ready, Willing and Able (1937), Slim (1937), They Won’t Forget (1937), The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), Strange Alibi (1941), Out of the Fog (1941), Blues in the Night (1941), Across the Pacific (1942), and Casablanca (1942). Katz also worked as a writer on such films as Heart of the North (1938), Blackwell’s Island (1939), The Man Who Dared (1939), Women in the

219 Wind (1939), Waterfront (1939), No Place to Go (139), Kid Nightingale (1939), The Return of Doctor X (1939), Code of the Secret Service (1939), and British Intelligence (1940). He later worked as a production manager on The Yellow Cab Man (1950), The Asphalt Jungle (1950), Two Weeks With Love (1950), and The Red Badge of Courage (1951), and was an associate producer for Moby Dick (1956), Love in the Afternoon (1957), The Vikings (1958), The Journey (1959), Scent of Mystery (1960), Paris Blues (1961), and Topkapi (1964). Los Angeles Times, June 10, 2003, B12.

Kazan, Elia Controversial Academy Award–winning film director Elia Kazan died at his home in Manhattan, New York, on September 28, 2003. He was 94. He was born Elia Kazanjoglou in Constantinople (now Istanbul), Turkey, on September 7, 1909. He accompanied his parents to the United States at the age of four and studied drama at Yale. He began working as an assistant stage

Elia Kazan

2003 • Obituaries

manager with the Group Theatre in 1932 and directed his first play in 1935. Kazan produced, directed and wrote the 1937 documentary film The People of the Cumberlands and directed the 1941 documentary feature It’s Up to You about food rationing. Kazan also appeared in supporting roles in two films in the early 1940s —City for Conquest (1940) and Blues in the Night (1941). During the 1940s he also became one of the leading directors on Broadway, helming such productions as The Skin of Our Teeth (1942), One Touch of Venus (1943), All My Sons (1947), A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), and Death of a Salesman (1949). He made his feature film debut as a director with 1945’s A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. He won the Oscar for best director for his 1947 film Gentleman’s Agreement starring Gregory Peck. Kazan also directed the films The Sea of Grass (1947), Boomerang (1947), Pinky (1949), Panic in the Streets (1950), the 1951 film version of A Streetcar Named Desire starring Marlon Brando and Vivien Leigh, Viva Zapata (1952), and Man on a Tightrope (1953). Kazan became embroiled in the political controversies of the time when he testified before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1952, acknowledging he had been a member of the Communist Party in the 1930s and, reversing a previous stance, named names of other party members. His testimony during the Hollywood Blacklist period alienated a segment of Hollywood that still reviled his actions 50 years later. Kazan earned a second Academy Award for his 1954 film On the Waterfront, starring Brando, and was nominated the following year for his direction of East of Eden starring James Dean. Kazan directed and produced several more films over the next two decades including Baby Doll (1956), A Face in the Crowd (1957) starring Andy Griffith, Wild River (1960), and Splendor in the Grass (1961). He adapted his 1961 novel America America for film in 1963 and gained another Oscar nomination. He subsequently directed The Arrangement in 1969, which was also adapted from his own novel. His later films include The Visitors (1972) and The Last Tycoon (1976). Kazan also wrote several more novels including The Understudy (1974), Act of Love (1978), and The Anatolian (1982), and wrote his autobiography, Elia Kazan: A Life, in 1988. He received a Kennedy Center Life Achievement Award in 1983 and was awarded an honorary Academy Award in 1998. Kazan was married to actress

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220

Molly Day Thatcher from 1932 until her death in 1963. He was married to actress Barbara Loden from 1967 until her death in 1980. His survivors include his third wife, Frances Rudge, whom he married in 1982, and a son, screenwriter Nicholas Kazan. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 29, 2003, A1; New York Times, Sept. 29, 2003, A1; Time, Oct. 13, 2003, 25.

Keach, Stacy, Sr. Leading character actor Stacy Keach, Sr., the father of actors Stacy and James Keach, died of complications from congestive heart failure in Burbank, California, on February 14, 2003. He was 78. The older Keach was born in Chicago on May 29, 1914. He was a drama teacher before moving to Los Angeles in the 1940s to direct the Pasadena Playhouse. He also worked with Universal Pictures as a dialogue director on such films as Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves (1944), The Scarlet Claw (1944), Hi, Beautiful (1944), Frisco Sal (1945), and Sudan (1945). Keach created, produced and directed the Western series Tales of the Texas Rangers, from its start on radio in the 1950s through its television incarnation in 1958. Keach was also a popular character actor on television from the 1950s, appearing in episodes of The Lone

Ranger, Cheyenne, Maverick, Colt .45, The Californians, 77 Sunset Strip, The Deputy, Shotgun Slade, Wagon Train, Perry Mason, Bonanza and Mannix. He appeared as the recurring character Professor Carlson in the television comedy spy spoof Get Smart in the 1960s, and was seen in episodes of Adam-12, Marcus Welby, M.D., Harry O, Kojak, Barnaby Jones, The Rockford Files, Baretta, The Incredible Hulk, Dynasty, Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, St. Elsewhere, Hotel and 1985’s Twilight Zone. Keach was also seen in numerous tele-films including Vanished (1971), Once Upon a Dead Man (1971), The Heist (1972), The Missiles of October (1974), The Desperate Miles (1975), Kingston (1976), Once an Eagle (1977), It Happened at Lakewood Manor (1977), Little Mo (1978), The Clone Master (1978), Harold Robbins’ The Pirate (1978), Fighting Back: The Story of Rocky Bleier (1980), Mission of the Shark: The Saga of the U.S.S. Indianapolis(1991), Matlock: The Witness Killings (1991), Fatal Friendship (1991), and Running Mates (1992). Keach was also featured in a handful of films during his career including The Parallax View (1974), High Velocity (1977), Big Wednesday (1978), Saturday the 14th (1981), Superstition (1982), Lies (1983), Armed and Dangerous (1986), Pretty Woman (1990), and Cobb (1994). More recently Keach was seen in the recurring role of Judge Webster in several episodes of the television series Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman. New York Times, Feb. 17, 2003, A19; People, Mar. 3, 2003, 79; Variety, Feb. 24, 2003, 87.

Keiko

Stacy Keach, Sr.

Keiko, the whale who starred in the film Free Willy (1993), died of pneumonia in a fjord near Taknes Bay, Norway, on December 12, 2003. He was believed to be about 27. Keiko had been captured near Iceland in 1979 and was subsequently sold to a marine park. After the release of the film Keiko, which means Lucky One in Japanese, was found in an aquarium in Mexico City. In poor health, he was taken to Oregon where he was rehabilitated. He returned to the screen in two film sequels, Free Willy 2: The Adventure Home (1995) and Free Willy 3: The Rescue (1997). He was moved to Iceland in 1998. Attempts to return Keiko to the wild were unsuccessful as the whale appeared to prefer the

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World Owes Me a Living (1944), The Long Knife (1958), and Yesterday’s Enemy (1959). He was best known in England for hosting the BBC Radio 2 program, Your Hundred Best Tunes, from 1959 until his death. Keith was the brother of actor David Kossoff. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 21, 2003, B12.

Kellett, Les

Keiko the Whale

company of humans. He was released from Iceland in 2002 and swam to Norway, where he became a popular attraction. New York Times, Dec. 14, 2003, 50; Time, Dec. 22, 2003, 135.

British professional wrestler Les Kellett died on January 9, 2003. He was 86. Kellett was born in Bradford, England, in 1916. He began wrestling professionally in the late 1930s. Kellett served in the British army during World War II and resumed his ring career after the war. Known as “The Fox” and “The Clown Prince of Wrestling,” Kellett was a favorite ring star on British television in the 1950s.

Keith, Alan Veteran British radio personality Alan Keith died in London, England, on March 17, 2003. He was 94. He was born Alec Kossoff in London on October 19, 1908. He began his career on stage in the late 1920s and began working with BBC radio in the 1930s. Keith appeared in a handful of films in the 1940s and 1950s including Suicide Squadron (1941), Give Us the Moon (1943), The

Les Kellett

Kelley, William

Alan Keith

Oscar-winning screenwriter William Kelley died of cancer in Bishop, California, on February 3, 2003. He was 73. Kelley was born in New York City in 1929. He began working in televi-

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222

Lonny Kellner

(1952), Flower of Hawaii (1953), I’ll See You at Lake Constance (1956), and Otto — Der Liebesfilm (1992).

Kelly, Michael William Kelley

Michael Kelly, a leading journalist, columnist and editor of the Atlantic Monthly, was killed

sion in the mid–1950s, scripting episodes of such series as Gunsmoke, Bonanza, Kung Fu, Petrocelli, and How the West Was Won. Working as an editor for several publishing houses, Kelley’s first novel, Gemini, was published in 1959. Subsequent novels The God Hunters and The Tyree Legend followed in the 1960s. He also wrote the telefilms The Winds of Kitty Hawk (1978), The Demon Murder Case (1983), and The Blue Lightning (1986). Kelley co-wrote the 1986 film Witness with Earl Wallace. The film, directed by Peter Weir and starring Harrison Ford, earned Kelley and Wallace an Academy Award for best original screenplay. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 8, 2003, B23; Variety, Feb. 10, 2003, 58.

Kellner, Lonny German singer and actress Lonny Kellner died of bone cancer in Hamburg, Germany, on January 22, 2003. She was 72. Kellner was born in Germany on March 8, 1930. A popular singer from the 1950s, she performed in over a dozen films during her career including Dancing Stars

Michael Kelly

223 during the war in Iraq in a Humvee accident while covering the war with the Army’s 3rd Infantry Division on April 4, 2003. He was 46. Kelly was born in Washington, D.C., in 1957. He began his career as a reporter with the Cincinnati Post and the Baltimore Sun. Kelly later wrote for such publications as The New Yorker, The New York Times, and The Washington Post. Kelly received acclaim for covering the first Gulf War in 1991 for the New Republic. He wrote a book about the war, Martyr’s Day, in 1994. Kelly became editor of The Atlantic Monthly in 1999. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 5, 2003, B21; New York Times, Apr. 5, 2003, A10; Time, Apr. 14, 2003, 27; Variety, Apr. 24, 2003, 38.

Kempson, Rachel British actress Rachel Kempson, the widow of actor Michael Redgrave, mother of Vanessa, Lynn and Corin Redgrave, and grandmother of Natasha Richardson, died of natural causes at Richardson’s home in Millbrook, New York, on May 24, 2003. She was 92. Kempson was born in Dartmouth, England, on May 28, 1910. She made her stage debut in a 1933 production of Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing at Stratford. In 1935 Kempson married actor Michael Redgrave. Their marriage lasted nearly 50 years

2003 • Obituaries

until his death on March 21, 1985. Kempson remained a leading stage actress from the 1930s. She also appeared in numerous films during her career including Jeannie (1941), The Captive Heart (1946), A Woman’s Vengeance (1948), The Sea Shall Not Have Them (1954), Tom Jones (1963), The Third Secret (1964), Curse of the Fly (1965), Georg y Girl (1966) with daughter Lynn, Grand Prix (1966), The Jokers (1966), The Charge of the Light Brigade (1968), Thank You All Very Much (1969), The Virgin Soldiers (1969), Two Gentlemen Sharing (1969), Jane Eyre (1970), Out of Africa (1985), Stealing Heaven (1988), She’s Been Away (1989), and Deja Vu (1997). Kempson was also seen in television productions of Elizabeth R (1971), Trelawny of the Wells (1972), The Judge’s Wife (1972), Love for Lydia (1978), Little Lord Fauntleroy (1980), Blunt Instrument (1980), The Bell (1982), Camille (1984), The Jewel in the Crown (1984), The Black Tower (1985), Lorna Doone (1990), Uncle Vanya (1991), and For the Great Good (1991). Her other television credits include episodes of Colonel March of Scotland Yard, Roald Dahl’s Tales of the Unexpected, Worlds Beyond and Boon. Los Angeles Times, May 27, 2003, B11; New York Times, May 26, 2003, A17; People, June 9, 2003, 93; Time, June 9, 2003, 24.

Kerchbron, Jean French film and television director Jean Kerchbron died in France on February 3, 2003. He was 78. Kerchbron was born in Paris on June 24, 1924. He began directing in the late 1950s and helmed and scripted the 1967 adaptation of The Golem. He also directed television productions of Marion Delorme (1967), Tango (1970), L’Atlantide (1972), President Faust (1974), Commissaire Moulin (1976), and Grand Hotel (1986).

Kerr, Jean

Rachel Kempson (with children Vanessa, Corin and Lynn Regrave)

Playwright and author Jean Kerr, who was best known for her best-selling book Please Don’t Eat the Daisies, died of pneumonia in White Plains, New York, on January 5, 2003. She was 80. Kerr was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania, on July 10, 1922. She began writing plays in the 1940s

Obituaries • 2003

224 Johnny Mack Brown, Fighting Mustang (1948), Deadline (1948), Sunset Carson Rides Again (1948), Dead Man’s Gold (1948), The Kid from Gower Gulch (1950), Battling Marshal (1950), and Mustang! (1959).

Khouri, Walter Hugo

Jean Kerr

Brazilian film director and writer Walter Hugo Khouri died of heart failure in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on June 27, 2003. He was 73. Khouri was born in Sao Paulo on October 21, 1929. He made his film debut scripting and directing the 1953 feature O Gigante de Pedra (The Rock Giant). He helmed several dozen films over the next four decades including Lonesome Women (1959), In the Devil’s Throat (1960), Eros … the Bizarre (1964), The Burning Body (1966), The Amorous Ones (1968), The Palace of Angels (1970), The Goddesses (1972), The Desire (1975), The Children of the Fire (1978), Love Strange Love (1982), I (1987), Forever (1991), and Lost Passion (1998).

and made her Broadway debut with Song of Bernadette in 1946, co-written with her husband, drama critic Walter Kerr. The couple also wrote the 1949 comedy revue Tough and Go. Kerr wrote Please Don’t Eat the Daisies in 1957. The book was adapted into a film starring Doris Day in 1960, and was a popular television comedy series from 1965 to 1967. Her play Knave of Hearts was adapted for the 1956 film That Certain Feeling, and another play, Mary, Mary, was adapted to film in 1963. Other books include The Snake Has All the Lines (1960), Penny Candy (1970), and How I Got to Be Perfect (1978). Her husband, Walter, died in 1996. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 8, 2003, B10; New York Times, Jan. 7, 2003, C14; People, Jan. 20, 2003, 113; Time, Jan. 20, 2003, 25; Variety, Jan. 13, 2003, 83.

Keyes, Stephen Actor Stephen Keyes, who was featured as heavies in a handful of Western films with Sunset Carson in the late 1940s, died of congestive heart failure in Mesquite, Texas, on May 25, 2003. Keyes film credits include Oklahoma Raiders (1944), Land of the Outlaws (1944) with

Walter Hugo Khouri

Kibben, Jaime Filmmaker Jaime Kibben was killed in an automobile accident in Tel Aviv on January 11, 2003, while working on a documentary about the

225

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Jurgen Kiil, left

Pact (2003), and Turn Right by the Yellow Dog (2003).

King, Andrea Jaime Kibben

Israeli and Palestinian peace process. He was 55. He was born on December 29, 1947. Kibben’s films include the shorts The Greening of Cuba, The Will of Dean Snider, and Ya no Mas!, a Spanish-language production on domestic violence. In the 1990s he worked as a sound engineer for PBS’s News Hour with Jim Lehrer.

Kiil, Jurgen Leading Danish actor Jurgen Kiil died in Copenhagen, Denmark, on June 1, 2003. He was 72. Kiil was born in Arhus, Denmark, on February 13, 1931. A leading film and television actor from the 1960s, Kiil was seen in the films Eric Soya’s ’17 (1967), Unfaithful (1966), Pretty Boy and Rosa (1967), I Love Blue (1968), The Key to Paradise (1970), Tintomare (1970), Hooray for the Blue Hussars (1970), Gold for the Tough Guys of the Prairie (1971), My Sisters Children Go Astray (1971), Love Me Darling (1971), The House of Parting (1973), Me and the Mafia (1973), Violets Are Blue (1975), Cop (1976), Mind Your Back, Professor (1977), In My Life (1978), The Parallel Corpse (1982), Otto Is a Rhino (1983), Casanova (1990), The Shadow (1998), Minor Mishaps (2002), The

Leading actress Andrea King died in Woodland Hills, California, on April 22, 2003. She was 84. King was born Georgette Andre Bary in Paris, Francis, on February 1, 1919. She began her film career in Hollywood in the early 1940s, appearing in Mr. Skeffington (1944), The Very Thought of You (1944), Roughly Speaking (1945), God Is My Co-Pilot (1945), Hotel Berlin (1945), Navy Nurse (1945), It Happened in Springfield (1945), Shadow of a Woman (1946), The Beast with Five Fingers (1946) with Peter Lorre, The Man I Love (1946), Ride the Pink Horse (1947), My Wild Irish Rose (1947) as singer Lillian Russell, Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid (1948), Song of Surrender (1949),

Andrea King

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226

Buccaneer’s Girl (1950), I Was a Shoplifter (1950), Southside 1-1000 (1950), Dial 1119 (1950), The Lemon Drop Kid (1951), Mark of the Renegade (1951), the 1952 sci-fi cult classic Red Planet Mars with Peter Graves, The World in His Arms (1952), Outlaw Queen (1957), Band of Angels (1957), Darby’s Rangers (1958), House of the Black Death (1965), Daddy’s Gone A-Hunting (1969), and Blackenstein (1973). She was also a popular television performer from the 1950s, appearing in episodes of such series as Lux Video Theatre, Crusader, Cheyenne, Maverick, Perry Mason, The Alaskans, Bourbon Street Beat, Hawaiian Eye, Surfside 6, 77 Sunset Strip, Family Affair, Dragnet, Columbo, and Medical Center. She was largely inactive in films and television from early 1970s through the 1980s but returned to the screen in an episode of Murder, She Wrote, and the films The Linguini Incident (1991), Inevitable Grace (1994), The Color of Evening (1994). Los Angeles Times, Apr. 26, 2003, B22; Variety, Apr. 28, 2003, 80.

King, Earl Sing, songwriter and guitarist Earl King died in New Orleans, Louisiana, of complications from diabetes on April 17, 2003. He was 69. King was born Earl Silas Johnson in New Orleans on

Earl King

February 7, 1934. He began performing locally in the early 1950s with Huey “Piano” Smith and Guitar Slim. He led Slim’s band for awhile in 1954. King also performed and recorded such popular tunes as “Come On (Let the Good Times Roll),” “Trick Bag,” “Those Lonely, Lonely Nights” and “A Mother’s Love.” He continued to perform through the 1990s. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 23, 2003, B11; New York Times, Apr. 20, 2003, A23; Time, May 12, 2003, 27; Variety, Apr. 28, 2003, 80.

King-Wood, David Scottish actor David King-Wood died after a brief illness on September 3, 2003. He was 89. King-Wood was born in Persia on September 12, 1913. He was featured in several films in the 1950s including No Haunt for a Gentleman (1952), The Unholy Four (1954), Men of Sherwood Forest (1954), Break in the Circle (1955), The Creeping Unknown (aka The Quatermass Xperiment) (1955), The Stolen Airliner (1955), Private’s Progress (1956), and Jamboree (1957). King-Wood was also active on stage, appearing in Broadway productions of The Hidden River (1957) and Much Ado About Nothing (1959). He left acting to become a teacher at St. Bernard’s School in New York in

David King-Wood

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1960, where he remained until his retirement in 2001.

Kjer, Bodil Danish actress Bodil Kjer died in Copenhagen, Denmark, on February 1, 2003. He was 85. Kjer was born in Denmark on September 2, 1917. She began her film career in Denmark in the late 1930s, appearing in several dozen films including A Gentleman in Top Hat and Tails (1942), Elly Petersen (1944), The Invisible Army (1945), Jenny and the Soldier (1947), John and Irene (1949), Meet Me on Cassiopeia (1951), In the Green of the Woods (1968), The Missing Clerk (1971), Copper (1976), Mirror, Mirror (1978), and Tradition: Up Yours! (1979). She was best known in the United States for her role as Old Philippa in 1987’s Babette’s Feast. She continued to appear in such films as Waiting for Sunset (1995) and Two Women (2001) until her death.

Bodil Kjer

Kleeb, Helen Veteran character actress Helen Kleeb, who appeared as Miss Mamie Baldwin on the televi-

Helen Kleeb (right, with Mary Jackson as The Waltons’ Baldwin sisters)

sion series The Waltons in the 1970s, died in California on December 28, 2003. She was 96. Kleeb was born on January 6, 1907. She began her career on stage in Portland, Oregon, in the late 1920s. She soon began working in radio in Portland and, later, San Francisco. Kleeb moved to Los Angeles in 1950 and was soon appearing in character roles in films. Her numerous credits include Kansas City Confidential (1952), Witness to Murder (1954), Magnificent Obsession (1954), The Desperate Hours (1955), There’s Always Tomorrow (1956), A Day of Fury (1956), Friendly Persuasion (1956), The Invisible Boy (1957), Hot Summer Night (1957), Curse of the Undead (1959), The Gazebo (1959), Cage of Evil (1960), The Young Savages (1961), The Manchurian Candidate (1962), Toys in the Attic (1963), Seven Days in May (1964), Hush … Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964), Sex and the Single Girl (1964), The Hallelujah Trail (1965), The Fortune Cookie (1966), Eight on the Lam (1967), Fitzwilly (1967), The Party (1968), Blue (1968), Halls of Anger (1970), Star Spangled Girl (1971), and The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (1982). She also appeared in the tele-films Vanished (1971), A Little Game (1971), They Call It Murder (1971), The Couple Takes a Wife (1972), Alexander, Alexander (1973), The Art of Crime (1975), Eleanor and Franklin (1976), and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1981) as the Widow Douglas. She was a popular character actress in television from the early 1950s, guest-starring in such series as Dragnet, I Love Lucy, Frontier, Gunsmoke, Playhouse 90, Climax!, Letter to Loretta, The Rough Riders, Alcoa Theatre, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Trackdown, Dennis the Menace, The Andy Griffith Show, The Twilight Zone, The Beverly

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228

Hillbillies, Mister Ed, The Virginian, Branded, Get Smart, The Munsters, Lost in Space, Perry Mason, Dr. Kildare, Bewitched, The Invaders, The High Chaparral, Here Come the Brides, Bonanza, Green Acres, Room 222, Adam-12, Barnaby Jones, The Invisible Man, Lou Grant, One Day at a Time, CHiPs, Little House on the Prairie, Simon & Simon, Highway to Heaven, Who’s the Boss?, and The Golden Girls. She appeared regularly as Mrs. Slocum in the television comedy series Pete and Gladys in 1960, and was Miss Claridge in the Harrigan and Son series in 1960. She and Mary Jackson appeared as the eccentric Baldwin sisters on The Waltons from 1972 to 1981. She reprised her role as Mamie Baldwin in the tele-films A Wedding on Walton’s Mountain (1982), A Day for Thanks on Walton’s Mountain (1982), A Walton Thanksgiving Reunion (1993), A Walton Wedding (1995), and A Walton Easter (1997).

helmed such productions as Attention: Vulgarity! (1959), The Groom (1960), Look, the Sky (1962), Welcome Kostya! (1964), Adventures of a Dentist (1965), Sport, Sport, Sport (1970), And Still I Believe… (1974), Larissa (1980), Agony (1981), Farewell to Matyora (1983), and the war drama Come and See (1985). New York Times, Nov. 1, 2003, A12; Variety, Nov. 10, 2003, 60.

Kneebone, Tom

Russian film director Elem Klimov died in Moscow hospital on October 26, 2003. He was 70. Klimov was born in Stalingrad (now Volgograd), Russia, on July 9, 1933. He began his career in the late 1950s directing satirical films. He

Canadian comic actor Tom Kneebone died of a heart attack in a Toronto, Canada, hospital on November 15, 2003. He was 71. Born in New Zealand, Kneebone came to Canada in 1963. A popular cabaret performer, he also appeared on Broadway and with Ontario’s Stratford and Shaw festivals. He hosted the Canadian television series Vacation Time in 1962 and Fantastica in 1973, and was Bennett in the drama series Counterstrike in 1990. Kneebone was also seen in the films The Luck of Ginger Coffey (1964) and A Judgment in Stone (1986), and the 1990 tele-film Back to the Beanstalk. Kneebone’s other television credits include episodes of the series The Forest Rangers, King of Kensington, Adderly, Diamonds, and Be-

Elem Klimov

Tom Kneebone (right, with Lt. Gov. James Bartleman of Ontario)

Klimov, Elem

229 yond Reality. He served as artistic director for the Smile Theatre Company in Canada, writing and directing numerous productions.

Knepper, Jimmy Jazz trombonist Jimmy Knepper died of complications of Parkinson’s disease in Triadelphia, West Virginia, on June 14, 2003. He was 75. Knepper was born in Los Angeles on November 22, 1927. He began performing at an early age and played in big bands led by Charlie Barnet, Woody Herman, and others. He was best known for his association with Charlie Mingus from 1957 to 1962, participating in Mingus’ albums The Clown, Tijuana Moods and Mingus Ah Um. In the 1960s Knepper also performed with Herbie Mann and toured with Benny Goodman’s ensemble. He was a member of the Thad Jones–Mel Lewis Jazz Orchestra from 1968 to 1974. Knepper continued to perform and tour through the 1990s. New York Times, June 16, 2003, A17.

Jimmy Knepper

2003 • Obituaries

Ko, Sau Leung “Blacky” Taiwanese stuntman and actor Sau Leung “Blacky” Ko was found dead at a friend’s apartment in Shanghai, China, on December 8, 2003. While initial reports indicated that he died of injuries from an automobile accident, it was later reported that the cause of death was likely due to alcohol poisoning. He was 50. Ko had jumped the Great Wall of China on a motorcycle in 1992, and had also leaped across China’s Yellow River several years later. He was an actor and stuntman in numerous films from the early 1970s, originally billed as Yuen Lung. His numerous film credits include One Armed Boxer (1971), Mighty One (1971), Secret Rivals, Part II (1977), Shaolin Ex Monk (1978), Master Killers (1978), Deadly Silver Spear (1978), Mission Kiss and Kill (1979), Shaolin Invincibles (1979), Boxer’s Adventures (1979), Return of the Tiger (1979), Mission Over the Eagle Castle (1981), Red Phoenix (1981), Pink Force Commando (1982), Black and White (1983), Wheels on Meals (1984), Legend of Wisely (1985), Heart of the Dragon (1985), Shyly Joke (1986), My Family (1986), Rosa (1986), In the Line of Duty (1986), The Final Test (1987), Hero of Tomorrow (1988), Burning Sensation (1989), Code of Fortune (1989), Slake’s Limbo (1989), Curry and Pepper (1990), It Takes Two to Mingle (1990), Alan and Eric Between Hello and Goodbye (1991), God of Gamblers II (1991), Invincible (1992), Fight Back to School (1992), Rhythm of Destiny (1992), Seri-

Sau Leung “Blacky” Ko

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230

ous Crimes Squad (1993), Chez ’n Ham (1993), Don’t Give a Damn (1994), God of Gamblers Returns (1994), Asian Connection (1995), Thunderbolt (1995), Jet Li’s The Enforcer (1995), Mahjong Dragon (1996), Young and Dangerous II (1996), Best of the Best (1996), Full Alert (1997), Black Rose II (1997), The Legend of Speed (1999), Cop Abula (1999), Crying Heart (1999), Born to Be King (2000), Her Name Is Cat 2: Journey to Death (2000), For Bad Boys Only (2000), City of Desire (2001), Hero of City (2001), Gangs 2001 (2001), and Black Mask 2: City of Masks (2002). Ko also directed a handful of action films including Curry and Pepper (1990), Whampoa Blues (1990), Invincible (1992), The Days of Being Dumb (1992), Chez ’n Ham (1993), and Hero from Beyond the End of Time (1993).

Kobayashi, Chitosi Japanese television actress Chitose Kobayashi died of heart failure in Tokyo on November 26, 2003. She was 66. Kobayashi was born Chitose Yamamoto in Japan on February 13, 1937. She was featured in the 1965 martial arts film The Bloody Shuriken. She starred in many Japanese television dramas from the 1970s including Good News in 1999.

Komatsu, Hosei Japanese character actor Hosei Komatsu died in Tokyo on July 11, 2003. He was 78. Komatsu was born in Nagano, Japan, on November 4, 1924. He appeared in numerous films from the early 1960s, often in villainous roles. His film credits include The Sun’s Burial (1960), The Pleasures of the Flesh (1965), Beast Alley (1965), Life of a Tattooed Man (1965), Captive’s Island (1966), The Daylight Demon (1966), Silence Has No Wings (1966), The Private Police (1967), Hoodlum Soldier on the Attack (1967), The Hoodlum Priest (1967), Death by Hanging (1968), Three Resurrected Drunkards (1968), Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman and the Fugitives (1968), Deep Desire of Gods (1968), Double Suicide (1969), City of Beasts (1970), The Underground Syndicate (1970), Hot Springs Devil-Tongue Geisha (1970), Female Convict Scorpion Jailhouse 41 (1972), Razor 2: The Snare (1973), Blood (1984), Riot in Shimane Prison (1975), A Portrait of Shunkin (1976), Japanese Honor (1977), Nomugi Pass (1979), Distant Tomorrow (1979), Kosatsu (1979), Rapewoman: Dirty Sunday (1980), The Highest Honor (1982), All Right, My Friend (1983), Farewell to the Ark (1984), Shinran: Path to Purity (1987), Guys Who Never Learn II (1988), The Gangster’s Moll (1992), and Oishinbo (1996).

Konig, Hans H. German film director and writer Hans H. Konig died in Munich, Germany, on November 13, 2003. He was 91. Konig wrote and directed several films in the early 1950s including Rape on the Moor (1952) and The Little Town Will Go to Sleep (1954). He also directed the films Geliebtes Fraulein Doktor (1954), Heisse Ernte (1956), Frauen sin fur die Liebe Da (1957) and Jagerblut (1957).

Konrad, Dorothy

Chitosi Kobayashi

Veteran character actress Dorothy Konrad died in Los Angeles of complications from diabetes on December 29, 2003. She was 91. She was a familiar face on television from the early 1960s, appearing in episodes of such series as My Three Sons, Mister Ed, The Jack Benny Program, Law-

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Warren Kremer (self-portrait drawing Richie Rich)

Dorothy Konrad

man, Ben Casey, Gunsmoke, 77 Sunset Strip, The Lucy Show, Petticoat Junction, Kraft Suspense Theatre, Gidget, The Monkees, The Mod Squad, Bonanza, Love, America Style, Daniel Boone, Adam12, Emergency!, Rod Serling’s Night Gallery, The Love Boat, and The Jeffersons. She had the recurring role of Flora in the sit-com Mayberry R.F.D. in 1969 and appeared regularly as Mrs. Trilling in the comedy series The Last Resort in 1979. Konrad also appeared in a handful of films during her career including Sweet Bird of Youth (1962), Tickle Me (1965), The Ugly Dachshund (1966), The Reluctant Astronaut (1967), Blue (1968), Futureworld (1976), Dixie Dynamite (1976), the 1977 tele-film Benny and Barney: Las Vegas Undercover, and Racquet (1979).

Kremer also illustrated many of the Casper the Friendly Ghost comics, refining the look of the character to the version that is best known today. He retired from Harvey in the 1980s. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 13, 2003, B23; New York Times, Sept. 10, 2003, C15; People, Sept. 29, 2003, 76; Time, Sept. 22, 2003, 25.

Krstulovic, Zdravka Croatian actress Zdravka Krstulovic died in Varazdin, Croatia, of complications from Alzheimer’s disease on December 4, 2003. She was 63. Krstulovic was born in Split, Croatia, on September 30, 1940. She was best known in Yugo-

Kremer, Warren Cartoonist Warren Kremer died in Glen Ridge, New Jersey, on July 24, 2003. He was 82. Kremer was born in the Bronx, New York, in 1921. He began his career as a pulp magazine illustrator in the 1940s before joining Harvey Comics as a cartoonist later in the decade. Kremer originally worked on Harvey’s horror comics, illustrated Black Cat and Tomb of Terror. In the 1950s Kremer created the character of Richie Rich, the “poor little rich kid.” He also created Stumbo the Giant and the little devil, Hot Stuff.

Zdravka Krstulovic

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232

slavia as the star of the popular television series Nase Malo Misto in 1970 and Velo Misto in 1981. A film and stage actress from the 1960s, she was seen in the films Inspektor (1965), Kako sue se Voleli Romeo i Julija (1966), Operation Belgrade (1968), Brat Doktora Homera (1968), God Died in Vain (1969), Servantes iz Malog Mista (1982), and Zadarski Memento (1984).

Krueger, Lorraine

Kruger, Pit German actor Pit Kruger died of heart failure in Frankfurt, Germany, on November 6, 2003. He was 68. A popular cabaret and television performer, Kruger starred in the Fernfahrer German television series from 1963 to 1967. He appeared in a handful of films during his career including Rudi, Benimm Dich (1972), Der Mann in Pyjama (1981), The Wild Fifties (1983), and Younger and Younger (1993).

Actress Lorraine Krueger died of cancer in Westlake Village, California, on July 15, 2003. She was 85. An actress and dance in Hollywood from the late 1930s, Krueger was seen in such films as New Faces of 1937 (1937), Everybody’s Doing It (1938), Exposed (1938), I’m from the City (1938), Idiot’s Delight (1939), All Women Have Secrets (1939), Golden Gloves (1939), The Farmer’s Daughter (1940), Dance, Girl, Dance (1940), Model Wife (1941), Unholy Partners (1941), Hi Buddy (1943), He’s My Guy (1943), Sarong Girl (1943), Adventures of a Rookie (1943), Henry Aldrich’s Little Secret (1944), Slightly Terrific (1944), Out of This World (1945), and One Exciting Week (1946).

Pit Kruger

Krzyzewska, Ewa

Lorraine Krueger

Polish actress Ewa Krzyzewska died of injuries she received in an automobile accident in Spain on July 30, 2003. She was 64. Krzyzewska was born in Krakow, Poland, on February 7, 1939. A leading actress from the late 1950s, she was seen in the films Ashes and Diamonds (1961), Atomic War Bride (1960), Susanne and the Boys (1961), All Soul’s Day (1962), The Criminal and the Lady (1963), I Count on Your Sins (1964), Christmas Eve (1966), A Cure for Love (1966), The Descent to

233

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2003. He was 72. Kumar was the brother of actor Uttam Kumar. He appeared in over 500 films following his debut in 1954’s Hrod. His many films include Personal Assistant (1959), Raja-Saja (1960), Illusory Deer (1960), Dada Thakur (1962), Jaya (1965), Antony Firingee (1967), Kamallata (1969), Disguised (1971), Har Mana Har (1972), and Sanyasi Raja (1975).

Kupcinet, Irv

Ewa Krzyzewska

Hell (1966), A Frame of Mind (1966), Hell and Heaven (1966), Faust XX (1966), Pharaoh (1966), Return to Earth (1967), The Woodpecker (1970), Operation Brutus (1971), How Far, How Near (1972), and Jealousy and Medicine (1973). She subsequently retired from acting and left Poland. She worked at the United Nations in New York, heading the radio library.

Newspaper celebrity gossip columnist and television personality Irv Kupcinet died of complications from pneumonia in a Chicago hospital on November 10, 2003. He was 91. Kupcinet was born in North Lawndale, Illinois, on July 31, 1912. He began working as a sports writer in 1935, and started writing Kup’s Column for The Chicago Daily Times in January of 1943. The newspaper became The Chicago Sun-Times in 1948. For over 60 years he chronicled the comings and goings of celebrities, particularly when they ventured to the Chicago area. He also hosted a weekly television program in Chicago, At Random. His syndicated television program ran from 1959 to 1986. He also appeared in cameo roles in several films produced by Otto Preminger including Anatomy of

Kumar, Tarun Indian film star Tarun Kumar died of a heart ailment in Calcutta, India, on October 27,

Tarun Kumar

Irv Kupcinet

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234

a Murder (1959) and Advise and Consent (1962). His daughter, Karen, an aspiring actress, was killed in Hollywood in 1963 in a case that has never been solved. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 11, 2003, B10; New York Times, Nov. 11, 2003, B9; Time, Nov. 24, 2003, 23; Variety, Nov. 17, 2003, 58.

Kupferman, Meyer Composer Meyer Kupferman died of heart failure near Rhinebeck, New York, on December 3, 2003. He was 77. Kupferman was born in New York City on July 2, 1926. He studied the violin and the clarinet as a child and began performing in jazz clubs in his teens. He soon began composing and had completed his first piano concerto and opera by 1948. During his career he composed seven operas, nine ballets, and hundreds of other musical pieces. Kupferman was also involved in composing film scores in the 1960s for such features as Blast of Silence (1961), Hallelujah the Hills (163), Black Like Me (1964), Goldstein (1965), The Double-Barrelled Detective Story (1965), Fearless Frank (1967), and Truman Capote’s Trilog y (1969). Los Angeles Times, Dec. 7, 2003, B25; New York Times, Dec. 3, 2003, C17.

Meyer Kupferman

Kuter, Kay E. Veteran character actor Kay E. Kuter died of pulmonary complications in Burbank, California, on November 12, 2003. He was 78. Kuter

Kay E. Kuter

was born in Los Angeles, California, on April 25, 1925. A working actor from the early 1950s, Kuter was seen in such films as Sabrina (1954), Desiree (1954), City of Shadows (1955), Guys and Dolls (1955), The Steel Jungle (1956), The Mole People (1956), Under Fire (1957), The Big Night (1960), A Time for Killing (1967), Watermelon Man (1970), An Enemy of the People (1970), The Last Starfighter (1984), Zombie High (1987), Frankenstein General Hospital (1988), Warlock (1989), Gross Anatomy (1989), The Seventh Coin (1992), and The Hollywood Sign (2001). He was also seen in the tele-film Goddess of Love (1988) and was a voice actor for video games and such animated features as Annabelle’s Wish (1997) as Santa Claus and The Little Mermaid II: Return to the Sea (2000). Kuter had the recurring role of Newt Kiley in the television comedy series Petticoat Junction and Green Acres from the mid–1960s through 1970. He was also seen in episodes of Medic, The Great Gildersleeve, Stories of the Century, Meet McGraw, Navy Log, The Adventures of Jim Bowie, The Jack Benny Show, Frontier Doctor, Zorro, Tales of Wells Fargo, Bonanza, Riverboat, Perry Mason, Overland Trail, Coronado 9, The Rifleman, Two Faces West, The Tall Man, The Roaring 20’s, Maverick, Redigo, Mister Ed, The Rogues, The Outer Limits, Wild Wild West, Laredo, The Virginian, Cowboy in Africa, The Doris Day Show, I Dream of Jeannie, The Name of the Game, Mayberry R.F.D., Gunsmoke, Kung Fu, Cannon, Far Out Space Nuts, Harry O, Quincy, Dallas, V,

235 1985’s The Twilight Zone, Baywatch, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Beauty and the Beast, Matlock, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Seinfeld, The X Files, Frasier, Boy Meets World, Baywatch Nights, Sabrina, the Teenage Witch, Brimstone, The Pretender, and ER. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 18, 2003, B11.

LaBeija, Pepper Female impersonator Pepper LaBeija, the queen of Harlem’s drag balls, died of a heart attack and complications from diabetes in a Manhattan hospital on May 14, 2003. He was 53. Born Herman Williams in 1950, he joined the House of LaBeija, a group of Harlem female impersonators, in 1970 and became leader of the house in 1972. Pepper LaBeija and the balls were immortalized in the 1991 documentary film Paris Is Burning. Los Angeles Times, May 29, 2003, B15; New York Times, May 26, 2003, A17.

Pepper LaBeija

2003 • Obituaries

Ladynina, Marina Russian actress Marina Ladynina died in Moscow on March 8, 2003. She was 94. Ladynina was born in Tyombino, Siberia, Russia, on June 24, 1908. She began her career on stage with the Moscow Art Theatre, and made her film debut in the 1935 drama Dangerous Paths. She was best known as a star of musical comedies, many of which were directed by her husband, Ivan Pyriev. Her films include The Country Bride (1938), Tractor-Drivers (1939), The Beloved (1940), They Met in Moscow (1941), We Will Come Back (1943), Six P.M. (1946), The Ballad of Siberia (1947), Cossacks of the Kuban (1949), and Devotion (1954). A favorite star of Russian leader Joseph Stalin, her film career largely ended with Stalin’s death in the early 1950s. She continued to perform on the stage. Her husband died in February of 1968. Ladynina’s work was first seen widely in the United States in the 1997 documentary about Russian musical films, East Side Story. Ladynina was proclaimed a “living legend of the Russian cinema” at the Moscow International Film Festival in 2001. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 12, 2003, B10.

Marina Ladynina

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236

Laffan, Kevin British writer Kevin Laffan died of complications from pneumonia following heart surgery in London on March 11, 2003. He was 80. Laffan was born in Reading, Berkshire, England, on May 24, 1922. He was best known as the creator of the popular British soap opera Emmerdale in 1972. He continued to write for the series until 1985. He also wrote for the British television series Bud (1963), Man in a Suitcase (1967), Castle Haven (1969), Kate, Beryl’s Lot (1973), Justice (1973), I Thought You’d Gone (1984), and The Inspector Alleyn Mysteries (1992). He scripted the 1968 tele-play The Best Pair of Legs in the Business, which was adapted for a feature film in 1972. His play It’s a 2'6" Above the Ground World was filmed as The Love Ban in 1973. Variety, Apr. 21, 2003, 55.

Lamb was born in Provo, Utah, on February 27, 1917. She was married to powerful Nevada political leader and state senator Floyd Lamb from the late 1930s until their divorce in 1967. Eleanor Lamb subsequently teamed with screenwriter Douglas Day Stewart to script the popular family films Where the Red Fern Grows (1974), Seven Alone (1975), and Against a Crooked Sky (1975).

Eleanor Lamb

Lambert, Henri

Kevin Laffan

Lamb, Eleanor Screenwriter Eleanor Lamb died in Las Vegas, Nevada, on April 3, 2003. She was 86.

French actor Henri Lambert died in Clamart, Hauts de Seine, France, on April 3, 2003. He was 75. Lambert was born in Paris on December 5, 1927. He appeared in numerous films from the early 1960s including The Crossing of the Rhine (1960), Women Are Like That (1960), Skin and Bones (1961), The Mysteries of Paris (1962), Vice and Virtue (1962), Two Are Guilty (1963), Maigret Sees Red (1963), Jeff Gordon, Secret Agent (1963), Greed in the Sun (1964), You’re Taking a Risk, Mr. Coplan (1964), The Gorillas (1964), The Majordomo (1965), Mission to Caracas (1965), The Man from Mykonos (1965), Circus Angel (1965), The Man Who Was Worth Millions (1967), La Grande Sauterelle (1967), Clodo (1970), The Five

237 Crazy Boys (1971), The Pariah (1972), The Killers (1973), The Conspiracy (1973), The French Detective (1975), Stop Calling Me Baby! (1977), Rape (1978), Convoy of Girls (1978), Inspector Blunder (1980), Code Name: Emerald (1985), Maniac Killer (1987), Dark Mission: Evil Flowers (1988), Autubus (1990), and Maigret: The Candle Auction (1995).

Lanchbery, John Composer and conductor John Lanchbery died of cancer in Melbourne, Australia, on February 26, 2003. Lanchbery was born in London on May 15, 1923. He studied at the Royal Academy of Music and began composing for films in the early 1950s. His credits include No Trace (1950), Blackout (1950), Colonel March of Scotland Yard (1952), Double Exposure (1954), and Delayed Action (1954). Lanchbery was best known for his role as principal conductor of the Royal Ballet from 1960 to 1972, often working with choreographer Frederick Ashton. He and Ashton

John Lanchbery

2003 • Obituaries

worked together on the 1971 film Tales of Beatrix Potter. He also composed or adapted scores for the films Don Quixote (1973), The Turning Point (1977), Nijinsky (1980), and Agatha Christie’s Evil Under the Sun (1982). Lanchbery was also music director for the American Ballet Theater from 1978 to 1980. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 4, 2003, B12; New York Times, Feb. 28, 2003, B10; Variety, Apr. 21, 2003, 55.

Landen, Dinsdale British character actor Dinsdale Landen died in England on December 29, 2003. He was 71. Landen was born in Margate, Kent, England, on September 4, 1932. Known for his comic roles, he began his career on stage in a 1946 production of Housemaster. Landen made his West End debut in the thriller A Dead Secret in 1957. He remained a popular performer on stage and soon began appearing in roles in such films as The League of Gentlemen (1959), The Valiant (1962), We Joined the Navy (1962), Playback (1963), They All Died Laughing (1964), Rasputin, the Mad Monk (1966), Mosquito Squadron (1969), Every Home Should

Dinsdale Landen

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238

Have One (1970), Young Winston (1972), Digby, the Biggest Dog in the World (1973), International Velvet (1978), Morons from Outer Space (1985), and The Steal (1994). He starred in the 1967 British television series Mickey Dunne and was Arthur P. Devenish in Devenish in 1977. He also appeared in television productions of Days to Come (1966), Jamie, on a Flying Visit (1968), A Child and a Half (1969), Bermondsey (1972), An Echo of Theresa (1973), The Next Scream You Hear (1974), The Fight Against Slavery (1975), Plaintiffs and Defendants (1975), Two Sundays (1975), The Glittering Prizes (1976), Fathers and Families (1977), C2 H5 OH (1980), Freud (1984), Absent Friends (1985), On the Razzle (1986), What the Butler Saw (1987), Some Other Spring (1991), The Buccaneers (1995), and The Wingless Bird (1997). Landen’s other television credits include episodes of Out of This World, The Man in Room 17, The Avengers, Fraud Squad, The Guardians, Jason King, Great Mysteries, The Protectors, Doctor Who, All Creatures Great and Small, and Lovejoy. Landen was married to actress Jennifer Daniel from 1959 until his death.

2003. She was 30. She was born Veronica Browning on August 22, 1972. She began working in adult films in the late 1990s and appeared in approximately 30 features including High Fly (1998), The World’s Luckiest Patient (1999), Fountain of Youth (1999), Extreme Teen 2 (1999), California Calendar Girls 2 (1999), 75 Nurse Org y (1999), and Busty Pom Pom Girls (2000).

Landry, Clarence Tap dancer Clarence “Frenchie” Landry died in Santa Monica, California, on November 14, 2003. He was 89. Landry was a member of the High Hatters tap dancing team with Vernon Bradley and Eudell Johnson. They performed with Count Basie and Duke Ellington bands and were featured in the 1942 film Ride ’Em Cowboy with Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. Landry also danced in the films I’ll See You in My Dreams (1951) and Virgin Sacrifice (1959), and appeared on television in episodes of Mannix and Here’s Lucy.

Landers, Holly

Lange, Hope

Adult film actress Holly Landers was killed in an automobile accident while celebrating New Years’ Eve in San Jose, Costa Rica, on January 1,

Actress Hope Lange died of intestinal infection due to ischemic colitis in a Santa Monica,

Holly Landers

Hope Lange

239 California, hospital on December 19, 2003. She was 72. Lange was born in Redding Ridge, Connecticut, on November 28, 1931. Raised in New York City, she made her debut on stage at the age of 12 in a 1943 production of The Patriots. She continued her education before resuming her acting career in 1950, appearing in commercials and small roles in such series as The Jackie Gleason Show and the quiz show Back That Fact. She made her film debut in 1956’s Bus Stop with Marilyn Monroe. Lange earned an Oscar nomination for her role as Selena Cross in the 1957 drama Peyton Place. She continued to appear in such films as The True Story of Jesse James (1957), The Young Lions (1958) with Marlon Brando, In Love and War (1958), The Best of Everything (1959), Wild in the Country (1961) with Elvis Presley, Pocketful of Miracles (1961), Love Is a Ball (1963), and Jigsaw (1968). She was also seen on television in episodes of Kraft Television Theatre, Playhouse 90, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, and The Fugitive. Lange starred as Carolyn Muir in the supernatural comedy television series The Ghost and Mrs. Muir from 1968 to 1970, earning two Emmy Awards for her performance. She also starred as Jenny Preston in the sit-com The New Dick Van Dyke Show from 1971 to 1974. She was also seen in the tele-films Crowhaven Farm (1970), That Certain Summer (1972), The 500 Pound Jerk (1973), I Love You, Goodbye (1974), Fer-de-Lance (1974), The Secret Night Caller (1975), The Love Boat II (1977), Like Normal People (1979), The Day Christ Died (1980), Pleasure Palace (1980), the 1980 mini-series Beulah Land, Finder of Lost Loves (1984), Private Sessions (1985), Ford: The Man and the Machine (1987), Dead Before Dawn (1993), Cooperstown (1993), Message from Nam (1993), and Before He Wakes (1998). She also guest starred in episodes of Medical Story, Police Story, The Love Boat, Matt Houston, Fantasy Island, Hotel, Murder, She Wrote, and Trying Times, and starred as Gloria in the short-lived comedy series Knight & Daye in 1989. Lange appeared as Joanna Kersey, Charles Bronson’s illfated wife, in the 1974 vigilante thriller Death Wish. Later film credits include The Prodigal (1983), I Am the Cheese (1983), A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2: Freddy’s Revenge (1985), David Lynch’s Blue Velvet (1986), Tune in Tomorrow (1990), Tom Clancy’s Clear and Present Danger (1994), and Just Cause (1995). Lange was married to actor Don Murray from 1956 to 1961 and to di-

2003 • Obituaries

rector Alan J. Pakula from 1963 to 1971. She was married to Charles Hollerith, Jr., from 1986 until her death. Survivors include her son, actor Christopher Murray, and daughter, Patricia Murray. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 22, 2003, B9; New York Times, Dec. 22, 2003, B7; People, Jan. 12, 2004, 117; Time, Jan. 12, 2004, 23; Variety, Jan. 12, 2004, 61.

Langton, Basil British character actor Basil Langton died in Santa Monica, California, on May 29, 2003. He was 91. Langton was born in Bristol, England, on January 9, 1912. He began his career on stage in the 1930s and appeared in a handful of British films during the decade including The Shadow of Mike Emerald (1936), One Good Turn (1936), The Belles of St. Clements (1936), Mr. Smith Carries On (1937), The Minstrel Boy (1937), Merry Comes to Town (1937), Father Steps Out (1937), The Elder Brother (1937), Double Exposure (1937), and Almost a Gentleman (1938). He moved to the United States after World War II where he continued his career on the Broadway stage in such productions as The Affair and Camelot. He also appeared often in television, guest starring in such series as Highway to Heaven, Murphy Brown,

Basil Langton

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Wings, and The Naked Truth. Langton was also seen as the elderly banjo playing alien in the pilot episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation. Los Angeles Times, June 5, 2003, B13; New York Times, June 4, 2003, C13.

LaRusso, Louis Playwright Louis LaRusso, II, died of bladder cancer in Jersey City, New Jersey, on February 22, 2003. He was 67. LaRusso was born in Hoboken, New Jersey, on October 13, 1935. He wrote numerous plays about life in Hoboken including his first, Beginnings. LaRusso’s 1976 play Lamppost Reunion, was nominated for a Tony Award. His plays Wheelbarrow Closers (1976) and Kockout (1979) were also produced on Broadway. LaRusso helped rewrite the script for the 1977 hit film Saturday Night Fever. He also scripted the films Beyond the Reef (1983), Hell Hunters (1986), and The Closer (1990), which was adapted from his play. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 28, 2003, B14; New York Times, Feb. 25, 2003, A27; Variety, Mar. 3, 2003, 79.

Louis LaRusso

Lassick, Sydney Heavy-set character actor Sydney Lassick, who was best known for his role as the asylum inmate Charlie Cheswick in the 1975 film One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, died of complications from diabetes in Los Angeles on April 12, 2003. He was 80. Lassick was born in Chicago, Illinois, on July 23, 1922. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II before pursuing an acting career. Lassick was featured in such films as The Bonnie Parker Story (1958), Al Capone (1959), Paratroop Command (1959), Sinderella and the Golden Bra (1964), Carrie (1976), The Happy Hooker Goes to Washington (1977), The Billion Dollar Hobo (1978), China 7, Liberty 37 (1978), Hot Stuff (1979), Skatetown, U.S.A. (1979), 1941 (1979), Alligator, History of the World: Part 1 (1981), The Unseen (1981), Pandemonium (1982), Fast-Walking (1982), Silent Madness (1984), Night Patrol (1984), Stitches (1985), Ratboy (1986), Body Slam (1987), Lady in White (1988), The Further Adventures of Tennessee Buck (1988), Curse II: The Bite (1988), Committed (1988), Tale of Two Sisters (1989), Out on Bail (1989), Judgment (1989), Pacific Palisades (1990), Sonny Boy (1990), Don’t Tell Mom the Babysitter’s Dead (1991), Cool as Ice (1991), The Art of Dying (1991), Shakes the Clown (1992), Deep Cover (1992), Smoothtalker (1992), Miracle Beach (1992), Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit (1993), Future Shock (1993), Eye of the

Sydney Lassick

241 Stranger (1994), Freeway (1996), Johns (1996), Squanderers (1996), An American Vampire Story (1997), Man on the Moon (1999), Vice (2000), and House of Pain (2003). Lassick was also seen often on television, appeared in the tele-films Bunco (1977), Greatest Heroes of the Bible (1978), The Cracker Factory (1979), Father Damien: The Leper Priest (1980), Murder One, Dancer 0 (1983), Attack of the 5 Ft. 2 Women (1994), and Something to Sing About (2000). His other television credits include episodes of Serpico, The Man from Atlantis, Eight Is Enough, Baretta, Tabitha, Kaz, Barney Miller, Archie Bunker’s Place, Gloria, Matt Houston, Night Court, Amazing Stories, Moonlighting, On the Air, Dream On, and The X Files. Variety, Apr. 28, 2003, 80.

Lasswell, Tom Actor Tom Lasswell died of a heart attack in Chicago, Illinois, while attending a play opening on June 6, 2003. He was 71. Lasswell was a leading stage performer in Portland, Oregon. He also appeared in a handful of films including Don’t

2003 • Obituaries

Answer the Phone! (1980), the 1980 tele-film The Kids Who Knew Too Much, Breaking In (1989), Free Willy (1993), and Birddog (1999).

Lawrence, Don British science-fiction artist Don Lawrence died of emphysema in a hospital in Jevington, West Sussex, England, on December 29, 2003. He was 75. Lawrence was born in London on November 17, 1928. He began working as a comic artist in the mid–1950s, drawing such books as Marvelman, Marvelman Family, Wyatt Earp, Davy Crockett, and Wells Fargo. He began drawing The Rise and Fall of the Trigan Empire in Ranger comics in 1965, and also drew for Eagle weekly. He also drew the comic based on the television puppet series Fireball XL-5. In 1977 Lawrence and Martin Lodewijk created the comic Storm for the Dutch publishing house Oberon. He continued to draw the comic for over 20 years.

Don Lawrence

Tom Lasswell

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242

Leal, Alfredo Mexican matador and actor Alfredo Leal died of heart failure in Cuidad de Mexico on October 2, 2003. He was 73. Leal was born in Ciudad de Mexico on May 18, 1930. A professional matador from the late 1940s, Leal served as a bullfighting coach on the set of the 1957 film The Sun Also Rises. He appeared in several Mexican films from the 1960s including Time to Die (1966), Acapulco 12-22 (1975), Traficantes de Cocaina (1987), and Cuentas Claras (1999). He was also a familiar face on Mexican television, starring in several series including El Maleficio (1983), La Indomable (1987), and Extranos Caminos del Amor (1989).

Pat Leavy

(1989) and Hedda Gabler (1993), and the television series The Riordans and Paths to Freedom. She starred as Hannah Finnegan in Fair City from 1990.

Lebeshev, Pavel Leading Russian cinematographer Pavel Lebeshev died of heart disease in Moscow on February 23, 2003. He was 63. Lebeshev as born in

Alfredo Leal

Leavy, Pat Irish film television actress Pat Leavy died in Dublin, Ireland, on the set of the television series Fair City on April 2, 2003. She was 66. Leavy was featured in the films The Ballroom of Romance (1982), Anne Devlin (1984), Fools of Fortune (1990), One More Woman (1990), The Commitments (1991), Horse (1993), Moll Flanders (1996), The Butcher Boy (1997), The General (1998), and This Is My Father (1998). She also appeared in television productions of Dick Francis: Twice Shy

Pavel Lebeshev (portrait by Sergei Chepik)

243 Moscow on February 15, 1940, the son of cinematographer Timofei Lebeshev. Pavel Lebeshev made his debut as a director of photography in films in the late 1960s, filming such features Beginning of an Unknown Era (1967), Byelorussia Station (1970), Home Among Strangers (1974), Ascent (1976), Slave of Love (1976), An Unfinished Piece for a Player Piano (1977), The Centaurs (1978), Five Evenings (1979), A Few Days from the Life of I.I. Oblomov (1979), The Lifeguard (1980), Family Relations (1981), Direct Heiress (1982), Without Witness (1983), The Chosen Ones (1983), Rest Time from Saturday Until Monday (1984), Acca (1988), Forbidden Zone (1988), Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk District (1989), Hard to Be a God (1990), Sons of Bitches (1990), Adam’s Rib (1990), Pretty Face (1990), Great Idea (1991), Nastja (1993), Over the Dark Water (1993), Sin: A Story of Passion (1993), Anna: From Six Till Eighteen (1993), The First Love (1995), Prisoner of the Mountains (1996), Hello, Fools! (1996), The Barber of Siberia (1998), Mama (1999), Cheque (2000), and As Far as My Feet Will Carry Me (2001).

Lee, Joanna Actress and screenwriter Joanna Lee, who starred as an alien in Ed Wood’s 1956 cult classic Plan 9 from Outer Space, died of bone cancer in Santa Monica, California, on October 24, 2003. She was 72. Lee began her career as an actress, starring as the alien Tanna in Wood’s Plan 9 from Outer Space, and appearing as Alice Summers in 1959’s The Brain Eaters. She was also seen in episodes of On Trial, The 20th Century–Fox Hour, Leave It to Beaver, Death Valley Days and The Donna Reed Show on television. A serious automobile accident sidetracked her acting career, and she began writing for television in the early 1960s. She scripted episodes of such series as The Flintstones, The Farmer’s Daughter, Petticoat Junction, Gilligan’s Island, Julia, The Governor & J.J., Nanny and the Professor, and The Waltons. She wrote and produced the 1975 tele-film Babe about legendary athlete Babe Didrikson Zaharias. She directed the 1979 tele-film Mirror, Mirror. She also scripted numerous after-school specials and tele-films including, often producing and directing. Her credits include I Want to Keep My Baby (1976), Mulligan’s Stew (1977), Mary Jane Harper Cried

2003 • Obituaries

Joanna Lee

Last Night (1977), Tell Me My Name (1977), Ziegfeld: The Man and His Women (1978), Like Normal People (1979), The Love Tapes (1980), Children of Divorce (1980), The Kid Who Wouldn’t Quit: The Brad Silverman Story (1987), and My Dad Can’t Be Crazy, Can He? (1989). Her autobiography, A Difficult Woman in Hollywood, was published in 1999. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 8, 2003, B25; Variety, Nov. 10, 2003, 60.

Lesco, Lisa Romanian actress and singer Lisa Lesco died in Los Angeles on December 26, 2003. She was 88. Lesco was born in Bucharest, Romania, in February of 1915. She began her career on stage in the late 1930s and made her film debut in 1940’s The Heart of a Queen. She also appeared in the films Herzkonig (1947) and Spy for Germany (1956). She subsequently moved to the United States, where she remained active in theater.

Lester, Terry Terry Lester, who starred as roguish businessman Jack Abbott on the daytime soap opera The Young and the Restless from 1980 until 1989, died on November 28, 2003. He was 53. Lester was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, on April 13, 1950. In films from the early 1970s, he had small roles in Airport (1970) and Airport 1975 (1974). He starred as Jonah in the 1976 children’s televi-

Obituaries • 2003

244 sion series Ark II, and was featured in the telefilms Barbary Coast (1975), KISS Meets the Phantom of the Park (1978), Once Upon a Spy (1980), Blade in Hong Kong (1985), and In Self Defense (1987). After leaving The Young and the Restless, Lester starred as Mason Capwell on Santa Barbara from 1989 to 1990, and was Royce Keller on As the World Turns from 1993 to 1994. His other television credits include episodes of Flying High, Eight Is Enough, Dallas, Hotel, Star Trek: Voyager, JAG, Diagnosis Murder, and Walker, Texas Ranger. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 22, 2004, B15.

LeSueur, Larry

Lisa Lesco

Radio war correspondent Larry LeSueur died of Parkinson’s disease in Washington, D.C., on February 5, 2003. He was 93. LeSueur was known for his work with Edward R. Murrow covering World War II for CBS radio, including the D-Day invasion and the Allied liberation of Paris. He wrote of his experiences covering the Russian front during the war in the book Twelve Months That Changed the World. LeSueur received two Peabody Awards in 1949 and 1950 for his coverage of the first years of the United Nations.

Terry Lester Larry LeSueur

245 Los Angeles Times, Feb. 7, 2003, B12; New York Times, Feb. 7, 2003, B11; Time, Feb. 17, 2003, 22.

Letuli, Freddie Chief Letuli Oli Misilagi of American Samoa, a pioneer in the art of Samoan fire knife dancing, died of respiratory problems in a Honolulu, Hawaii, hospital on July 22, 2003. He was 84. Letuli was born in American Samoa on April 30, 1919. He began dancing while in his teens after purchasing tap dance shoes and an instruction booklet by Fred Astaire from a Sears catalog, prompting his friends to call him Freddie. He was instrumental in organizing the first World Fire Knife Competition in American Samoa under the auspices of the Flaming Sword of Samoa Association. He exhibited his skills in several films in the 1950s including One Way Street (1950), Holiday Rhythm (1950), Salome (1953), Miss Sadie Thompson (1953), and Around the World in Eighty Days (1956). He also appeared on

Freddie Letuli

2003 • Obituaries

television in an episodes of Circus Boy. Letuli became a senator from the village of Leone in 1977, and an associate judge on the American Samoan High Court in 1983. He was bestowed the title of a Paramount Chief in 2001.

Levy, Jules Films and television producer Jules Levy died in Los Angeles on May 24, 2003. He was 80. Levy was born in Los Angeles on February 12, 1923. He began producing films in the early 1940s including The Boys from Syracuse (1940), Tight Shoes (1941), Hellzapoppin (1941), Butch Minds the Baby (1942), Pardon My Sarong (1942), and The Hairy Ape (1944). During World War II Levy served in the Army Air Force with the production unit at Hal Roach Studios. After the war he continued to produce such films as Abilene Town (1946) and New Orleans (1947). With Arthur Gardner and Arnold Laven, Levy formed LevyGardner-Lavin in 1951 to produce films and television series. He produced such films as Without Warning (1952), Vice Squad (1953), Down Three Dark Streets (1954), The Monster That Challenged the World (1957), The Vampire (1957), The Re-

Jules Levy

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246

turn of Dracula (1958), The Flame Barrier (1958), Geronimo (1962), The Glory Guys (1965), Clambake (1967) with Elvis Presley, The Scalphunters (1968), Sam Whiskey (1969), Underground (1970), The McKenzie Break (1970), The Hunting Party (1971), The Honkers (1972), Kansas City Bomber (1972), White Lightning (1973), McQ (1974) with John Wayne, Brannigan (1975), and Gator. Levy also produced such popular television series as The Rifleman starring Chuck Connors, Law of the Plainsman, The Detectives starring Robert Taylor, and The Big Valley. Los Angeles Times, May 28, 2003, B11.

Lewgoy, Jose Brazilian actor Jose Lewgoy died of a pulmonary infection in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on February 10, 2003. He was 82. Lewgoy was born in Veranopolis, Brazil, on November 16, 1920. He was a leading actor in Brazilian films from the 1940s, appearing in over 100 features. His film credits include Quando a Noite Acaba (1950), S.O.S. Noronha (1957), A Bomb for a Dictator (1957), Ring Around the World (1966), A Rose for

Jose Lewgoy

Everyone (1967), Anguished Land (1967), Tarzan and the Jungle Boy (1968), Black Palm Trees (1968), The Girl Watchers (1969), Mortal Sin (1970), Intimidade (1975), The Mucker (1978), Tabu (1982), Fitzcarraldo (1982), Blame It on Rio (1984), Kiss of the Spider Woman (1983) as the Warden, The Scarlet Scorpion (1986), The Lady from the Shanghai Cinema (1987), Cobra Verde (1988), Moon Over Parador (1988), Scent of Gardenias (1993), A Thousand and One (1994), The Monk and the Hangman’s Daughter (1995), The Jew (1995), and The Patriot (1998).

Lichtenfield, Louis Special effects artist Louis Lichtenfield died of cancer at his Los Angeles home on September 12, 2003. He was 84. Lichtenfield served in the U.S. Air Force as an aerial photographer before entering films in the 1950s. He worked on the films The Silver Chalice (1954), Helen of Troy (1956), The Spirit of St. Louis (1957) which earned him an Academy Award nomination, and No Time for Sergeants (1958). He later worked as a matte artist on the 1976 remake of King Kong and 1980’s Flash Gordon. He also served as an executive with Universal Studios and was a production manager at Florida’s Epcot Center. Variety, Oct. 13, 2003, 42.

Louis Lichtenfield

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2003 • Obituaries

Linetsky, Jaclyn Canadian actress Jaclyn Linetsky, who performed the English-speaking voice of the animated children’s television series character Caillou, was killed in an accident in Montreal, Canada, on September 8, 2003, when the minivan she was traveling in collided with a tractor trailer. She was 17. Linetsky performed in Caillou from 2000 until 2002. She currently performed in the animated series What’s with Andy? as the voice of Lori. Canadian teen actor Vadim Schneider, 17, was also killed in the accident. Linetsky and Schneider were co-starring in the French Canadian teen television drama series 15/Love. People, Sept. 29, 2003, 76.

Sidney Lippman

Alphabet Song”) in 1949. His novelty song “Chickery Chick,” was also a popular tune. Lippman wrote the music his collaborator, Syliva Dee, wrote the lyrics to “Too Young,” which was hit for Nat King Cole in 1951. New York Times, Mar. 14, 2003, C11.

Little Eva

Jaclyn Linetsky

Lippman, Sidney Songwriter Sidney Lippman, who wrote the hit song “Too Young,” died in a North Bergen, New Jersey, nursing home on March 11, 2003. He was 89. Lippman was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1913. He began writing songs in the 1940s, teaming with Buddy Kaye and Fred Wise on the popular hit “‘A’ You’re Adorable” (“The

Eva Narcissus Boyd, who was known as Little Eva when she recorded the hit song “The Loco-motion” in 1962, died in Kinston, North Carolina, on April 11, 2003. She was 59. Boyd was born in Belhaven, North Carolina, on June 29, 1943. Boyd was discovered by Carole King and Gerry Goffin when she recorded a demo of “The Loco-Motion” when she worked for them as a babysitter. Little Eva also recorded the hit tunes “Let’s Turkey Trot” and “Keep Your Hands Off My Baby.” Los Angeles Times, Apr. 12, 2003, B19; New York Times, Apr. 14, 2003, A21; People, Apr. 28, 2003, 93; Variety, Apr. 21, 2003, 55.

Obituaries • 2003

248

Little Eva

Llausas, Leonor Mexican actress Leonor Llausas died in Mexico City of complications from rheumatoid arthritis on February 13, 2003. She was 73. Llausas was born in Mexico on August 3, 1929. A leading actress from the early 1950s, she was seen in numerous films including El Vagabundo (1953), Una Mujer en la Calle (1955), The Criminal Life of Archibaldo de la Cruz (1955), Talpa (1956), La Tiejera de Oro (1960), A Song to Remember (1960), La Tigresa (1972), La Derrota (1973), Las Poquianchis (1976), The Bricklayers (1976), The Black Widow (1977), La Guera Rodriguez (1978), Guyana: Cult of the Damned (1980), Miserio (1980), The Madcap Who Performed Miracles (1980), Que Viva Tepito! (1980), Under Fire (1983), Poison for the Fairies (1984), Little Treasure (1985), Love Around the Corner (1985), La Pintada (1986), The Novice (1988), and De Muerte Natural (1996). She also appeared often on Mexican television from the 1970s, starring in numerous soap operas including Juano Iris (1985) and El Premio Mayor (1995).

Leonor Llausas

Lodge, David British character actor David Lodge died of cancer in London on October 18, 2003. He was 82. Lodge was born in Rochester, Kent, England, on August 19, 1921. He served in the Royal Air Force during World War II and performed comedy spots with the Ralph Reader Gang Shows during the war to entertain the troops. He continued to work as an entertainer after the war, performing often with Peter Sellers, Michael Bentine and Spike Milligan’s Goon Show. He made his film debut in 1955’s The Cockleshell Heroes. Lodge was featured in over 100 films during his career including Private’s Progress (1956), The Long Arm (1956), Women Without Men (1956), The Intimate Stranger (1956), These Dangerous Years (1957), Stranger’s Meeting (1957), The Naked Truth (1957), The Counterfeit Plan (1957), The Safecracker (1958), Tank Force (1958), The Silent Enemy (1958), Up the Creek (1958), I Was Monty’s Double (1958), I Only Arsked! (1958), Desert Attack (1958), Girls at Sea (1958), Further Up the

249

2003 • Obituaries

Magnificent Deadly Sins (1971), Beware My Brethren (aka The Fiend) (1971), Bloodsuckers (aka Incense for the Damned) (1972), Mutiny on the Buses (1972), Hide and Seek (1972), Go for the Take (1972), Charley One-Eye (1972), The Amazing Mr. Blunden (1972), Ghost in the Noonday Sun (1973), Carry on Girls (1973), Carry On Dick (1974), The Return of the Pink Panther (1975), Carry on Behind (1975), Carry on England (1976), Sahara (1983), and Edge of Sanity (1989). Lodge was a regular in the 1975 Carry on Laughing! television series and was Hector Dent in the 1979 comedy series Lovely Couple. He was also featured in the tele-films QB VII (1974) and Killer with Two Faces (1975). His other television credits include episodes of Ghost Squad, The Saint, Gideon’s Way, The Avengers, The Champions, My Partner, the Ghost, The Pathfinders, Father Brown, The Sweeney, Bless This House, Robin’s Nest, Target, Worzel Gummidge, Nanny, Minder, Hot Metal, and Lovejoy. David Lodge

Creek (1958), Idol on Parade (1959), The Ugly Duckling (1959), Yesterday’s Enemy (1959), Emergency —Ward 10 (1959), The League of Gentlemen (1959), I’m All Right Jack (1959), Bobbikins (1960), Never Let Go (1960), Jazz Boat (1960), Two Way Stretch (1960), Watch Your Stern (1960), The Hellfire Club (1960), The Bulldog Breed (1960), Roommates (1961), No My Darling Daughter (1961), Carry on Regardless (1961), Night Creatures (1962), The Pirates of Blood River (1962), Kill or Cure (1962), Trial and Error (1962), Time to Remember (1962), On the Beat (1962), Mrs. Gibbons’ Boys (1962), Go to Blazes (1962), Two Left Feet (1963), The Long Ships (1963), Saturday Night Out (1963), The Long Ships (1963), A Shot in the Dark (1964), Guns at Batasi (1964), The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders (1965), The Alphabet Murders (1965), The Intelligence Men (1965), The Early Bird (1965), San Ferry Ann (1966), After the Fox (1966), Press for Time (1966), Smashing Time (1967), Sky Bike (1967), Headline Hunters (1967), Corruption (1967), Only When I Larf (1968), The Fixer (1968), Oh! What a Lovely War (1969), The Magic Christian (1969), What’s Good for the Goose (1969), Scream and Scream Again (1969), Crooks and Coronets (1969), Sudden Terror (1970), The Railway Children (1970), Raising the Roof (1970), Hoffman (1970), Bachelor of Arts (1971), On the Buses (1971), Mr. Horatio Knibbles (1971), The

Loeb, Hal Film producer Harold “Hal” Loeb died of cancer in Los Angeles on May 24, 2003. He was 80. Loeb was born in Los Angeles on February 12, 1923. After service in the Army Air Force during World War II Loeb worked as a Warner Bros. film publicist and a journalist for Motion Picture Daily and Independent Film Journal. He began working in television as a casting director for Lux Video Theater in 1950 and later directed segments of the program. Loeb later worked as a theatrical producer before rejoining Warner Bros. Teaming with Gabriel Katzka, Loeb produced two films in 1970, Kelly’s Heroes and Soldier Blue, before his retirement.

Longley, Ty Ty Longley, guitarist for the rock group Great White, died in a fire at a West Warwick, Rhode Island, nightclub caused by the band’s pyrotechnic display during a concert on February 20, 2003. He was 31. Longley was born on September 4, 1971, in Sharon, Pennsylvania. He joined the veteran rock group, Great White, in 1990 and had toured with the group for nearly 13 years. He was among the 98 victims who perished in the fire.

Obituaries • 2003

250

Ty Longley

Emil Loteanu

Los Angeles Times, Feb. 22, 2003, A1; New York Times, Feb. 26, 2003, A20; Variety, Mar. 3, 2003, 77.

Loteanu, Emil Russian film director and writer Emil Loteanu died in Moscow on April 18, 2003. He was 66. Loteanu was born in Clocusna, Romania (now Moldova) on November 6, 1936. He directed over a dozen films from the late 1950s including There Was a Young Boy (1960), Wait for Us at Dawn (1963), Fiddlers (1971), Their Hot Valleys (1974), Queen of the Gypsies (1975), The Shooting Party (1978), Anna Pavlova (1983), The Morning Star (1987), and The Shell (1993).

Loudon, Dorothy Dorothy Loudon

Tony Award–winning Broadway star Dorothy Loudon died after a long illness with cancer in a New York City hospital on November 15, 2003. She was 70. Loudon was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on September 17, 1933. She began

her career as a singer in the early 1950s. She appeared regularly on several television series including It’s a Business in 1952, Laugh Line in 1959, and The Garry Moore Show from 1962 to 1964.

251

2003 • Obituaries

She made her stage debut in a 1962 production of a Jules Feiffer play. Soon after she appeared on Broadway in Nowhere to Go but Up. She received a Tony nomination for her role in 1969’s The Fig Leaves Are Falling. Loudon received the Tony Award for her performance as the evil orphanage manager Mrs. Hannigan in the 1977 musical hit Annie. She was again nominated for her performance in the 1979 play Ballroom. Loudon starred as Dorothy Banks in the short-lived television comedy series Dorothy in 1979. She also appeared in episodes of The Perry Como Show, The Ed Sullivan Show, The Kraft Music Hall, The DuPont Show of the Week, Magnum, P.I., and Murder, She Wrote. She made rare film appearances in Garbo Talks (1984) and Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1997). Los Angeles Times, Nov. 17, 2003, B9; New York Times, Nov. 16, 2003, 43; People, Dec. 1, 2003, 177; Time, Dec. 1, 2003, 23.

Lowenthal, John Documentary filmmaker John Lowenthal died of esophageal cancer in London on September 9, 2003. He was 78. Lowenthal was born in Manhattan on May 14, 1925. A graduate of the Columbia University School of Law, Lowenthal was a volunteer for former State Department official Alger Hiss’s defense on perjury charges in 1949 and 1950. Hiss had been accused of passing secret information to the Soviet Union. Lowenthal later taught at Rutgers law school. He took a sabbatical from his legal career to produce and direct the 1980 documentary film The Trials of Alger Hiss about the landmark spy case. New York Times, Sept. 21, 2003, 33.

Mike Lozanski

Ludgin, Chester Opera singer Chester Ludgin died of cancer in New York City on August 9, 2003. He was 78.

Lozanski, Mike Canadian professional wrestler Mike Lozanski died in his sleep at his home in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on December 18, 2003. He was 35. He wrestled in Canada as The Natural in the early 1990s, occasionally teaming with his brother, Chris. He competed often in Mexico and Japan during the decade, sometimes under the names Mike Anthony and Tigre Canadiense. Lozanski competed in matches with Paul Heyman’s ECW promotion from 1998 to 1999.

Chester Ludgin

Obituaries • 2003

252

Ludgin was a leading baritone with the New York City Opera from 1957. He starred in the world premieres of such productions as Robert Ward’s The Crucible and Robert Kurka’s The Good Soldier Schweik. Ludgin was also seen in productions of Puccini’s Madame Butterfly and Janacek’s Makropoulos Affair. New York Times, Aug. 17, 2003, 33; Variety, Nov. 3, 2003, 51.

Lukjanova, Tatjana

Lurio, Don Italian choreographer and dancer Don Lurio died of respiratory failure in Rome on January 26, 2003. He was 75. Lurio was born in New York City in 1927. A leading stage, film and television choreographer in Italy from the 1950s, he designed dance numbers for the films Casino de Paris (1957), Candy (1968), and A Woman Is Good Business (1977). Lurio also performed in several films including Casino de Paris (1957) and The Bobo (1967).

Serbian actress Tatjana Lukjanova died in Belgrade, Serbia, on August 19, 2003. She was 79. Lukjanova was born in Belgrade on November 6, 1923. A leading actress in films and television from the early 1960s, Lukjanova was featured in television productions of Koreni (1965), Snaha (1969), Krunisanje (1970), Susedi (1973), U Agoniji (1981), Sestre (1981), Banjica (1984), Dome, Slatki Dome (1988), Balkan Ekspres 2 (1989), Nasa Engleskinja (1997), Seljaci (2001), and Harold i Mod (2001).

Don Lurio

Lux, Guy French television game show creator and host Guy Lux died of a heart attack at his home in Neuilly-Sur-Seine, France, on June 13, 2003. He was 83. Lux was born Maurice Guy in Paris on June 21, 1919. He created the popular French game show Intervilles in 1962. He retired from his on-screen role as host in 1993, though continued to produce the series. Lux was also seen in the films Bang Bang (1967), Stadium Nuts (1972), and Le Bourreau des Coeurs (1983). Tatjana Lukjanova

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2003 • Obituaries

Lyall, Gavin

Guy Lux

Luxford, Bert

British author Gavin Lyall died of cancer in London on January 18, 2003. He was 70. Lyall was born in Birmingham, West Midlands, England, on May 9, 1932. A pilot in the Royal Air Force, Lyall was also a leading novelist best known for his thrillers beginning with The Wrong Side of the Sky in 1961. His other novels include The Most Dangerous Game, Midnight Plus One, Shooting Script, and Judas Country. Lyall created the character of British special forces officer Maj. Harry Maxim in 1980’s The Secret Servant. Maxim was also the hero of the novels The Conductor of Major Maxim (1982), The Crocus List (1985), and Uncle Target (1988). Lyall’s later books include Spy’s Honour (1993) and Honorable Intentions (1999). He also wrote the original story for the 1967 Hammer science fiction film Moon Zero Two. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 23, 2003, B15; New York Times, Jan. 22, 2003, A19; Variety, Mar. 3, 2003, 79.

British special effects director Albert J. “Bert” Luxford died in England after a brief illness on March 4, 2003. Luxford designed special effects for numerous films from the 1960s including the 1964 James Bond film Goldfinger, where he provided Bond’s gadget-laden Aston Martin. His numerous film credits include Thunderball (1965), You Only Live Twice (1967), Countess Dracula (1970), Twins of Evil (1971), Diamonds Are Forever (1971), 200 Motels (1971), The Devil Within Her (1976), Hawk the Slayer (1980), and Highlander (1986).

Bert Luxford

Gavin Lyall

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254

Lynch, Alfred British actor Alfred Lynch died of cancer in England on December 16, 2003. He was 70. Lynch was born in the East End of London on January 26, 1933. He began his career on stage in the late 1950s, appearing in Lindsay Anderson’s production of the military drama The Long and the Short and the Tall. He played a cockney soldier in Joan Littlewood’s production of Brendan Behan’s The Hostage on stage in London and New York. Lynch made his film debut in Tony Richardson’s 1958 adaptation of the John Osborne play Look Back in Anger. He appeared in a television production of No Trams to Lime Street in 1959 and co-starred with Sean Connery in the 1961 comedy film Operation Snafu (aka On the Fiddle). He continued to appear in such films as Two and Two Make Six (1962), The Password Is Courage (1962), 55 Days at Peking (1963), and West 11 (1963). He again starred with Connery as one of his fellow prisoners in a brutal military prison in the 1963 drama The Hill. Lynch was also seen in the films Franco Zeffirelli’s The Taming of the Shrew (1967) with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, Something Like Love (1968), The Sea Gull (1968), The Blockhouse (1973), Loophole (1980), The Krays (1990) as the Kray twins’ father, Charlie, Until the End of the World (1991), and Second Best (1994). Lynch starred in the 1965 BBC historical television series Hereward the Wake, and was Squadron Leader Jimmy Porter in the 1969 series Manhunt. He was also seen in television productions of Bewitched (1985), On the Razzle (1986), and The Deliberate Death of a Polish Priest (1986), and episodes of The Gold Robbers, Going

Alfred Lynch (right, with Sean Connery)

Straight, Bullman, Boon, Doctor Who, Bergerac, Lovejoy, and Pie in the Sky.

Lynn, Imogene Singer Imogene Lynn died of respiratory failure and complications from renal cancer in Lancaster, California, on February 24, 2003. She was 80. Lynn was born in Trenton, Missouri, in 1922. She began her professional career in 1940 as a singer with Emerson Gill’s band. She moved to Los Angles in 1942 where she recorded the popular hits “Who Wouldn’t Love You” and “Big Boy.” She began performing with Artie Shaw’s band in 1944, singing the hit “Accentuate the Positive.” She later sang with the MerryMacs and the Starlighters. From the late 1940s she was the singing voice for several actors, dubbing for Mona

Imogene Lynn voiced Tex Avery’s Little Red Riding Hood

255 Freeman in Mother Wore Tights (1947) and Isn’t It Romantic? (1948) and for Vera Miles in Beau James (1957). She also dubbed the singing voice of Leslie Parrish’s Daisy Mae in 1959’s Li’l Abner. She was also the voice of Little Red Riding Hood in several cartoons from Tex Avery.

Machalica, Henryk Polish actor Henryk Machalica died in Warsaw, Poland, on November 1, 2003. He was 73. Machalica was born in Chybie, Poland, on June 18, 1930. He was featured in numerous films from the late 1960s including The Leap (1967), 150 km Per Hour (1972), Passion (1978), Lynx: The Smile of the Evil Eye (1981), The Consul (1982), The Wolf (1983), The Faithful River (1983), Woman in a Hat (1985), Capital, or How to Make Money in Poland (1989), The Book of Great Wishes (1997), The Dark Side of Venus (1998), and The Black Beach (2001).

2003 • Obituaries

MacKechnie, Donald Actor and director Donald MacKechnie died of complications from AIDS at a Los Angeles hospice on October 11, 2003. He was 65. MacKechnie was born in London, England, on June 22, 1938. He began working in the theater in the late 1950s as an artistic director. He was hired by Laurence Olivier as staff director of London’s National Theatre in 1968. MacKechnie came to the United States in the early 1970s, serving as artistic director of New York’s GeVa Theatre in 1973. He moved to Los Angeles in the early 1980s, where he appeared in a small role in Roland Joffe’s film Fat Man and Little Boy (1989). He was also seen on television in episodes of Hotel and Tales from the Darkside. MacKechnie also wrote the play Meetin’s on the Porch in the 1980s. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 18, 2003, B22.

Donald MacKechnie

Mackenzie, Gisele

Henryk Machalica

Actress and singer Gisele MacKenzie, who was a regular performer in the 1950s television series Your Hit Parade, died of colon cancer at a Burbank, California, hospital, on September 5, 2003. She was 76. MacKenzie was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, on January 10, 1927. She began her career singing on the radio in

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Gisele Mackenzie

Canada, where she starred in the series Meet Gisele, before coming to Los Angeles in 1951. She was heard regularly on radio’s The Mario Lanza Show and performed with Edgar Bergen, Bob Crosby and Morton Downey. She performed with Your Hit Parade from 1953 to 1957 and also appeared on such series as The Jack Benny Show, Kraft Television Theatre, Studio One, The Bell Telephone Hour, and Lux Playhouse. MacKenzie hosted her own television show, The Gisele MacKenzie Show, from 1957 to 1958. She also continued to be seen on such series as Bachelor Father, U.S. Steel Hour, People Will Talk, Celebrity Game and Burke’s Law. She was a regular of The Sid Caesar Show from 1963 to 1964. MacKenzie starred in an obscure 1972 horror film, The Oval Portrait, and continued to appear in theatrical productions. She was also seen in episodes of tv’s Crazy Like a Fox, Murder, She Wrote, MacGyver, and Boy Meets World. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 6, 2003, B20; New York Times, Sept. 9, 2003, A29; Time, Sept. 15, 2003, 29; Variety, Sept. 15, 2003, 51.

67. MacLean was born in Dorchester, Massachusetts, on January 2, 1936. He began his career on stage in the late 1950s, performing in numerous Shakespearean productions. MacLean made his film debut in 1963’s The Cardinal. He was also seen in the films The Playground (1965), The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973), Squirm (1976), Force: Five (1981), Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo (1984), and Margaret’s Museum (1995). MacLean also appeared often on television, starring in the tele-films Fantasy Island (1977), The Castaways on Gilligan’s Island (1979), Disaster on the Coastliner (1979), Tenspeed and Brown Shoe (1980), Angel on My Shoulder (1980), Midnight Offerings (1981), The Million Dollar Face (1981), and Who Is Julia? (1986). MacLean starred as Hugh Clayborn in the daytime soap opera The Secret Storm in 1970 and was John Rainey in Where the Heart Is from 1971 to 1973. He played Scott McKenzie in Somerset in 1970, was Dr. Paul Whitman in Days of Our Lives in 1977. He also appeared in General Hospital in 1982 and Rituals as Governor Harrison in 1985. His other television credits include episodes of Starsky and Hutch, The Streets of San Francisco, Wonder Woman, Police Story, Charlie’s Angels, The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries, Barnaby Jones, Kate Loves a Mystery, Spider-Man, Battlestar Galactica, Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, Hart to Hart, Happy Days, Remington Steele, Cagney & Lacey, Matt Houston, Hardcastle and

MacLean, Peter Actor Peter MacLean died of lymphoma in a Los Angeles hospital on May 28, 2003. He was

Peter MacLean

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McCormick, The Fall Guy, Three’s a Crowd, Hill Street Blues, Knight Rider, Hotel, The A-Team, Hunter, MacGyver, Jake and the Fatman, Out of This World, Murder, She Wrote, and Knots Landing. Variety, Aug. 4, 2003, 48.

Maddox, Lester Lester Maddox, the segregationist governor of Georgia from 1967 to 1971, died of pneumonia after a long illness in Atlanta, Georgia, on June 25, 2003. He was 87. Maddox was born in Atlanta on September 30, 1915. A strict segregationist, Maddox closed his restaurant in Atlanta in the 1960s rather than serve black customers. He was elected governor of Atlanta in 1966 and made an unsuccessful bid for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1968. Maddox was featured as Governor Patrick Burns in the 1975 tele-film The Kansas City Massacre. Los Angeles Times, June 26,2003, B14; New York Times, June 26, 2003, A29; Time, July 7, 2003, 25.

Rusty Magee

ton, D.C., in 1955. After studying music at Brown University and Yale, he wrote music for such theatrical productions as Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Moliere’s Scapin. He also appeared in Woody Allen’s 1986 film Hannah and Her Sisters. New York Times, Feb. 23, 2003, 29.

Magnusson, Kisa Swedish singer Kisa Magnusson died of complications from asthma in Stockholm, Swe-

Lester Maddox

Magee, Rusty Actor and composer Rusty Magee died of colon cancer in New York city of February 16, 2003. He was 47. Magee was born in Washing-

Kisa Magnusson

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den, on January 5, 2003. She was 53. Magnusson was born in Kisa, Ostergotland, Sweden, on May 14, 1949. She performed in the musical Hair on stage in 1968. Magnusson also appeared in several Swedish films including Keep All Doors Open (1973) and Buddies (1976).

Makhene, Ramolao South African actor Ramolao Makhene died of liver cancer in Johannesburg, South Africa, on July 13, 2003. He was 56. Makhene was born in Western Native Township in 1947. He began performing on stage in the 1970s, starring in productions of Nongogo, Going Up, and Sophiatown, which he co-wrote. Makhene was seen in several films during his career including A Place for Weeping (1986), Oddball Hall (1990), Cyborg Cop (1993), The Air Up There (1994), and Cry, the Beloved Country (1995). Sabine Mamou

(1981), A Room in Town (1982), The Wall (1983), Parking (1985), The Day You Love Me (1986), Three Places for the 26th (1988), Tsahal (1994), A Visitor from the Living (1997), Jeanne and the Perfect Guy (1999), The New Eve (1999), The Adventures of Felix (2000), Don’t Make Trouble! (2001), Replay (2001), Sobibor, Oct. 14, 1943, 4 p.m. (2001), Liberte-Oleron (2001), and My Life on Ice (2002).

Mann, Herbie

Ramolao Makhene

Mamou, Sabine French film editor Sabine Mamou died in France on December 12, 2003. Mamou worked in films from the 1970s, cutting such features as As Long as One Is Intoxicated (1974), L’Autre France (1977), Documenteur: An Emotion Picture

Jazz musician Herbie Mann died of prostate cancer at his home in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on July 1, 2003. He was 73. Mann was born Herbert Solomon in Brooklyn, New York, on April 16, 1930. He began playing the clarinet, saxophone and flute at an early age, and performed while serving in the U.S. Army in the early 1950s. He embarked on a career in music after leaving the army in 1953, performing with Matt Mathews and Pete Rugolo. Mann formed the Afro-Jazz Sextet in 1959, and toured throughout the world. He was noted as being one of the first musicians to perform jazz on a flute. He was also an innovator in incorporating Brazilian music with American jazz. He recorded the hit album Live at the Village Gate in 1962. Mann formed the group

259

2003 • Obituaries

Woman Obsessed (1959), and My Blood Runs Cold (1965). He was best known for his work in television, writing episodes of Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, Rawhide, and The Untouchables, and producing the long-running television Western Gunsmoke from 1965 to 1968. Mantley also produced the series Wild Wild West, Dirty Sally, How the West Was Won, and Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. He also was producer for the 1968 film Firecreek, and the tele-films Cutter’s Trail (1970), The Macahans (1976), Gunsmoke: Return to Dodge (1987), and Gunsmoke: The Last Apache (1990). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 18, 2003, B21. Herbie Mann

Family of Mann in 1973, and recorded the fusion album Memphis Underground. He began his own record label in 1979 and recorded over 100 albums during his career. He continued to perform and record until his death. Los Angeles Times, July 3, 2003, B15; New York Times, July 3, 2003, A21; People, July 21, 2003, 89; Time, July 14, 2003, 21; Variety, July 14, 2003, 53.

Mantley, John

Marion, Beth Actress Beth Marion died of complications from a stroke in Jacksonville, Oregon, on February 18, 2003. She was 90. Marion was born in Clinton, Iowa, on July 11, 1912. She began her film career in the mid–1930s, often as leading lady to such Western stars as Ken Maynard and Johnny Mack Brown. Marion’s film credits include Between Men (1935), Trail of Terror (1935), Silver Spurs (1936), For the Service (1936), Avenging Waters (1936), The Fugitive Sheriff (1936),

Television producer and writer John Mantley died of heart failure and complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Sherman Oaks, California, on January 14, 2003. He was 82. Mantley was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on April 25, 1920. Mantley wrote the 1957 science fiction film The 27th Day based on his novel. He also scripted the films The Parson and the Outlaw (1957),

John Mantley (left, with James Arness)

Beth Marion

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Everyman’s Law (1936), Rip Roarin’ Buckaroo (1936), Phantom of the Range (1936), Wild Horse Round-Up (1936), Phantom Gold (1938), and Frontier Scout (1938). She was married to stuntman Cliff Lyons from the late 1930s until their divorce in the mid–1950s. She subsequently married architect Julian Koch. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 28, 2003, B14.

Marshall, William William Marshall, a leading actor of the stage and screen who became best known for his starring role in the 1972 cult horror film Blacula, died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease at a Los Angeles nursing home on June 11, 2003. He was 78. Marshall was born in Gary, Indiana, on August 19, 1924. He studied acting in New York City, and made his Broadway debut in the late 1940s. He seen in productions of Set My People Free, Lost in the Stars, and the 1951 revival of The Green Pastures. He made his film debut several years later in 1952’s Lydia Bailey. Marshall was also seen in the films Demetrius and the Gladiators (1954), Something of Value (1957), Sabu and the Magic Ring (1957) as the Genie, The Hell with Heroes (1968), The Boston Strangler (1958) as Massachusetts Senator Edward Brooke, Skull-

duggery (1970), Zigzag (1970), the 1970 tele-film The Mask of Sheba, and Honky (1971). Marshall also appeared often on television, guest starring in such series as The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Bonanza, Rawhide, Man from U.N.C.L.E., Danger Man, Ben Casey, Daniel Boone, Star Trek, Wild Wild West, Mannix, The Jeffersons, and Benson. During his career he also made notable stage appearances as singer Paul Robeson and statesman Frederick Douglass, and taught acting workshops on college campuses. Marshall is best known for his 1972 role as African Prince Mamuwalde who, after being bitten by Count Dracula, became the exploitation hero Blacula. He reprised the role in the 1973 sequel, Scream, Blacula, Scream! Marshall also starred in the 1974 Exorcist-style film Abby, and the 1977 nuclear drama Twilight’s Last Gleaming. He was featured as Judge Marcus Black in the 1977 television series Rosetti and Ryan, and starred as Shakespeare’s Othello in a 1981 television production. Marshall was featured as the King of Cartoons in the children’s series Pee-wee’s Playhouse from 1987 to 1991. His later film credits include Amazon Women on the Moon (1987), The Fisher King (1991), Maverick (1994), Sorceress (1994), and Dinosaur Valley Girls (1996). Los Angeles Times, June 16, 2003, B9; New York Times, June 21, 2003, A28; People, June 30, 2003, 125; Variety, June 23, 2003, 57.

Martinez, Adalberto Mexican comic actor Adalberto Martinez, who was often known as Resortes, died of heart and respiratory failure in Mexico City on April 4, 2003. He was 87. Martinez was born in Tepito, Mexico City, Mexico, on January 25, 1916. He began his career performing on stage as a dancer. He appeared in over 100 films and television productions during his career from the late 1940s. His numerous film credits include El Nieto del Zorro (1948), El Luchador Fenomeno (1952), El Rey de Mexico (1956), Los Fantasmas Burlones (1965), The Coyness of Love (1965), To Kill Is Easy (1966), Santo and Blue Demon Against the Monsters (1969), Los Cacos (1971), El Andariego (1976), The Bricklayers (1976), El Sexo Sentido (1980), Pedro Navaja (1985), El Exterminador Nocturno (1986), and Las Delicias de Poder (1996). Los Angeles Times, Apr. 8, 2003, B11. William Marshall

261

Adalberto Martinez

2003 • Obituaries

Chico Martins

Martins, Chico Brazilian stage, film, and television actor Chico Martins died of pneumonia in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on April 23, 2003. He was 78. Martins was born in Machado, Minas Gerais, Brazil, on May 27, 1924. He began performing on stage in the 1950s, performing with the Brazilian Theatre of Comedy. He was featured in numerous Brazilian films including Panca de Valente (1968), Senhora (1976), Os Imorais (1979), A Megerea Domada (1994), and Ivanov (1998). He was also a familiar face on Brazilian television starring in such series as Nino, o Italianinho (1969), Toninho On the Rocks (1970), Rosa-dos-Ventos (1973), Os Apostolos de Judas (1976), Renuncia (1982), and O Cometa (1989).

Masked Marvel, The Stu McCullum, who wrestled professionally as the Masked Marvel in the early 1950s, died of complications of diabetes in La Crescenta, Cali-

The Masked Marvel

Obituaries • 2003

262

fornia, on May 25, 2003. He was 73. McCullum was born in New Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on May 21, 1930. He began wrestling as the Masked Marvel in 1949. From the mid–1950s McCullum competed as Buddy Stewart. He retired from the ring in he 1960s and worked for ABC television as a carpenter.

Masters, Anthony British author Anthony Masters died of a heart attack in Hastings, East Sussex, England, on April 4, 2003. He was 62. Masters wrote juvenile fiction as well as detective thrillers. He received the John Llewellyn Rhys Memorial Prize for his first novel, The Seahorse. Masters other works include the crime novels Murder Is a Long Time Coming (1991), Confessional (1993), Death’s Door (1995), The Men (1997), and The Good and Faithful Servant (1999). He also wrote the juvenile books Extreme Survival, Ocean Tomb, Dancing with the Dead, Dark Tower, Shark Attack, and Shock Waves.

Masters, Mike Mike Masters, a burly character actor in films and television from the late 1950s, died of cancer in Arleta, California, on December 2, 2003. He was 74. Masters was born Michael Shanto in Chicago, Illinois, in 1929. He worked in radio before serving in the U.S. Army in France during the Korean War. He subsequently went to Hollywood, where he was seen on television in episodes of Tales of Wells Fargo, Man and the Challenge, Sea Hunt, The Man from Blackhawk, The Rebel, The Tall Man, Perry Mason, Saints and Sinners, Combat!, Kraft Suspense Theatre, Branded, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Wild Wild West, Laredo, Hondo, Mission: Impossible, It Takes a Thief, Bonanza, The Outsider, The Virginian, Mannix, The Immortal, Bearcats!, Cannon, Medical Center, Rod Serling’s Night Gallery, Banacek, Barnaby Jones, The Streets of San Francisco, Emergency!, Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, Knight Rider, Airwolf, Remington Steele, The A-Team, and Baywatch. Masters was also seen in small roles in a handful of films including The Sergeant Was a Lady (1961), The Manchurian Candidate (1962), Seven Days in May (1964), Young Dillinger (1965), Macho Callahan (1970), Ssssssss (1973), Lepke (1975), The Apple Dumpling Gang Rides Again (1979), The Man with Bogart’s Face (1980), and

Anthony Masters

Mike Masters

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Cheech & Chong’s Nice Dreams (1981). He also appeared in the tele-films Set This Town on Fire (1973), The Hanged Man (1974), Kiss Me, Kill Me (1976), Who Is Julia! (1986), Jake Spanner, Private Eye (1989), and Columbo: Columbo Cries Wolf (1990).

Mathis, Lynn Actor Lynn Mathis died of hypertensive cardiovascular disease at his home in Dallas, Texas, on October 19, 2003. He was 49. Mathis was born in Amarillo, Texas, in 1954. He was a leading performer in local theater in Dallas, and was featured often in the television series Walker, Texas Ranger and Wishbone. He was also seen in the films Night Vision (1997), The Newton Boys (1998), The Protector (1999), Certain Guys (1999), Hell Swarm (2001), The Keyman (2001), The Life of David Gale (2003), and The Alamo (2003).

Carol Matthau (with husband, Walter)

businessman Charles Marcus in 1933. She becoame close friends with Gloria Vanderbilt and Oona O’Neill. She met and married author William Saroyan while still a teenager. Saroyan proved an abusive spouse and the couple divorced in 1949. She briefly remarried Saroyan in 1951. In 1955 her novella about her early life, The Secret in the Daisy, was published under the name Carol Grace. She met actor Walter Matthau while she was an understudy in the play Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? and the two were married in 1959. The following year she appeared in the film Gangster Story directed by her husband. She was also featured in John Cassavetes’ 1976 gangster film Mikey and Nicky. The two remained married until the actor’s death in 2000. Carol Matthau also authored 1992’s Among the Porcupines: A Memoir. Survivors include her son, director Charles Matthau. Los Angeles Times, July 25, 2003, B14; New York Times, Juy 24, 2003, B10; Time, Aug. 4, 2003, 21; Variety, Aug. 4, 2003, 48.

Lynn Mathis

Matthau, Carol Writer and actress Carol Matthau died of a brain aneurysm in New York City on July 20, 2003. She was 77. She was born Carol Doree in New York City on September 11, 1925. Though born to poverty, Matthau became part of New York’s society when her mother married wealthy

Matz, Bob Warner Bros. animator Bob Matz died in Westchester, California, on March 28, 2003. He was 90. Matz began working in animation with Leon Schlesinger Productions in late 1936. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and resumed his career at Warner Bros. after the war where he worked on Merrie Melodies and Looney

Obituaries • 2003

264

Bill Mauldin Bob Matz

Tunes cartoons. He worked with Fritz Freling at Warner and subsequently joined Freling’s DePatieFreling studio. Matz worked on the animated Pink Panther series. He later worked with such other studios as Filmation, Marvel, and Jim Henson, where he was animation director for Muppet Babies in the mid–1980s.

Mauldin, Bill Pulitzer Prize–winning cartoonist Bill Mauldin died of pneumonia and complications of Alzheimer’s disease in Newport Beach, California, on January 22, 2003. Mauldin was born in Mountain Park, New Mexico, on October 29, 1921. He was best known for his drawings of soldiers Willie and Joe, exemplifying the American fighting man during World War II. The cartoons were published in the armed force newspaper, Stars and Stripes. His series, Up Front with Mauldin, earned him a Pulitzer Prize in 1945. Tom Ewell and David Wayne played Willie and Joe in

the 1951 film Up Front, and Harvey Lembeck replaced Wayne as Joe in the 1952 sequel Back at the Front. Mauldin himself appeared in John Huston’s 1951 film The Red Badge of Courage and Fred Zinnemann’s Teresa (1951). Mauldin received a second Pulitzer Prize in 1959 while an editorial cartoonist with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. He moved to the Chicago Sun-Times in 1962. Mauldin wrote and drew 16 books during his career. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 23, 2003, A1; New York Times, Jan. 23, 2003, B7; People, Feb. 10, 2003, 119; Time, Feb. 3, 2003, 17.

Mayer, Jerry Actor Jerry Mayer was found dead at his home in New York City on February 3, 2003. He was 61. Mayer was born in Waterloo, Iowa, on May 12, 1941. Best known for his one-man stage productions, Mayer was also featured in the films Simon (1980), Brubaker (1980), Single White Female (1992), Vanya on 42nd Street (1994), Nobody’s Fool (1994), and Joe Gould’s Secret (2000). He also appeared in the tele-films A Marriage:

265 Georgia O’Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz (1991) and Women and Men 2: In Love There Are No Rules (1991), and was featured in episodes of Serpico, Miami Vice, The Equalizer, Law & Order, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, and Ed. New York Times, Feb. 6, 2003, C15.

Mazen, Glenn Actor Glenn Mazen died of bladder cancer at his home in Marblemount, Washington, on October 6, 2003. He was 70. Mazen was active in local theater in San Francisco and Seattle. He was best known for his portrayal of Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas in Robert Litz’s one-man show Douglas from 1984. Mazen was also seen in a handful of films including Edge of Honor (1991), Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey (1993), and The Temp (1993), and was featured in an episode of television’s Northern Exposure.

2003 • Obituaries

McCarthy, Thomas J. Film editor and executive Thomas J. McCarthy died of respiratory failure and complications from Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease in a Los Angeles hospital on August 1, 2003. He was 76. McCarthy was born in Hollywood on July 21, 1927. He began his career in the late 1940s at Technicolor before joining MGM as an editor. He worked as an editor on such television series as Gunsmoke, Combat!, and The High Chaparral. He also edited the films Joy in the Morning (1965), and George Pal’s The Power (1968) and Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze (1975). McCarthy also edited the 1972 tele-film Sandcastles. McCarthy later worked as an executive with Columbia Pictures and Weintraub Entertainment before retiring in 1988. Variety, Sept. 29, 2003, 76.

Thomas J. McCarthy

McCarver, Pat Glenn Mazen

Patrick McCarver, a collector and expert on Gone with the Wind memorabilia, died of complications from diabetes in Conroe, Texas, on July 5, 2003. He was 65. McCarver, the older brother of baseball legend Tim McCarver, was born in

Obituaries • 2003

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Pat McCarver

Memphis, Tennessee, in 1938. A Southern history buff, McCarver amassed a huge collection of Gone with the Wind items, including a 16 foot long, 5 foot high scale mode of Scarlett O’Hara’s Tara plantation and a coat worn by Clark Gable in the film. McCarver was the author of the illustrated 1990 The Gone with the Wind Collector’s Guide. He often displayed his collections at film festivals and theatrical screenings of Gone with the Wind. Memphis Commercial Appeal, July 8, 2003, B6.

(1952), Face to Face (1952), Niagara (1953), Rogue’s March (1953), Plunder of the Sun (1953), Island in the Sky (1953), Man in the Attic (1953), Charade (1953), Them! (1954), Ring of Fear (1954) as homicidal maniac Dublin O’Malley, The Child (1954), The Long, Gray Line (1955), I Cover the Underworld (1955), Moonfleet (1955), The King’s Thief (1955), Diane (1956), The Guns of Fort Petticoat (1957), Valley of the Dragons (1961), Cheyenne Autumn (1964), Mara of the Wilderness (1965), Follow Me, Boys! (1966), The Happiest Millionaire (1967), The Gnome-Mobile (1967), King’s Pirate (1967), Bandolero! (1968), Roller Boogie (1979), My Chauffeur (1986), and The Dead (1987). He also appeared in the tele-films and mini-series The New Daughters of Joshua Cabe (1976), Captains and the Kings (1976), Once an Eagle (1976), How the West Was Won (1978), Columbo: The Conspirators (1978), and John Carpenter’s Body Bags (1993). McClory starred as Jack McGivern in the television western series The Californians from 1957 to 1958, and was Officer Madden in The Adventures of Gallegher in 1964. He starred in Pat McShane in the detective series Kate McShane in 1975 and was Myles Delany in the adventure series Bring ’Em Back Alive from 1982 to 1982. His numerous television roles also include guest appearances in such series as Cav-

McClory, Sean Irish-American character actor Sean McClory died of complications from a heart condition at his home in Hollywood Hills, California, on December 10, 2003. He was 79. McClory was born in Dublin, Ireland, on March 8, 1924. He began his career on stage in Galway, Ireland, and was a member of the Abbeth Theatre troupe in Dublin. He came to the United States in the late 1940s. The burly actor appeared in numerous films including Dick Tracy’s Dilemma (1947), Dick Tracy Meets Gruesome (1947), Roughshod (1949), The Daughter of Rosie O’Grady (1950), The Glass Menagerie (1950), Storm Warning (1951), Lorna Doone (1951), David and Bathsheba (1951), The Desert Fox (1951), Anne of the Indies (1951), John Ford’s The Quiet Man (1952) with John Wayne, Les Miserables (1952), What Price Glory

Sean McClory

267 alcade of America, General Electric Theater, Medic, Lux Video Theatre, Frontier, Climax!, Broken Arrow, 20th Century–Fox Hour, The Restless Gun, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Have Gun Will Travel, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, One Step Beyond, The Man from Blackhawk, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Overland Trail, The DuPont Show with June Allyson, Adventures in Paradise, Wagon Train, Stagecoach West, The Dick Powell Show, Bronco, Bonanza, Tales of Wells Fargo, Boris Karloff ’s Thriller, Checkmate, The Detectives, Laramie, The Dakotas, The Great Adventure, Rawhide, The Outer Limits, Daniel Boone, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, My Favorite Martian, Death Valley Days, The Virginian, The Iron Horse, Mannix, The High Chaparral, The Guns of Will Sonnett, Gunsmoke, Lost in Space, Tarzan, The Blue Knight, Battlestar Galactica, and Fantasy Island. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 13, 2003, B24.

McCloskey, Robert Author and illustrator Robert McCloskey, who was best known for his children’s book Make Way for the Ducklings, died at his Deer Isle,

Robert McCloskey

2003 • Obituaries

Maine, home after a long illness on June 30, 2003. He was 88. McCloskey was born in Hamilton, Ohio, on September 14, 1914. His 1941 tale of a mother duck leading her eight ducklings through a busy city was the recipient of the Caldecott Medal for best American children’s book. McCloskey’s other books include Homer Price (1943), Blueberries for Sal (1948), One Morning in Maine (1952), and Time of Wonder (1957), which earned him another Caldecott Medal. Los Angeles Times, July 6, 2003, B16; New York Times, July 1, 2003, C15; Time, July 14, 2003, 21.

McCrary, Tex Tex McCrary, a pioneer in radio and television talk shows, died in New York City on July 29, 2003. He was 92. McCrary was born in Calvert, Texas, on October 13, 1910. He began his career as a journalist, becoming editorial writer at The New York Daily Mirror. McCrary served in the Army Air Corps during World War II, working as a public relations officer. He was one of the first Americans to see Hiroshima after the atomic bomb was dropped in 1945. After the war McCrary became editor of the magazine American Mercury. He married actress and model Jinx Falkenburg in 1945. He and his wife were soon hosting the NBC television program At Home with Tex and Jinx, and the interview program The Swift Home Service Club. They also hosted the radio program Meet Tex and Jinx in the late 1940s.

Tex McCrary (right, with Jinx Falkenburg)

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McCrary was also instrumental in persuading General Dwight Eisenhower to run for president in 1952. He and Falkenburg separated in the 1980s, though they never divorced. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 2, 2003, B21; New York Times, July 30, 2003, C12; Variety, Sept. 8, 2003, 66.

McEndree, Maurice Film producer Maurice McEndree died at his home in Carnation, Washington, after a brief illness on May 17, 2003. He was 72. McEndree and actor Seymour Cassel co-produced John Cassavetes’ first film as director, Shadows, in 1959. He also served as producer, cinematographer and editor for Cassavetes’ 1968 film Faces. McEndree also had a brief career as an actor, appearing with Cassavetes in the 1967 film Devil’s Angels, and in episodes of such television series as Perry Mason, The Virginian, Gunsmoke, and Laredo. He also scripted the 1964 exploitation film Bunny Yeager’s Nude Las Vegas, and directed 1973’s Self Portrait. Los Angeles Times, May 20, 2003, B12; Variety, May 26, 2003, 64.

McGee, Jack Dancer Jack McGee died of cancer in Fort Worth, Texas, on April 21, 2003. He was 75. McGee began his career as a stunt double for child actor Bobby Breen in the 1930s, and had a small role in Breen’s 1937 film Make a Wish. He was also featured in the films Scandal Street (1938) and Star Maker (1939). He was an original dancer with the Jivin’ Jacks and Jills dance group and appeared in the films Best Foot Forward (1943), Meet the People (1944), Sweet Genevieve (1947), and Good News (1947). He subsequently left Hollywood to care for his family in Texas.

McGovern, Dennis Actor and author Dennis McGovern died of heart failure in New York City on January 10, 2003. He was 59. Best known for his roles on stage, he appeared on Broadway in 1978’s Gorey Stories, and toured with productions of Da, 1776, and The Mousetrap. McGovern was also seen in the daytime soap opera The Doctors and the 1983 film Exposed. McGovern was also editor of Opera Scene, and co-authored Sing Out Louise, I Remember Too Much, and American Aria. New York Times, Jan. 26, 2003, 23.

McPhail, Addie

Maurice McEndree

Actress Addie McPhail, who was the third and last wife of silent screen comedian Fatty Arbuckle, died in Canoga Park, California, on April 14, 2003. She was 97. She was born Addie Dukes in White Plaines, Kentucky, on July 15, 1905. She began her career in films in the late 1920s, appearing in such features and shorts as A Big Bluff (1928), Anybody Here Seen Kelly? (1928), The Big Palooka (1929), The Barber’s Daughter (1929), The Lunkhead (1929), Ticklish Business (1929), Scotch (1930), Oh Darling (1930), The Three Sisters (1930), Western Knights (1930), Peace and Harmony (1930), How’s My Baby? (1930), Night Work (1930), Midnight Daddies (1930), Won by a Neck (1930), Extravagance (1930), Up a Tree (1930), Marriage Rows (1931), Dance Hall Marge (1931), Girls Demand Excitement (1931), Aloha (1931), Faiting Lover (1931), and For the Love of Ludwig

269

Addie McPhail

(1932). She met Fatty Arbuckle when he directed her 1930 film Up a Tree and married him two years later. Arbuckle, whose film career had faded after his trial and eventual acquittal on charges of complicity in the death of actress Virginia Rappe a decade earlier, was attempting a comeback when he died of a heart attack a year after their marriage. After Arbuckle’s death, McPhail resumed her film career, appearing in An Old Gypsy Custom (1934), The Super Snooper (1934), Merry Wives of Reno (1934), By Your Leave (1934), Bordertown (1935), It’s in the Air (1935), Women of Glamour (1937), and Northwest Passage (1940) before retiring from the screen. She later worked as a volunteer nurse at the Motion Picture and Television Retirement Home in Woodland Hills, California. Los Angeles Times, May 5, 2003, B9.

2003 • Obituaries

continued to perform in films for the next two decades, appearing in such features as Confidence Girl (1952), Diplomatic Courier (1952), One Minute to Zero (1952), O’Henry’s Full House (1952), Horizons West (1952), Back at the Front (1952), From Here to Eternity (1953), A Blueprint for Murder (1953), All the Brothers Were Valiant (1953), Day of Triumph (1953), The Caine Mutiny (1954), Francis Joins the WACS (1954), Women’s Prison (1955), Santa Fe Passage (1955), The Come On (1956), Teenage Thunder (1957), Terror in a Texas Town (1958), Hot Car Girl (1958), Night of the Blood Beast (1958), Lone Texan (1959), Attack of the Giant Leeches (1959), The Louisiana Hussy (1959), The Gallant Hours (1960), Young Jesse James (1960), That Touch of Mink (1962), A Public Affair (1962), Man’s Favorite Sport? (1964), Seven Days in May (1964), The Best Man (1964), The Killers (1964), Lt. Robin Crusoe, U.S.N. (1966), Dead Heat on a Merry-Go-Round (1966), Never a Dull Moment (1968), Hello, Dolly! (1969), The Resurrection of Zachary Wheeler (1971), and the 1974 tele-film Sidekicks. McVey’s television credits were numerous, with appearances in episodes of such series as You Are There, I Love Lucy, Dragnet, Stories of the Century, The Lone Ranger, My Friend Flicka, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Climax!, Gunsmoke, Annie Oakley, Broken Arrow, Perry Mason, Maverick, Sugarfoot, Tomb-

McVey, Tyler Veteran character actor Tyler McVey died of leukemia in Rancho Mirage, California, on July 4, 2003. He was 91. McVey was born in Bay City, Michigan, in 1912. He began his career in radio in 1938, performing on hundreds of programs through the mid–1950s. McVey made his film debut in a small role in the science fiction classic The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951). After making $500 a week for his brief role, McVey decided to pursue an acting career in films. He

Tyler McVey

Obituaries • 2003

270

stone Territory, Gunsmoke, Wagon Train, Navy Log, Sea Hunt, The Restless Gun, Have Gun Will Travel, Peter Gunn, Bat Masterson, Zane Grey Theater, Frontier Doctor, The Rough Riders, Buckskin, Wanted: Dead or Alive, The Rebel, Law of the Plainsman, Colt .45, Dennis the Menace, Riverboat, Checkmate, Klondike, The Deputy, The Jack Benny Show, Gunslinger, Rawhide, Death Valley Days, Ben Casey, Tales of Wells Fargo, Bonanza, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, McHale’s Navy, The Virginian, Redigo, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Joey Bishop Show, Wild Wild West, The F.B.I., Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, The Road West, The High Chaparral, Ironside, Daniel Boone, Mayberry R.F.D., Ellery Queen, All in the Family, Eight Is Enough, and Highway to Heaven.

Mendoza, Ray Leading Mexican professional wrestler Ray Mendoza died at his home in Mexico City on April 17, 2003. He was 73. Mendoza was born Jorge Diaz in Mexico City on June 6, 1929. He began wrestling professionally in the early 1950s as El Pelon (The Bald One). He later took the name Ray Mendoza and held numerous wrestling titles from the 1950s through the 1970s. Mendoza was also featured in several Mexican films,

Ray Mendoza

often appearing with masked wrestlers Santo and the Blue Demon. His film credits include Santo vs. the Vampire Women (1962), Blue Demon Contra el Poder Satanico (1966), The Treasure of Montezuma (1966), Santo vs. the Villains of the Ring (1966), and Santo and Blue Demon Against Doctor Frankenstein (1974).

Menendez, Juanjo Spanish actor Juanjo Menendez died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Madrid, Spain, on November 7, 2003. He was 74. Menendez was born in Madrid on May 15, 1929. He was featured in numerous films from the early 1950s including It Happened in Sevilla (1955), The Miracle of Marcelino (1955), Radio Stories (1955), Susanna and Me (1957), Carlota (1958), Reitro Park (1959), The Thieves (1959), La Venganza de Don Mendo (1961), Carol Reed’s The Running Man (1963), A Nearly Decent Girl (1963), Make Love, Not War (1966), Sister Citroen (1967), Novios 68 (1967), Night Is Made for Stealing (1967), Tristana (1970), Madrid, Costa Fleming (1975), La Loca Historia de los Tres Mosqueteros (1983) as King Louis XIII, and Burn Me (1994).

Juanjo Menendez

271

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Merriman, Eric British television comedy writer Eric Merriman died in London on June 2, 2003. He was 78. Merriman was born in Golders Green, England, on December 6, 1924. He served in the Royal Air Force during World War II and began working as a comedy scriptwriter after the war. Merriman and Barry Took created the radio comedy series Beyond Our Ken for Kenneth Horne in 1958. He also wrote the comedy sketch series Great Scott— It’s Maynard! starring Bill Maynard and Terry Scott. Merriman also wrote much of Norman Vaughan’s material as host of Sunday Night at the London Palladium. He also wrote comedy routines for such performers as Max Bygraves, Tommy Cooper and Dave Allen. He wrote and co-hosted the BBC2 comedy series Call It What You Like in 1965 and Mild and Bitter in 1966. He also created the 1974 television sitcom Happy Ever After. Merriman also wrote for Russ Abbot’s Saturday Madhouse in the early 1980s.

Richard Merson

Cheers, Night Court, Quantum Leap, and Star Trek: The Next Generation.

Metcalf, Audrey Actress Audrey Ward Metcalf died of a blood disorder at her home in Maine on January 22, 2003. She was 92. Metcalf was best known for her role as Elizabeth Martin, the Aneta Corsaut character’s mother, in the 1958 science fiction classic The Blob. Metcalf appeared in numerous stage productions with Philadelphia’s Hedgerow Theatre from 1938 to 1956. She was married to stage actor David Metcalf.

Eric Merriman

Merson, Richard Character actor Richard Merson died in Fulton, Texas, of bladder cancer on June 1, 2003. He was 69. Merson was born in England on May 14, 1934. He appeared on British television in the 1979 mini-series The Old Curiosity Shop and the 1980 production of Caught on a Train. Merson subsequently came to the United States where he was featured on television in episodes of

Meyer, Jean French actor Jean Meyer died in Paris on January 8, 2003. He was 88. Meyer was born in Paris on January 14, 1914. He appeared in numerous French films from the early 1940s including Adieu Leonard (1943), I Am with You (1943), The Uncatchable Mr. Frederic (1945), Between Eleven and Midnight (1950), Clara de Montargis (1951), House of Pleasure (1952), Trial at the Vatican (1952), Pity for the Vamps (1956), and My Uncle, Mr. Hulot (1958). Meyer directed and starred in the films Would-Be Gentleman (1958)

Obituaries • 2003

272

Jean Meyer

Leonard Michaels

and Marriage of Figaro (1959). He appeared in several films in the 1960s including 121 rue Blanche a Paris (1961) and The Sucker (1965).

Michaels, Leonard Author Leonard Michaels died of lymphoma and complications from bowel surgery in Berkeley, California, on May 10, 2003. He was 70. Michaels was born in New York City on January 2, 1933. He wrote the best-selling novel The Men’s Club and scripted the film version in 1986 which starred Roy Scheider. Michaels also wrote several short-story collections including Going Places (1969),I Would Have Saved Them if I Could (1975), and A Girl with a Monkey (2000). Los Angeles Times, May 13, 2003, B11; New York Times, May 13, 2003, A29. Don Michaelson

Michaelson, Don Dr. Don Michaelson, a physican who appeared in small roles in several films, died of lung

cancer at his home in Vista, California, on December 19, 2003. He was 81. Michaelson was born in Humboldt, Iowa, on July 10, 1922. He received his medical degree from the University of Iowa in

273 1951. From 1975 to 1996 Michaelson examined stars and directors for most of the major studios to ensure they met insurance requirements prior to filming. He also often served as the on-set doctor during filming. Michaelson also appeared in small roles in the films Resurrection (1980), Space Cowboys (2000), and Slackers (2002), and in television episodes of Little House on the Prairie and Tales from the Crypt.

Miller, George Comedian George Miller, who was a frequent guest of David Letterman’s late-night television shows, died of leukemia and complications from a blood clot in his brain in a Los Angeles hospital on March 5, 2003. He was 61. He was born George Wade Cornberger in Seattle, Washington, in 1942. He began his career in Los Angeles as a stand-up comic in the late 1960s. Miller appeared over 50 times on NBC’s Late Night with David Letterman and CBS’s Late Show with David Letterman. He also appeared often on Johnny Carson’s The Tonight Show. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 8, 2003, B21; New York Times, Mar. 11, 2003, A23; People, Mar. 24, 2003, 85; Time, Mar. 17, 2003, 17; Variety, Mar. 17, 2003, 60.

2003 • Obituaries

Miller, James British documentary filmmaker James Miller was shot to death in Rafah, in the Gaza Strip, by Israeli troops on May 2, 2003. He was 34. Miller was born in Pembrokshire, England, on December 18, 1968. He was a photographer and television cameraman best known for his work on the Emmy Award–winning documentary Beneath the Veil, about life in Afghanistan under the Taliban. He also made the documentary Prime Suspect, about war crimes in Kosovo. He was filming in Palestine for an HBO documentary at the time of his death.

James Miller

Miller, Peter

George Miller

Actor Peter Miller died of cancer at a Santa Monica, California, hospital on October 7, 2003. He was 73. Miller was a supporting actor in films in the 1950s. He was featured in such movies as Blackboard Jungle (1955), Handle with Care (1955), Rebel Without a Cause (1955), Forbidden Planet (1956), Crime in the Streets (1956), A Strange Adventure (1956), Tea and Sympathy (1956), The Delinquents (1957), The Iron Sheriff

Obituaries • 2003

274

Peter Miller

(1957), Imitation General (1958), and Marines, Let’s Go (1961). Miller was also active in television, appearing in episodes of West Point, Navy Log, U.S. Marshal, Boris Karloff ’s The Veil, The Tall Man, and Dr. Kildare. Variety, Oct. 20, 2003, 58.

Miquel, Jean-Pierre French actor Jean-Pierre Miquel died of cancer in Vincennes, France, on February 22, 2003. He was 66. Miquel was born in Neuillysur-Seine, France, on January 22, 1937. He began his career on stage in the early 1960s and appeared often in productions of the Comedie-Francaise from 1970. He served as artistic director on numerous theatrical productions. He was also featured in several films during his career including Costa-Gavras’ Z (1969), The Strangler (1972), Special Section (1975), All Fired Up (1982), Tatie Danielle (1990), The Elegant Criminal (1990), Max and Jeremy (1992), Alas for Me (1993), and Terminale (1998). Miquel served as administrator of the Comedie-Francaise from 1993 until 2001.

Jean-Pierre Miquel

Mitchell, Gordon Actor and bodybuilder Gordon Mitchell died of a heart attack in Marina del Rey, California, on September 20, 2003. He was 80. Mitchell was born Charles Pendleton in Denver, Colorado, on July 29, 1923. A leading bodybuilder in the early 1950s, Mitchell was selected by Mae West as part of her all-male chorus line. He soon appeared in small parts in such films as Prisoner of War (1945), The Man with the Golden Arm (1955), The Ten Commandments (1956), Around the World in Eighty Days (1956), The Spirit of St. Louis (1957), The Enemy Below (1957), The Buccaneer (1958), The Young Lions (1958), Rio Bravo (1959), Li’l Abner (1969), and Spartacus (1960). Mitchell subsequently moved to Italy, where he was featured in over 100 films, primarily European “sword and sandal” action features and “spaghetti” Westerns including Vulcan, Son of Jupiter (1961), Atlas Against the Cyclops (1961), The Giant of Metropolis (1961), The Centurion (1962), Fury of Achilles (1962), Caesar Against the Pirates (1962), With Fire and Sword (1962), Brennus, Enemy of Rome (1963), Ali Baba and the Seven

275

Gordon Mitchell

Saracens (1964), Hercules and the Princess of Troy (1965), Vengeance of the Vikings (1965), The Revenge of Spartacus (1965), Seven Slaves Against Rome (1965), The Revenge of Lady Morgan (1965), Treasure of the Petrified Forest (1965), Three Graves for a Winchester (1965), 2 + 5 Mission Hydra (1965), Kill or Be Killed (1966), Thompson 1880 (1966), Reflections in a Golden Eye (1967), Rita of the West (1967), Born to Kill (1967), John the Bastard (1967), Death on the Run (1967), Beyond the Law (1967), Phenomenal and the Treasure of Tutankamen (1968), Dead for a Dollar (1968), All on the Red (1968), Seven Times Seven (1968), Saguaro (1968), The Killer Likes Candy (1968), If One Is Born a Swine … Kill Him (1968), Fellini Satyricon (1969), Sartana the Gravedigger (1969), The Wings of War (1969), Once Upon a Time in the Wild, Wild West (1969), Finders Killers (1970), Stranger That Kneels Beside the Shadow of a Corpse (1970), Reach You Bastard (1970), Django and Sartana Are Coming … It’s the End (1970), Coffin Full of Dollars (1971), Day of Judgment (1971), Operation Cobra (1971), Let’s Go and Kill Sartana (1971), Hero Called Allegria (1971), Magnificent West (1971), Ballad of Django (1971), The Arizona Kid (1971), His Name Was Sam Walbash, but They Call Him Amen (1971), Go Away! Trinity Has Ar-

2003 • Obituaries

rived in Eldorado (1972), The Slave (1972), Shanghai Joe (1972), The Big Bust (1972), Frankenstein 80 (1972), They Called Him Trinity (1972), Pan (1973), Slaughterday (1973), The Paris Sex Murders (1973), Anything for a Friend (1973), Frankenstein’s Castle of Freaks (1974), Little Godfather from Hong Kong (1974), Achtung! The Desert Tigers (1976), Happy Birthday, Harry (1976), The Billion Dollar Fire (1976), The Man from Chicago (1977), The Mark (1978), Black Gold Dossier (1979), Kiss Me with Lust (1979), Black Emmanuelle (1979), Dr. Jekyll Junior (1979), The Experiment (1980), Umbrella Coup (1980), Diamond Connection (1982), Rush (1983), Endgame (1983), White Fire (1984), She (1985), Cobra Mission (1985), Three Men on Fire (1986), Commando Invasion (1986), SFX Retaliator (1987), Overdose (1987), Mines of Kilimanjaro (197), Evil Spawn (1987), Cross of the Seven Jewels (1987), Blood Delirium (1988), Bikini Drive-In (1995) and An Enraged New Word (2003). Mitchell returned to the United States in the late 1980s and owned and operated a gym in Marina Del Rey. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 25, 2003, B14; New York Times, Sept. 26, 2003, A22; Variety, Oct. 6, 2003, 103.

Mitchell, Grover Jazz trombonist Grover Mitchell died of cancer in New York City on August 8, 2003. He was 73. Mitchell was born in Whatley, Alabama, on March 17, 1930, and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. During the 1950s he played briefly with bands led by Lionel Hampton and Duke Ellington. He joined the Count Basie Orchestra in 1962, and played with the group till the early 1970s. During the 1970s he worked in Los Angeles studios. He was a musician on The Flip Wilson Show on NBC and soloed on the soundtrack for the Billie Holiday biopic Lady Sings the Blue (1972). He rejoined Basie’s group from 1980 until Basie’s death in 1984. Mitchell followed Thad Jones and Frank Foster as bandleader for the Count Basie Orchestra in 1995. He led the group to two Grammy Award–winning albums, Live at the Manchester Guild Hall (1996) and Count Plays the Duke (1998). Los Angeles Times, Aug. 9, 2003, B20; New York Times, Aug. 8, 2003, C11; Time, Aug. 18, 2003, 21; Variety, Nov. 3, 2003, 51.

Obituaries • 2003

276 of Arts and Crafts in London and began working with Tyrone Guthrie, the artistic director of the Stratford Festival, in 1953. She also designed for the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England. Moiseiwitsch also designed costumes for numerous productions and worked as a designer with the Royal Shakespeare Company, the National Theatre, and the Metropolitan Opera. She was set decorator for the 1957 film version of Oedipus Rex, and was costume designer for television productions of La Traviate (1981) and King Lear (1984). New York Times, Feb. 21, 2003, C11; Variety, Mar. 3, 2003, 79.

Monash, Paul

Theatrical designer Tanya Moiseiwitsch died in London on February 18, 2003. She was 88. Moiseiwitsch was born in London on December 3, 1914. She attended the Central School

Television writer and producer Paul Monash died of pancreatic cancer in Los Angeles on January 14, 2003. He was 88. Monash was born in New York City on June 17, 1914. The son of silent film actress Rhoda Melrose, Monash wanted to be a novelist but soon found himself working as a scripter for films. He worked on such movies as Operation Manhunt (1954), Foreign Intrigue (1956), Bailout at 43,000 (1957), Touch of Evil (1958), The Safecracker (1958), Sing, Boy, Sing

Tanya Moiseiwitch (portrait bust by Ruth Abernethy)

Paul Monash

Grover Mitchell

Moiseiwitsch, Tanya

277 (1958), The Gun Runners (1958), The Lawbreakers (1960), and The Crimebusters (1961). In the 1950s Monash also became a prolific writer for such early live television series as Climax!, Suspense, Schiltz Playhouse of Stars, Desilu Playhouse, Playhouse 90, You Are There, Studio One, and Kraft Theater. He wrote the pilot for the 1959 series The Untouchables and also scripted pilot episodes for The Asphalt Jungle in 1961 and Twelve O’Clock High in 1964. Monash also produced the television series Cain’s Hundred, Peyton Place and Judd, for the Defense in the 1960s. Monash began producing films in the late 1960s including Deadfall (1968), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), Slaughterhouse-Five (1972), The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973) which he also scripted, The Front Page (1974), Stephen King’s Carrie (1976), Big Trouble in Little China (1986), and The Rage: Carrie 2 (1999). He also wrote several tele-films including All Quiet on the Western Front (1979), Salem’s Lot (1979), V (1984), Stalin (1992), Killer Rules (1993), Kingfish: A Story of Huey P. Long (1995), George Wallace (1997), Rescuers: Stories of Courage: Two Couples (1998), and The Golden Spiders: A Nero Wolfe Mystery (2000). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 16, 2003, B12; New York Times, Jan. 16, 2003, B10; Time, Jan. 27, 2003, 19; Variety, Jan. 20, 2003, 81.

Monkhouse, Bob British television comedian Bob Monkhouse died of prostate cancer in Bedfordshire, England, on December 29, 2003. He was 75. Monkhouse was born in Beckenham, Kent, England, on June 1, 1928. He began his career as a writer of comic strips and short adult novels. He worked as a radio broadcaster from the late 1940s and formed a comedy writing team with Denis Goodwin. They created the comedy television series Fast and Loose in 1953, and My Pal Bob several years later. Monkhouse also appeared in over a dozen films including The Secret People (1952), Carry On Sergeant (1958), Dentist in the Chair (1960), Dentist on the Job (1961), A Weekend with Lulu (1962), Maid for Murder (1965), The Bliss of Mrs. Blossom (1968), and Simon Simon (1970). He starred as Bob Mason in the 1964 British comedy series The Big Noise, and was a voice actor in 1966’s Thunderbirds Are Go. Monkhouse was best known as the host of numerous British television

2003 • Obituaries

Bob Monkhouse

gameshows including The Golden Shot, Celebrity Squares, For Love or Money, Family Fortunes, Opportunity Knocks, The National Lottery, and Wipeout. He also made guest appearances in such series as The Upper Hand, Jonathan Creek, and Big Bad World. His autobiography, Crying with Laughter, was published in 1993. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 9, 2004, B16.

Monteiro, Joao Cesar Portuguese filmmaker Joao Cesar Monteiro died of cancer in Lisbon, Portugal, on February 2, 2003. He was 64. Monteiro was born in Figueira da Foz, Portugal, on February 2, 1939. He was best known for his 1989 film Recollections of the Yellow House, which earned him the Silver Lion Award at the Venice Film Festival. He directed, and often scripted, over a dozen other films including What Will I Do with This Sword? (1975), Trails (1978), Silvestre (1982), By the Seaside (1986), The Last Dive (1992), God’s Comedy (1996), The Hips of John Wayne (1997), God’s Wedding (1999), and Snow White (2000). Variety, Feb. 10, 2003, 57.

Obituaries • 2003

278 phis, Tennessee, on November 29, 2003. He died soon afterwards at a Memphis hospital. He was 51. Booker was born on June 6, 1952. He began wrestling in 1977 as Larry Latham and teamed with Wayne “Honkytonk Man” Farris as the Blonde Bombers. They held several tag team championships in the Mid-South area in the late 1970s and early 1980s, competing against such teams as the Fabulous Ones and the Rock ’n’ Roll Express. He entered the WWF as Moondog Spot in 1981. Teaming with Moondog Rex, he held the WWF Tag Team Title for several months. Spot, with an assortment of fellow Moondogs including Rex, Spike, Cujo and Splat, held various regional tag team titles throughout the 1990s.

Mora, Ute

Joao Cesar Monteiro

German actress Ute Mora died of cancer in Munich, Germany, on September 3, 2003. She was 58. Ms. Mora was born in Wuppertal, Germany, on August 12, 1945. She was best known for her role as Berta Griese in the popular German television series Lindenstrasse from 1985 until her death.

Moondog Spot Larry Booker, who wrestled as one of the fearsome Moondogs, suffered a heart attack while wrestling at the Mid-South Coliseum in Mem-

Moondog Spot (right, with Moondog Rex and manager Ronnie Lottz)

Ute Mora

279

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Morell, Barry Barry Morell, a leading tenor with the Metropolitan Opera for over 20 years, died of esophageal cancer at his Cape Cod, Massachusetts, home on December 4, 2003. He was 75. Morell was born in Manhasset, New York, in 1928. He studied singing from the late 1940s and debuted with the New York City Opera Company as Pinkerton in Madame Butterfly in 1955. He made his debut with the Met three years later in the same role. He remained a leading performer with the Met for the next 21 years in such operas as Tosca and La Boheme. He made his final Met appearance in a 1979 production of Madame Butterfly, and retired from the stage in 1986. New York Times, Dec. 8, 2003, B7.

Bill Morey

Barry Morell

Morey, Bill Character actor Bill Morey died in a Santa Monica, California, hospital on December 10,

2003. He was 83. Morey was born in Framingham, Massachusetts, on December 1919. He began his career in the 1940s, performing on stage and radio. He appeared in numerous films during his career including the 1975 cult classic Death Race 2000, The Onion Field (1979), Whitcomb’s War (1980), Some Kind of Hero (1982), Brainstorm (1983), Ghost Warrior (1986), Real Men (1987), Omega Syndrome (1987), Elvira, Mistress of the Dark (1988), Dad (1989), and Big Man on Campus (1989). He also appeared in numerous tele-films including Kill Me if You Can (1977), The Solitary Man (1979), Amber Waves (1980), Enola Gay: The Men, the Mission, the Atomic Bomb (1980) as General George Marshall, Crisis at Central High (1981), This House Possessed (1981), The Violation of Sarah McDavid (1981), Callie & Son (1981), Marian Rose White (1982), Mae West (1982), Games Mother Never Taught You (1982), the 1983 mini-series The Thorn Birds, Happy (1983), the 1985 mini-series adaptation of James Michener’s Space, Brothers-in-Law (1985), The Eagle and the Bear (1985), and Her Wicked Ways (1991). Morey appeared regularly as Lt. Sean Fisk in the supernatural comedy-mystery series Tucker’s Witch in 1982. He also starred as Oscar in 1993’s The John Larroquette Show and was E.L. Luddin in the 1999 television series Beggars and Choosers. His numerous television credits also include episodes of Mork & Mindy, The Waltons,

Obituaries • 2003

280

Happy Days, Laverne & Shirley, Archie Bunker’s Place, Simon & Simon, St. Elsewhere, Remington Steele, Cagney & Lacey, Hardcastle and McCormick, Moonlighting, Shadow Chasers, Hill Street Blues, Father Dowling Mysteries, Hunter, Designing Women, Beverly Hills, 90210, Civil Wars, L.A. Law, The Golden Palace, One West Waikiki, Murder One, The Visitor, Working, Boy Meets World, The Secret Lives of Men, and Frasier.

Morley, Karen Actress Karen Morley died of pneumonia at the Motion Picture Country House in Woodland Hills, California, on March 8, 2003. She was 93. She was born Mildred Linton in Ottumway, Iowa, on December 12, 1909. She began her film career in the late 1920s, appearing in such features as Thru Different Eyes (1929), Inspiration (1931), Strangers May Kiss (1931), Daybreak (1931), Never the Twain Shall Meet (1931), Politics (1931), High Stakes (1931), Laughing Sinners (1931), The Sin of Madelon Claudet (1931), The Cuban Love Song (1931), Mata Hari (1931) with Greta Garbo, Arsene Lupin (1932), Are You Listening? (1932), Man About Town (1932), Downstairs (1932), Washing-

ton Masquerade (1932), The Phantom of Crestwood (1932), Scarface (1932) as the gangster’s moll, Poppy, The Mask of Fu Manchu (1932) with Boris Karloff, Flesh (1932), Gabriel Over the White House (1933), Dinner at Eight (1933), The Crime Doctor (1934), Our Daily Bread (1934), Straight Is the Way (1934), Wednesday’s Child (1934), Black Fury (1935), Ten Dollar Raise (1935), The Healer (1935), Thunder in the Night (1935), The Littlest Rebel (1935), Devil’s Squadron (1936), Beloved Enemy (1936), Outcast (1937), The Last Train from Madrid (1937), The Girl from Scotland Yard (1937), On Such a Night (1937), Kentucky (1938), Pride and Prejudice (1940), Jealousy (1945), The Unknown (1936), The Thirteenth Hour (1947), Framed (1947), Samson and Delilah (1949), M (1951), and Born to the Saddle (1953). Morley’s film career was cut short in the late 1940s when she was blacklisted after her refusal to testify before the House Committee on Un-American Activities. She continued to be involved in leftist causes and ran for lieutenant governor in New York on the American Labor Party ticket in 1954. Morley was married to director Charles Vidor from 1932 until 1943, and, later, to actor Lloyd Gough. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 23, 2003, B10; New York Times, Apr. 27, 2003, 47; People, May 5, 2003, 123; Time, May 5, 2003, 26; Variety, Apr. 28, 2003, 80.

Morris, Frances

Karen Morley

Leading actress Frances Morris died in Santa Clarita, California, on December 2, 2003. She was 95. She was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, on August 3, 1908. She began her career in films as a leading lady in B-Westerns in the late 1920s, appearing in nearly 150 films over the next 30 years. Her numerous film credits include Thunder (1929), The Ridin’ Fool (1931), Guns for Hire (1932), Trailing North (1933), Pilgrimage (1933), Miss Fane’s Baby Is Stolen (1934), Nevada Cyclone (1934), Sing and Like It (1934), Stand Up and Cheer! (1934), Manhattan Love Song (1934), Hollywood Hoodlum (1934), The Cat’s Paw (1934), Against the Law (1934), Rawhide Terror (1934), Pals of the Range (1935), G Men (1935), Go Into Your Dance (1935), Alias Mary Dow (1935), Bonnie Scotland (1935), Here’s to Romance (1935), Redheads on Parade (1935), Case of the Missing

281

Frances Morris (as Ma Kent in Superman)

Man (1935), Lawless Riders (1935), Dangerous Intrigue (1936), Bridge of Sighs (1936), Preview Murder Mystery (1936), Give Us This Night (1936), Palm Springs (1936), On the Wrong Trek (1936), Devil’s Squadron (1936), Neighborhood House (1936), Bullets or Ballots (1936), Hollywood Boulevard (1936), Wedding Present (1936), Rose Bowl (1936), The Big Show (1936), More Than a Secretary (1936), Gold Diggers of 1937 (1936), Valiant Is the Word for Carrie (1936), Internes Can’t Take Money (1937), Venus Makes Trouble (1937), The Singing Marine (1937), Easy Living (1937), Exclusive (1937), Dance, Charlie, Dance (1937), Stand-In (1937), She Married an Artist (1937), Hollywood Hotel (1938), Little Miss Roughneck (1938), King of the Newsboys (1938), Cocoanut Grove (1938), Professor Beware (1938), The Sisters (1938), Sergeant Madden (1939), The Forgotten Woman (1939), I Stole a Million (1939), Our Leading Citizen (1939), Our Neighbors —The Carters (1939), A Child Is Born (1939), Young Tom Edison (1940), The House Across the Bay (1940), Sailor’s Lady (1940), Private Affairs (1940), Manhattan Heartbeat (1940), The Golden Fleecing (1940), I Want a Divorce (1940), Sandy Gets Her Man (1940), Life with Henry (1941), Sky Raiders (1941), Caught in the Draft (1941), Life Begins for Andy Hardy (1941), I’ll Sell My Life (1941), We Go Fast (1941), Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (1941), New York Town (1941), The Feminine Touch (1941), Dick Tracy vs. Crime, Inc. (1941), The Lady Is Willing (1942), My Heart Belongs to Daddy (1942), This Gun for Hire (1942), Strictly in the

2003 • Obituaries

Groove (1942), Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch (1942), Lady Bodyguard (1943), Over My Dead Body (1943), Hangmen Also Die (1943), Slightly Dangerous (1943), So Proudly We Hail! (1943), The Woman of the Town (1943), Four Jills in a Jeep (1944), Cover Girl (1944), The Story of Dr. Wassell (1944), Lumberjack (1944), The Bermuda Mystery (1944), Casanova Brown (1944), The Woman in the Window (1945), Keep Your Powder Dry (1945), Conflict (1945), Duff y’s Tavern (1945), Crime of the Century (1946), One More Tomorrow (1946), Centennial Summer (1946), Earl Carroll Sketchbook (1946), Blue Skies (1946), The Chase (1946), The Razor’s Edge (1946), That Brennan Girl (1946), California (1947), Suddenly, It’s Spring (1947), The Ghost Goes Wild (1947), Smash-Up, the Story of a Woman (1947), Blaze of Noon (1947), The Millerson Case (1947), The Unfaithful (1947), Living in a Big Way (1947), The Perils of Pauline (1947), The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (1947), Wild Harvest (1947), The Big Clock (1948), The Walls of Jericho (1948), Night Has a Thousand Eyes (1948), Sealed Verdict (1948), Joan of Arc (1948), Alias Nick Beal (1949), Holiday Affair (1949), A Dangerous Profession (1949), Mrs. Mike (1949), Caged (1950), This Side of the Law (1950), Edge of Doom (1950), Between Midnight and Dawn (1950), Again … Pioneers (1950), The Killer That Stalked New York (1950), Never Wave at a WAC (1952), The Captive City (1952), My Son John (1952), Carrie (1952), The Miracle of Our Lady of Fatima (1952), Because of You (1952), Miss Sadie Thompson (1953), Women’s Prison (1955), Crime Against Joe (1956), Gun for a Coward (1957), Fury at Showdown (1957), Wild Is the Wind (1957), and Portrait of a Mobster (1961). Morris also appeared often in character roles on television from the 1950s, notably as Clark Kent’s adoptive mother on the first episode of The Adventures of Superman in 1952. Other television credits include episodes of Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok, Cavalcade of America, The Man Behind the Badge, Playhouse 90, Maverick, The Restless Gun, Man Without a Gun, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Rawhide, Perry Mason, The Deputy, M Squad, The Case of the Dangerous Robin, Thriller, The Virginian, and Wagon Train.

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282

Morris, Michael

Morse, Sid

Radio and television writer and producer Michael Morris died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Los Angeles on June 20, 2003. He was 85. He was born Misha Shtuchkoff in Russia in 1918 and came to the United States with his actor-parents in the early 1920s. He sometimes performed with his father on radio and in Yiddish films as a child. He began writing for radio after serving in the U.S. Army during World War II. Morris wrote scripts for such series as Mr. and Mrs. North and Hollywood Story. He began working in television in 1960 after moving to Los Angeles. Morris scripted episodes of such series as Perry Mason, The Andy Griffith Show, McHale’s Navy, Bewitched, F Troop, It’s About Time, The Flying Nun, The Mothers-inLaw, Nanny and the Professor, All in the Family, and Temperatures Rising. He was also a writer and producer for the sit-com Chico and the Man. Morris also wrote the films For Love or Money (1963) and Wild and Wonderful (1964) and scripted television productions of Jack and the Beanstalk (1967), and Second Chance (1972). Variety, June 30, 2003, 47.

Television writer Sid Morse died on November 30, 2003. He was 83. Morse was born on May 29, 1920. He was an associate producer and writer for the Boris Karloff supernatural anthology series The Veil in the late 1950s. Morse also wrote for such television series as The Andy Griffith Show, The Doris Day Show, Dragnet 1967, The D.A., The Odd Couple, The Love Boat, Shazam!, and Isis. He produced the 1969 tele-film Wake Me When the War Is Over.

Michael Morris

Morton, Jay Writer Jay Morton died of a brain aneurysm in Charlotte, North Carolina, on September 6, 2003. He was 92. Morton was born in Hollywood, California, in 1911. He began working as a writer with Fleischer Studios in the late 1930s, and was soon writing the Superman animated shorts. Morton reportedly coined the popular catch-phrase “Faster than a speeding bullet, more powerful than a locomotive, able to leap tall buildings in a single bound.” Los Angeles Times, Sept. 19, 2003, B11; Time, Sept. 29, 2003, 21; Variety, Sept. 29, 2003, 77.

Jay Morton

283

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Moser, Hugo

Moya, Stella

Film and television director and writer Hugo Moser died of cancer in a Buenos Aires, Argentina, hospital on December 16, 2003. He was 77. Moser was born in Argentina on April 14, 1926. He began working in films in the 1950s, scripting such features as El Hombre Virgen (1956), Fantoche (1957), Strange Gods (1958), Salitre (1959), Vacation in Argentina (1960), and Rebelde con Causa (1961). He also began writing for television in the early 1960s, scripting the series Las Familia Falcon. He was also a director from the early 1970s, helming the films Quiero Besarlo, Senor (1973), La Flor de la Mafia (1974), and Fotografo de Senoras (1978). He worked primarily in television from the 1980s, directing and writing such series as Historia de un Trepador (1984), El Admionero y la Dama (1985), and El Precio del Poder (2002).

British stage and film actress Stella Moya died of cancer in San Antonio, Texas, on June 10, 2003. She was 86. She was born in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on June 18, 1916, and raised in London. She began performing on stage in the 1930s and starred in a handful of films including Stormy Weather (1936), The Scarab Murder Case (1936), East Meets West (1936), and Underneath the Arches (1937). She continued to appear in stage productions during World War II, when she met U.S. Air Force pilot Monty Mantoux. She married Mantoux in 1946 and abandoned her acting career to accompany her husband on his assignments with the Air Force.

Mui, Anita Hong Kong actress and pop singer Anita Mui died of cervical cancer in a Hong Kong hospital on December 30, 2003. She was 40. Mui was born Mei Yan Fang on October 10, 1963. She became a leading pop star after winning a singing contest in the early 1980s. She had a hit record-

Hugo Moser Anita Mui

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ing with 1984’s “Homecoming,” and became known as the Asian Madonna. She also began a career in films, co-starring with such actors as Jackie Chan and Leslie Cheung. Mui’s film credits include Dancing Warrior (1983), Mad Mad 83 (1983), Let’s Make Laugh (1983), Behind the Yellow Line (1984), Young Cops (1985), Lucky Diamond (1985), Golden Destroyers (1985), Musical Dancer (1985), Last Song in Paris (1986), Chocolate Inspector (1986), 100 Ways to Murder Your Wife (1986), Happy Ding Dong (19086), Why, Why, Tell Me Why! (1986), The Happy Bigamist (1987), Rouge (1987), Kid Dreams Thriller (1987), Trouble Couple (1987), One Husband Too Many (1988), Black Heart Ghost (1988), The Greatest Lover (1988), A Better Tomorrow III (1989), Black Dragon (1989), Code of Fortune (1989), Shanghai Encounter (1990), The Last Princess of Manchuria (1990), When My Dear Come Again (1991), Top Bet (1991), Saviour of Souls (1992), Justice, My Foot (1993), The Heroic Trio (1993), Moon Warriors (1993), The Magic Crane (1993), Heroic Trio 2: Executioners (1993), Fight Back to School III (1993), Mad Monk (1993), Legend of the Drunken Master (1994), Jet Li’s The Enforcer (1995), Rumble in the Bronx (1996) with Jackie Chan, Who’s the Man, Who’s the Woman (1996), Eighteen Springs (1997), Wu Yen (2001), Let’s Sing Along (2001), Dance of a Dream (2001), Midnight Fly (2001), and July Rhapsody (2002). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 1, 2004, B10; New York Times, Jan. 6, 2004; Time, Jan. 12, 2004, 23; Variety, Jan. 12, 2004, 60.

Sumitra Mukharjee

Murati, Lili Leading Hungarian actress Lili Murati died in Madrid, Spain, on April 16, 2003. She was 92. Murati was born in Szeged, Hungary, in 1911. She was featured in numerous films in Hungary from the mid–1930s including Miss President (1935), The Homely Girl (1935), Pay, Madame! (1937), 80 Mile Speed (1937), Miert? (1941), The Perfect Fam-

Mukharjee, Sumitra Indian actress Sunitra “Paro” Mukherjee died of a heart attack at her home in Kolkata, West Bengal, India, on May 21, 2003. She was 58. Mukherjee began her film career in the late 1960s, appearing in over 500 films. She was seen in such films as Basanata Bilap (1973), Datta (1976), Tusi (1978), Ganadevata (1979), Devdas (1979), and Ogu Bodhu Sundari (1981), a Bengali version of My Fair Lady. In recent years Mukharjee appeared primarily on Indian television.

Lili Murati

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ily (1942), Late (1943), This Was in Budapest (1943), A Nun at the Crossroads (1967), Las Bellas (1969), A Diary of a Murderess (1975), Island of 1000 Delights (1978), and Winter Diary (1988). Murati was also seen in David Lean’s 1965 classic Doctor Zhivago as a lady with a baby who jumps aboard a train.

Murolo, Roberto Italian singer Roberto Murolo died of heart failure in Naples, Italy, on March 13, 2003. He was 91. Murolo was born in Naples on January 19, 1912. He began his career in music performing with a quartet in the late 1930s. He embarked on a solo career after World War II. He became a leading recording star in Italy and was featured in a handful of films including Paolo and Francesca (1949), Catene (1949), El Voto (1950), The Counterfeiters (1950), Three Steps North (1951), Menzogna (1952), Tormento (1953), Viale Della Canzone (1965), and Cavalli si Nasce (1988). Murolo continued to perform and record until his death.

Roberto Murolo

Murphy, Brianne Pioneer female film director and cinematographer Brianne “Bri” Murphy died of a brain tumor and lung cancer after a long illness

Brianne Murphy

in Puerto Vallarto, Mexico, on August 20, 2003. She was 70. Murphy was born in London, England, on April 1, 1933. Moving to the United States, she attended New York City’s Neighborhood Playhouse. She worked in such jobs as a rodeo trick rider and a photographer for the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus. She moved to Hollywood in the mid–1950s where she worked on films by directors Jerry Warren and Ralph Brooke, both of whom would later become her husband. Working as production manager, script supervisor, wardrobe mistress, and occasional performer, Murphy was involved with such low-budget fare as Man Beast (1956), The Incredible Petrified World (1957), Teenage Zombies (1959), Bloodlust! (1961), One Way Wahini (1965), House of the Black Death (1965), Agent for H.A.R.M. (1966), A Man Called Dagger (1967), The Hostage (1967), and Fever Heat (1968). She directed the obscure 1972 horror film Blood Sabbath (aka Yyalah). In the late 1970s Murphy became working as a director of photography for such television series as Mulligan’s Stew, Kaz, Little House on the Prairie, Married: The First Year, Trapper John, M.D., Breaking Away, Stone, Father Murphy, Square Pegs, For Love and Honor, Highway to Heaven, In the Heat of the Night, Shades of LA, and Love & War, earning several Emmy nominations for her work. The first woman to become a member of the Cinematographers Guild,

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286

Murphy also filmed Anne Bancroft’s Fatso (1980), Cheech & Chong’s Nice Dreams (1981), Blackbird Fly (1991), and To Die, to Sleep (1992), which she also directed. Murphy was also cinematographer for the tele-films Like Mom, Like Me (1978), Secrets of the Bermuda Triangle (1978), Merlene of the Movies (1981), Little House: Look Back to Yesterday (1983), There Were Times, Dear (1985), Kung Fu: The Next Generation (1987), Destined to Live (1988), My Dad Can’t Be Crazy, Can He? (1989), and In the Best Interest of the Child (1990). Los Angeles Times, Aug. 27, 2003, B10; New York Times, Aug. 29, 2003, A21; Variety, Sept. 8, 2003, 67.

Murray, Trevor Irish film production designer Trevor Murray died suddenly while shooting the Steven Segal film Belly of the Beast in Bangkok, Thailand, on April 14, 2003. He was 33. Murray was born in Fenagh, County Carlow, Ireland, in 1969. He came to Los Angeles in the 1990s, working as a model maker for the films Space Truckers (1996) and Titanic (1997). He was art director for the films Bit Players (2000), Dancing at the Blue Iguana (2000), and The Forsaken (2001), and was production designer on 2003’s Tough Luck.

Muzaferija, Zaim Bosnian actor Zaim Muzaferija died in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, on November 5, 2003. He was 80. Muzaferija was born in Visoko, Bosnia, on March 9, 1923. After World War II he led the Visoko amateur theater group, directing 80 plays over 25 seasons. He made his film debut in 1961’s Boom Town. He was featured in numerous films over the next 40 years including The Fast (1967), Playing Soldiers (1967), Kaya, I’ll Kill You (1967), The Demolition Squad (1967), The Trek (1968), The Battle of Neretva (1969), Handcuffs (1970), Shepherd (1971), A Day Longer Than a Year (1971), Life of a Shock Force Worker (1972), Doktor Mladen (1975), Manhunt (1977), Dardevil’s Time (1977), Moment (1978), The Smell of Quinces (1982), When Father Was Away on Business (1986), The Magpie Strateg y (1987), Silent Gunpowder (1990), Death of a Schoolboy (1990), Adam the Icebreaker (1990), An Additional Soul (1991), Evil Blood (1991), The Perfect Circle (1997), and Peackeepers (1999).

Zaim Muzaferija

Myshkova, Nelli Trevor Murray

Russian actress Nelli Myshkova died in Moscow on September 13, 2003. She was 77. Myshkova was born in Leningrad (now St. Pe-

287

2003 • Obituaries

N!Xau (from The Gods Must Be Crazy)

Nelli Myshkova

tersburg), Russia, on May 8, 1926. A stage actress, she starred as the Princess of Lake Ilmen in the 1953 Russian film Sadko (aka The Magic Voyage of Sinbad). She also starred as Vasilisa in 1956’s Ilya Muromets (aka The Sword and the Dragon). Her other film credits include The House I Live In (1958), The Magic Weaver (1960), The Man from Nowhere (1961), Nevermore (1962), The House with an Attic (1964), An Easy Life (1964), The Viper (1965), Doktor Vera (1967), Man’s Talk (1968), and Vertical Races (1983).

Crazy Hong Kong (1993), and The Gods Must Be Funny in China (1994). Los Angeles Times, July 7, 2003, B9; New York Times, July 8, 2003, A25; People, July 21, 2003, 89; Variety, July 21, 2003, 71.

Nagoya, Akira Japanese character actor Akira Nagoya died of pneumonia in a Tokyo, Japan, hospital on June 24, 2003. He was 72. Nagoya was born in Tokyo on December 8, 1930. He studied at the Japan

N!Xau N!xau, the South African Kalahari Bushman who gained fame for starring in Jamie Uys’ satirical 1980 film The Gods Must Be Crazy, was found dead in the veldt near Tsumkwe, Namibia, on July 3, 2003. He had been missing for several days. He was 59. N!xau starred as Xixo, a Bushman whose discovery of an empty Coca-Cola bottle caused chaos for his tribe, in The Gods Must Be Crazy. He reprised the role in the 1989 sequel The Gods Must Be Crazy II. He received international acclaim for his role and appeared in several films in China including Crazy Safari (1991),

Akira Nagoya

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Broadcasting Corporation and was featured in numerous films from the early 1960s including The Twilight Story (1960), Heaven and Hell (1963), Fort Graveyard (1964), Love in a Small Room (1975), A Portrait of Shunkin (1976), Station (1982), Loves Lost (1982), The Great Department Store Robbery (1987), and Love Letter (1998). He was also the voice of Usi-Kai in Hayao Miyazaki’s Oscar-winning anime feature Princess Mononoke (1997). Nakoya was also a popular television actor in Japan.

Nassour, Tony Producer and digital editor Tony Nassour died of cancer in Sherman Oaks, California, on May 1, 2003. He was 47. Nassour created numerous commercials and music videos, and was the creator of the entertainment website, BreakTV.com. He also produced the cable programs Deep Dish TV and Deep Fried TV for Showtime.

Natanson, Joseph Joseph Natanson, a Surrealist painter who worked for many years as a designer and special effects artist for films, died in Rome on September 15, 2003. He was 94. Natanson was born in Cracow, Poland, on January 3, 1909. He studied art throughout Europe before World War II, and fought with the Polish army during the war. After the war he illustrated writer Karol Zbyszewski’s The Fight for Narvik: Impressions of the Polish Campaign in Norway. He remained in England after the war and became involved in films when Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger chose him to do the special effects for their production of The Red Shoes in 1947. Moving to Italy in the mid–1950s he was a matte artist and special effects designer for such films as Casta Diva (1954), Sign of the Gladiator (1959), Colossus and the Amazon Queen (1960), Two Women (1960), Francis of Assisi (1961), Atlas Against the Cyclops (1961), The Giant of Metropolis (1962), Cleopatra (1963), My Son, the Hero (1963), Jungle Adventurer (1964), The Cavern (1965), The Witches (1965), After the Fox (1966), Cast a Giant Shadow (1966), Spirits of the Dead (1968), Fellini’s Satyricon (1969), and The New Gladiators (1984).

Neau, Andre French cinematographer Andre Neau died in France on February 1, 2003. He was 69. Neau was born in Thouarce, Maine et Loire, France, on February 24, 1933. He worked in films as a director of photography from the mid–1970s, filming such features as Golden Night (1976), One Wild Moment (1977), The Return of Martin Guerre (1982), Blood and Sand (1987), Summer Interlude (1989), and Beware of My Love (1998). Neau also photographed numerous television productions in France including the 1993 mini-series Les Maitres du Pain and the 1999 tele-film The Magnificent Cuckold.

Nemethy, Ferenc Tony Nassour

Hungarian actor Ferenc Nemethy died in Budapest, Hungary, on April 8, 2003. He was 77. Nemethy was born in Hajdudorog, Hungary,

289

2003 • Obituaries

Newman, David

Andre Neau

Screenwriter David Newman, who received an Oscar nomination for his first screenplay for 1967’s Bonnie and Clyde, and later scripted the Superman films, died of complications from a stroke in a New York City hospital on June 26, 2003. He was 66. Newman was born in New York City on February 4, 1937. He began his career working as an editor for Esquire magazine in the 1960s. After writing Bonnie and Clyde in 1967, Newman wrote such films as There Was a Crooked Man… (1970), What’s Up, Doc? (1972), Bad Company (1972), Oh! Calcutta! (1972), Superman (1978), Superman II (1980), Still of the Night (1982), Jinxed! (1982), Superman III (1983), Sheena (1984), Santa Claus (1985), Michael Jackson’s Moonwalker (1988), and Takedown (2000). He most recently scripted several episodes of the Mutant X syndicated television series. He is survived by his wife, Leslie Newman, who often collaborated with him on scripts including the Superman series. Los Angeles Times, June 30, 2003, B9; New York Times, June 28, 2003, A12; Variety, July 14, 2003, 54.

Ferenc Nemethy

on February 19, 1926. A leading performer on the Hungarian stage, screen and television, he was seen in the films Forbidden Ground (1968), What Will Become of You, Esther? (1968), The Upthrown Stone (1968), Face (1970), Love (1971), and The Red Countess (1985). He was also seen in several U.S. tele-films including Murderers Among Us: The Simon Wiesenthal Story (1989), Max and Helen (1990), Daughter of Darkness (1990), Rasputin (1996), and Mary, Mother of Jesus (1999), and the films Mata Hari (1985), Alfred Nobel (1995) and The Gambler (1997).

David Newman

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Newman, Eve Music and film editor Eve Newman died in a Burbank, California, hospital of complications from lung cancer on October 10, 2003. She was 88. Newman began her career working at Disney as an animator in the 1930s. She worked as a music editor on numerous films from the 1950s including many by director Roger Corman. Her films include Flight to Mars (1951), Wagons West (1952), Flat Top (1952), The Maze (1953), Wichita (1955), Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), Spook Chasers (1957), Dino (1957), Hell’s Five Hours (1958), Fort Massacre (1958), Man of the West (1958), I Bury the Living (1958), Some Like It Hot (1959), The Gunfight at Dodge City (1959), House of Usher (1960), Alakazam the Great (1960), Master of the World (1961), Pit and the Pendulum (1961), Tales of Terror (1962), The Raven (1963), Operation Bikini (1963), X —The Man with X-Ray Eyes (1963), and The Comedy of Terrors (1964). She soon began editing films at American International Pictures, cutting such features as Muscle Beach Party (1964), Pajama Party (1964), Beach Blanket Bingo (1965), How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (1965), Sergeant Deadhead (1965), Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine (1965), The Ghost in the Invisible Bikini (1966), Fireball 500 (1966), The Big T.N.T. Show (1966), C’mon, Let’s Live a Little (1967), Three in the Attic (1968), Wild in the Streets (1968) which earned her an Academy Award nomination, Bloody Mama (1970), Deadhead Miles (1972), Little Cigars (1973), The Other Side of the Mountain (1975), Two Minute Warning (1976) which garnered her a second Oscar nomination, Paradise Alley (1978), Little Miss Marker (1980), and No Small Affair (1984). She also edited the tele-films The Stranger Who Looks Like Me (1974) and Into the Homeland (1987).

Ney, Nora Polish actress Nora Ney died of pneumonia and complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Encinitas, California, on February 21, 2003. She was 95. She was born Zoscia Neyman near Bialystok, Poland, in 1908. She began her film career in the 1920s, appearing in such features as The Oriole (1926), The Red Clown (1927), Police Chief Tageyev (1929), Voice of the Desert (1932), The

Beauty of Life (1930), Daughter of General Pankratov (1934), and Dr. Murek (1939). She left Poland for the Soviet Union at the start of World War II, where she worked on Soviet radio. She returned to Poland after the war, but was unable to resume her film career. Ney emigrated to the United States in 1946.

Ney, Nora Brazilian signer Nora Ney died of multiple organ failure in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on October 28, 2003. She was 81. Ney was born in Rio de Janiero, on March 20, 1922. She made her radio debut in 1951, and recorded her first album in 1952. She recorded Bill Haley’s rock ’n’ roll classic “Rock Around the Clock” in 1956. Married to singer Jorge Goulart, she and her husband left Brazil for political reasons in 1964. They returned in 1972 to record the album Tire o seu Sorriso de Caminho. Ney was featured in numerous Brazilian films in the 1950s including Carnaval Atlantida (1952), Tres Recrutas (1953), Carnaval em Caxias (1954), Guerra ao Samba (1956), and Garotas e Samba (1957).

Nora Ney of Brazil

Ngakane, Lionel South African actor and filmmaker Lionel Ngakane died in Rustenburg, South Africa, after a long illness on November 26, 2003. He was 75. Ngakane was born in Pretoria, South Africa, on July 17, 1928. He appeared in films from the early

291

Lionel Ngakane

2003 • Obituaries

Jackie Nicholas

1950s including Cry, the Beloved Country (1951), Duel in the Jungle (1954), Safari (1956), Odongo (1956), The Mark of the Hawk (1958) with Eartha Kitt, Elephant Gun (1958), The Night We Got the Bird (1961), The Painted Smith (1962), Two Gentlemen Sharing (1969), and The Squeeze (1977). He also appeared in the 1958 British television production of Quatermass and the Pit and an episode of Danger Man. Ngakane was a founding member of the Federation Panafrican des Cineastes (FEPACI), and directed the films Vulcani/Awake (1962) and Jemima & Johnny (1965).

Nicholas, Jackie Wrestler Samuel “Jackie” Nicholas died in a Portland, Maine, nursing home after a long illness on April 22, 2003. He was 92. A champion amateur wrestler, he began competing professionally in the 1940s and was a popular performer on television in the 1950s. He was known in the ring for his “Clinging Grapevine” finishing hold. He retired in the mid–1960s, and subsequently worked as a wrestling promoter and restaurateur.

Nicot, Claude French comic actor died in Paris on November 17, 2003. He was 78. A popular performer in post–World War II France, Nicot was seen in such films as Monsieur Chasse (1947), Monsieur

Claude Nicot

Vincent (1947), The Lovers of Verona (1949), Minnie (1950), Street Without a King (1950), Justice Is Done (1950), Les Petites Cardinal (1951), Perfectionist (1951), A Lady Without Camelias (1953), La Belle de Cadix (1953), No Exit (1954), Fruits of Summer (1955), Speaking of Murder (1957), Adorable Liar (1962), Dinner for Savages (1964), The Gardener of Argenteuil (1966), and Ca Fait Tilt (1978). He also appeared often on French television, performing in series and tele-films.

Nilsson, Jesse Actor Jesse Nilsson, star of the television series Adventure Inc., died in North York, Ontario,

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292

Jesse Nilsson

Canada, of heart failure brought on by pneumonia and asthma on April 26, 2003. He was 25. The Canadian actor starred as Gabriel Patterson in the syndicated television series Adventure Inc. He had previously starred in the television series Our Hero as Rollins in 2000, and University as A.J. Stock in 2001. Nilsson was also featured in the films Teenage Space Vampires (1998) and The Skulls (2000), and the tele-film Model Behavior (2000). His other television credits include episodes of Ready or Not, Twice in a Lifetime, and In a Heartbeat.

Nixon, Joan Lowery Mystery writer Joan Lowery Nixon died in Houston, Texas, of complications from pancreatic cancer on June 28, 2003. She was 77. Nixon was born in Los Angeles, in 1926. Her first book was published in 1964. Nixon was the author of numerous mystery novels for young adults. She wrote over 100 books and was the recipient of four Edgar Awards from the Mystery Writers of America and two Spur Awards from the Western Writers of America. Her numerous works include Mystery of the Secret Stowaway (1970), The Alligator Under the Bed (1974), Danger in Dinosaur Valley (1978), Bigfoot Makes a Movie (1979), The April Fool Mystery (1980), Mysterious Queen of Magic (1981), Days of Fear (1983), The Stalker (1985), Secret, Silent Screams (1988), The Island of Dangerous Dreams (1989), A Candidate for Mur-

Joan Lowery Nixon

der (1991), The Haunted House on Honeycutt Street (1991), The Name of the Game Was Murder (1993), Don’t Scream (1996), Search for the Shadowman (1996), The House on Hackman’s Hill (2001), and Nightmare (2003). Her novel The Other Side of Dark was made into the 1995 tele-flim Awake to Danger. New York Times, July 7, 2003, B6.

Nizet, Charles Exploitation film producer, director and writer Charles Nizet died on February 4, 2003. Nizet directed the films Mission: Africa (1968), Slaves of Love (1969), Three-Way Split (1970), The Ravager (1970), Voodoo Heartbeat (1972), Help Me … I’m Possessed (1976), and Rescue Force (1989).

Norton, Cliff Character actor Cliff Norton died of lung cancer at his home in Studio City, California, on January 25, 2003. He was 84. Norton was born in Chicago, Illinois, on March 21, 1918. He began his career in radio in Chicago before shifting to television with a recurring role in the variety se-

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Cliff Norton

Charles Nizet’s film Voodoo Heartbeat

ries Garroway at Large from 1949 to 1951. He subsequently starred in the comedy series The Public Life of Cliff Norton in 1952, and was a regular performer on the series The Dave Garroway Show, What’s Going On?, and Caesar Presents in the early 1950s. He was also seen in episodes of such series as Studio One, Checkmate, Dr. Kildare, The Dick Van Dyke Show, The Jack Benny Program, Grindl, My Favorite Martian, McHale’s Navy, My Favorite Martian, My Living Doll, The Munsters, The Joey Bishop Show, Bewitched, Ben Casey, The Andy Griffith Show, Hogan’s Heroes, The Smothers Brothers Show, Mr. Terrific, The Monkees, Death Valley Days, Wild Wild West, and I Dream of Jeannie. Norton starred as the Boss in the prehistoric comedy series It’s About Time in 1966, and was a voice actor in such animated series as Where’s Huddles? and The Jetsons. He appeared in several films during his career including Country Music Holiday (1958), It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (1963), Kiss Me, Stupid (1964), Harlow (1965), McHale’s Navy Joins the Air Force (1965), Frankie and Johnny (1966), The Ghost and Mr. Chicken

(1966), The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming (1966), Munster, Go Home (1966), The Phantom Tollbooth (1970) as a voice actor, Suppose They Gave a War and Nobody Came? (1970), Harry and Tonto (1974), Funny Lady (1975), and Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976). He was also seen in the tele-films The Rear Guard (1976), Never Con a Killer (1977), Stick Around (1977), The Mouse and His Child (1977) as the voice of Crow, It Happened One Christmas (1977), Ziegfeld: The Man and His Women (1978), and The World According to Straw (1990). Other television credits include episodes of Love, American Style, Get Smart, Here’s Lucy, The Beverly Hillbillies, Green Acres, Dusty’s Trail, The Odd Couple, Temperatures Rising, Lotsa Luck, Here’s Lucy, The Bob Newhart Show, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, Alice, Maude, One Day at a Time, Eight Is Enough, Archie Bunker’s Place, Young Maverick, Lou Grant, Highway to Heaven, Too Close for Comfort, Remington Steele, The Facts of Life, General Hospital, Gimme a Break!, Mr. Belvedere, Crazy Like a Fox, Punky Brewster, Dream On, and Murphy Brown. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 31, 2003, B13; New York Times, Feb. 1, 2003, A16; Variety, Feb. 10, 2003, 57.

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294

Nozaki, Albert Film special effects and art designer Albert Nozaki died in Los Angeles after a long illness on November 16, 2003. Nozaki was best known as the designer of the Martian warships in George Pal’s 1953 science fiction classic The War of the Worlds. Nozaki also worked with Pal as art designer on When Worlds Collide (1951) and Houdini (1952). He was also credited with such films as Champagne for Two (1947), The Big Clock (1948), Bride of Vengeance (1949), Sorrowful Jones (1949), Appointment with Danger (1951), Pony Express (1953), Casanova’s Big Night (1954), Living It Up (1954), The Ten Commandments (1956), Loving You (1957), and The Buccaneer (1958). Los Angeles Times, Nov. 29, 2003, B25; New York Times, Dec. 2, 2003, B8; Variety, Dec. 8, 2003, 74. Kevin Oakley

trying to rescue his son from a stream. He was 41. Oakley and his son were pulled out to sea by the current. The son was saved by another vacationer, but Oakley drowned. He was born on August 11, 1962, and worked in films from the early 1990s. His credits include The Swan Princess (1994), Space Jam (1996), Cats Don’t Dance (1997), The Mighty Kong (1998), Quest for Camelot (1998), The Iron Giant (1999), Mission to Mars (2000), Osmosis Jones (2001), Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron (2002), Eight Crazy Nights (2002), and Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 20, 2003, B3.

O’Connor, Donald

Albert Nozaki

Oakley, Kevin Special effects artist and animator Kevin Oakley died in a drowning accident in Haleakala National Park, Hawaii, on August 18, 2003, while

Entertainer Donald O’Connor, who starred in the popular Francis, the Talking Mule comedy series in the 1950s and co-starred with Gene Kelly in the 1952 musical Singin’ in the Rain, died of heart failure at a Calabasas, California, retirement home on September 27, 2003. He was 78. O’Connor was born in Chicago on August 28, 1925, the son of vaudeville performers. He began appearing with his family on stage while still an infant and made his film debut as a specialty dancer in 1937’s Melody for Two. Signed by Para-

295

Donald O’Connor (with Elaine Stewart)

mount, O’Connor appeared in such films as It Can’t Last Forever (1937), Men with Wings (1938), Sing You Sinners (1938), Sons of the Legion (1938), Tom Sawyer, Detective (1938) as Huckleberry Finn, Boy Trouble (1939), Unmarried (1939), Million Dollar Legs (1939), Death of a Champion (1939), Beau Geste (1939), On Your Toes (1939), and Night Work (1939). O’Connor then returned to the stage for several years. He resumed his film career in 1942 at Universal, where he appeared in numerous musicals. His film credits include What’s Cookin’? (1942), Private Buckaroo (1942), Give Out, Sisters (1942), Get Hep to Love (1942), When Johnny Comes Marching Home (1942), It Comes Up Love (1943), Mister Big (1943), Top Man (1943), Chip Off the Old Block (1944),This Is the Life (1944), The Merry Monahans (1944), Bowery to Broadway (1944), Patrick the Great (1945), Something in the Wind (1947), Are You with It? (1948), Feudin’, Fussin’ and A-Fightin’ (1948), Yes Sir That’s My Baby (1949), Curtain Call at Cactus Creek (1950), The Milkman (1950), and Double Crossbones (1951). O’Connor starred as Peter Stirling in the first Francis the Talking Mule film in 1950, and remained with the series for Francis Goes to the Races (1951), Francis Covers the Big Town (1953), Francis Joins the WACS (1954), and Francis in the Navy (1955). He starred as Cosmo Brown in the musical hit Singin’ in the Rain with

2003 • Obituaries

Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds in 1952. He continued to appear in such films as I Love Melvin (1953), Call Me Madam (1953), Walking My Baby Back Home (1953), There’s No Business Like Show Business (1954), Anything Goes (1956), and 1957’s The Buster Keaton Story as Keaton. During the 1950s O’Connor appeared often in The Colgate Comedy Hour, winning a Emmy Award for his performances. He was also seen in such television series as Playhouse 90, Chrysler Theatre, The DuPont Show of the Month, The Jackie Gleason Show, and The Judy Garland Show. O’Connor starred in the 1961 Italian film The Wonders of Aladdin, and appeared in Cry for Happy (1961), and That Funny Feeling (1965). His film appearances decreased from the 1960s, though O’Connor was seen on television in episodes of Ellery Queen, The Bionic Woman, Police Story, Hunter, The Love Boat, Alice, The Littlest Hobo, Simon & Simon, Hotel, Highway to Heaven, Murder, She Wrote, Tales from the Crypt, Frasier, and The Nanny. He also appeared in a handful of films later in his career including Ragtime (1981), Pandemonium (1982), A Time to Remember (1987), Toys (1992), Father Frost (1996), and Out to Sea (1997). Los Angeles Times, Sept. 28, 2003, B22; New York Times, Sept. 29, 2003, A19; People, Oct. 13, 2003, 91; Time, Oct. 6, 2003, 25; Variety, Oct. 6, 2003, 102.

O’Duffy, Michael Irish lyric tenor Michael O’Duffy died after a long illness in Herfordshire, England, on April 19, 2003. He was 84. A popular singer in the 1950s and 1960s, O’Duffy was featured in several films including John Ford’s The Rising of the Moon (1957), Gideon’s Day (1958), and Johnny Nobody (1961).

Oliver, Dale Disney animator Dale Oliver died of an aneurysm in North Hollywood, California, on October 2, 2003. He was 83. Oliver was born in Lincolnville, Kansas, on December 14, 1919. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps Glider Pilot Program during World War II, where he sketched and painted aviation art. After the war Oliver worked as a commercial artist, joining Walt Dis-

Obituaries • 2003

296

Carlos Olmos

Olsson, Diana

Michael O’Duffy

ney Studio’s animation department. He worked on such Disney films as Sleeping Beauty, 101 Dalmations, Peter Pan, Winnie the Pooh, The Rescuers Down Under, Robin Hood, and 1981’s The Fox and the Hound. He subsequently retired from Disney.

Olmos, Carlos Mexican television writer Carlos Olmos died in Mexico of respiratory failure due to bronchitis on October 13, 2003. He was 55. Olmos began his career was a playwright in Mexico City, writing The Dandy of the Savoy and Profane Games. He was best known for writing the popular Mexican soap opera, or telenovela, Cuna de Lobos (aka Den of Wolves) in 1986. He also wrote the series Just as We Are (1987) and Unimagined Sin (2001). His most recent play, After the Earthquake, debuted earlier in the year. Variety, Oct. 27, 2003, 67.

British radio actress Diana Olsson died in Edinburgh, Scotland, on October 11, 2003. She was 74. Olsson was born in London on February 12, 1929. She began her career on stage but soon was performing on radio. She joined the BBC Drama Repertory Company in the 1950s. She performed in numerous radio dramas including the Philip O’Dell mysteries and the 1960 Gothic chiller The Doomsday Book. She also performed in radio productions of R.C. Sheriff ’s A Shred of Evidence (1960), Margery Allingham’s Look to the Lady (1961), and 1961’s Counsel for the Defence. In the 1970s she was featured in the radio series Dr. Finlay’s Casebook and numerous other dramas. She was seen in the Scottish television soap opera Take the High Road, and also performed often on stage.

Oman, Julia Trevelyan British theatrical designer Julia Trevelyan Oman died of cancer in Harefordshire, England, on October 10, 2003. She was 73. Oman was born in Kensington, West London, England, on July 11, 1930. In the late 1950s she worked as a designer for BBC television, working on such series as The Billy Cotton Band Show and Jack Good’s Six Five Special. She designed Jonathan Miller’s 1966 television production of Alice in Wonderland and worked on The Forsyte Saga in 1967. She subse-

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Julia Trevelyan Oman

quently left the BBC. She designed the sets for the Royal Ballet’s production of Frederick Ashton’s Enigma Variations in 1968, the National Theatre’s production of The Merchant of Venice in 1970, and the Royal Shakespeare Company’s Othello in 1971. Several years later she redesigned Covent Garden’s sets for La Boheme. Oman also worked on several films including Tony Richardson’s Charge of the Light Brigade (1967) and Sam Peckinpah’s Straw Dogs (1971). She was married to historian and writer Sir Roy Strong from 1971. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 15, 2003, B10; New York Times, Oct. 20, 2003, A15.

Omarr, Sydney Astrologer and columnist Sydney Omarr died of pneumonia and complications from a heart attack in a Santa Monica, California, hospital on January 2, 2003. He was 76. Omarr was born Sidney Kimmelman in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on August 5, 1926. He became interested in astrology and numerology as a teen and began writing horoscopes for film stars for various magazines. Omarr also worked as a newsman for CBS radio before becoming a full-time astrological columnist and consultant. He was a fre-

Sydney Omarr

quent guest on television talk shows and his column appeared in over 200 newspapers. He was also the author of 12 best-selling books, one for each of the 12 zodiac signs. Omarr was stricken with multiple sclerosis in 1971, but continued his work until a heart attack hospitalized him in December of 2002. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 3, 2003, B10; New York Times, Jan. 4, 2003, A12; People, Jan. 20, 2003, 113.

Orbison, Joan Animator Joan Orbison died on January 19, 2003. She was 92. She began working in films in the late 1930s and worked at Disney, UPA, Eagle, and Hanna-Barbera during her career. She worked as an animator on such 1970s television cartoon series as Shazzan!, Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!, Josie and the Pussycats, The New Scooby-Doo Movies, and Hong Kong Phooey.

Obituaries • 2003

298

Orlandi, Felice Veteran character actor Felice Orlandi died of lung cancer in Burbank, California, on May 21, 2003. He was 77. Orlandi was born in Italy on September 18, 1925. He came with his family to the United States at an early age and was raised in Cleveland, Ohio. Orlandi served in the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II. After the war he studied drama and performed on stage. He made his film debut as a gangster in Stanley Kubrick’s 1955 film Killer’s Kiss. Orlandi was also featured in the films The Harder They Fall (1956), Never Love a Stranger (1958), The Pusher (1960), Bullitt (1968), They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? (1969), Catch-22 (1970), The Outside Man (1972), The Outfit (1974), Hard Times (1975), The Driver (1978), The Long Riders (1980), Hit List (1989), and Another 48 Hrs. (1990). He was also seen in the tele-films Honor Thy Father (1973), The Girl on the Late, Late Show (1974), Fugitive Family (1980), and The Neon Empire (1989). Orlandi’s numerous television credits also include episodes of Naked City, Burke’s Law, The Wackiest Ship in the Army, Wild Wild West, Hogan’s Heroes, Captain Nice, Gunsmoke, Mission: Impossible, The High Chaparral, The F.B.I., Mission: Impossible, Cannon, Cade’s County, The Streets of San Francisco, Mannix, Hawaii Five-O, Petrocelli, Police

Felice Orlandi

Story, The Bionic Woman, The Powers of Matthew Star, Hill Street Blues, and Tales from the Darkside. Los Angeles Times, May 24, 2003, B31.

Osterman, Lester Theatrical producer Lester Osterman died in a Norwalk, Connecticut, hospital on January 28, 2003. He was 88. Osterman was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1914. He was a successful broker on Wall Street before he made his debut as a Broadway financial backer with Mr. Wonderful in 1956. The following year Osterman produced the musical adaptation of Candide, which received a Tony nomination for best musical. Osterman went on to win Tony awards for productions of A Moon for the Misbegotten (1974), The Shadow Box (1977), and Da (1978). He also produced the plays High Spirits (1964), Fade Out, Fade In (1964), and The Rothschilds (1970). Osterman’s final production was 1986’s Execution of Justice. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 1, 2003, B21; New York Times, Jan. 31, 2003, C11; Variety, Feb. 3, 2003, 79.

Lester Osterman

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Palmer, Robert

Palomo, Eduardo

British singing star Robert Palmer died of a heart attack in Paris on September 26, 2003. He was 54. Palmer was born in Batley, Yorkshire, England, on January 19, 1949. In the late 1960s he began performing in England with the bands Alan Bown Set and Vinegar Joe. Palmer began a solo career in 1974. During the 1980s he became a top performer with his sharp fashion style and slickly produced music videos on MTV. He had hit songs with “Addicted to Love,” “Simply Irresistible,” “Some Guys Have All the Luck,” and “I Didn’t Mean to Turn You On.” Palmer started the rock group Power State with John Taylor and Andy Taylor in 1985, producing the hits “Communication” and “Get It On.” He recorded the album His Ridin’ High in 1992 and a greatest hits album was released in 1995. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 27, 2003, B20; New York Times, Sept. 27, 2003, A25; Time, Oct. 6, 2003, 25; Variety, Oct. 6, 2003, 103.

Mexican actor Eduardo Palomo died of a heart attack after collapsing at a restaurant in Los Angeles on November 8, 2003. He was 41. Palomo was born in Mexico City on May 13, 1962. He began his career on television in Mexico in the early 1980s, where he starred numerous telenovelas (soap operas). He was best known for his role as Juan del Diablo in Corazon Salvaje (Wild Heart) from 1993. Palomo also starred in several Mexican films including Benjamin’s Woman (1991), Bandits (1991), My Dear Tom Mix (1991), Gertrudis Bocanegra (1992), A Breakfast Chronicle (1999), and El Misterio de Trinidad (2003). Palomo came to the United States to appear as Capt. Lazareno in the 2003 television mini-series Kingpin. Variety, Nov. 17, 2003, 58

Eduardo Palomo

Panama, Norman

Robert Palmer

Film producer, director and writer Norman Panama died of Parkinson’s disease in Los Angeles on January 13, 2003. He was 88. Panama was born in Chicago, Illinois, on April 21, 1914. He began writing plays and sketches in the 1930s,

Obituaries • 2003

300 direct such films as Not with My Wife, You Don’t! (1966), How to Commit Marriage (1969), The Maltese Bippy (1969), and I Will, I Will … for Now (1976), and the tele-films Coffee, Tea or Me? (1973) and Barnaby and Me (1977). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 25, 2003, B19; New York Times, Jan. 27, 2003, A23; Variety, Feb. 3, 2003, 77.

Parady, Ron

Norman Panama

often collaborating with Melvin Frank. They went to Hollywood in the early 1940s, where they wrote the 1942 Bob Hope comedy My Favorite Blonde. Panama continued to work on such films as Star Spangled Rhythm (1942), Happy Go Lucky (1942), Thank Your Lucky Stars (1943), And the Angels Sing (1944), Duffy’s Tavern (1945), Road to Utopia (1946) which earned him and Frank Oscar nominations for best original screenplay, Monsieur Beaucaire (1946), Our Hearts Were Growing Up (1946), It Had to Be You (1947), A Southern Yankee (1948), and The Return of October (1948). Panama scripted and produced Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House in 1948, and made his directoral debut with 1950’s The Reformer and the Redhead. Continuing to work with Frank, Panama co-scripted the 1954 Christmas classic White Christmas, and directed, and often produced and scripted, such films as Strictly Dishonorable (1951), Callaway Went Thataway (1951), Above and Beyond (1952), Knock on Wood (1954) earning another Oscar nomination for screenplay, The Court Jester (1956) with Danny Kaye, The Certain Feeling (1956), The Trap (1959), and The Road to Hong Kong (1962). Panama received a third Academy Award nomination for his script for 1960’s The Facts of Life. Panama’s partnership with Melvin Frank dissolved in 1966, and he continued to

Character actor Ron Parady died in Norwalk, Connecticut, of cancer on June 15, 2003. He was 63. Parady was born in Cleveland, Ohio, on March 12, 1940. He was best known for his television roles, appearing regularly as Assistant Chief Dennis Mahoney on Hill Street Blues in 1983, and as Andrew Gross in The City in 1995. He was also seen in the tele-films Who Am I This Time? (1982), The Lost Honor of Kathryn Beck (1984), C.A.T. Squad: Python Wolf (1988), and Our Town (1989), and episodes of The Equalizer, Spenser: For Hire, Early Edition, and Law & Order. He was also seen in the daytime soap operas As the World Turns and One Life to Live.

Ron Parady (as Scrooge)

301 Parady also appeared in a handful of feature films during his career including The Naked Face (1984), The Protector (1985), Bum Rap (1988), Nick and Jane (1997), and Walking to the Waterline (1998). He was also a frequent stage performer, appearing in Broadway productions of Candida (1981), Prelude to a Kiss (1990), An American Daughter (1997), and Proof (2000). He appeared as Scrooge in Washington’s Ford’s Theatre production of A Christmas Carol for six seasons.

Parker, Suzy Leading fashion model turned actress Suzy Parker died at her home in Montecito, California, on May 3, 2003. She was 70. Parker was born Cecelia Anne Renee Parker in San Antonio, Texas, on October 28, 1932. She was one of the leading models of the 1950s, modeling for designer Coco Chanel. Later in the decade she moved to films, starring in such features as Funny Face (1957), Kiss Them for Me (1957), Ten North Frederick (1958), The Best of Everything (1959), A Circle of Deception (1960), The Interns (1962), Flight from Ashiya (1964), and Chamber of Horrors (1966). She also appeared on television in episodes of

Suzy Parker

2003 • Obituaries

Burke’s Law, The Twilight Zone, Dr. Kildare, Tarzan, It Takes a Thief, and Rod Serling’s Night Gallery. She married actor Bradford Dillman in 1963 and retired her career later in the decade. Los Angeles Times, May 6, 2003, B13; New York Times, May 6, 2003, C17; People, May 19, 2003, 111; Time, May 19, 2003, 27.

Parrish, Julie Actress Julie Parrish died at a Tarzana, California, hospital of ovarian cancer on October 1, 2003. She was 62. Parrish was born Ruby Joyce Wilbar in Middlesboro, Kentucky, on October 21, 1940. After appearing on the local stage, she won a national modeling contest in the early 1960s and had a small role in Jerry Lewis’ 1962 film It’s Only Money. Changing her name to Julie Parrish, her next role was in Lewis’ 1963 comedy The Nutty Professor. She continued to appear in such films as Harlow (1965), Winter A-Go-Go (1965), Fireball 500 (1965), and Paradise, Hawaiian Style (1966) with Elvis Presley. Parrish starred as Linda Lewis in the 1967 television comedy series Good Morning, World, and was Betty Harrington in the drama series Return to Peyton Place in 1972. Parrish was also seen in the films The Doberman Gang (1972) and The Devil and Max

Julie Parrish

Obituaries • 2003

302

Devlin (1981). She also appeared in the tele-films The Time Machine (1978), Greatest Heroes of the Bible (1978), When She Was Bad… (1979), The Last Fling (1987), and Baby M (1988). She appeared as Maggie Brady in the daytime soap opera Capitol from 1982 to 1985, and was Joan Diamond on the drama series Beverly Hills, 90210 from 1996 to 1997. Her numerous television credits also include episodes of Temple Houston, Gunsmoke, Burke’s Law, Ben Casey, The F.B.I., Gidget, Bonanza, Pistols ’n’ Petticoats, the original Star Trek pilot episode, Family Affair, Death Valley Days, Mannix, Family Affair, The Smith Family, The Rockford Files, Laverne & Shirley, Dynasty, Hotel, Murder, She Wrote, and Hunter. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 8, 2003, B10; Variety, Oct. 13, 2003, 42.

Parslow, Philip Film and television producer Philip L. Parslow died of a heart attack at his home in Sherman Oaks, California, on July 29, 2003. He was 66. Parslow was born in Los Angeles on August 2, 1936. A football player with the University of California in the late 1950s, he played pro football for several years until an injury ended his career. After attending the Director’s Guild’s assistant directors training program, Parslow worked as an assistant director on such films as Gaily, Gaily (1969), Doctors’ Wives (1971), and J.W. Coop (1972). In 1973 he served as an associate producer on the film The Paper Chase. He subsequently worked with Tom Laughlin’s Billy Jack Productions and Steve McQueen’s Solar Productions. He produced the films The Master Gunfighter (1975) and An Enemy of the People (1978), and the tele-films The Underground Man (1974) and Love for Rent (1979). Parslow worked primarily in television from the early 1980s, serving as a producer on such series as Dynasty, Falcon Crest, John Grisham’s The Client, Prey, Brimstone, and Boomtown. He also produced the tele-films Right of Way (1983), A Doctor’s Story (1984), Women of Valor (1986), There Was a Little Boy (1993), The Innocent (1994), The Colony (1996), and Knots Landing: Back to the Cul-de-Sac (1996), and the feature film Once You Meet a Stranger (1996). Variety, Sept. 1, 2003, 62.

Passendorfer, Jerzy Polish filmmaker Jerzy Passendorfer died in Skolinow, Poland, at the retirement home for actors on February 20, 2003. He was 79. Passendorfer was born in Wilno, Poland, on April 8, 1923. He began his career on the Polish stage near the end of World War II. He graduated from film school in Prague in 1951 and began directing educational films. He was an assistant to director Leonard Buczkowski on the Polish comedy film Adventure in Marienstadt in 1954. He made his directoral debut on a feature film in 1957 with The Treasure of Captain Martens. He subsequently directed Answer to Violence (1959), Fire Bath (1963), The Lost Bridge (1963), Colours of Battle (1964), A Sunday of Justice (1966), Big Beat (1967), Heading for Berlin (1969), The Last Days (1969), The Day of Purification (1970), Operation Brutus (1971), Kill the Black Sheep (1972), and Mewy (1986). He was best known for directing the epic television series Janosik in 1974.

Passgard, Lars Swedish actor Lars Passgard died in Malmo, Sweden, on March 16, 2003. He was 62. Passgard was born in Boras, Sweden, on February 14, 1941. He was featured in numerous Swedish films from the early 1960s including Through a Glass Darkly (1961), The Baby Carriage (1963), The Prize (1963), Swedish Wedding Night (1964), The Chasers (1965), The Serpent (1966), A Time in the Sun (1966), and Fuller Report (1967). Passgard worked often in television from the 1990s, appearing in the series Vasasagan (1998) and the

Lars Passgard (on the right?)

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mini-series Labyrinten (2000), Soldiers by Moonlight (2000), and The Fifth Woman (2002).

Paterson, William Actor William Paterson died of lung cancer in San Francisco, California, on September 3, 2003. He was 84. Paterson was born in Buffalo, New York, on July 7, 1919. He performed on the San Francisco stage for many years, and was also seen in a handful of films including Dirty Harry (1971), At Long Last Love (1975), Hard Traveling (1985), and Pacific Heights (1990). He also appeared in the tele-films The Taming of the Shrew (1976), 1981’s A Christmas Carol as Ebenezer Scrooge, and Hear No Evil (1982). His other television credits include episodes of Bonanza, The Waltons, and Midnight Caller. Variety, Oct. 13, 2003, 43.

William Paterson

Johnny Paycheck

and moved to Nashville in the mid–1950s. He worked as a bass player for various country musicians and made several recordings under the name Donny Young. He became known as Johnny Paycheck in the mid–1960s. A leading singer and songwriter, he was best known for the 1977 hit “Take This Job and Shove It.” His other hits include “Don’t Take Her, She’s All I Got,” “I’m the Only Hell Mama Ever Raised,” “Slide Off Your Satin Sheets,” and “You Can Have Her.” “Take This Job and Shove It” was adapted for film in 1981, with Paycheck appearing in a small role. He also appeared in the films Smokey and the Good Time Outlaws (1978), Hell’s Angels Forever (1983), and Paradise Park (1991), and was featured in episodes of Hee Haw and The Dukes of Hazzard. Paycheck was sent to prison in 1989 on charges of shooting a man in the head. His sentence was commuted by the Ohio governor in 1991 and he resumed his musical career. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 20, 2003, B15; New York Times, Feb. 20, 2003, A29; People, Mar. 10, 2003, 87; Time, Mar. 3, 2003, 25; Variety, Feb. 24, 2003, 87.

Paycheck, Johnny Country singer Johnny Paycheck died of complications from asthma and emphysema in a Nashville, Tennessee, nursing home on February 19, 2003. He was 64. He was born Donald Eugene Lytle in Greenfield, Ohio, on May 31, 1938. He began singing professionally at the age of 15

Pecas, Max French exploitation film producer, director and writer Max Pecas died of cancer in Paris on February 10, 2003. He was 77. Pecas was born in Lyon, France, on April 25, 1925. He began making films in the early 1960s, directing numerous

Obituaries • 2003

304

Max Pecas

adult features including Daniella by Night (1961), Sweet Ecstasy (1962), Five Wild Girls (1964), The Erotic Touch of Hot Skin (1963), Heat at Midnight (1965), Torment (1966), The Slave (1967), The Night of the Three Lovers (1967), Her and She and Him (1969), I Am a Nymphomaniac (1970), I Should Have Stayed in Bed (1972), Private Club (1974), Young Casanova (1974), 1001 Perversions of Felicia (1975), Sweet Taste of Honey (1976), Who Is That Splashing in the Mediterranean? (1980), and Les Branches a Saint-Tropez (1983).

with the Neighborhood Playhouse. Peck made his debut on the Broadway stage in the 1942 production of Emlyn Williams’ The Morning Star. Unable to serve in the military during World War II because of a back injury, Peck soon went to Hollywood where he starred in such features as Days of Glory (1944), Valley of Decision (1944), and Alfred Hitchcock’s Spellbound (1945). Peck was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor four times during the 1940s for his roles in The Keys of the Kingdom (1944), The Yearling (1946), The Gentleman’s Agreement (1947), and Twelve O’Clock High (1949). Other film include Duel in the Sun (1946), The Macomber Affair (1947), The Paradine Case (1947), Yellow Sky (1948), and The Great Sinner (1949). He remained one of Hollywood’s favorite leading men in the 1950s in such movies as The Gunfighter (1950), Only the Valiant (1951), David and Bathsheba (1951), Captain Horatio Hornblower (1951), Ernest Hemingway’s The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1952), The World in His Arms (1952), Roman Holiday (1953) with Audrey Hepburn, The Million Pound Note (1953), Night People (1954), The Purple Plain (1954), The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit (1956), John Huston’s Moby Dick (1956) as Captain Ahab, Designing Women (1957), The Bravados (1958), The Big Country (1958) which he also produced, Pork Chop Hill (1959), Beloved Infidel (1959), and the 1959 end-of-the-world epic On the Beach with Ava Gardner. Peck began the 1960s as the commander of a military operation in The Guns of Navarone (1961), an attorney whose family is threatened by a vengeful Robert Mitchum in Cape Fear (1962), and star of the Western epic How the West Was Won (1962). After winning the

Peck, Gregory Leading actor Gregory Peck, whose role as dedicated Southern attorney Atticus Finch in 1962’s To Kill a Mockingbird earned him an Academy Award and was named the greatest film hero of all time by the American Film Institute earlier in the year, died at his home in Los Angeles on June 12, 2003. He was 87. Peck was born in LaJolla, California, on April 5, 1916. He became interested in acting attending college and went to New York in the late 1930s, where he performed

Gregory Peck (left, with Jane Fonda and Jimmy Smits from Old Gringo

305 Oscar for To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), Peck continued to star in such films as Captain Newman, M.D. (1963), Behold a Pale Horse (1964), Mirage (1965), Arabesque (1966), The Stalking Moon (1969), Mackenna’s Gold (1969), The Chairman (1969), Marooned (1969), I Walk the Line (1970), Shoot Out (1971), Billy Two Hats (1973), the supernatural thriller The Omen (1976), MacArthur (1977) as Gen. Douglas MacArthur, The Boys from Brazil (1978) in a rare villainous role as Nazi scientist Dr. Josef Mengele, and The Sea Wolves (1980). Peck was featured as Abraham Lincoln in the 1982 television mini-series The Blue and the Gray, and starred in the 1983 tele-film The Scarlet and the Black. He was the President of the United States in the 1987 fantasy Amazing Grace and Chuck and aging writer Ambrose Bierce in 1989’s Old Gringo. Peck was featured in the 1991 film Other People’s Money and had a cameo role in the 1991 remake of Cape Fear. He appeared in the 1993 tele-film The Portrait and made his final film appearance in the role of Father Mapple in the 1998 tele-film remake of Moby Dick. Peck was awarded the Medal of Freedom by President Lyndon Johnson in 1968, and was the recipient of the American Film Institute’s Life Achievement Award in 1989 Los Angeles Times, June 13, 2003, A1; New York Times, June 13, 2003, A1; People, June 30, 2003, 46; Time, June 23, 2003, 86; Variety, June 16, 2003, 44.

2003 • Obituaries

Jean Pelegri

Pelegri, Jean French writer and actor Jean Pelegri died on September 24, 2003. He was 83. Pelegri was born in Algeria on June 20, 1920. His first novel was published in the early 1950s. He was best known for writing the autobiographical novel The Olive Trees of Justice. He also scripted the 1962 film version and was featured in the film as the father. Pelegri was also seen in the films Pickpocket (1959), The Big Carnival (1983), Therese (1986), Frequent Death (1988), and Coming to Terms with the Dead (1994).

Pentecost, George Character actor George Pentecost died in a Los Angeles hospital on December 23, 2003, after

George Pentecost

a long illness. He was 64. Pentecost was born in Detroit, Michigan, on July 15, 1939. He began his career on stage in Detroit in the 1960s and made his Broadway debut in The Show Off with Helen Hayes in 1967. Pentecost was also seen in the films All the President’s Men (1976), The Last Married Couple in America (1980), and No Small Affair (1984), and the tele-films After George (1983), It

Obituaries • 2003

306

Came Upon the Midnight Clear (1984), and Roswell (1994). He starred as Horace “Stubbs” Wilmington in the 1977 television comedy series Blansky’s Beauties and was recurring character Tony the Tuna in the daytime soap opera Another World from 1984 to 1988, and again from 1994 to 1995. His other television credits include episodes of The Rockford Files, Barney Miller, Happy Days, Laverne & Shirley, Eight Is Enough, Charlie’s Angels, Lou Grant, Barney Miller, Mork & Mindy, Starsky and Hutch, One Day at a Time, Diff ’rent Strokes, Night Court, Remington Steele, Family Ties, Newhart, Hooperman, L.A. Law, and Kirk.

Perez Diaz, Amalia Venezuelan actress Amalia Perez Diaz died of a heart attack in Caracas, Venezuela, on December 26, 2003. She was 80. Perez Diaz was born in Valparaiso, Chile, on June 15, 1923. She was best known for her roles in numerous Venezuelan tele-novelas from the 1980s including Luz Marina, Angelito, La Salvaje, Topacio, La Dama de Rosa, Carmen Querida, Ilusiones, La Nina de Mis Ojos, and 2002’s Mi Gorda Bella.

Perlov, David Israeli documentary filmmaker David Perlov died in a Tel Aviv, Israel, hospital on December 13, 2003. He was 73. Perlov was born in Brazil in 1930, the son of a circus magician. He moved to France in the early 1950s where he directed a short film based on illustrations from a children’s book. He emigrated to Israel in 1958, where he made such documentary films as In Jerusalem (1963), Tel Katzir (1964), and Israeli Theatre 1967 (1967). He also directed the drama The Pill (1968), and a biography of Israeli statesman David Ben-Gurion, 42-6 — Ben Gurion, in 1970. He began the film Diary (Yoman) in 1973, completing it ten years later. During much of this period Perlov was a professor at Tel Aviv University. Perlov received the first Israeli Prize for Cinema in 1999. His final film, Photos 1952–2002 was released earlier in 2003.

David Perlov

Petersen, Ann

Amalia Perez Diaz

Belgian film and television actress Ann Petersen died in Opwijk, Flanders, Belgium, on December 12, 2003. She was 76. Petersen was born in Wuuztwezel, Belgium, on June 22, 1927. She

307

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Peterson, Robert Broadway actor Robert Peterson died of a heart attack in Salt Lake City, Utah, on December 1, 2003. He was 71. Peterson was born in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1932. He studied opera in New York and was cast in the Broadway production of Camelot in the early 1960s. Peter understudied Robert Goulet as Lancelot and filled in for Goulet when the actor was ill. In the late 1960s Peterson went to Utah, where he joined the faculty of the University of Utah. He performed in numerous theatrical productions in Salt Lake City, including the role of Don Quixote in Man of La Mancha.

Ann Petersen

a popular character actress in films from the early 1960s. Her numerous credits include At the Drop of a Head (1962), Mira (1971), Home Sweet Home (1973), Golden Ophelia (1974), Ham from the Ardennes (1977), Kasper in the Underworld (1979), Vrijdag (1981), Zaman (1983), A Strange Love Affair (1984), Hector (1987), Koko Flanel (1990), Sacrament, Het (1990), Boom Boom (1990), Seventh Heaven (1993), Manneken Pis (1995), Left Luggage (1998), and Pauline & Paulette (2001). She also appeared in television productions of Hebben (1968), Kaviaar of Spaghetti (1968), Lieutenant Tenant (1968), The Angel in the Pawnshop (1973), Saved (1973), Night Run to the West (1974), Total Eclipse (1975), As Good as New (1978), Place Saint Catherine (1979), Hedda Gabler (1984), and Massagesalon (1986), and the television series Axel Nort (1965), Keromar (1970), Magister Maesius (1973), Circus Rondau (1976), Slisse & Cesar (1977), Transport (1983), Ramona (1991), Samson en Gert (1993), and Thuis (1995).

Robert Peterson

Petrassi, Goffredo Italian composer Goffredo Petrassi died in Rome on March 2, 2003. He was 98. Petrassi was born in Zagarolo, Italy, on July 16, 1904. A leading classical composer, he was noted for his Partita for Orchestra in 1933 and his subsequent orchestral compositions. He composed the scores for several documentary shorts in the 1940s and a handful of feature films in the 1950s including Bitter Rice (1950), Under the Olive Tree (1951), A

Obituaries • 2003

308

Goffredo Petrassi

Husband for Anna (1953), Cartouche (1954), and Family Diary (1962).

Peyrelon, Michel French character actor Michel Peyrelon died in Paris on June 4, 2003. He was 66. He was born

Michel Peyrelon

in Le Puy-en-Velay, France, on October 10, 1936. A stage and film performer, he was featured in over 100 movies from the early 1960s. His numerous credits include The Virgins (1963), Vertigo for a Killer (1970), The Lion’s Share (1971), High Heels (1972), Scoumoune (1972), The Son (1973), The Crazy Capo Affair (1973), Rough Day for the Queen (1973), Nothing to Report (1973), Going Places (1974), A Cloud in the Teeth (1973), Icy Breasts (1974), The Common Man (1975), Cat and Mouse (1975), Veronique (1975), The French Detective (1975), Mad Enough to Kill (1975), The Phoney (1975), The Good Guys and the Bad Guys (1976), Femmes Fatales (1976), Scrambled Eggs (1976), The Accuser (1977), Dora and the Magic Lantern (1978), One Two Two (1978), These Sorcerers Are Mad (1978), The Sewers of Paradise (1979), Cop or Hood (1979), Give Me Back My Skin (1980), Tusk (1980), Transit (1982), Shock Cops (1983), Hold Me Back or I’ll Have an Accident (1984), Our Story (1984), Le Cowboy (1984), Follow My Gaze (1986), Miss Mona (1987), The Debauched Life of Gerard Floque (1987), Camomille (1988), My Friend the Traitor (1988), Radio Carbeau (1989), A Vampire in Paradise (1992), The Seven Deadly Sins (1992), The Visitors (1993), Justinien Trouve, or God’s Bastard (1993), The Great White of Lambarene (1995), The Best Job in the World (1996), The Red Dwarf (1998), and Monster Trouble (2000).

Pfitzmann, Gunter German actor Gunter Pfitzmann died of a cardiac infarction in Berlin, Germany, on May 30, 2003. He was 79. Pfitzmann was born in Berlin on April 8, 1924. A popular character actor in German films from the early 1950s, his numerous credits include Adventure in Berlin (1952), The Captain and His Hero (1955), Spy for Germany (1956), Dr. Crippen Lives (1958), Forbidden Paradise (1958), Taiga (1958), I’ll Carry You on My Hands (1958), Stalingrad: Dogs, Do You Want to Live Forever? (1958), The Bridge (1959), Rebel Flight to Cuba (1959), Miracle of Malachias (1961), The Squeaker (1963), The Captain (1971), Dear Fatherland Be at Peace (1976), and Why the UFOs Steal Our Lettuce (1984). Pfitzmann was also a popular television actor in Germany, starring in the series Praxis Bulowbogen from 1987 to 1997, and the 1996 mini-series Jungle Hospital.

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Gunter Pfitzmann

Philipp, Gunther Austrian comic actor Gunther Philipp died in Bad Godesberg, Germany, on October 3, 2003. He was 85. Philipp was born in Toplitza, Austria-Hungary, on June 8, 1918. He appeared in over 100 films from the late 1940s including Kiss Me Casanova (1949), Scandal at the Embassy (1950), Eva Inherits Paradise (1951), The Rose of Stamboul (1953), The Emperor Waltz (1953), The Happy Wanderer (1955), Congress Dances (1956), Symphonie in Gold (1956), And Who Is Kissing Me? (1956), The Beggar Student (1958), The Count of Luxemburg (1957), Seven Years Hard Luck (1957), Bombs on Monte Carlo (1959), Twelve Girls and One Man (1959), The White Horse Inn (1960), Oh Egon! (1961), On Thin Ice (1961), Season in Salzburg (1961), Born to Sing (1962), The Turkish Cucumber (1962), The Merry Widow (1962), Is Geraldine an Angel? (1963), Help, My Bride Steals (1964), Happy-End in St. Gilgen (1966), The Sweet Sins of Sexy Susan (1967), The Lucky Strike (1967), Hate Is My God (1969), Whispering in the Hayloft (1969), When the Mad Aunts Are Coming (1970), The Hostess Exceeds All Bounds (1970), My Father, the Ape and I (1971), When My Darling Stands Up

2003 • Obituaries

Gunther Philipp

(1971), Cutting Loose at the Wolfgangesee (1971), Two in Seventh Heaven (1974), What a Mess (1982), Banana Joe (1982), International Zone (1994), and The Window-Theatre (2002).

Phillips, Don, Jr. Actor Don Phillips, Jr., died of complications from a brain tumor in Austin, Texas, on April 4, 2003. He was 49. Phillips was born in Dallas, Texas, on September 25, 1953. He was featured in several films including Bottle Rocket (1996), Waiting for Guffman (1996), Lone Star (1996), and No Pain, No Gain (2003). He was also seen in the 1991 tele-film A Seduction in Travis County, and an episodes of television’s Heaven Help Us. He also was active in local theater as a director and performer.

Phillips, Sam Sam Phillips, the owner of Sun Records who recorded Elvis Presley’s first record in 1953, died of respiratory failure in a Memphis, Tennessee,

Obituaries • 2003

310 contract to RCA in 1956 for $35,000. He continued to operate Sun Records until 1962 and sold the studio in 1969. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1986. Los Angeles Times, July 31, 2003, A1; New York Times, Aug. 1, 2003, C11; People, Aug. 18, 2003, 97; Time, Aug. 11, 2003, 19; Variety, Aug. 4, 2003, 47.

Phillips, Woolf

Don Phillips, Jr.

hospital on July 30, 2003. He was 80. Phillips was born in Florence, Alabama on January 5, 1923. He began his career as a local radio disc jockey before coming to Memphis in 1945. He opened several small recording studios in the late 1940s and worked as a talent scout for Chess and Modern labels. He founded Sun Records in 1952, primarily recording blues artists before Elvis came on the scene. Phillips recorded Elvis’ first sing, “That’s All Right, Mama” and “Blue Moon of Kentucky.” During the 1950s Sun also had hits with such artists as Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roy Orbison and Carl Perkins. Phillips sold Elvis’

Sam Phillips (right, with Elvis Presley, Bill Black and Scotty Moore)

British band leader Woolf Phillips died in Reseda, California, on July 11, 2003. He was 84. Phillips was born in London on January 5, 1919. He began working for a music publisher, as well as performing in bands, while in his early teens. He became a writer and arranger for the big bands, working with Joe Loss and Harry Roy. During World War II Phillips played with the Royal Army Medical Corps band. After the war he arranged for Ambrose, Ted Heath and Geraldo. Phillips fronted the band the Skyrockets in the late 1940s. During the 1950s he was often heard on British radio and television. He recorded the theme for the television game show What’s My Line? and hosted several episodes of The Goon Show. He went to Los Angeles in 1966 to work as an accompanist and musical director. He worked with such artist as Donald O’Connor, Pat Boone, Shari Lewis, and Milton Berle.

Woolf Phillips

311

Phipps, Thomas W. Playwright and television writer Thomas W. Phipps died in Southampton, New York on February 20, 2003. He was 89. Phipps was born in New York City in 1913, and was the brother of actress Joyce Grenfell. Phipps scripted several films in the early 1940s including Broadway Melody of 1940 (1940) and A Yank at Eton (1942). He wrote the 1957 Broadway play Four Winds and scripted numerous television dramas for such series as Robert Montgomery Presents, The Studio One, Philco Television Playhouse, and Goodyear Television Playhouse in the 1950s. He also worked with Truman Capote on the script for the 1968 television adaptation of Vera Caspary’s mystery classic Laura. New York Times, Mar. 3, 2003, B7.

Pialat, Maurice French filmmaker and actor Maurice Pialat died of kidney failure in Paris on January 12, 2003. He was 77. Pialat was born in Cunlhat, Puy de Dome, Auvergne, France, on August 31,

Maurice Pialat

2003 • Obituaries

1925. A painter, Pialat made short films from the 1950s including the autobiographical L’amour Existe in 1960. He directed his first feature film, Naked Childhood, in 1968, and received acclaim for the 1971 French television mini-series The House in the Woods. He also starred in that production and many of his later films. Pialat’s credits include We Will Not Grow Old Together (1972), The Mouth Agape (1974), Graduate First (1979), Loulou (1980), To Our Loves (1983), Police (1985), Under the Sun of Satan (1987) which was awarded the Palme d’Or at Cannes, Van Gogh (1991), and Le Garcu (1995). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 13, 2003, B8; New York Times, Jan. 15, 2003, C12; Time, Jan. 27, 2003, 19; Variety, Jan. 20, 2003, 81.

Pickard, Sorrells Actor and country musician Sorrells Pickard died of a heart attack at his home in Keystone Heights, Florida, on July 5, 2003. He was 63. Pickard was born James W. Bazzell, Jr., in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1940. He began singing at local clubs before moving to Nashville, where he appeared on the Grand Ole Opry television program. Pickard also wrote songs and played with

Sorrells Pickard

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312

Ringo Starr on the 1970 album Beaucoups of Blues. Later moving to Los Angeles, Pickard was featured in several films including Hardbodies (1984), Running Hot (1984), Hardbodies 2 (1986), and Ultraviolet (1992).

Pieral Diminutive French comedian and actor Pieral died in Paris on August 22, 2003. He was 79. Pieral was born in Levallois-Perret, Hautsde-Seine, France, on November 22, 1923. A popular performer in films from the early 1940s, his numerous film credits include The Devil’s Envoys (1942), The Eternal Return (1943), Blondine (1945), Hoboes in Paradise (1945), Danger de Mort (1947), Black Crown (1951), Lucretia Borgia (1953), The Sins of Lola Montes (1955), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1956) with Anthony Quinn, Bobosse (1959), Princess of Cleves (1960), Captain Blood (1960), Spermula (1976), That Obscure Object of Desire (1977), Zoo Zero (1979), Love Crime (1982), and Les Elephants de la Planete Mars (2000).

Pitbull 2 Anthony Durante, who was a leading wrestler with ECW in the 1990s, was found dead of a drug overdose with his girlfriend, Dianna Hulsey, at their rented house in Westerly, Rhode Island, on September 25, 2003. He was 36. Durante, with partner Gary Smith, competed as the Pitbull tag team with ECW in the mid–1990s. They held the ECW Tag Team championship in 1995, and Durante held the ECW Television Title the following year. In recent years Durante had competed in Mixed Martial Arts events.

Pitbull 2

Pitti, Carl

Pieral

Actor and stuntman Carl Pitti died at a Hemet Valley, California, hospital on August 9, 2003. He was 86. Pitti was born in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1917. His parents were close friends of humorist Will Rogers and performed in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. Pitti also went into show business in the 1930s, appearing in the films Of

313

2003 • Obituaries

Platt, Louise

Carl Pitti

Actress Louise Platt died in Greenport, New York, on September 6, 2003. She was 88. Platt was born in Stamford, Connecticut, on August 3, 1915. She began her career on stage, appearing on Broadway in productions of A Room in Red and White, Spring Dance, Promise, and In Clover. Platt went to Hollywood in the late 1930s, where she appeared in the films I Met My Love Again (1938), Spawn of the North (1938), and Tell No Tales (1939). Her best known film appearance was in John Ford’s 1939 Western classic Stagecoach with John Wayne. She appeared in several other films including Forgotten Girls (1940), Captain Caution (1940), and Street of Chance (1942) before leaving Hollywood to return to the stage. She returned to Broadway in the early 1940s, where she was seen in such plays as Johnny Belinda, The Traitor, and Anne of a Thousand Days as Anne Boleyn. In the 1950s she appeared on television in episodes of Star Tonight, Kraft Television Theatre, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The U.S. Steel Hour, and Naked City, and was seen as Ruth Holden in the television soap opera The Guiding Light from 1958 to 1959. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 25, 2003, B14; Variety, Oct. 6, 2003, 104.

Mice and Men (1939), Billy the Kid (1941), and The Kissing Bandit (1948). Pitti also coached numerous stars for their roles in Westerns including Robert Taylor, Joan Crawford, Barbara Stanwyck, Deborah Kerr and Rock Hudson. He also continued to perform in front of the camera on such films as The Bandit Queen (1950), The Lawless Breed (1953), The Woman They Almost Lynched (1953), Tribute to a Bad Man (1956), Gun Glory (1957), The Hallelujah Trail (1965), Boy, Did I Get a Wrong Number! (1966) as Bob Hope’s stunt double, The Hallelujah Trail (1965), and High Plains Drifter (1973). Pitti also worked on television in such series as Gunsmoke, Bonanza, and The Man from U.N.C.L.E. He worked with Michael Landon as a coach, stand-in, and stuntman on the television series Little House on the Prairie from 1974 until 1983. He subsequently retired to his ranch in Hemet. Pitti was named to the Hollywood Stuntmen’s Hall of Fame in 1984. Variety, Oct. 20, 2003, 58. Louise Platt

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314

Plimpton, George Author, editor and occasional actor George Plimpton died suddenly at his Manhattan apartment on September 25, 2003. He was 76. Plimpton was born in New York City on March 18, 1927. He worked as a journalist from the 1950s. Plimpton was a founder and editor of the respected quarterly magazine The Paris Review in 1953, which published the early works of such authors as Phillip Roth and Jack Kerouac. He became well known for his 1963 book Paper Lion, which recounted his exploits training with the Detroit Lions football team. As a “participatory” journalist, Plimpton also performed on the trapeze with a circus, boxed Archie Moore, and pitched baseball to Willie Mays. These and other exploits became the subjects of such books as Bogey Man, Out of My League, and Shadow Box. Plimpton also appeared in small roles in films from the late 1960s including The Detective (1968), Beyond the Law (1968), Rio Lobo (1970), The Private Files of J. Edgar Hoover (1977), and If Ever I See You Again (1978). He was featured in Warren Beatty’s 1981 film Reds, and appeared in the films Volunteers (1985), Religion, Inc. (1989), Easy Wheels (1989), The Bonfire of the Vanities (1990), L.A. Story (1991), Little Man Tate (1991),

George Plimpton

Just Cause (1995), Nixon (1995), Good Will Hunting (1997), The Last Days of Disco (1998), Ed TV (1999), Woman Found Dead in Elevator (2000), and Just Visiting (2001). Plimpton also participated in the documentary films Pumping Iron II: The Women (1985), The Civil War (1990), Baseball (1994), and others. He was also seen on television in episodes of such series as The Equalizer, Wings, Central Park West, The Single Guy, ER, It’s Like, You Know…, Wonderland, Just Shoot Me!, and several episodes of Nero Wolf Mystery. He was also a voice actor in The Simpsons. Plimpton was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2002. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 27, 2003, A1; New York Times, Sept. 27, 2003, A25; Time, Oct. 6, 2003, 25; Variety, Oct. 6, 2003, 103.

Plunkett, James Irish writer James Plunkett died in Dublin, Ireland, on May 28, 2003. He was 83. He was born James Plunkett Kelly in Sandymount, Ireland, on May 21, 1920. A trade union leader, Plunkett began writing short fiction in the 1940s. His short stories were published in the collections The Eagles and the Trumpets (1965), The Trusting and the Maimed (1955) and Collected Short Sto-

James Plunkett

315 ries (1977). Plunkett wrote the novels Strumpet City (1969), which was filmed for television in 1980, Farewell Companions (1977), and The Circus Animals. Plunkett was also a playwright whose works include Big Jim, Farewell Harper, and Homecoming.

Polak, Jindrich Czech film director Jindrich Polak died in Prague, Czech Republic, after a long illness on August 22, 2003. He was 78. Polak was born on May 5, 1925. He wrote and directed the 1958 film Death in the Saddle, and continued to make such films as Clown Ferdinand and the Rocket (aka Rocket to Nowhere) (1963), Voyage to the End of the Universe (1963), Tomorrow I’ll Wake Up and Scald Myself with Tea (1977), Smrt Stoparek (1979), and Lucie, Postrach Ulice (1984). He also worked often on television directed the series Pan Tau (1969) and Expedition Adam ’84 (1984).

2003 • Obituaries

Pollexfen, Jack Jack Pollexfen died after a long illness of pneumonia and complications from diabetes on November 22, 2003. He was 95. Pollexfen began his career as a newspaper reporter in Los Angeles. He also the author of several plays. He became involved with films in 1943 with Mister Big, when he scripted an adaptation of a magazines article for MGM. He served several years in the U.S. Air Force before returning to films, scripting the adventure films Treasure of Monte Cristo (1949), The Desert Hawk (1950), The Secret of Convict Lake (1951), At Sword’s Point (1952), and Lady in the Iron Mask (1952). He teamed with Aubrey Wisberg to write and produce the 1951 science fiction classic The Man from Planet X. Often collaborating with Wisberg, Pollexfen wrote and/or produced numerous films through the early 1960s including The Son of Dr. Jekyll (1951), Captive Women (1952), Sword of Venus (1953), Problem Girls (1953), Port Sinister (1953), The Neanderthal Man (1953), Captain John Smith and Pocahontas (1953), Dragon’s Gold (1954) which he also directed, Captain Kidd and the Slave Girl (1954), Return to Treasure Island (1954), Son of Sinbad (1955), The Indestructible Man (1956) which he also directed, Daughter of Dr. Jekyll (1957), Five Bold Women (1960), and Monstrosity (aka The Atomic Brain) (1964).

Jindrich Polak

Jack Pollexfen (left, with Edgar Ulmer)

Obituaries • 2003

316

Poole, Kent Kent Poole, a local basketball star who had a featured role in the 1986 film Hoosiers, committed suicide by hanging himself from a tree outside his Crawfordsville, Indiana, home on September 11, 2003. He was 39. Poole had been depressed about his forthcoming divorce. Poole was born in Lebanon, Indiana, on December 9, 1963. A high school basketball champion, Poole was cast as Merle Webb in the 1986 basketball film Hoosiers starring Gene Hackman. He subsequently played Molly Ringwald’s boyfriend in the 1988 film Fresh Horses.

Javier Portales

Best (1968), Operacion San Antonio (1969), Newcomers to Love (1969), Routine Has to Be Broken (1974), Husbands Vacationing (1975), Don’t Be Weak with Life (1975), America’s Fat (1976), What’s Autumn? (1977), Operacion Comando (1980), La Gran Aventura de Los Parchis (1983), Chorros (1987), and Naked Tango (1991). Portales also appeared often on Argentine television.

Price, Sari

Kent Poole

Portales, Javier Argentine film and television actor Javier Portales died in Buenos Aires, Argentina, of complications from diabetes on October 14, 2003. He was 66. Portales was born in Tancacha, Cordoba, Argentina, on April 21, 1937. A popular star from the 1950s, Portales was seen in over 100 films during his career. His numerous credits include the films Three Times Ana (1961), That Forward Center Dies at Dawn (1961), My First Girl Friend (1965), Arm in Arm Down the Street (1966), El Gloton (1967), A Boy Like Me (1968), The Piranhas (1968), Criminal Affair (1968), We Are the

Actress Sari Price died of a heart attack in Oslo, Norway, on October 14, 2003. She was 70. Ms. Price began her career on the New York stage and studied under Sandy Meisner. She moved to Hollywood in the 1960s, where she was seen on television in episodes of such series as Gidget, The Andy Griffith Show, The Partridge Family, The Rookies, Charlie’s Angels, and The Fall Guy. Price also appeared in the tele-films Eleanor and Franklin (1976), James A. Michener’s Dynasty (1976), Amelia Earhart (1976), Once an Eagle (1976), A Killing Affair (1977), Kill Me If You Can: The Caryl Chessman Story (1977), Ziegfeld: The Man and His Women (1978), First, You Cry (1978), Angel Dusted (1981), and The People vs. Jean Harris (1981). Price was also seen in the films Lifeguard (1976) and Born of Water (1976). In the mid–1980s Price moved to Norway where she continued her career in such films as Orion’s Belt (1985) and Hold My Heart (2002). Variety, Oct. 27, 2003, 67.

317

2003 • Obituaries

27, 2003. He was 89. Quadflieg was born on Oberhausen, Germany, on September 15, 1914. He began his career on stage in the early 1930s. He also appeared in numerous films during his career including Kora Terry (1940), The Heart of a Queen (1940), The Red Terror (1942), Philharmoniker (1944), Liebestraum (1951), Dark Eyes (1951), The Forester’s Daughter (1952), Lola Montes (1955) as Franz Liszt, San Salvatore (1955), Faust (1960) as Faust, Kama Sutra (1969), Dantons Tod (1981), and The Journey (1986). He also remained active performing on stage and television until his retirement in 1999. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 6, 2003, B29.

Queeny, Mary

Sari Price (right, with Shirley Jones)

Quadflieg, Will German stage and film actor Will Quadflieg died in Hamburg, Germany, on November

Will Quadflieg

Egyptian actress Mary Queeny (Quinne) died at her home in Cairo, Egypt, on November 25, 2003. She was 90. Queeny was born in Lebanon in 1913 and went to Cairo with her aunt in the early 1930s. She appeared in such films as A Guilty Conscience (1932), When a Woman Loves (1933), The Pasha Director’s Daughter (1938), Bewitching Eyes (1934), A Rebellious Girl (1940), and Women Without Men (1953). She and her husband, director Ahmed Galal, formed a production company, Studio Galal, in 1944, producing

Mary Queeny

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318

numerous films. Queeny continued to run the studio after her husband’s death in 1947 until selling it in 1963. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 29, 2003, B25.

Quilley, Denis British stage, screen and television actor Denis Quilley died of cancer in London on October 5, 2003. He was 75. Quilley was born in London on December 26, 1927. He began his career on stage in the 1940s and was appearing on British television from the 1950s. Quilley was featured on television in episodes of The Vise, and starred as Professor Val Randolph in the 1965 series Undermind. He also appeared in the 1967 series Contrabandits as Chief Inspector Ted Hallam, and was Commander Charles Traynor in 1970’s Timeslip. Quilley also appeared in the films Life at the Top (1965), Anne of the Thousand Days (1969), The Black Windmill (1974), Murder on the Orient Express (1974), Evil Under the Sun (1982), Privates on Parade (1982), Memed My Hawk (1984), King David (1985), Foreign Body (1986), and Mister Johnson (1990). He also appeared in

television productions of Long Day’s Journey Into Night (1973), In This House of Brede (1975), Clayhanger (1976), The Crucible (1980), Cassidy (1989), The Shell Seekers (1989), A Dangerous Man: Lawrence After Arabia (1990), and Cleopatra (1999). Quilley was featured in the television mini-series Masada (1981), A.D. (1985), and The Marriage of Figaro (1995). His other television credits include episodes of The Man in Room 17, The Avengers, Number 10, Rich Tea and Sympathy, The Return of Sherlock Holmes, and Sir Bernard’s Stately Homes. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 8, 2003, B10; New York Times, Oct. 7, 2003, A29; Variety, Oct. 13, 2003, 43.

Quinterno, Dante Argentine cartoonist Dante Quinterno died in Buenos Aires on May 15, 2003. He was 93. Quinterno was born in San Vicente, Argentina, on October 26, 1909. He began his career in comics in 1925 with Pan y Truco. He created Don Gil Contento in 1928, which included the character, Patoruzu. The character, billed as the last of the giant Tehuelche Indians, became the star of the strip and Argentina’s most popular comic character. He continued to draw the character and other strips through the mid–1980s.

Dante Quinterno (with his cartoon creation, Patoruzu)

Denis Quilley

319

Ragotzy, Jack Jack Ragotzy, actor and founder of the summer stock company, The Barn Theatre in Augusta, Michigan, died of a heart attack at his home there on December 15, 2003. He was 81. Ragotzy was born on December 16, 1921. He and his wife, the former Betty Ebert, founded the Village Players in 1946. This evolved into The Barn Theatre in 1949, and Ragotzy served as executive producer for over the next 50 years. He also earned an Obie Award for directing the OffBroadway productions of A Clearing in the Woods and The Time of the Cuckoo in 1959. He directed the Broadway production of Angela in 1969. Ragotzy also guest-starred in episodes of several television series including The Nurses, The Defenders, Dragnet, The Virginian, Get Smart, The Six Million Dollar Man, Remington Steele, Hunter, and China Beach, and was featured in the 1988 tele-film Fatal Judgment.

2003 • Obituaries

Wizard of Oz, died following a brain seizure at a Tampa, Florida, hospital on August 17, 2003. She was 74. Raia was born on Long Island, New York, in 1929. At the age of ten, Raia and her older brother, Matthew Raia, were cast as inhabitants of Oz’s Munchkinland in the film classic. Variety, Oct. 6, 2003, 104.

Ralston, Vera Ice skater and film star Vera Hruba Ralston died of cancer at her home in Santa Barbara, California, on February 9, 2003. She was 79. Ralston was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, on June 21, 1923. She began figure skating at the age of ten and competed in the 1936 Olympics. She began her film career in 1941 starring in the Republic Pictures feature Ice-Capades, and the 1942 follow-up, Ice-Capades Revue. She signed a contract with Republic and continued to appear in such films as The Lady and the Monster (1944), Storm Over Lisbon (1944), Lake Placid Serenade (1944), Dakota (1945), Murder in the Music Hall (1946), The Plainsman and the Lady (1946), Wyoming (1947), The Flame (1947), I, Jane Doe (1948), Angel on the Amazon (1948), The Fighting Kentuckian (1949), Surrender (1950), The Wild Blue

Jack Ragotzy

Raia, Margie Margaret “Margie” Raia, who was featured as a Munchkin in the 1939 fantasy classic The

Vera Ralston

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320

Yonder (1951), Belle Le Grande (1951), Hoodlum Empire (1952), A Perilous Journey (1953), Fair Wind to Java (1953), Jubilee Trail (1954), Timberjack (1955), Accused of Murder (1956), Spoilers of the Forest (1957), Gunfire at Indian Gap (1957), The Notorious Mr. Monks (1958), and The Man Who Died Twice (1958). Ralston married Republic boss Herbert J. Yates in 1952. She retired from the screen in 1958, shortly after Yates lost control of the studio. Yates died in 1966. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 15, 2003, B22; New York Times, Feb. 18, 2003, A24; Time, Mar. 3, 2003, 25; Variety, Feb. 24, 2003, 87.

Bad,” and “Salty Tears.” Randazzo was featured in the films The Girl Can’t Help It (1956), Rock, Rock, Rock (1956), Mister Rock and Roll (1957), and Hey, Let’s Twist (1961). Los Angeles Times, Nov. 26, 2003, B10; New York Times, Nov. 26, 2003, B8.

Rapf, Maurice

Teddy Randazzo, a leading 1950s rock ’n’ roll singer, died in Orlando, Florida, on November 21, 2003. He was 66. Randazzo was born on May 20, 1937. Randazzo was lead singer of The Three Chuckles in the 1950s, recording such popular songs as “Won’t You Give Me a Chance” and “Richer Than I.” As a solo artist Randazzo also recorded “Little Serenade” and “The Way of a Clown.” He also wrote several classic rock songs including “Going’ Out of My Head,” “Hurt So

Screenwriter Maurice Rapf died in Hanover, New Hampshire, on April 15, 2003. He was 88. Rapf was born in New York City on May 19, 1914, the son of pioneer film executive Harry Rapf. A co-founder of the Writers Guild of America, Rapf wrote such films as Divorce in the Family (1932), We Went to College (1936), They Gave Him a Gun (1937), The Bad Man of Brimstone (1937), Sharpshooters (1938), North of Shanghai (1939), Winter Carnival (1939), Jennie (1940), Dancing on a Dime (1940), Call of the Canyon (1942), Brotherhood of Man (1945), Song of the South (1946), So Dear to My Heart (1949), and Father Brown (1954). His film career was halted in the late 1940s when he was blacklisted for his support of the Communist Party. He subsequently moved back to New York where he worked on

Teddy Randazzo

Maurice Rapf

Randazzo, Teddy

321 commercial and industrial films. He was also professor emeritus at Dartmouth College’s film department. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 19, 2003, B17; New York Times, Apr. 18, 2003, D8; Variety, May 5, 2003, 83.

Rassimov, Ivan Ivan Rassimov, a leading actor in Italian films from the 1960s, died in Rome following a brief illness on March 14, 2003. He was 64. Rassimov was born Ivan Djrassimovic to Croatian parents in Trieste, Italy, on May 7, 1938. Sometimes using the pseudonym Sean Todd, Rassimov starred in numerous films from the early 1960s including Robbery Roman Style (1964), Mario Bava’s Planet of the Vampires (1965), Half a Man (1965), The Witch in Love (1966), Soledad (1967), Cjamango (1967), If You Want to Live … Shoot! (1968), Don’t Wait, Django … Shoot! (1968), Cowards Don’t Pay (1969), Overrun! (1969), The Tigers of Mompracem (1970), Sergio Martino’s Next! (aka Blade of the Ripper) (1970), Congo Hell (1970), Cross Current (1971), Vengeance Is a Dish Served Cold (1971), Man from Deep River (aka Sacrifice!) (1972), They’re Coming to Get You! (1972), Excite

Ivan Rassimov

2003 • Obituaries

Me (1972), Spirits of Death (1972), Mafia Junction (1973), Spasmo (aka The Death Dealer) (1976), The Eerie Midnight Horror Show (1974), The Legend of Sea Wolf (1975), Assault with a Deadly Weapon (1976), Emmanuelle in Bangkok (1976), Inhibition (1976), Ilsa, Harem Keeper of the Oil Sheiks (1976), The Last Survivor (1977), Shock (aka Beyond the Door II) (1977), Emanuelle Around the World (1977), Covert Action (1978), Emanuelle in the Country (1978), The Humanoid (1979), Eaten Alive (1980), The Odd Squad (1982), The Raiders of Atlantis (1983), Torna (1984), Wild Team (1985), and Body Count (1986). Rassimov subsequently retired from films and was a comic magazine publisher at the time of his death. Survivors include his wife, two children, and his sister, actress Rada Rassimov.

Rauber, Francois French pianist, composer and musical arranger Francois Rauber died in France on December 14, 2003. He was 70. Rauber was born in Neufchateau, Vosges, France, on January 19, 1933. He was best known for his long association

Francois Rauber

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as orchestrator and arranger for Jacques Brel. He also served as musical director for the 1975 film Jacques Brel Is Alive and Well and Living in Paris. He also worked with such artists as Charles Aznavour and Juliette Greco. Rauber also worked as a composer on such films as Risky Business (1967), My Uncle Benjamin (1969), Tintin and the Temple of the Sun (1969), Franz (1971), Tintin and the Lake of Sharks (1972), A Pain in the A… (1973), and Colonel Chabert (1994).

Ray, Andrew British actor Andrew Ray died of a heart attack in London on August 20, 2003. He was 64. Ray was born Andrew Olden in London on May 31, 1939, the son of actor and comedian Ted Ray. He made his film debut at the age of ten in 1950’s The Mudlark. Ray remained a popular performer in such films as The Yellow Balloon (1953), Escape by Night (1953), A Prize of Gold (1955), Escapade (1955), Woman in a Dressing Gown (1957), Gideon of Scotland Yard (1958), The Young and the Guilty (1958), Serious Charge (1959), Twice Round the Daffodils (1972), The Survivor (1962), The Girl-Getters (1966), and Super Seven Calling Cairo (1966). By the mid–1960s Ray’s career was in decline and he made an unsuccessful attempt at suicide in 1965. He subsequently resumed his career on stage, receiving acclaim for his perfor-

Andrew Ray (from The Mudlark)

mance in a West End production of Howard’s End in 1967. He was featured in a 1974 television production of Great Expectations and was the Duke of York in the 1980 television mini-series Edward and Mrs. Simpson. Ray appeared in the films Rough Cut (1980) and Paris by Night (1988), and the tele-films The Bunker (1981), Death of an Expert Witness (1983), Pope John Paul II (1984), and Passion and Paradise (1989) as the Duke of Windsor. He also starred as Dr. John Reginald in the television series Peak Practice from 1992 to 1994, and guest starred in episodes of such series as Upstairs, Downstairs, Carry on Laughing!, Roald Dahl’s Tales of the Unexpected, and Inspector Morse.

Ray, Gene Anthony Actor Gene Anthony Ray, who played Leroy in the film and television productions of Fame, died in Manhattan of complications from a stroke on November 15, 2003. He was 41. Ray was born in New York City on May 24, 1962. He was dancer Leroy Johnson in the 1980 film Fame and

Gene Anthony Ray

323 reprised the role in the television series two years later. Ray was later seen in the 1995 film Out-ofSync, and danced and choreographed 1996’s Eddie. New York Times, Nov. 19, 2003, C14; People, Dec. 8, 2003, 145.

Raymond, Paula Paula Raymond, a leading actress in films and television in the 1950s who was best known as the leading lady in the 1953 monster classic The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, died after a long illness on December 31, 2003. She was 79. Raymond was born Paula Ramona Wright in San Francisco, California, on November 23, 1924. A model and stage actress, she began her career in films in the late 1940s, appearing in Rusty Leads the Way (1948), Racing Luck (1948), Blondie’s Secret (1948), Challenge of the Range (1949), Adam’s Rib (1949), East Side, West Side (1949), Crisis (1950), Duchess of Idaho (1950), Devil’s Doorway (1950), Grounds for Marriage (1951), Inside Straight (1951), The Tall Target (1951), Texas Carnival (1951), The Sellout (1952), The Bandits of Corsica (1953), The Story of Three Loves (1953), The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953), City That

2003 • Obituaries

Never Sleeps (1953), King Richard and the Crusaders (1954), The Human Jungle (1954), The Gun That Won the West (1955), and The Flight That Disappeared (1961). She was also seen often on television in episodes of such series as Your Show Time, The Unexpected, Ford Television Theatre, Four Star Playhouse, Cavalcade of America, The Californians, M Squad, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, Yancy Derringer, Peter Gunn, Perry Mason, One Step Beyond, The Rough Riders, Bat Masterson, Hawaiian Eye, 77 Sunset Strip, G.E. Theater, The Deputy, Philip Marlowe, Lock Up, Bourbon Street Beat, Cheyenne, Have Gun Will Travel, Tightrope, The Untouchables, The Brothers Brannagan, The Aquanauts, Michael Shayne, Maverick, Rawhide, The Beachcomber, Death Valley Days, Temple Houston, and The Man from U.N.C.L.E. Raymond appeared in several low-budget horror films in the 1960s including Hand of Death (1962) with John Agar, Blood of Dracula’s Castle (1969), and Five Bloody Graves (1970). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 10, 2004, B20.

Reddick, Bill Actor Bill Reddick died of a heart attack in Greenbrae, California, on March 4, 2003. He was 84. Reddick was born in Paducah, Kentucky, in 1918. He was featured in several films from the 1970s including The Sunshine Boys (1975), Shoot the Moon (1982), Sudden Impact (1983) with Clint Eastwood, and Tucker: The Man and His Dream (1988). He also appeared in the 1981 tele-film Bitter Harvest.

Redding, Noel

Paula Raymond

Songwriter and musician Noel Redding was found dead at his Clonakilty, Ireland, home on May 11, 2003. He was 57. Redding was born in Folkestone, England, in Dec. 25, 1945. Bass player Redding and drummer Mitch Mitchell teamed with Jimi Hendrix to form the Jimi Hendrix Experience in 1966, producing the albums Are You Experiences?, Axis: Bold as Love, and Electric Ladyland. They recorded such hit songs as “Foxey Lady,” “Purple Haze,” and “Hey Joe.” The group disbanded in 1969. Redding subsequently formed the bands Fat Mattress and the Noel Redding Band.

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324 Los Angeles Times, May 14, 2003, B10; New York Times, May 15, 2003, B11; People, May 26, 2003, 113; Time, May 26, 2003, 25; Variety, May 19, 2003, 52.

Redwood, John Henry Actor and playwright John Henry Redwood, III, died of heart disease at his Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, home on June 17, 2003. He was 60. Redwood was born in Brooklyn, New York, on September 10, 1942. He began his career on stage, appearing in Broadway productions of Guys and Dolls and The Piano Lesson. Redwood was also featured in several films including Gordon’s War (1973), Porky’s (1982), Passion Fish (1992), Mr. Holland’s Opus (1995), and Boys and Girls (2000). He was also featured in several episodes of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. Redwood starred in the one-man show Paul Robeson, and was Robeson’s voice in the 1999 PBS special I’ll Make Me a World. Later in his career he began writing Bill Reddick

Noel Redding (left, with Jimi Hendrix and Mitch Mitchell) John Henry Redwood

325 plays, achieving success with Old Settler (1998) and No Niggers, No Jews, No Dogs (2000). Los Angeles Times, June 28, 2003, B23; New York Times, June 29, 2003, 27.

Reid, Gordon Scottish actor Gordon Reid suffered a massive heart attack and collapsed on stage while performing in Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot in London on November 26, 2003. He was pronounced dead at a London hospital soon afterward. Reid was born in Wishaw, Lanarkshire, Scotland. He was best known for his role as Angus Livingstone in the 1993 British television series Doctor Finlay’s Casebook. He also appeared on television in episodes of Doctor Who, All Creatures Great and Small, Juliet Bravo, Poirot, Lovejoy, My Wonderful Life, and Peak Practice. Reid also appeared in a handful of films during his career including Leon the Pig Farmer (1992), Mansfield Park (1999), and The Others (2001) with Nicole Kidman.

2003 • Obituaries

Mad Mad Mad Mad World (1963), Darling Lili (1970), WUSA (1970), The Seven Minutes (1971), and Time After Time (1979). He also worked in television on such series as Gunsmoke, Wild Wild West, and Little House on the Prairie, and the telefilms Steambath (1973), The Amazing Howard Hughes (1977) which earned him an Emmy Award nomination, and Double Switch (1987).

Reynolds, Sheldon Television producer, director and writer Sheldon Reynolds died of emphysema at his upstate New York home on January 25, 2003. He was 79. He created the popular television spy series Foreign Intrigue in the early 1950s, and directed the 1956 feature film version starring Robert Mitchum. He also produced the 1954 Sherlock Holmes series starring Ronald Howard as Holmes and Howard Marion Crawford as Dr. Watson. He also produced the 1957 detective series Dick and the Duchess starring Patrick O’Neal and Hazel Court. During the 1960s Reynolds directed several films including A Place Called Glory (1965), Killer’s Carnival (1966), and Assignment to Kill (1968). Reynolds again became associated with master detective Sherlock Holmes, producing the Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson television series in 1982 starring Geoffrey Whitehead and Donald Pickering in the title roles. New York Times, Mar. 4, 2003, A23; Variety, Mar. 24, 2003, 81.

Rhue, Madlyn Gordon Reid

Reynolds, Lynn Film and television makeup artist Lynn Reynolds died on December 28, 2003. He was 86. He began his career in Hollywood as a makeup artist after serving in the U.S. Army during World War II. Reynolds worked on such films as Around the World in Eighty Days (1956), Kid Galahad (1962), The Yellow Canary (1963), It’s a

Character actress Madlyn Rhue, whose career was ended in the mid–1990s after a lengthy battle with multiple sclerosis, died of complications from pneumonia at the Motion Picture and Television Fund hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on December 16, 2003. She was 68. Rhue was born Madleine Roche in Washington, D.C., on October 3, 1935. She studied acting in New York in the late 1950s and began her film career in 1959 with The Miracle and Operation Petticoat. Rhue was featured in such films as The Ladies’ Man (1961), A Majority of One (1962), Escape from Zahrain (1962), It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (1963), He Rides Tall (1964), Kenner (1969), and

Obituaries • 2003

326 ers, Daniel Boone, Slattery’s People, I Spy, A Man Called Shenandoah, Laredo, The Iron Horse, Star Trek, Captain Nice, Wild Wild West, Ironside, Cowboy in Africa, It Takes a Thief, The Guns of Will Sonnett, Land of the Giants, Hawaii 5-0, Longstreet, Mannix, Banacek, Mission: Impossible, Ghost Story, Barnaby Jones, Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law, Cannon, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, Police Story, Baretta, Petrocelli, Starsky and Hutch, Switch, CHiPs, Charlie’s Angels, Hart to Hart, Dynasty, Diff ’rent Strokes, Fantasy Island, and L.A. Law. After being crippled by multiple sclerosis, she performed her later roles from a wheelchair, appearing regularly as ballistics expert Annie Hartung in the 1987 series Houston Knights. She also appeared in the tele-film A Mother’s Justice (1991), and had a recurring role as librarian Jean O’Neill on Angela Lansbury’s Murder, She Wrote in the mid–1990s. Rhue was married to actor Tony Young from 1962 until their divorce in 1970. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 18, 2003, B15; New York Times, Dec. 20, 2003, B22.

Madlyn Rhue

Stand Up and Be Counted (1972). She also appeared in the tele-films Stranger on the Run (1967), The Manhunter (1972), Poor Devil (1973), The Sex Symbol (1974), Medical Story (1975), Goldie and the Boxer (1979), The Best Place to Be (1979), Fantasies (1982), and Games Mother Never Taught You (1982). Rhue starred as Marjorie Grant in the television drama series Bracken’s World in 1969, and was Hilary Mason in the 1976 series Executive Suite. She also had the recurring role of Mrs. Angela Schwartz in the 1982 series Fame, and played Daphne DiMera in the daytime soap opera Days of Our Lives from 1982 until 1984. Her numerous television credits also include episodes of Have Gun Will Travel, Black Saddle, M Squad, Riverboat, Cheyenne, Tightrope, The Rebel, Tales of Wells Fargo, Gunsmoke, Bourbon Street Beat, Laramie, Hotel de Paree, Perry Mason, The Alaskans, Pony Express, The Untouchables, Outlaws, Bonanza, Sugarfoot, Checkmate, General Electric Theater, Stagecoach West, Adventures in Paradise, Bus Stop, Cain’s Hundred, Route 66, The Nurses, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Rawhide, Arrest and Trial, The Virginian, Espionage, The Fugitive, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Defend-

Rice, Pierre Comic artist Pierre Rice died in Washington, D.C., on May 23, 2003. He was 86. Rice was an artist with Harvey Comics in the 1940s, drawing such titles as The Green Hornet and Captain Freedom. He also worked on Starman, The Spectre and the Justice Society of American for DC. He resumed his work in comics after military service in World War II, drawing for Timely (Marvel) Comics. He primarily worked on Western comics there including Blaze Dawson, Tex Taylor, and Arizona Annie. He left comics in the 1950s. Rice’s book, Man as Hero: The Human Figure in Western Art, was published in 1987.

Richardson, Claibe Composer Claibe Richardson died in Manhattan, New York, of cancer on January 5, 2003. He was 74. Richardson was born in Shreveport, Louisiana, in 1928. He began writing songs in the 1950s for such musicals as Upstairs at the Downstairs and What a Day. He was best known as the composer of the Broadway musical The Grass Harp in 1971, based on the novella by Truman Capote. He also worked with lyricist Stephen

327

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Ridley, Greg

Pierre Rice’s artwork for Starman

Greg Ridley, singer and bass player with the rock band Humble Pie, died of complications from a stroke and pneumonia in a hospital in Alicanti, Spain, on November 19, 2003. He was 56. Ridley was born in Carlisle, Cumbria, England, on October 23, 1947. He began his career in music as a teenager and was a member of the band The VIPs in the early 1960s. They recorded the songs “Wintertime,” “I Wanna Be Free” and “Straight Down to the Bottom.” The VIPs underwent several lineup and name changes, becoming Spooky Tooth in 1968. They recorded the album It’s All About later in the year which included the single “It’s All About.” Ridley subsequently joined with musicians Steve Marriott, Peter Frampton, and Jerry Shirley as the rock band Humble Pie. They quickly recorded two albums —As Safe Is Yesterday (Is) and Town and Country, and had a hit single with “Natural Born Woman.” Frampton left the group in the early 1970s and was replaced by Clem Clempson. Humble Pie recorded such hit songs as “I Don’t Need No Doctor,” “Thirty Days in the Hole,” and “Hot N Nasty.” After the band’s breakup in 1975, Ridley continued to perform with the groups Strange Brew and Steve Marriott’s All

Claibe Richardson

Cole on a musical stage adaptation of The Night of the Hunter. New York Times, Jan. 10, 2003, B8. Greg Ridley

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Stars. Near the end of the decade Ridley retired from music, though he joined a Humble Pie revival band in 2002.

Riefenstahl, Leni German filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl, who was best known for directing such Nazi propaganda films as Triumph of the Will for Adolf Hitler, died at her home in Poecking, Germany, on September 8, 2003. She was 101. Riefenstahl was born in Berlin, Germany, on August 22, 1902. She began her career on stage as a dancer before acting in films in the early 1920s. She starred in several of Arnold Fanck’s films including Peaks of Destiny (1926), The Sacred Mountain (1926), The Big Leap (1927), The White Hell of Pitz Palu (1929), Storm Over Mont Blanc (1930), and Ski Chase. Trained by Fanck, she soon turned to filmmaking, as director, producer, editor, scripter and star of 1931’s The Blue Light. Her work drew the attention of Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Party and when he came to power she was chosen to film the Nuremberg Party Convention in 1934. Her efforts led to the notorious propaganda film Triumph of the Will. She subsequently made the film Olympia, which documented the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. During World War II she worked on a non-musical film version of Eugen d’Albert’s opera Tiefland (aka Lowlands). Though the film was completed in 1944, German’s defeat in the war delayed its release for nearly a decade. Riefenstahl was arrested as a war criminal after the war and imprisoned for over four years. She was cleared of charges of being a Nazi collaborator by a West German court in 1952. Riefenstahl

Leni Riefenstahl (with Adolf Hitler)

subsequently attempted to resume her career but met with little success. She worked as a photographer for several magazines and, in 1993, wrote her memoirs. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 10, 2003 B10; New York Times, Sept. 10, 2003, C14; People, Sept. 22, 2003, 165; Time, Sept. 22, 2003, 25; Variety, Sept. 15, 2003, 51.

Ritter, Dorothy Fay Dorothy Fay Ritter died after a long illness at the Motion Picture and Television Home in Woodland Hills, California, on November 5, 2003. She was 88. She was born Dorothy Fay Southworth in Prescott, Arizona, on April 4, 1915. The wife of singing cowboy Tex Ritter, she starred in such Western films as Law of the Texan (1938), Prairie Justice (1938), The Stranger from Arizona (1938), Frontier Scout (1939), Rollin’ Westward (1939), Song of the Buckaroo (1939), Sundown on the Prairie (1939), Trigger Pals (1939), Rainbow Over the Range (1940), North from the Lone Star (1941) and the 1941 serial White Eagle. She also appeared in 1940s The Green Hornet, and had small roles in the films The Philadelphia Story (1940), Glamour for Sale (1940), Lady Be Good (1941) and The Iron Claw (1941). She was married to Tex Ritter from 1941 until his death in 1974. Her son, actor John Ritter, died two months prior to her death. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 13, 2003, B15; New York Times, Nov. 14, 2003, A27; People, Dec. 1, 2003, 177.

Dorothy Fay Ritter (with her husband, Tex)

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Ritter, John John Ritter, who was best known for his role as Jack Tripper in the television comedy hit Three’s Company from the late 1970s, died of a dissection of the aorta in a Burbank, California, hospital on September 11, 2003, after falling ill on the set of his sit-com 8 Simple Rules … For Dating My Teenage Daughter. He was 54. Ritter was born in Burbank on September 17, 1948, the youngest son of country singer and cowboy star Tex Ritter and actress Dorothy Fay Ritter. John Ritter studied drama at the University of Southern California before he began acting on television in the late 1960s. He guest starred in episodes of such series as Hawaii Five-O, Dan August, Medical Center, M*A*S*H, Kojak, Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law, The Streets of San Francisco, The Bob Newhart Show, Phyllis, The Bob Crane Show, Movin’ On, Rhoda, Mannix, Petrocelli, Barnaby Jones, Mary Tyler Moore, The Rookies, Starsky and Hutch, The Love Boat, and The Waltons, where he starred in the recurring role of the Rev. Matthew Fordwick from 1973 to 1976. Ritter also appeared in the films The Barefoot Executive (1971), Scandalous John (1971), The Other (1972), The Stone Killer (1973), and Nickelodeon (1976), and the tele-films Evil Roy Slade (1972) and The Night That Panicked America (1975), before joining Suzanne Somers and Joyce DeWitt in the cast of Three’s Company in 1977. Ritter starred as Jack Tripper on Three’s Company for seven seasons, earning an Emmy for Best Actor in a Comedy Series in 1984. He continued as the character in the short-lived spin-off series Three’s a Crowd from 1984 to 1985. Ritter was also featured in such films as Breakfast in Bed (1978), Americathon (1979), Here at Large (1980), Wholly Moses (1980), They All Laughed (1981), The Flight of Dragons (1986), Real Men (1987), Skin Deep (1989), Problem Child (1990), Problem Child 2 (1991), Noises Off… (1992), Stay Tuned (1992), North (1994), Sling Blade (1996), Nowhere (1997), A Gun, a Car, a Blonde (1997), Hacks (1997), Montana (1998), Shadow of Doubt (1998), I Woke Up Early the Day I Died (1998), Bride of Chucky (1998), Panic (2000), Lost in the Pershing Point Hotel (2000), TripFall (2000), Terror Tract (2000), Nuncrackers (2001), Tadpole (2002), Man of the Year (2002), Manhood (2003), and Bad Santa (2003). He was also seen in the tele-films Leave Yesterday Behind (1978), Ringo (1978), How

John Ritter (with Joyce DeWitt and Suzanne Somers from Three’s Company)

to Survive the 70s and Maybe Even Bump Into Happiness (1978), The Comeback Kid (1980), Pray TV (1982), In Love with an Older Woman (1982), Sunset Limousine (1983), Love Thy Neighbor (1984), Letting Go (1985), Unnatural Causes (1986), A Smoky Mountain Christmas (1986), The Last Fling (1987), Prison for Children (1987), Tricks of the Trade (1988), My Brother’s Wife (1989), Stephen King’s It (1990), The Dreamer of Oz (1990) as L. Frank Baum, The Summer My Father Grew Up (1991), Danielle Steel’s Heartbeat (1993), The Only Way Out (1993), Gramps (1995), The Colony (1995), Unforgiveable (1996), For Hope (1996), Mercenary (1997), A Child’s Wish (1997), Dead Man’s Gun (1997), Loss of Faith (1997), Chance of a Lifetime (1998), Dead Husbands (1998), Holy Joe (1999), It Came from the Sky (1999), and Lethal Vows (1999). Ritter starred as Detective Harry Hooperman in the police series Hooperman from 1987 to 1989, and was John Hartman in the comedy series Hearts Afire with Markie Post and Billy Bob Thornton from 1992 to 1995. He was Andrew Covington in the Felicity series from 2000 to 2003, and was the voice of Clifford the Big, Red Dog in the early 2000s. He starred as Paul Hennessy on the comedy series 8 Simple Rules … For Dating My Teenage Daughter,

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which had been renewed for a second season at the time of his death. Other television credits include guest roles in such series as The Associates, Pryor’s Place, Life with Lucy, The Cosby Show, Anything but Love, The Larry Sanders Show, Dave’s World, NewsRadio, Wings, Touched by an Angel, Over the Top, Buff y the Vampire Slayer, Ally McBeal, Veronica’s Closet, Chicago Hope, Family Law, Tucker, The Ellen Show, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, Scrubs, and Breaking News. Ritter’s survivors include his second wife, actress Amy Yasbeck, and son, Jason, who stars in the television series Joan of Arcadia. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 13, 2003, B22; New York Times, Sept. 13, 2003, A11; Time, Sept. 22, 2003, 25; Variety, Sept. 22, 2003, 71.

eral television productions and appeared in the films The Walter Ego (1991), John Putch’s Valerie Flake (1999), and BachelorMan (2003). She was also the author of six novels including Simon Says, The Burning Woman, Caroline, Caroline, and Women in the Wind. Variety, Oct. 6, 2003, 103.

Rivas, Carlos

Actress and writer Margaret Hill Ritter died at her home in New York City on August 28, 2003. She was 81. Ritter was born in Ada, Oklahoma, on August 17, 1922. She performed with the Totem Pole Playhouse from 1954, appearing in numerous productions over the next 30 years. She made her final stage performance in Arsenic and Old Lace in 1993. Ritter was also seen in sev-

Leading Mexican actor Carlos Rivas died of prostate cancer in Los Angeles on June 16, 2003. He was 74. Rivas was born in Odessa, Texas, on September 16, 1928. He became a leading actor in Mexican films in the 1950s, who also appeared in films for such Hollywood directors as Alfred Hitchcock John Huston and Henry Hathaway. Rivas film credits include The Raiders (1952), Fury in Paradise (1955), Rodgers and Hammerstein’s The King and I (1956) as Lun Tha, Comanche (1956), The Beast of Hollow Mountain (1956), The Big Boodle (1957), Boy’s Town (1957), Panama Sal (1957), The Black Scorpion (1957), The Deerslayer (1957), Machete (1958), Sonatas (1959), The Miracle (1959), El Craack (1959), The Unforgiven (1960), The Dalton That Got Away (1960), Pepe (1960), Madmen of Mandoras (aka

Margaret Hill Ritter

Carlos Rivas

Ritter, Margaret Hill

331 They Saved Hitler’s Brain) (1964), Tarzan and the Valley of Gold (1966), True Grit (1969) with John Wayne, The Undefeated (1969), Topaz (1969), Hang Your Hat on the Wind (1969), The Gatling Gun (1973), Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze (1975), Gas Food Lodging (1992), My Crazy Life (1993), and The Colonel’s Last Flight (2000). Rivas also guest-starred on television in episodes of such series as Cheyenne, Zorro, Sea Hunt, Maverick, Perry Mason, The Dakotas, The Addams Family, Branded, Gunsmoke, The High Chaparral, Bonanza, Daniel Boone, Mannix, Mission: Impossible, Barnaby Jones, Simon & Simon, and The A Team. Rivas was also a frequent performer on the stage and a founding member of the Nosotros, a Los Angeles–based group designed to improve the image of Hispanics in the entertainment industry, in 1969. Los Angeles Times, June 20, 2003, B14; Variety, June 23, 2003, 57.

2003 • Obituaries

on April 10, 1913. She began her acting career as a child in 1924, a performed on stage from 1928. She also appeared in numerous Egyptian films during her career including Sons of Aristocrats (1932), The Defence (1935), Eternal Glory (1937), The Hour of Fate (1938), Heart of Woman (1940), El Doctor (1940), A Man Between Two Women (1941), Children of the Poor (1942), Cleopatra (1943), Who Is the Criminal? (1944), Les Miserables (1944), The Hand of God (1946), Victims of Modernism (1946), Angels in Hell (1947), Love in the Shadows (1953), The Water-Carrier Is Dead (1977), and Ard El Ahlam (1993). She continued to perform until poor health hospitalized her several months before her death. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 29, 2003, B12; Variety, Oct. 6, 2003, 104.

Road Warrior Hawk

Leading Egyptian actress Amina Rizk died of heart failure in a Cairo, Egypt, hospital on August 24, 2003. She was 90. She was born in Egypt

Mike Hegstrand, who as Road Warrior Hawk, was half of the most dominant wrestling tag-team of the 1980s, was found dead at his home in Florida on October 19, 2003. He had suffered from heart problems in recent years. He was 46. Hegstrand was born on September 12,

Amina Rizk

Road Warrior Hawk

Rizk, Amina

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1957, and trained as a wrestler in the Minnesota area. He began his career in the ring in Canada under the name Crusher von Haig in the early 1980s. Taking the name Hawk and teaming with Joe Laurinatis, as Animal, the Road Warriors were born in 1983 and soon dominated the NWA with manager Paul Ellering. They held title belts with that promotion and the AWA, and were immensely popular in Japan. In the early 1990s the duo entered the WWF, where they became known as the Legion of Doom. They held several championships with that promotion as well. Hawk and Animal continued to compete through the 1990s, though injuries and poor health curtailed their in-ring activities. In recent years Hegstrand had been working with evangelist and former wrestler Ted DiBiase on Christian-themed wrestling shows.

Robbins, Rex Stage and screen actor Rex Robbins died of a brain aneurysm in Pierre, South Dakota, where he was visiting relatives. He was 68. Robbins was born in Pierre, South Dakota, on March 30, 1935. He was a popular performer on Broadway, where he appeared in productions of Gypsy, The Changing Room, and Richard III with Al Pacino.

Rex Robbins

He also appeared in a handful of films from the early 1970s including 1776 (1972) as Roger Sherman, Simon (1980), The First Time (1982), The Man Who Wasn’t There (1983), Reuben, Reuben (1983), No Big Deal (1983), Key Exchange (1985), The Secret of My Succe$s (1987), Vampire’s Kiss (1989), Stella (1990), Love or Money (1990), I.Q. (1994), The Associate (1996), Breathing Room (1996), and The Royal Tenenbaums (2001). Robbins also appeared in numerous tele-films and mini-series including The Widowing of Mrs. Holroyd (1974), The Tenth Month (1979), The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg (1980), The Day the Women Got Even (1980), The Private History of a Campaign That Failed (1981), Running Out (1983), Kennedy (1983), Rockabye (1986), The Two Mrs. Grenvilles (1987), and Hemingway (1988). Robbins was Dr. Hugh Jessup in the daytime soap opera Where the Heart Is in 1969, and was Dr. Greg Manning in the television drama series Nurse in 1981. His other television credits include episodes of Murder, She Wrote, Law & Order and Ed. New York Times, Oct. 2, 2003, A29; Variety, Oct. 6, 2003, 104.

Roberts, Denise Lynne Stuntwoman and actress Denise Lynne Roberts died of cancer in Keller, Texas, on March 22, 2003. She was 51. Roberts performed stunts and appeared in small roles in such films as Other People’s Money (1991), Love Is Like That (1992), Anything That Moves (1992), Death Becomes Her (1992), Leprechaun (1993), Body of Influence (1993), Stepmonster (1993), Boiling Point (1993), In the Line of Fire (1993), Forrest Gump (1994), The River Wild (1994), Don Juan DeMarco (1995), Species (1995), Nemesis 2: Nebula (1995), Strange Days (1995), Steel Frontier (1995), Nemesis III: Prey Harder (1995), Rumpelstiltskin (1996), Courage Under Fire (1996), 2 Days in the Valley (1996), Daddy’s Girl (1996), Menno’s Mind (1996), Crossworlds (1996), Bean (1997), Titanic (1997), As Good as It Gets (1997), The Hunted (1997), and Star Trek: Insurrection (1998). She also worked on the tele-films The Good Doctor: The Paul Fleiss Story (1996) and The Right to Remain Silent (1996), and episodes of such series as Renegade and Melrose Place.

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Roberts, Henry “Phace” Tap dancer Henry “Phace” Roberts died in New York City on November 8, 2003. He was 92. Roberts was born in Savannah, Georgia, in 1911. He began performing on the streets as a child and joined the tap group the Five Blazers at age 14. Roberts also danced with the groups the Three Rockets and the Copasetics. Roberts was seen in the films Cabin in the Sky (1943), Stormy Weather (1943), and The Cotton Club (1984), and performed on television with Milton Berle, Sammy Davis, Jr., and on The Ed Sullivan Show. His last performance was on a European tour with the Copasetics in the late 1990s. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 23, 2003, B19; New York Times, Nov. 22, 2003, B7.

Lee Robinson

Henry “Phace” Roberts

and Dust in the Sun (1958). His short-story was filmed as The Siege of Pinchgot (aka Four Desperate Men) (1959), and he scripted the 1959 film The Climbers. Robinson moved to television in the 1960s and was best known for co-producing the popular television series Skippy the Bush Kangaroo from 1967 to 1969. A feature film, Skippy and the Intruders, was made in 1969. Robinson also produced the television series Barrier Reef (1971), Boney (1972), Shannon’s Mob (1975), and Bailey’s Bird (1977). He returned to feature films as executive producer of the 1982 ar drama Attack Force Z starring Mel Gibson. He also produced 1982’s Highest Honor. He was working on a film about a sacred Aboriginal tjuringa stone, The Keeper of Dreams, at the time of his death.

Robinson, Lee Australian filmmaker Lee Robinson died in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, after a long illness on September 22, 2003. He was 80. Robinson was born in Petersham, Australia, on February 22, 1923. He began making films after World War II, filming Namatjira the Painter in 1947. Robinson directed the films Return of the Plainsman (1953), King of the Coral Sea (1956), Walk Into Paradise (1956), The Stowaway (1958),

Roc, Patricia Patricia Roc, a leading British film star in the 1940s and 1950s, died in a Locarno, Switzerland, hospital of kidney failure on December 30, 2003. She was 88. Roc was born in London on June 7, 1915. She made her theatrical debut in a stage production of the comedy Nuts in May in London in 1938. She began her career in films later in the year after being cast as a Polish prin-

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Rockwell, Robert

Patricia Roc

cess by Alexander Korda in 1938’s The Rebel Son. She soon became one of England’s most popular actresses, appearing in such features as The Gaunt Stranger (1938), The Mysterious Mr. Reeder (1939), The Missing People (1940), Pack Up Your Troubles (1940), Lady in Distress (1940), It Happened to One Man (1940), The Farmer’s Wife (1941), My Wife’s Family (1941), Let the People Sing (1942), We’ll Meet Again (1943), Millions Like Us (1943), Suspected Person (1943), 2,000 Women (1944), A Lady Surrenders (1944), Madonna of the Seven Moons (1945), Johnny Frenchman (1945), and The Wicked Lady (1945). Roc went to Hollywood after World War II and co-starred with Susan Hayward in the 1946 western Canyon Passage. She continued to appear in such films as So Well Remembered (1947), Jassy (1947), The Brothers (1947), When the Bough Breaks (1947), One Night with You (1948), The Perfect Woman (1949), Return to Life (1949), The Man on the Eiffel Tower (1950), Fugitive from Montreal (1950), Circle of Danger (1951), Black Jack (1951), Something Money Can’t Buy (1952), The Widow (1954), Cartouche (1954), Scotland Yard Dragnet (1958), The House in the Woods (1959), and Bluebeard’s Ten Honeymoons (1960). She also appeared in an episode of Roger Moore’s television series The Saint in 1962.

Actor Robert Rockwell, who starred as biology teacher Philip Boynton opposed Eve Arden in the 1950s television sit-com Our Miss Brooks, died of cancer at his Malibu, California, home on January 25, 2003. He was 82. Rockwell was born in Chicago, Illinois, on October 15, 1920. He was a popular radio actor from the 1940s and was featured in numerous films including You Gotta Stay Happy (1948), The Red Menace (1949), Alias the Champ (1949), Task Force (1949), The Blonde Bandit (1950), Unmasked (1950), Singing Guns (1950), Belle of Old Mexico (1950), Federal Agent at Large (1950), Woman from Headquarters (1950), Destination Big House (1950), Trial Without Jury (1950), Lonely Heart Bandits (1950), Prisoners in Petticoats (1950), Call Me Mister (1951), The Frogmen (1951), Week-End with Father (1951), The Prince Who Was a Thief (1951), The Turning Point (1952), and War of the Worlds (1953). Rockwell starred in the Our Miss Brooks series from 1952 to 1956, and starred in the 1959 television western series The Man from Blackhawk. He was also seen as Jor-El, Kryptonian father of Superman, in the

Robert Rockwell

335 first episode of the 1952 Adventures of Superman television series. His other television credits include episodes of The Lone Ranger, Racket Squad, Sky King, Tales of Wells Fargo, Gunsmoke, Perry Mason, Surfside 6, Checkmate, Death Valley Days, Maverick, Bronco, Lassie, Green Acres, Petticoat Junction, Here’s Lucy, Eight Is Enough, Diff ’rent Strokes, Benson, Charlie’s Angels, Knots Landing, Emerald Point N.A.S., Mama’s Family, E/R, Hunter, Dynasty, Rags to Riches, Newhart, Growing Pains, Valerie, and Beverly Hills, 90210. Rockwell was also featured in the 1968 film Sol Madrid and the 1968 tele-film Lassie: The Adventures of Neeka. He appeared regularly as Tom Bennett in the 1969 television sit-com The Bill Cosby Show and was Dr. Greg Hartford in the daytime soap opera Search for Tomorrow from 1977 to 1978. He also appeared regularly in the sit-com Growing Pains as Wally Overmier from 1988 to 1991, and was seen in the tele-films Murder in Texas (1981), Golden Gate (1981), Life of the Party: The Story of Beatrice (1982), The Kid with the 2001 I.Q. (1983), and The World According to Straws (1990). Rockwell was featured in the 1995 film Perfect Alibi, and was seen often on television in numerous commercials in his later years. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 28, 2003, B10; Variety, Feb. 3, 2003, 79.

Roddy, Rod Announcer Rod Roddy whose resonant voice shouted contestants on The Price Is Right to “Come on down!” for nearly 20 years, died of breast and colon cancer in a Los Angeles hospital on October 27, 2003. He was 66. He was born Robert Ray Roddy in Fort Worth, Texas, on September 28, 1937. He worked in radio as a disc jockey and did voice-over work for television commercials. Roddy was the announcer for the Soap television sit-com from 1977 to 1981. Other announcing jobs included the game shows Love Connection from 1981 to 1985 and Press Your Luck from 1983 to 1986. He joined host Bob Barker on The Price Is Right in 1986 after the death of longtime announcer Johnny Olson the previous year. Roddy was also heard in episodes of Martial Law and That ’70s Show. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 29, 2003, B12; New York Times, Oct. 29, 2003, C15; People, Nov. 10,

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Rod Roddy

2003, 125; Time, Nov. 10, 2003, 28; Variety, Nov. 3, 2003, 50.

Roe, Matt Character actor Matt Roe died of multiple myeloma in Los Angeles on October 9, 2003. He was 51. The Brooklyn native began his film career in the late 1980s, appearing in the tele-films Baby M (1988), Love and Betrayal (1989), The Neon Empire (1989), The Big One: The Great Los Angeles Earthquake (1990), and Calendar Girl, Cop, Killer? The Bambi Bembenek Story (1992). Roe was also featured in such feature films as Puppet Master (1989), My Blue Heaven (1990), Child’s Play 2 (1990), Double Revenge (1990), Last Call (1991), The Unborn (1991), Sins of the Night (1993), Naked Gun 33Ω: The Final Insult (1994), Pentathlon (1994), Sexual Malice (1994), Improper Conduct (1994), and Night All Day (2002). He starred as Mayor Artie Worth in Roger Corman’s cable television film Black Scorpion and the subsequent series. Roe’s other television credits in-

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Matt Roe

clude episodes of Murder, She Wrote, Hill Street Blues, L.A. Law, Who’s the Boss, Wings, Time Trax, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, Sisters, Mr. & Mrs. Smith, Dark Skies, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Malibu Shores, Pacific Blue, Gideon’s Crossing, and Judging Amy. Roe also scripted the tele-films Tainted Love (1995) and Irresistible Impulse (1996), and the 1998 feature Minion. Variety, Oct. 27, 2003, 67.

Rogers, Fred Fred Rogers, who entertained several generations of children as the host of public television’s Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, died of cancer at his home in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on February 27, 2003. He was 74. Rogers was born in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, on March 20, 1928. He began his career in children’s television as a puppeteer on the local Pittsburgh program The Children’s Corner in the 1950s. Rogers became an ordained Presbyterian minister in 1963 and developed Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood shortly afterwards. He produced the program at Pittsburgh’s station WQED from 1968 until his retirement in 2000. Rogers also composed most of the songs heard on the program, including his theme which began “It’s a beautiful day in the

Fred Rogers

neighborhood.” He also appeared in a 1996 episode of tv’s Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, and was heard in an episode of the animated series Arthur in 1997. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 28, 2003, A1; New York Times, Feb. 28, 2003, A1; People, Mar. 17, 2003, 60; Time, Mar. 10, 2003, 18; Variety, Mar. 3, 2003, 77.

Rolfe, Guy British actor Guy Rolfe, who starred as the ghastly grinning Mr. Sardonicus in William Castle’s 1961 horror classic, died on October 19, 2003. He was 91. Rolfe was born in Kilburn, North London, England, on December 27, 1911. He began his career on stage in the mid–1930s. He made his film debut in the late 1940s, appearing in small roles in such films as Nicholas Nickleby (1947), Odd Man Out (1947), Hungry Hill (1947), Uncle Silas (1947), Meet Me at Dawn (1947), Saraband for Dead Lovers (1948), Broken Journey (1948), The Girl in the Painting (1949), and Easy Money (1948). Rolfe moved to leading roles with

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Rolla, Stefano

Guy Rolfe (as Mr. Sardonicus)

1949’s The Spider and the Fly. Alternating from heroic to villainous roles, he continued to star in such films as Prelude to Fame (1950), The Reluctant Widow (1951), Home to Danger (1951), Ivanhoe (1952) as Prince John, Young Bess (1953), The Veils of Bagdad (1953), King of the Khyber Rifles (1953), Operation Diplomat (1953), Dance Little Lady (1955), You Can’t Escape (1956), It’s Never Too Late (1956), Light Fingers (1957), Girls at Sea (1958), Yesterday’s Enemy (1959), The Stranglers of Bombay (1960), Rivak the Barbarian (1960), King of Kings (1961), and Snow White and the Three Stooges (1961) as Count Oga. Rolfe starred as Mr. Sardonicus in 1961 and was Prince Grigory in Taras Bulba the following year. Moving toward character roles later in the decade, Rolfe continued to appear in such films as The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964), The Alphabet Murders (1965), Land Raiders (1969), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), And Now the Screaming Starts! (1973), The Bride (1985) and Dolls (1987). Later in his career he starred as Andre Toulin in several films in the cult Puppet Master series including Puppet Master III: Toulon’s Revenge (1991), Puppet Master 4 (1993), Puppet Master 5: The Final Chapter (1994), and Retro Puppet Master (1999). He was also featured in the tele-films The Adventures of William Tell (1986) and The Dark Angel (1987). Rolfe was also seen in episodes of Boris Karloff ’s Thriller, The Saint, The Champions, The Avengers, Department S, and Space: 1999.

Italian filmmaker Stefano Rolla was killed in a car bomb attack on an Italian military compound in Nasiriya, Iraq, on November 12, 2003. He was 65. Rolla worked in films as an assistant director from the early 1960s on such features as Hunchback Italian Style (1962), The Swindlers (1963), Spy in Your Eye (1966), Double Face (1969), Sacco and Vanzetti (1971), Sergio Leone’s My Name Is Nobody (1973), Deep Red (1975), The Genius (1975), The Last Survivor (1977), and Battle Force (1977). Rolla directed several films including Professione Figlio (1980), Venetian Lies (1980), and Carlotta (1980). He had recently been involved in filmmaking as a producer, overseeing the 2002 documentary Clown in Kabul, about Dr. Patch Adams’ work in Afghanistan after the fall of the Taliban regime. He was in Iraq to prepare a documentary film about the peacekeeping forces there at the time of his death.

Stefano Rolla

Romer, Anneliese German stage actress Anneliese Romer died in Berlin after a long illness on November 25, 2003. She was 81. Romer was born on June 24, 1922. She began her career on stage in the 1940s.

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Jean-Pierre Ronfard

Anneliese Romer

She was also featured in several films during her career including 1956’s The Girl from Flanders. Romer also appeared on German television from the 1960s, including a role in the 1996 mini-series Deutschlandied.

Ronfard, Jean-Pierre French-Canadian actor Jean-Pierre Ronfard died of complications from surgery in a Montreal, Quebec, Canada, hospital on September 26, 2003. He was 74. Ronfard was born in Thivencelles, France, on January 14, 1929. After studying drama in France, he performed and taught in Algeria and throughout Europe before coming to Canada in 1960. He was artistic director of the National Theatre for several years. He returned to France briefly before settling in Quebec, where he continued a career in theatre. He was also seen in the films Comfort and Indifference (1982), The Emperor of Peru (1982), Seurat: The Realm of Light (1991), La Fenetre (1992), Remue-Menage (1996), Encore Dimanche (2002), and Chaos and Desire (2002).

Rosenfield, Lois Theatrical producer Lois Rosenfield died of cancer in Glencoe, Illinois, on May 25, 2003. She was 78. She and her husband, Maurice, formed Rosenfield Productions in Chicago in 1972. They produced the 1973 film Bang the Drum Slowly starring Robert De Niro. They also produced numerous theatrical productions including the 1980 hit Barnum. New York Times, June 7, 2003, A27; Variety, June 23, 2003, 55.

Ross, Bertram Dancer Bertram Ross died of pneumonia after a long illness from Parkinson’s syndrome in Manhattan, New York, on April 20, 2003. He was 82. Ross was born in Brooklyn, New York, on November 13, 1920. He joined the Martha Graham Dance Company in 1949, and co-starred with Graham in 1953’s Night Journey. He partnered with Graham for two decades, playing such roles as Agamemnon and Orestes in Clytemnestra, Adam in Embattled Garden, and St. Michael in Seraphic Dialogue. He served as co-director of the company from 1966 until 1973. He soon began

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teaming with pianist and songwriter John Wallowitch in a singing act. Ross was also a choreographer for the Broadway play The Aunt in 1989, and was the subject of a 1998 documentary film This Moment. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 25, 2003, B12; New York Times, Apr. 24, 2003, A29; Variety, Aug. 25, 2003, 108.

Ross, Troyanne Actress Troyanne Ross died in Charlotte, North Carolina, on August 21, 2003. She was 76. She began her career in local theatre and was a weather girl on a local television station. Ross costarred with Rory Calhoun in the 1960 race film Thunder in Carolina. She subsequently founded a modeling school in Charlotte, which she operated from the 1960s through the 1980s.

Lois Rosenfield

Troyanne Ross

Rossi, Joey Bertram Ross (with Martha Graham)

Joey Rositano, who competed in the 1970s as professional wrestler Joey Rossi, died of lung cancer in Nolensville, Tennessee, on Novem-

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Joey Rossi

ber 30, 2003. He was 51. He was the son of wrestler Len Rossi, and teamed with his father in the ring in the 1970s. Rossi also held the NWA Mid-America Tag Team Titles with Bearcat Brown. He retired from the ring in the 1980s.

Rowberry, Dave

Dave Rowberry

Roy, William Pianist, songwriter and former child star William Roy died of respiratory failure in West

Rock musician Dave Rowberry, who was keyboard player for the Animals in the 1960s, was found dead in his London apartment on June 6, 2003. Rowberry, who suffered from heart problems, was 62. Rowberry was born in Nottingham, England, on July 4, 1940. He joined the Mike Cotton Jazzmen in 1962, and replaced original keyboardist Alan Price in the Animals in 1965. Often singing back-up to band leader Eric Burdon, Rowberry was heart on such hits as “Don’t Bring Me Down,” “It’s My Life,” and “We’ve Got to Get Out of This Place.” He recorded the album Animalism before the group disbanded later in the decade. Rowberry performed in recent years with several members of the group as Animals and Friends. Variety, June 23, 2003, 55.

William Roy

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Palm Beach, Florida, on September 2, 2003. He was 75. Roy was born in Detroit, Michigan, in 1928. He began performing at the age of three, singing on a local radio program. He was soon acting on radio in episodes of The Green Hornet and The Lone Ranger. As Billy Roy, he began working in films in the early 1940s, appearing in Aloma of the South Seas (1941), Pride of the Yankees (1942), The Major and the Minor (1942), Good Luck, Mr. Yates (1943), Hangmen Also Die (1943), The Iron Major (1943), Gangway for Tomorrow (1943), The Cross of Lorraine (1943), Passage to Marseille (1944), The Conspirators (1944), The Corn Is Green (1945), That Hagen Girl (1947), It Happened in Brooklyn (1947), and Arch of Triumph (1948). He also appeared in numerous radio productions and studied musical composition. After leaving the screen Roy composer the score for the 1953 Broadway musical Maggie, and contributed songs to the revue New Faces of 1962. He also worked as a musical arranger and accompanist for numerous performers including Rosemary Clooney, Mabel Mercer, and Julie Wilson. Janice Rule

Rule, Janice Actress Janice Rule died at her home in Manhattan, New York, on October 17, 2003. She was 72. Rule was born in Norwood, Ohio, on August 15, 1931. She began her career performing on stage as a dance in Chicago nightclubs while in her teens. She went to Hollywood in the early 1950s and made her film debut in Goodbye, My Fancy. She was featured in the films Fourteen Hours (1951), Starlift (1951), Holiday for Sinners (1952), and Rogue’s March (1953). She co-starred with Paul Newman in his Broadway debut in the 1953 production of Picnic. Rule also appeared on Broadway in The Flowering Beach, Night Circus and The Happiest Girl in the World. She also resumed her film career in the features A Woman’s Devotion (1956), Gun for a Coward (1957), Bell, Book and Candle (1958) with Jimmy Stewart, The Subterraneans (1960), Invitation to a Gunfighter (1964), The Chase (1966), Alvarez Kelly (1966), Welcome to Hard Times (1967), the 1967 Matt Helm spy spoof The Ambushers with Dean Martin, The Swimmer (1968) with Burt Lancaster, Doctors’ Wives (1971), Gumshoe (1971), Kid Blue (1973), Robert Altman’s Three Women (1977), Missing (1982), American Flyers (1985), and L.A.

Bad (1985). She was also featured in the tele-films Shadow on the Land (1968), Trial Run (1969), The Devil and Miss Sarah (1971), and the 1978 miniseries The Word. Rule’s other television credits include episodes of Goodyear Television Playhouse, Studio One, Robert Montgomery Presents, The U.S. Steel Hour, The Alcoa Hour, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, Playhouse 90, Have Gun Will Travel, Wagon Train, M Squad, Suspicion, Kraft Television Theatre, Moment of Fear, The Twilight Zone, Route 66, Checkmate, Adventures in Paradise, Dr. Kildare, The Defenders, The Reporter, Ben Casey, Slattery’s People, Burke’s Law, The Fugitive, Run for Your Life, Journey to the Unknown, The Name of the Game, Great Mysteries, Barnaby Jones, Spencer For Hire, Murder, She Wrote, and The Ray Bradbury Theatre. Ms. Rule received a Ph.D. in psychoanalysis from the Southern California Psychoanalytic Institute in Los Angeles in 1983, largely retiring from the screen. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 24, 2003, B17; New York Times, Oct. 22, 2003, A21; Variety, Nov. 3, 2003, 50.

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342

Russell, Bing Character actor Neil “Bing” Russell died of cancer in Thousand Oaks, California, on April 8, 2003. He was 76. Russell was born in Brattleboro, Vermont, on May 5, 1926. The father of actor Kurt Russell, he was featured in over 50 films from the early 1950s including Big Leaguer (1953), Crashout (1955), Tarantula (1955), Behind the High Wall (1956), Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957), The Deadly Mantis (1957), Drango (1957), The Land Unknown (1957), Ride a Violent Mile (1957), Teenage Thunder (1957), Fear Strikes Out (1957), Bombers B-52 (1957), Cattle Empire (1958), Suicide Battalion (1958), Good Day for a Hanging (1958), Rio Bravo (1959), The Horse Soldiers (1959), Last Train from Gun Hill (1959), The Magnificent Seven (1960), Saint of Devil’s Island (1961), Stakeout! (1962), The Stripper (1963), One Man’s Way (1964), Cheyenne Autumn (1964), The Hallelujah Trail (1965), Madame X (1966), Billy the Kid Versus Dracula (1966), Ride to Hangman’s Tree (1967), Blackbeard’s Ghost (1968), Journey to Shiloh (1968), The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes (1969), $1,000,000 Duck (1971), Now You See Him, Now You Don’t (1972), The Apple Dumpling Gang (1975), Overboard (1987), Sunset (1988), Tango & Cash (1989), and 1990’s Dick Tracy. He was featured as deputy Clem Foster on the longrunning television Western series Bonanza from

1962 to 1973. He was also seen in the tele-films Yuma (1971), A Taste of Evil (1971), Set This Town on Fire (1973), Satan’s School for Girls (1973), Runaway! (1973), A Cry in the Wilderness (1974), The Sex Symbol (1974), Death Sentence (1974), Arthur Hailey’s The Moneychangers (1976), and The Loneliest Runner (1976). Russell appeared as Elvis Presley’s father, Vernon, in the 1979 tele-film Elvis, with his son, Kurt, starring as Elvis. The older Russell was also featured in numerous television series including You Are There, Gunsmoke, Wagon Train, Wyatt Earp, Tombstone Territory, Maverick, Colt .45, Science Fiction Theatre, Tales of Wells Fargo, Northwest Passage, Sugarfoot, Have Gun Will Travel, Zane Grey Theater, Black Saddle, Bronco, The Rifleman, Johnny Ringo, Wanted: Dead Or Alive, Maverick, The Alaskans, Laramie, Wrangler, Tate, Surfside 6, Bronco, The Blue Angels, The Twilight Zone, The Untouchables, Death Valley Days, Rawhide, Ben Casey, The Andy Griffith Show, Stoney Burke, The Fugitive, The Virginian, The Munsters, Branded, Combat!, The Big Valley, A Man Called Shenandoah, The Monroes, The Monkees, I Dream of Jeannie, Hondo, The Guns of Will Sonnett, Dundee and the Culhane, Ironside, The Outcasts, Adam-12, Mannix, Alias Smith and Jones, Longstreet, Emergency!, The Rockford Files, The Streets of San Francisco, Petrocelli, and Little House on the Prairie.

Russell, Mary Jane Mary Jane Russell, a leading fashion model in the 1940s and 1950s, died of pulmonary fibrosis in Charleston, South Carolina, on November 20, 2003. She was 77. She was born Mary Jane Walton in Teaneck, New Jersey, on July 10, 1926. She began modeling in New York City in the late 1940s, appearing on the covers of dozens of magazines including Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar. The 5'6" model worked with such photographers as Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Irving Penn, and Richard Avedon. New York Times, Dec. 8, 2003, B7.

Russell, Peter Bing Russell

British actor Peter Russell died in England after a short illness on July 28, 2003. He was 72. Russell was born on March 29, 1931. He began his

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career on stage, appearing in the original London productions of such plays as The Devils and Jean Anouilh’s Becket. He also appeared often on British television in the 1960s, guest starring in episodes of Z Cars and Doctor Who. Russell was also seen in the series The Bill, Roald Dahl’s Tales of the Unexpected, The Dark Room, London’s Burning, Bramwell, the children’s series Oasis, and the tele-films Last of the Summer Wine and The Scarlet Pimpernel.

Russo, William

Mary Jane Russell

Composer and bandleader William Russo died of pneumonia in Chicago on January 11, 2003. He was 74. Russo was born in Chicago on June 25, 1928. He formed the Experiment in Jazz band in the late 1940s, and was an arranger and composer with Stan Kenton’s orchestra from 1950 to 1954. He subsequently let the Russo Orchestra in New York, and the London Jazz Orchestra, before returning to Chicago in 1965. He formed the Chicago Jazz Ensemble and, in the late 1960s, composed the rock cantata, The Civil War. He scored several experimental films from the 1970s including Everybody Rides the Carousel (1975), Whither Weather (1977), The Cosmic Eye (1986), Time of the Angels (1987), and My Universe Inside Out (1996).

William Russo Peter Russell

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Ryan, John Fergus Author John Fergus Ryan died of complications from diabetes and Parkinson’s disease in Memphis, Tennessee, on June 17, 2003. He was 72. Ryan was born in North Little Rock, Arkansas, in 1931. He moved to Memphis in the mid– 1950s and soon began writing for such magazines as The Evergreen Review, Mayfair, and Penthouse. His 1991 novel The Little Brothers of St. Mortimer was filmed as The White River Kid in 1999. Ryan also wrote the novels The Redneck Bride (1982) and Watching (1997). Ryan appeared on screen as Pa Flynt in the 1996 film The People vs. Larry Flynt.

spent four years in a Nazi concentration camp during World War II. A leading stage actress, she was also seen in the films The Wooden Rosary (1965), If Your Heart Can Feel (1980), The Year of the Quiet Sun (1985), The Star Wormwood (1988), The Convert (1994), and Faustyna (1995)

Sabotage Brazilian rap singer Sabotage was shot to death in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in the morning hours of January 24, 2003, after dropping his wife off at work. He was 30. He was born Mauro Mateus dos Santos in Sao Paulo in 1973. He recorded his first CD O Rap e Compromisso in 2001. He was featured in Beto Bryant’s 2002 film The Trespasser (aka The Invader). Sabotage also appeared in 2003’s Carandiru.

John Fergus Ryan

Rysiowna, Zofia Polish actress Zofia Rysiowna died of heart and respiratory problems in Warsaw, Poland, on November 17, 2003. She was 83. Rysiowna was born in Rozwadow, Poland, on May 17, 1920. She

Sabotage

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Sadler, Laura British actress Laura Sadler died in a London hospital on June 19, 2003, of head injuries sustained five days earlier when she fell 40 feet from a balcony during a party in London. She was 22. Sadler was born in Ascot, Berkshire, England, on December 25, 1980. She began her career as a child actress, appearing in episodes of the television series Inspector Morse and Days Like These. She was featured in the 1989 tele-film Magic Moments and the 1993 television mini-series The Sahara Project. She made her film debut in 1996’s Intimate Relations. Sadler starred as Judi Jeffreys in the British television series Grange Hill from 1997 to 1999. She was also seen in television productions of Coming Home (1998), The Fallen Curtain (1999), and Anchor Me (2000). Sadler starred as Skirty Marm in the children’s fantasy television series Belfry Witches (1999), and was Nurse Sandy Harper in the series Holby City in 1999.

Oliver Sain

“Cruisin on Sunset.” Sain continued to perform until his death.

St. John, Dick Dick St. John, who with Mary Sperling formed the 1960s singing duo Dick & Dee Dee, died in Los Angeles on injuries suffered from a fall at his home on December 27, 2003. He was 63. St. John was born Richard Gosting in Santa Monica, California, in 1940. Joining with Sperling, they were signed by Liberty Records and recorded such hit tunes as “The Mountain’s High,” “Young and in Love,” and “Thou Shalt Not Steal.” St. John wrote many of their songs

Laura Sadler

Sain, Oliver Musician and songwriter Oliver Sain died of cancer in St. Louis County, Missouri, on October 28, 2003. He was 71. Sain was born in St. Louis on March 1, 1932, and raised in Mississippi. He began playing the saxophone at an early age and made his first recordings in the early 1960s. He had a number of hit songs in the 1970s including “Bus Stop,” “Party Hearty,” “Feel Like Dancing,” and “Booty Bumpin’”. His 1981 album So Good (In the Morning ) included the hit song

Dick St. John’s album The Best of Dick & Dee Dee

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346

and also wrote for such artists as Lesley Gore, Quincy Jones and Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons. Sperling retired in the early 1970s and was replaced as “Dee Dee” by St. John’s wife, Sandy. He continued to record and perform until his death. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 30, 2003, B13; New York Times, Jan. 3, 2004, A23.

St. John, Robert Veteran newsman and broadcaster Robert St. John died of leukemia at his home in Baltimore, Maryland, on February 6, 2003. He was 100. St. John was born in Chicago on March 9, 1902. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War I. After the war he began a career as a newspaper journalist. St. John was hired by the Associated Press in 1939 and covered World War II in Europe. He also broadcast for NBC radio during the war. He hosted the television series Believe It or Not for several months in 1949. St. John was also a leading supporter of Israel and covered Middle Eastern events for over 40 years, including five Arab-Israeli wars. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 9, 2003, B16; New York Times, Feb. 8, 2003, B7.

Robert St. John

Sanders, Honey Honey Sanders Shapiro, a Broadway actress turned talent agent, died of cardiac arrest in Los Angeles on October 31, 2003. She was 75. Sanders was born Honey Rubel in 1928. She began her career as a child, singing on Horace Heidt’s television show. She made her Broadway debut in 1961’s 13 Daughters. Sanders was also featured in Broadway productions of Mame (1966), The Rose Tattoo (1966), The Education of H*Y*M*A*N K*A*P*L*A*N (1968), and Heathen! (1971). She also appeared in the television soap opera The Edge of Night. In the 1970s she formed the Sanders Talent Agency. She was also a theatrical producer in the 1990s for productions of Tennessee Williams’ Not About Nightingales and The Sweet Smell of Success. New York Times, Nov. 3, 2003, A17.

Sandford, Jeremy British television writer Jeremy Sandford died in Hatfield, Hertfordshire, England, on

Jeremy Sandford

347 May 12, 2003. He was 72. Sandford was born in Hertfordshire on December 5, 1930. He began writing for BBC radio in the 1950s, scripting the radio play Dreaming Bandsmen in 1956. He made numerous short documentaries for radio, and moved to television in the early 1960s. He was best known for writing the controversial tele-play Cathy Come Home in 1966. He also wrote the 1971 tele-play Edna, the Inebriate Woman. New York Times, May 19, 2003, A19.

Sands, Johnny Actor Johnny Sands died at his home in Ainaloa, Hawaii, on December 30, 2003. He was 75. Sands was born Elbert Harp, Jr., in Lorenzo, Texas, on April 29, 1928. He left for Hollywood at the age of 13 to work as a theater usher. He was discovered by a talent scout in 1944 and made his film debut in the romantic comedy Affairs of Geraldine two years later. Sands was seen in over a dozen films over the next eight years including Till the End of Time (1946), The Stranger (1946), Born to Speed (1947), Blaze of Noon (1947), The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer (1947) as Shirley Temple’s boyfriend Jerry, The Fabulous Texan (1947), Adventure in Baltimore (1949), Massacre River (1949), It’s Your Health (1949), The Lawless

Johnny Sands

2003 • Obituaries

(1950), Two Flags West (1950), The Admiral Was a Lady (1950), Target Unknown (1951), The Basektball Fix (1951), Aladdin and His Lamp (1952) as Aladdin, and Sabre Jet (1953). Sands subsequently abandoned his film career and moved to Hawaii, where he was a successful real estate agent. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 14, 2004, B10.

Sanford, John Screenwriter John Sanford died of an aortic aneurysm in Montecito, California, on March 6, 2003. He was 98. Sanford was born Julian Lawrence Shapiro in Harlem, New York, on April 30, 1904. He earned a degree in law in the late 1920s but preferred to concentrate on writing. His first novel, The Water Wheel, was published in 1933 and was followed by The Old Man’s Place in 1935. He soon went to Hollywood where he met fellow writer Marguerite Roberts. They were married in 1938 and collaborated on writing the 1941 film Honky Tonk starring Clark Gable and Spencer Tracy. Sanford quite writing films to return to novels, including 1953’s The Land That Touches Mine, but his professional career was sidetracked when he was blacklisted for his refusal to cooperate with the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1951. A decade later Sanford’s works reemerged with the publication of the novel Every Island Fled Away in 1964. His other works include A View from This Wilderness (1977), To Feed Their Hopes: A Book of American Women (1978), A Man Without Shoes (1982), and The Winters of That Country (1984), and Intruders in Paradise (1997). His wife, Roberts, who had also resumed her screenwriting career in the 1960s

John Sanford (with wife Marguerite Roberts)

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348

with such movies as John Wayne’s True Grit, died on February 17, 1989. New York Times, Mar. 17, 2003, B7.

Sannoner, Milla Italian actress Milla Sannoner died in Milan, Italy, on April 14, 2003. She was 62. She appeared in over a dozen films from the early 1960s including The Last Charge (1962), Sergio Leone’s Avanti La Music (1962), Massacre at Grand Canyon (1965), Three Graves for a Winchester (1965), Io, Emmanuelle (1969), A Pocketful of Chestnuts (1970), and the 1976 television mini-series Sandokan. Sannoner later appeared in the films Madly in Love (1981) and Del Perduto Amore (1998).

Yvonne Sanson

Great Dawn (1946), The Return of the Black Eagle (1946), Flesh Will Surrender (1947), The Mysterious Rider (1948), Nero and the Burning of Rome (1949), The Emperor of Capri (1949), Catene (1949), Children of Chance (1950), Are We All Murderers? (1952), The Shameless Sex (1952), The Overcoat (1953), Tormento (1953), The Three Musketeers (1953), When You Read This Letter (1953), Star of India (1953), Frisky (1955), The Miller’s Wife (1955), The Sea Wall (1958), We Have Only One Life (1958), World of Miracles (1959), The Mercenaries (1961), Black City (1961), The Shortest Day (1962), Day of Wrath (1967), The Prophet (1968), The Conformist (1970), and A.A.A. Masseuse, Good-Looking, Offers Her Services (1972). Milla Sannoner

Sargent, Bill Sanson, Yvonne Italian actress Yvonne Sanson died in Bologna, Italy, on July 23, 2003. Sanson was born in Salonika, Greece, in 1926. She appeared in numerous films from the mid–1940s including The

Producer H. William “Bill” Sargent died of a heart attack in Caddo, Oklahoma, on October 19, 2003. He was 76. Sargent was born in Caddo on April 17, 1927. He began his career in show business as a promoter and producer in the late 1950s. He was founder of Home Entertain-

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2003 • Obituaries

Bill Sargent

ment Co., which introduced pay-per-view television to Los Angeles in 1962 with a boxing match between Muhammad Ali and George Logan. Sargent produced a video of Richard Burton’s production of Hamlet in 1964 which appeared in movie theaters. He also produced the filmed rock concert The T.A.M.I. Show in 1965 and a biographical film about actress Jean Harlow, Harlow, starring Carol Lynley. Sargent also produced the film version of the play Stop the World! I Want to Get Off. Sargent produced the one-man filmed show Give ’Em Hell, Harry!, starring James Whitmore as Harry S Truman in 1975 and produced Richard Pryor Live in Concert in 1979. Sargent also produced numerous musical events and several Broadway shows. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 26, 2003, B20; New York Times, Oct. 31, 2003, B9; Variety, Nov. 3, 2003, 50.

Saroyan, Lucy Lucy Saroyan, the daughter of writer William Saroyan and stepdaughter of actor Walter Matthau, died of complications of hepatitis C

Lucy Saroyan (with her father, William, and brother, Aram)

and cirrhosis of the liver in Thousand Oaks, California, on April 11, 2003. She was 57. Saroyan was born in San Francisco on January 17, 1946. She appeared in small roles in films from the 1960s including Isadora (1968), Some Kind of a Nut (1969), Maidstone (1970), Kotch (1971), The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974), Greased Lightning (1977), Blue Collar (1978), and Hopscotch (1980). She was also seen on television in episodes of Mannix, Columbo, The Name of the Game, The Blue Knight, and Eight Is Enough.

Sarquis, Nicolas Argentine film director and writer Nicolas Sarquis died of pulmonary edema in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on April 19, 2003. He was 65. Sarquis was born in Buenos Aires on March 6, 1938. He began making films in the mid–1960s, directing and scripting 1968’s Stick and Bone. His other film credits include Talampaya (1972), Navidad (1972), The Underground Man (1981),

Obituaries • 2003

350 ana, on September 9, 1924. He was a local radio and television announcer when began assisting his father, Allen Saunders, on writing comic strips. John Saunders replaced his father as writer for the Steve Roper strip in 1955. He took over writing the Mary Worth strip for his father in 1979. The older Saunders, who died in 1986, had written the strip from the late 1930s. Mary Worth, which is drawn by artist Joe Giella, is syndicated to over 350 newspapers around the world.

Savage, Archie Nicolas Sarquis

Zama (1984), Facundo, the Tiger’s Shadow (1995), and On the Earth (1998). He also directed the 1989 documentary about Argentine President Carlos Menem, Menem, Picture of a Man.

Saunders, John John P. Saunders, who wrote the popular syndicated comic strip Mary Worth for 24 years, died of complications from heart disease in Toledo, Ohio, on November 15, 2003. He was 79. Saunders was born in Crawfordsville, Indi-

Actor and dancer Archie Savage died in Los Angeles on February 4, 2003. He was 88. Savage was born in Norfolk, Virginia, on April 19, 1914. A member of Katherine Dunham’s dance company, he appeared in several films in the 1940s and 1950s including Carnival of Rhythm (1941), Tales of Manhattan (1942), Cabin in the Sky (1943), Jammin’ the Blues (1944), Broadway Rhythm (1944), His Majesty O’Keefe (1954), Carmen Jones (1954), Vera Cruz (1954), the 1955 serial Panther Girl of the Kongo, The Garment Jungle (1957), This Could Be the Night (1957), and South Pacific (1958). He also appeared in several episodes of Ramar of the Jungle on television. Savage went to Europe in the 1960s where he worked as an actor an choreographer on such films as The Son of the Red Pirate (1959), La Dolce Vita (1960), Assignment Outer Space (1960), The Last Days of Sodom and Gomorrah (1962), Tarzan Against the Leopard Men (1964), The Magnificent Cuckold (1964), Wild Wild Planet (1965), Snow Devils (1965), The War of the Planets (1966), Hercules Against the Sons of the Sun (1966), Virgin of the Jungle (1967), and Death Rides a Horse (1968).

Savage, Thomas

John Saunders

Western novelist Thomas Savage died at his retirement home in Virginia Beach, Virginia, on July 25, 2003. He was 88. Savage was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1915. Raised on a Montana ranch, Savage began writing Western novels in the early 1940s. He achieved success with his first two books, The Pass (1944) and Lona Hanson (1948). He also wrote The Power of the Dog (1967) and I Heard My Sister Speak My Name (aka

351

2003 • Obituaries

Thomas Savage Glenn Savan

The Sheep Queen (1977). His final novel, The Corner of Rife and Pacific, was published in 1988. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 30, 2003, B23.

Savan, Glenn Author Glenn Savan died after a long illness in Shrewsbury, Missouri, on April 14, 2003. He was 49. Savan was best known for writing the 1987 best-selling novel White Palace, which was filmed in 1990 starring Susan Sarandon. He also wrote the 1993 novel Goldman’s Anatomy. New York Times, Apr. 17, 2003, C13.

Sawa, Ranko Japanese silent film star Ranko Sawa died in Shinogyoku, Kyoto, Japan, on January 11, 2003. She was 99. She began her career in Japanese films in the 1920s, starring in A Diary of Chuji’s Travels (1927), The Morning Sun Shines (1929), and Japanese Girls at the Port (1933). Sawa retired from films after World War II but continued her career as a singer.

Ranko Sawa

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352

Sawa, Tamaki Japanese actress Tamaki Sawa was found dead of heart failure in the Komeito House of Councillors apartments in Tokyo, where she served as a legislator, on August 9, 2003. She was 66. She was born Masako Yamamoto in Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan, on January 2, 1937. Sawa was best known for her role in the popular Play Girl action television series from 1969 to 1974. She was also featured in several films including Duel in the Storm (1968), Wolves of the City (1968), and Black Rain (1989). She became involved in politics in the 1990s and was elected to Japan’s Upper House of Representatives in 1998. She continued to serve in the legislature until her death.

James Saxon

Tamaki Sawa

(1995), and Les Miserables (1998). He also was seen in television productions of Lady Windermere’s Fan (1985), Vanity Fair (1987), Twelfth Night (1988), Sharpe’s Honour (1994), Poldark (1996), In the Red (1998), Cleopatra (1999), The Prince and the Pauper (2000), and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (2002). He was a regular performer in numerous British television series including We’ll Meet Again (1982), Brass (1983), Roland Rat, the Series (1986), Brush Strokes (1986), The Paradise Club (1989), Time Riders (1991), McCallum (1995), and The Privateers (2000). He was also seen in episodes of Doctor Who, Poirot, Boon, The New Statesman, Casualty, Soldier Soldier, Medics, Lovejoy, A Touch of Frost, Murder Most Horrid, Tales from the Crypt, Chalk, and Jonathan Creek.

Saxon, James

Scace, David

British character actor James Saxon died of a heart attack in Chichester, England, on July 2, 2003. Saxon was featured in the films The Nesting (1982), Biggles: Adventures in Time (1986), A Prayer for the Dying (1987), England, My England

British stage and film actor David Scace died in England on March 11, 2003. He was 82. Scace was best known as a stage director and actor. He also appeared in the 1952 film Never Look Back, and the television mini-series Flam-

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2003 • Obituaries

bards (1978), The Racing Game (1979), and Judith Krantz’s Till We Meet Again (1989). He was the voice of Duke in the 1992 television series Truckers. Scace also appeared on television in episodes of Juliet Bravo, G.B.H., and The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes.

Scandurra, Franco Italian character actor Franco Scandurra died in Italy on April 10, 2003. He was 90. Scandurra was featured in numerous film from the early 1940s including The Spirit and the Flesh (1941), The Za-Burn Circus (1943), 07 Taxi (1946), The Brothers Karamazov (1947), Mademoiselle Gobete (1953), Immortal Melodies (1953), Marriage (1954), Great Vaudeville (1954), Love on the Riviera (1958), Uncle Was a Vampire (1959), Hercules’ Pills (1960), A Difficult Life (1961), Island Affair (1962), The Golden Arrow (1962), The Police Commissioner (1962), The Family Doctor (1968), Goodnight, Ladies and Gentlemen (1976), Eye of the Cat (1976), and Everybody in Jail (1984).

Schall, David Actor David Schall died of a heart attack in Hollywood on April 11, 2003. He was 53. Schall was born in Ford City, Pennsylvania, in 1949. He was active in politics in Pennsylvania, serving in Governor Milton J. Shapp’s administration from 1971 to 1976. He subsequently went to New York to pursue a career in acting. He performed in various plays and commercials including the OffBroadway productions Night Shift and Even in Laughter. In 1981 he founded the Actors Fellowship at the Marble Collegiate Church in Manhattan. Schall moved to Los Angeles in 1986 and was a founding member of the Actors Co-Op the following year. He appeared on television in episodes of such series as Cheers, Murder, She Wrote, Silk Stalkings, L.A. Law, ER, and the soap operas The Young and the Restless, Days of Our Lives, and Port Charles. He also appeared in the tele-films The Sitter (1991) and What Love Sees (1996), and the features Jack of Diamonds (2001) and The Theory of Everything (2003).

David Schall

Scharf, Walter Film composer and musical director Walter Scharf died of heart failure at his Brentwood, California, home on February 24, 2003. He was 92. Scharf was born in New York City on August 1, 1910. He began his career composing for the New York stage. He was an orchestrator for George Gershwin’s Broadway musical Girl Crazy in 1930. Scharf relocated to Hollywood in 1934 where he worked on hundreds of film and television shows during his career. Scharf was nominated for ten Academy Awards for his work on such films as Mercy Island (1941), Johnny Doughboy (1942), Hit Parade of 1943 (1943), In Old Oklahoma (1943), Brazil (1944), The Fighting Seabees (1944), Hans Christian Andersen (1952), Funny Girl (1968), and Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971). He also received an Oscar nomination for best song for the 1972 rat love theme to Ben. His numerous film credits also include Nancy Steele Is Missing! (1937), Suez (1938), The Three Musketeers (1939), Return of the Cisco Kid (1939), The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1939), Michael

Obituaries • 2003

354 Sack (1957), King Creole (1958), The Geisha Boy (1958), Don’t Give Up the Ship (1959), The Bellboy (1960), Cinderfella (1960), The Ladies Man (1961), The Errand Boy (1961), Pocketful of Miracles (1961), It’s Only Money (1962), The Funny Side of Life (1962), The Nutty Professor (1963), My Six Loves (1963), Where Love Has Gone (1964), Tickle Me (1965), Pendulum (1968), If It’s Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium (1969), The Cheyenne Social Club (1970), Journey Back to Oz (1971), Walking Tall (1973), This Is Elvis (1981), and Twilight Time (1982). Scharf also worked often in television, scoring over a dozen National Geographic specials. He was awarded two Emmy awards for his work on The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau. Other television credits include the tele-films The Triangle Factory Fire Scandal (1979), From Here to Eternity (1979), Blind Ambition (1979), The Scarlett O’Hara War (1980), Long Days of Summer (1980), and Midnight Offerings (1981), and such series as Ben Casey, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Wild Wild West, Mission: Impossible, Hawaii FiveO, and Salvage-1. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 28, 2003, B15; New York Times, Mar. 1, 2003, A16; Variety, Mar. 3, 2003, 79.

Schenkel, Carl

Walter Scharf

Shayne, Private Detective (1940), Henry Aldrich for President (1941), The Glass Key (1942), Flying Tigers (1942), Holiday Inn (1942), Secret Service in Darkest Africa (1943), The Masked Marvel (1943), Haunted Harbor (1944), Zorro’s Black Whip (1944), Captain America (1944), The Lady and the Monster (1944), The Tiger Woman (1944), Manhunt on Mystery Island (1945), The Woman Who Came Back (1945), Trail of Kit Carson (1945), Dakota (1945), The Phantom Rider (1946), Spoilers of the North (1947), Casbah (1948), The Countess of Monte Cristo (1948), King of the Rocket Men (1949), Yes Sir That’s My Baby (1949), Ma and Pa Kettle (1949), Francis (1950), Winchester ’73 (1950), Abbott and Costello Meet the Invisible Man (1951), Artists and Models (1955), Three Violent People (1956), The Joker Is Wild (1957), The Sad

German film director Carl Schenkel died of a heart attack at his home in Los Angeles on December 1, 2003. He was 55. Schenkel was born in Bern, Switzerland, in 1948. He began working in films as an assistant director in the 1970s on Bathtime in Bangkok (1976) and The Fruit Is Ripe (1976). Under the pseudonym Carlo Ombra he directed the 1979 horror comedy Dracula Blows His Cool. Schenkel continued to direct and write such German films as Strike Back (1981), Out of Order (1984), and Silence Like Glass (1989). He helmed the 1987 tele-film Bay Coven and episodes of the television series The Hitchhiker. Schenkel directed Denzel Washington in the 1989 film The Mighty Quinn. He also directed the films Knight Moves (1992), Exquisite Tenderness (1995) and Tarzan and the Lost City (1998) starring Casper Van Dien. Schenkel also continued to work in television, directing an episode of Profiler, and the tele-films Silhouette (1990), Beyond Betrayal (1994), In the Lake of the Woods (1996), Kalte Kusse (1997), Missing Pieces (2000), and 2001’s Murder

355

2003 • Obituaries

in Basel, Switzerland, on April 25, 1968. He starred as Steve Meier in the Swiss television soap opera Luthi und Blanc from 1999 through 2002. He was also seen in the film F. Is a Bastard (1998), and the tele-films White Fear (2001) and Big Deal (2002). A popular singer and musician, Schenkel recorded his first album, The Shell, in 1997.

Schiller, Fred

Carl Schenkel

on the Orient Express starring Alfred Molina as Agatha Christie’s detective Hercule Poirot.

Film and television writer Fred Schiller died in Los Angeles on February 8, 2003. He was 99. Schiller was born in Vienna, Austria, on January 6, 1904. He came to Hollywood in the 1930s and scripted the films The Flying Deuces (1939), The Heat’s On (1943), and Pistol Packin’ Mama (1943). He also wrote the original story for the films Something to Shout About (1943), Boston Blackie’s Rendezvous (1945), and Winter Wonderland (1947). Schiller worked primarily in television in the 1950s, writing episodes of such series as Four Star Playhouse, The Millionaire, The Veil, The Case of the Dangerous Robin, and The New Adventures of Charlie Chan.

Schenkel, Martin Swiss actor and musician Martin Schenkel died of a brain tumor in Zermatt, Switzerland, on March 26, 2003. He was 34. Schenkel was born

Martin Schenkel

Schlesinger, John Oscar-winning film director John Schlesinger died of complications from a stroke in Los Angeles on July 25, 2003. He was 77. Schlesinger was born in London on February 16, 1926. After service in World War II, he began working as an actor on the English stage. He also appeared in small roles in several films in the 1950s including Sailor of the King (1953), The Divided Heart (1954), Oh … Rosalinda!! (1955), Pursuit of the Graf Spee (1956), The Last Man to Hang (1956), Brothers in Law (1957), Black Tide (1957), and The Beasts of Marseilles (1957). In the late 1950s he began making documentary films for the BBC and directed segments of the Monitor television series. He directed and wrote the 1961 film Terminus, and helmed several acclaimed films in England including A Kind of Loving (1962), Billy Liar (1963), Darling (1965) with Julie Christie, and Far from the Madding Crowd (1969). Schlesinger earned an Academy Award for his Hollywood debut with 1969’s Midnight Cowboy (1969), starring Dustin Hoffman and Jon Voight as two

Obituaries • 2003

356

John Schlesinger

ill-fated New York street hustlers. Schlesinger continued to helm such films as Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971), The Day of the Locust (1975), Marathon Man (1976), Yanks (1979), Honky Tonk Freeway (1981), The Falcon and the Snowman (1985), The Believers (1987), Madame Sousatzka (1988), Pacific Heights (1990), The Innocent (1993), Eye for an Eye (1996), and 2000’s The Next Best Thing, starring Madonna. Schlesinger also directed several films for television including adaptations of Separate Tables (1983), An Englishman Abroad (1983), A Question of Attribution (1992), Cold Comfort Farm (1995), and The Tale of Sweeney Todd (1998). He had been in poor health for the past two years after suffering a serious stroke. Los Angeles Times, July 26, 2003, B22; New York Times, July 26, 2003, A15; People, Aug. 11, 2003, 99; Time, Aug. 4, 2003, 21; Variety, Aug. 4, 2003, 46.

Schmid, Aglaja Austrian actress Aglaja Schmid died in Austria on December 16, 2003. She was 77. Schmid was born in Scheibbs, Austria, on August 9, 1926. A popular film star in post–World War II Austria, she was seen in the films The Trial (1948), Das Andere Leben (1948), Der Seelenbrau (1950), My Name Is Niki (1952), Daughter of the Regiment (1953), Franz Schubert (1953), and Don Carlos (1961).

Schmidt, Mille Swedish actor Mille Schmidt died in Sweden on February 2, 2003. He was 80. Schmidt was born in Maniefred, Sweden, on December 24,

Aglaja Schmid

1922. A leading stage actor, Schmidt was also seen in numerous films from the early 1950s including We Three Debutantes (1953), Wild Birds (1955), Ingmar Bergman’s Smiles of a Summer Night (1957), The Staffan Stolle Story (1956), The Lady in Black (1958), Jazz Boy (1958), Swedish Portraits (1964), Me and You (1969), and Beware of the Jonsson Gang! (1981).

Schmidtmer, Christiane European actress Christiane Schmidtmer died in Heidelberg, Germany, of injuries received in an accident on March 30, 2003. She was 63. She began her film career in the early 1960s, appearing in such features as Delay in Marienborn (1963), Fanny Hill (1964), Ship of Fools (1965), Boeing, Boeing (1965), I Deal in Danger (1966), The Big Doll House (1971), The Specialist (1975), The Giant Spider Invasion (1975), Half a House (1976), and Lemon Popsicle III (1981). She was also featured in the 1973 tele-film Scream, Pretty

357

Christiane Schmidtmer

2003 • Obituaries

Peter Schrum

Pegg y, and appeared in episodes of Wild Wild West, Twelve O’Clock High, Hogan’s Heroes, and Wonder Woman.

Family Ties, Valerie, Night Court, Quantum Leap, and Legend.

Schrum, Peter

Schuyler, Richard

Actor Peter Schrum died of a heart attack in Prescott, Arizona, on February 17, 2003. He was 68. Schrum was born in Newark, New Jersey, on July 9, 1934. He began his career on the local stage, where he became known for his long-running appearances as Santa Claus. He began appearing in films in the late 1970s, and was featured in Galaxina (1980), Trancers (1985), Hollywood Harry (1986), Eliminators (1986), Flicks (1987), Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991), Blue Desert (1991), Demonic Toys (1992), Dead Man (1995), The Man Who Wasn’t There (2001), and The Hulk (2003). Schrum was also featured in the 1979 television mini-series The French Atlantic Affair, and starred as Uncle Ed Kaninsky in the television sit-com Gimme a Break! from 1982 to 1983. His other television credits include episodes of Vega$, The Jeffersons, T.J. Hooker,

Actor and stuntman Richard “Dick” Schuyler died of renal cell carcinoma in Green Valley, Arizona, on March 29, 2003. He was 76. Schuyler was born in Billings, Montana, in 1926. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II before going to Hollywood to work as a stuntman. Schuyler was Ronald Reagan’s stunt double the actor’s final two years with the Death Valley Days television series. Schuyler also worked on the films It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (1963), The Human Duplicators (1965), and The Resurrection of Zachary Wheeler (1971). He also worked on such television series as Combat!, The Fugitive, Twelve O’Clock High, Gunsmoke, The Andy Griffith Show, The F.B.I., Police Woman, Barreta, and T.J. Hooker.

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358

Schwartz, Bernard Film and television producer Bernard Schwartz died of complications of a stroke in Los Angeles on October 17, 2003. He was 85. Schwartz was born in New York City in 1918. He moved to Los Angeles in the late 1950s to work in Howard Hughes’ film industry. He oversaw production of the television series The Wackiest Ship in the Army and One Step Beyond. Schwartz also produced the films Journey to the Center of the Earth (1959), I Passed for White (1960), A Cold Wind in August (1961), A Global Affair (1964) starring Bob Hope, The Shuttered Room (1966), Eye of the Cat (1969), and Jennifer on My Mind (1971). He produced several blaxploitation films starring Fred Williamson and Pam Grier in the early 1970s including Hammer (1972), That Man Bolt (1973), and Bucktown (1975). Schwartz received an Oscar nomination for the 1980 film Coal Miner’s Daughter starring Sissy Spacek as country singer Loretta Lynn. He also produced Sweet Dreams (1985) with Jessica Lange as singer Patsy Cline, and the 1987 television mini-series Elvis and Me. His other film credits include

Bernard Schwartz

Roadgames (1981), Psycho II (1983), and St. Elmo’s Fire (1985). Los Angeles Times, Oct. 20, 2003, B9; New York Times, Oct. 24, 2003, A21.

Schwartz, David Film and television writer David R. Schwartz died on October 14, 2003. He was 92. Schwartz worked often in television in the 1950s, writing for such series as Amos ’n’ Andy, The Donna Reed Show, and Playhouse 90. Schwartz also scripted the films Island of Love (1963), Robin and the Seven Hoods (1964) starring Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin, Sex and the Single Girl (1964), That Funny Feeling (1965), and The Bobo (1967).

Schwartz, Zack Animator Zack Schwartz died in Israel on January 13, 2003. Schwartz served as an art director on The Sorcerer’s Apprentice sequence of the 1940 Disney animated classic Fantasia. He was a co-founder of UPA, where he worked on the

Zack Schwartz

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short films Hell Bent for Election and A Few Quick Facts About Fear. After selling his interest in UPA in 1946 he began working with partner David Hilberman in television advertising. He retired to Israel in the 1970s.

Scoppa, Peter R. Film and television assistant director Peter R. Scoppa died of complications from a heart attack in a Palm Harbor, Florida, hospital on August 24, 2003. He was 79. Scoppa worked in television from the early 1950s as an assistant director on such series as Sergeant Bilko, Car 54, Where Are You?, Hawk, Trials of O’Brien, For the People and East Side, West Side. Scoppa was also an assistant director on the films A Lovely Way to Die (1968), The Brotherhood (1969), Popi (1969), The Out-of-Towners (1970), Love Story (1970), Little Murders (1971), The Hospital (1971), The Heartbreak Kid (1972), The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973), The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974), The Stepford Wives (1975), Three Days of the Condor (1975), Taxi Driver (1976), The Front (1976), Mikey and Nicky (1976), and Winter Kills (1979). He retired in the late 1970s due to heart problems.

Scott, Jan Emmy Award–winning television art director Jan Scott died in Hollywood Hills, California, on April 17, 2003. She was 88. Ms. Scott was born in Carbondale, Illinois, in 1915. She worked as an art director from the 1960s, working on such films as The World of Henry Orient (1964) and Stiletto (1969). She primarily worked in television from the 1970s, earning 11 Emmy awards. She was art director or production designer on such tele-films and mini-series as The Scarecrow (1972), The Crooked Hearts (1972), Awake and Sing! (1972), Miracle on 34th Street (1973), The Man Without a Country (1973), She Lives! (1973), Judge Dee and the Monastery Murders (1974), Can Ellen Be Saved? (1974), Journey from Darkness (1975), Trilog y of Terror (1975), A Girl Named Sooner (1975), Eleanor and Franklin (1976), Young Pioneers (1976), Nightmare in Badham County (1976), Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years (1977), The Gathering (1977), Roots (1977),

Jan Scott

Studs Lonigan (1979), Orphan Train (1979), Marilyn: The Untold Story (1980), Evergreen (1985), The Long, Hot Summer (1985) Help Wanted: Kids (1986), A Fighting Chance (1986), Second Serve (1986), Foxfire (1987), Blind Faith (190), The Kennedys of Massachusetts (1990), Caroline? (1990), Jackie Collins’ Lucky/Chances (1990), Danielle Steel’s Changes (1991), Cruel Doubt (1992), A Time to Heal (1994), A Promise Kept: The Oksana Baiul Story (1994), Getting Out (1994), Secrets (1995), A Loss of Innocence (1996), The Summer of Ben Tyler (1996), The Love Letter (1998), and Grace and Glorie (1998). She also worked on the films The End (1978), Rich and Famous (1981), Grandview, U.S.A. (1984), Square Dance (1987), and Harvest of Fire (1996). Los Angeles Times, Apr. 20, 2003, B17; Variety, Apr. 28, 2003, 79.

Scott, Martha Actress Martha Scott, who received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress for her film debut in the 1940 adaptation of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town, died in Van Nuys, California, on May 28, 2003. She was 88. Scott was born in Jamesport, Missouri, on September 22,

Obituaries • 2003

360

Martha Scott (with William Holden in Our Town)

1914. She began her career on stage in the early 1930s, performing Shakespeare at the Chicago World’s Fair. She received acclaim for her role as Emily Webb in the Pulitzer Prize–winning play Our Town, and reprised the role in the 1940 film version. She continued to appear in such films as The Howards of Virginia (1940), Cheers for Miss Bishop (1941), They Dare Not Love (1941), One Foot in Heaven (1941), Hi Diddle Diddle (1943), In Old Oklahoma (1943), So Well Remembered (1947), Strange Bargain (1949), When I Grow Up (1951), The Desperate Hours (1955), The Ten Commandments (1956), Eighteen and Anxious (1957), Sayonara (1957), Ben-Hur (1959), The Search (1960), Charlotte’s Web (1973) as the voice of Mrs. Arable, Airport 1975 (1974), The Turning Point (1977), and Doin’ Time on Planet Earth (1988). She was also seen in the tele-films The Devil’s Daughter (1973), Sorority Kill (1974), Thursday’s Game (1974), Murder in the First Person Singular (1974), The Abduction of Saint Anne (1975), Columbo: Playback (1975), Medical Story (1975), Lemonade (1975), The Word (1978), Charleston (1979), Beulah Land (1980), Father Figure (1980), Summer Girl (1983), Adam (1983), Adam: His Song Continues (1986), Love and Betrayal (1989), and Laughter of the Streets (1990). Scott appeared regularly as Helen Elgin, the mother of Steve Austin, The Six Million Dollar Man, and foster mother of Jaime Sommars, The Bionic Woman, in episodes of both series. She also starred as Patricia Shepard in Dallas from 1979 to 1985, and was Mar-

garet Millington in Secrets of Midland Heights from 1980 to 1981. She also appeared as Jennifer Talbot in the daytime soap opera General Hospital from 1985 to 1986. Her other television credits include episodes of Robert Montgomery Presents, Your Show of Shows, Lux Video Theatre, Lights Out, The Clock, Armstrong Circle Theatre, Suspense, Goodyear Television Playhouse, Kraft Television Theatre, The U.S. Steel Hour, Route 66, The DuPont Show of the Week, The Nurses, Cimarron Strip, The F.B.I., The Courtship of Eddie’s Father, Longstreet, The Bob Newhart Show, Marcus Welby, M.D., Police Story, The Love Boat, Magnum, P.I., Hotel, Highway to Heaven, and Murder, She Wrote. Scott also remained active on stage, co-founding the Plumstead Playhouse with Henry Fonda and Robert Ryan in 1968. She also co-produced the film version of Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee’s play First Monday in October in 1981. Los Angeles Times, May 30, 2003, B12; New York Times, May 31, 2003, B17; People, June 16, 2003, 107; Time, June 9, 2003, 24.

Scribner, Sam Screenwriter Sam Scribner died of cancer in Santa Rosa, California, on July 17, 2003. He was 54. Scribner was born on October 7, 1948. He scripted the films Delta Heat (1992) and The Criminal Mind (1996).

Segundo, Compay Cuban singer and musician Compay Segundo died of kidney failure at his home in Havana, Cuba, on July 13, 2003. He was 95. Segundo was born in Siboney, Cuba, on November 18, 1907. He began composing and performing while in his teens, and formed the duo Los Compadres with Lorenzo Hierrezuelo in 1942. He remained a popular performer through the 1940s and 1950s until he largely retired to work in a Havana cigar factory after Fidel Castro took power in 1959. He resumed his career in 1997 as part of the Buena Vista Social Club, recording a Grammy Award–winning album in 1997. He was also featured in Wim Wenders documentary film of the same name in 1999. Segundo recorded

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Seiler, Neil British actor Neil Seiler died on February 14, 2003. He was 77. Seiler was featured in the 1973 Hammer horror film Captain Kronos, Vampire Hunter, and appeared in two episodes of television’s Doctor Who.

Neil Seiler

Sam Scribner

Compay Segundo

three more albums and numerous concerts until poor health sidelined him in May of 2003. Los Angeles Times, July 15, 2003, B13; New York Times, July 15, 2003, A23; People, July 28, 2003, 67; Time, July 28, 2003, 22; Variety, July 21, 2003, 70.

Sendrey, Albert Film composer and orchestrator Albert Sendrey died of congestive heart failure at the Motion Picture and Television Country House in Woodland Hills, California, on May 18, 2003. He was 91. Sendrey was born in Chicago, Illinois, on December 26, 1911. He worked with MGM in the 1940s and 1950s, serving as composer or orchestrator for numerous films, often on credited. His film credits including Undercurrent (1946), The Yearling (1946), The Sea of Grass (1947), A Date with Judy (1948), Big City (1948), The Three Musketeers (1948), The Kissing Bandit (1948), Hills of Home (1948), Duchess of Idaho (1950), The Yellow Cab Man (1950), Royal Wedding (1951), Father’s Little Dividend (1951), Because You’re Mine (1952), Kansas Pacific (193), A Slight Case of Larceny (1953), Guys and Dolls (1955), Meet Me in Las Vegas (1956), The Vagabond King (1956), The Opposite Sex (1956), and The Private Navy of Sgt. O’Farrell (1968). Sendrey also worked in television on such series as Wagon Train, Riverboat, Laramie, Bonanza, and Ben Casey, and was a pianist and conductor for singer Tony Martin. Los Angeles Times, June 1, 2003, B15; Variety, June 23, 2003, 56.

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362

Albert Sendrey

Senft, Hank Actor Henry “Hank” Senft died at his home in Port Washington, Long Island, New York, on July 20, 2003. He was 86. Senft was born in Brooklyn, New York, on November 15, 1916. He began his career in radio as an announcer and was a popular performer on the local stage. Senft was also seen in the Emmy Award–winning documentary Dreams of Distant Shores and in the 1988 horror film Rejuvenatrix.

Senkevich, Yuri Russian television host and documentarian Yuri Senkevich died of a heart attack in Moscow on September 25, 2003. He was 66. Senkevich was born in Choybalsan, Mongolia, on March 4, 1937. A doctor, Senkevich was chosen as part of the Russian cosmonaut corps in 1965. He was part of the international crew that traveled with Norwegian explorer Thor Heyerdahl across the Atlantic Ocean on a papyrus raft, the Ra. He accompanied Heyerdahl on two more expeditions

Yuri Senkevich

in the early 1970s. Senkevich hosted the Club of Travellers program on Russian television from 1973, telling his audience about far-away lands. He was also featured in the 1976 film The Little Mermaid. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 28, 2003, B23.

Serra, Raymond Veteran character actor Raymond Serra died on June 20, 2003. He was 71. Serra was born in New York City on November 3, 1931. He was a familiar face in films and television from the mid–1970s. His numerous film credits include The Gambler (1974), Marathon Man (1976), Hooch (1977), Manhattan (1979), Voices (1979), Gangsters (1979), Arthur (1981), Wolfen (1981), Vigilante (1983), Splitz (1984), Alphabet City (1984), The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985), Prizzi’s Honor (1985), Forever, Lulu (1987), A Time to Remember (1987), Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1990), Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze (1991), Sugar Hill (1994), The Si-

363

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Raymond Serra

lence of the Hams (1994), Safe Men (1998), Men of Means (1999), Shepherd (1999), 18 Shades of Dust (1999), Mambo Cafe (2000), Wannabes (2000), The Father, the Son (2002), and Mail Order Bride (2003). He was also seen in the tele-films Contract on Cherry Street (1977), Hardhat and Legs (1980), Fighting Back (1980), Bill (1981), Concealed Enemies (1984), Stone Pillow (1985), A Deadly Business (1986), The House of Ramon Iglesia (1986), The Saint in Manhattan (1987), Nasty Hero (1987), Alone in the Neon Jungle (1988), Money, Power, Murder (1989), Marilyn & Bobby: Her Final Affair (1993), Deadline for Murder: From the Files of Edna Buchanan (1995), and Gotti (1996). Serra’s numerous television credits also include episodes of Kojak, Archie Bunker’s Place, Spenser: For Hire, Crime Story, Who’s the Boss?, Murphy Brown, Matlock, Nurses, The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, Murder, She Wrote, and The Job.

Sessak, Hilde German character actress Hilde Sessak died in Berlin on April 17, 2003. She was 87. Sessak was born in Berlin on July 27, 1915. She began her career in films in Germany in the mid–1930s, appearing in The Girl from the Marsh Croft (1935), Light Cavalry (1935), Trouble Backstairs (1935),

Hilde Sessak

Dissatisfied Woman (1936), The Rape of the Sabines (1936), Intermezzo (1936), When Women Kept Silent (1937), Pan (1937), The Curtain Falls (139), Water for Canitoga (1939), Alarm (1941), Illusion (1941), Paracelsus (1943), Trip Into Adventure (1943), The Fire Tongue Bowl (1944), and OrientExpress (1944). After World War II Sessak appeared primarily in character and supporting roles in such films as The Axe of Wandsbek (1951), When the Evening Bells Ring (1951), The Man Between (1953), Afraid to Love (1954), We Cellar Children (1960), The Mysterious Magician (1964), Fanny Hill: Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure (1964), Long Legs, Long Fingers (1966), The Hunchback of Soho (1966), and The Gorilla of Soho (1968).

Shannon, Charles Television comedy writer and actor Charles Shannon died of complications from a stroke in

Obituaries • 2003

364

Charles Shannon

Million (1961), The Small World of Sammy Lee (1963), Up Jumped a Swagman (1965), The Little Ones (1965), Rasputin, the Mad Monk (1966), To Sir, with Love (1966), The Looking Glass War (1969), 11 Harrowhouse (1974), The Odessa File (1974), The Hiding Place (1975), Operation Daybreak (1976), the 1977 James Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me, Avalanche Express (1979), Unidentified Flying Oddball (1979), Erik the Viking (1989), The Madness of King George (1994), The Governess (1998), Simon Magus (1999), The Lost Son (1999), Solomon and Gaenor (1999), The Clandestine Marriage (1999), The End of the Affair (1999), The Man Who Cried (2000), The Importance of Being Earnest (2002) and 2002’s The Pianist. Shaps was also seen in the 1955 television mini-series Quatermass II, and was the voice of Prof. Rudolph Popkiss in 1961 marionette television series Supercar. He was also seen in television productions of The Joel Brand Story (1965), Nineteen Eight Four (1965), QB VII (1974), Bar Mitzvah Boy (1976), Jesus of Nazareth (1977), Holocaust (1978), Private Schulz (1981), Fanny by Gaslight (1981), Dying Day (1982), The Invisible Man (1984), Tennis Court (1984), Blackeyes (1989), Shalom Joan Collins (1989), Sherlock Holmes and the Leading Lady (1990), Can You Hear Me Thinking? (1990), Dark Season (1991), Martin Chuzzlewit (1994), Gulliver’s Travels (1996), Our Mutual Friend (1998), RKO 281

California on December 21, 2003. He was 44. The Houston, Texas, native was a stand-up comedian before becoming a writer for such television shows as Vibe starring Sinbad, The Man Show, ESPN Two Minute Drill, and Battlebots. Shannon also appeared as Lester, the pawnshop owner, on MTV’s Austin Stories.

Shaps, Cyril British character actor Cyril Shaps died in London after a brief illness on January 1, 2003. He was 79. Shaps was born in London on October 13, 1923. He was a familiar face on British films and television from the 1950s. His film credits include Interpol (1957), Miracle in Soho (1957), The Silent Enemy (1958), Passport to Shame (1958), SOS Pacific (1959), Danger Within (1959), Never Let Go (1960), Follow That Horse! (1960), Terror of the Tongs (1961), Return of the Stranger (1961), The Pursuer (1961), The Boy Who Stole a

Cyril Shaps

365 (1999), Anna Karenina (2000), Murder Rooms: The Kingdom of Bones (2001), and Jack and the Beanstalk: The Real Story (2001). His numerous television credits also include episodes of The Scarlet Pimpernel, Out of the Unknown, Man in a Suitcase, Doctor Who, Department S, The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes, The Saint, My Partner, the Ghost, Danger Man, Spyder’s Web, New Scotland Yard, The Persuaders, The Liver Birds, Jason King, Some Mothers Do ’Ave ’Em, The Sweeney, Raffles, Into the Labyrinth, The Young Ones, Lovejoy, Midsomer Murders, and Doctors.

Sharff, Stefan Film scholar and author Stefan Sharff died of lymphatic cancer in Lebanon, New Hampshire, on May 12, 2003. He was 83. He was born

Stefan Sharff

2003 • Obituaries

Stefan Leon Lerner in Lublin, Poland, on November 29, 1919. He studied at the Moscow Film School in the late 1930s and worked as an apprentice with Soviet director Sergei Eisenstein. Sharff emigrated to the United States in the early 1950s where he produced newsreels for the United Nations. He began working at Columbia University in 1963, serving as head of the film department from 1970 to 1978. Sharff produced and directed numerous documentaries during his career and two feature films, Across the River (1965) and Run (1975). New York Times, May 19, 2003, A19.

Shaw, Larry Record executive Larry Shaw died in Memphis, Tennessee, of a heart attack on May 11, 2003. He was 65. Shaw was born in Memphis in 1938. He joined Stax Records in the early 1970s, becoming the company’s vice president for advertising. Shaw produced the 1973 concert film Wattstax, featuring Stax artists performing in Watts for a benefit concert. Shaw founded The Shaw Group advertising agency after leaving Stax.

Larry Shaw

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366

Shaw, Peter

The Sheik

Actor and producer Peter Shaw died of heart failure at his Los Angeles home on January 31, 2003. He was 84. Shaw was born in Reading, England. He served in the British Army during World War II and began his acting career at MGM Studios after the war. He appeared in the films Forever Amber (1947) and The Exile (1947). He met actress Angela Lansbury at MGM and the two were married in 1949. In the 1950s Shaw worked as a film executive and agent. He became assistant head of production at MGM in 1964. He formed Corymore Productions at Universal in 1987, co-producing his wife’s long-running television series Murder, She Wrote with their two sons. Corymore also produced the tele-films Mrs. ’Arris Goes to Paris, Mrs. Santa Claus, The Unexpected Mrs. Pollifax, and the 2003 Murder, She Wrote tele-film The Celtic Riddle. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 5, 2003, B13; New York Times, Feb. 6, 2003, C15; People, Feb. 17, 2003, 89; Variety, Feb. 10, 2003, 57.

Ed Farhat, who wrestled professionally as the ring villain The Sheik from the 1950s through the 1990s died of a heart attack in Lansing, Michigan, on January 18, 2003. He was 73. Farhat was born on June 7, 1929, an began wrestling in 1952. He was known in the ring for his legendary acts of brutality in the ring. The Sheik, who was often accompanied to the ring by his manager, Abdullah Farouk (The Grand Wizard), held numerous championships during his career. He also ran the Big Time Wrestling promotion for the NWA in Detroit from 1964 through 1980. He trained his nephew, Sabu, to be a professional wrestler in the late 1980s, and occasionally teamed with him in matches in Japan in the 1990s. The Sheik also trained such competitors as Rob Van Dam. He officially retired from wrestling in 1998. New York Times, Jan. 26, 2003, 23.

Peter Shaw The Sheik

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2003 • Obituaries

Shia Jung Chinese actress Shia Jung died in Hong Kong of the SARS virus on March 26, 2003. She was 87. Shia Jung was born in Hong Kong on March 10, 1916. She appeared in silent films as a child including 1925’s The House Without a Key. She was featured as Lee Chan’s romantic interest in 1936’s Charlie Chan at the Circus and appeared in 1939’s Port of Hate. Appearing in films in Hong Kong from the late 1930s, her credits include Seven Fresh Roses (1938), Song Girl White Peony (1939), Light of the Overseas Chinese (1940), The Entangling Ones (1946), White Powder and Neon Lights (1947), The Golden Chain (1950), A Woman’s Revenge (1953), How Huang Fei-hong Saved the Dragon’s Mother’s Temple (1956), A Filial Son Meets a Fairy (1958), and A Maid from Heaven (1963).

Shields, Carol Canadian novelist Carol Shields died of complications from breast cancer in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, on July 16, 2003. She was 68. She was born Carol Ann Warner in Oak Park, Illinois, on June 2, 1935. She moved to Canada after her marriage in the late 1950s. Her first novel, Small Ceremonies, was published in 1976. Other works followed including The Box Garden (1977), Happenstance (1980), A Fairly Conventional Woman (1982), and the short-story collection Various Miracles (1985). Her 1987 novel Swann was adapted for film in 1996, and 1992’s The Republic of Love was also filmed in 2003. Shields was best known for her 1993 novel, The Stone Diaries, which earned her a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Later books include Larry’s Party (1997), Dressing Up for the Carnival (2000), and Unless (2002). Los Angeles Times, July 18, 2003, B12; New York Times, July 18, 2003, C11; People, Aug. 4, 2003, 83; Time, July 28, 2003, 22.

Carol Shields

Shirley, Lloyd British television producer Lloyd Shirley died of cancer in London on March 5, 2003. He

Lloyd Shirley

Obituaries • 2003

368

was 71. Shirley was born in London, Ontario, Canada on December 28, 1931. He went to England in the mid–1950s to join ABC Television, where he headed the features and light entertainment division. He became ABC’s head of drama in 1963. Shirley served as executive producer of such series as The Mind of Mr. J.G. Reeder, The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes, Van der Valk, The Sweeney, Minder, Rumpole of the Bailey, Man at the Top, Mr. Palfrey of Westminster, The Bill, Ladies in Charge, King & Castle, Hannay, and Singles. He also produced television productions of Napoleon and Love (1974), Woodentop (1983), Monsignor Quixote (1985), Imaginary Friends (1987), London Embassy (1987), Jack the Ripper (1988), and Ending Up (1989). Shirley retired from Thames television in 1992. Variety, Apr. 14, 2003, 38.

Shoenberger, Jim Jim Shoenberger, a leading serial fan who had written articles for various publications including Classic Images, died in Chicago of a heart

attack on August 1, 2003. He was 73. Jim was a frequent attendee at various film festivals throughout the country and was sometimes called upon to host panels at the Memphis Film Festival.

Shryane, Tony British radio producer Tony Shryane died at his home in St. Austell, Cornwall, England, on September 22, 2003. He was 84. Shrayne was born in Harborne, England, on January 20, 1919. He began working in radio as a sound engineer with BBC Midlands in the 1930s. He returned to the BBC after serving in the military during World War II, and was soon producing radio programs. Shryane produced the first episode of the farming soap opera The Archers for BBC radio on January 1, 1951, and continued to produced over 7,000 episodes of the series over the next 28 years. Shryane also produced the radio quiz programs Guilty Party (1954), My Word (1956), and My Music (1966). He retired from the BBC in 1979.

Tony Shryane Jim Shoenberger

369

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Siedow, Jim Jim Siedow, who starred as the cook in the 1974 horror classic The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and the 1986 sequel The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2, died at his home in Texas after a long illness on November 20, 2003. He was 83. As Drayton Sawyer, Siedow cooked up the victims of Leatherface and the clan in Tobe Hooper’s landmark horror film. Siedow was also seen in the films The Windsplitter (1971) and Hotwire (1980), and the 1977 tele-film Red Alert. Siedow also appeared on television in an episode of Steven Spielberg’s Amazing Stories.

Serge Silberman

Jim Siedow

Silberman, Serge French film producer Serge Silberman died in Paris on July 22, 2003. He was 86. Silberman was born in Lodz, Poland, on May 1, 1917. He came to France in 1945 after surviving Nazi concentration camps during World War II. He began his career in films working with the production company Victoria Films. He produced Jean-

Pierre Melville’s 1955 film Bob Le Flambeur (aka Fever Heat) and 1958’s The Desert of Pigalle. Silberman was instrumental in the early years of the French New Wave, producing Jacques Becker’s 1960 film The Hole. His other films include Dragon Sky (1962), Scheherazade (1963), Luis Bunuel’s Diary of a Chambermaid (1964), and The Spy (1964). He formed the Greenwich production company in 1966, producing the films Galia (1966), Farewell, Friend (1968), Bunuel’s The Milky Way (1969), Rider on the Rain (1969), And Hope to Die (1972), The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972), The Phantom of Liberty (1974), Bad Starters (1976), That Obscure Object of Desire (1977), Diva (1981), Exposed (1983), Akira Kurosawa’s Ran (1985), A.K. (1985), Max My Love (1986), Money (1991), Anna Karamazoff (1991), Les Paradoxes de Bunuel (1997), and The Moon and Sixpence (2003). Variety, July 28, 2003, 63.

Silver, Johnny Stage and screen actor Johnny Silver died of heart and kidney failure in Woodland Hills, Cal-

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370

Simmons, Richard

Johnny Silver

ifornia, on February 1, 2003. He was 84. Silver was born on April 16, 1918. A popular stage performer, he reprised his Broadway role as Benny Southstreet in the 1955 film version of Guys and Dolls (1955). He was also featured in the films Who’s Been Sleeping in My Bed? (1963), The Great Race (1965), The Thomas Crown Affair (1968), Never a Dull Moment (1968), How Sweet It Is! (1968), Pufnstuf (1970), Hammer (1972), Lepke (1975), Mel Brooks’ History of the World, Part I (1981), Spaceballs (1987), and Shakes the Clown. Silver was also seen in the tele-films What’s a Nice Girl Like You…? (1971) and Evita Peron (1981). His other television credits include episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Jack Benny Program, Dragnet, Bat Masterson, The Andy Griffith Show, The Dick Van Dyke Show, Burke’s Law, The Rogues, The Munsters, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Perry Mason, The F.B.I., Bonanza, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., Captain Nice, Family Affair, I Dream of Jeannie, Get Smart, Mannix, The Outsider, Marcus Welby, M.D., Love, American Style, The Odd Couple, Rod Serling’s Night Gallery, Here’s Lucy, McCloud, Adam-12, Maude, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, Barney Miller, Diff ’rent Strokes, Alice, Matlock, and Seinfeld. Variety, Feb. 24, 2003, 87.

Actor Richard Simmons, who starred in the 1950s television series Sergeant Preston of the Yukon, died after a long illness at an Oceanside, California, rest home on January 11, 2003. He was 89. Simmons was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, on August 19, 1913. He began his career in Hollywood in the late 1930s, where he appeared in such films and serials as A Million to One (1937), King of the Royal Mounted (1940), Sergeant York (1941), King of the Texas Rangers (1941), Seven Sweethearts (1942), Dr. Gillespie’s New Assistant (1942), The Youngest Profession (1943), Stand By for Action (1943), Thousands Cheer (1943), Love Laughs at Andy Hardy (1947), Undercover Maisie (1947), Lady in the Lake (1947), This Time for Keeps (1947), Three Daring Daughters (1948), Easter Parade (1948), On an Island with You (1948), A Southern Yankee (1948), The Three Musketeers (1948), Act of Violence (1948), Neptune’s Daughter (1949), The Great Sinner (1949), Look for the Silver Lining (1949), Duchess of Idaho (1950), To Please a Lady (1950), Dial 1119 (1950), Mr. Imperium (1951), Three Guys Named Mike (1951), Angels in the Outfield (1951), See You in My Dreams (1951), The Well (1951), No Questions Asked (1951), Glory Alley (1952), I Dream of Jeannie (1952), Above and Beyond (1952), Thunderbirds (1952), Desperate Search (1952), Battle Circus (1953), The Woman They Almost Lynched (1953), Three Sailors and a Girl (1953), Easy to

Richard Simmons (as Sgt. Preston, with Yukon King)

371 Love (1953), Remains to Be Seen (1953), Flight Nurse (1954), The Man with the Steel Whip (1954), Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window (1954), Brigadoon (1954), Rogue Cop (1954), A Star Is Born (1954), Tennessee Champ (1954), Men of the Fighting Lady (1954), Interrupted Melody (1955), Love Me or Leave Me (1955), You’re Never Too Young (1955), It’s Always Fair Weather (1955), and The Scarlet Coat (1955). From 1955 to 1958 Simmons played Sergeant Frank Preston, a Canadian mountie who, with his horse Rex and dog Yukon King, fought evildoers in the Yukon. He subsequently appeared in a handful of films including Sergeants 3 (1962), Lassie’s Great Adventure (1963), Robin and the 7 Hoods (1964), The Devil’s Brigade (1968), The Resurrection of Zachary Wheeler (1971), and the 1977 tele-film Don’t Push, I’ll Charge When I’m Ready. Simmons other television credits include episodes of My Little Margie, Stories of the Century, Black Saddle, Leave It to Beaver, Rawhide, Perry Mason, The Munsters, Death Valley Days, Dragnet, It Takes a Thief, and The Brady Bunch. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 14, 2003, B12; New York Times, Jan. 15, 2003, C12; People, Feb. 3, 2003, 93; Time, Jan. 27, 2003, 19; Variety, Jan. 20, 2003, 82.

Simone, Nina Singer Nina Simone died after a long illness at her home in Carry-le-Rouet, France, on April 21, 2003. She was 70. She was born Eunice Waymon in Tryon, North Carolina, on February 21, 1933. She began singing in church choir and attended Juilliard School of Music in the early 1950s. Later in the decade she recorded several hits including “I Loves You, Porgy” and “My Baby Just Cares for Me.” Simone was deeply involved in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, recording songs targeting racism and encouraging black pride. She left the United States in the early 1970s, eventually settling in France. Her autobiography, I Put a Spell on You, was published in 1991. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 22, 2003, B11; New York Times, Apr. 22, 2003, B9; People, Apr. 28, 2003, 93; Time, May 5, 2003, 26; Variety, Apr. 28, 2003, 79.

2003 • Obituaries

Nina Simone

Sims, Howard “Sandman” Tap dancer Howard “Sandman” Sims died in New York City on May 20, 2003. He was 86. Sims was born in Fort Smith, Arkansas, on January 24, 1917. He went to New York in 1947 where he danced at the Apollo Theater for nearly two decades. He also trained such dancers as Ben Vereen and Gregory Hines, and helped boxers Muhammad Ali and Sugar Ray Robinson with their ring footwork. Sims was also seen in several films including The Cotton Club (1984), Tap (1989), and Harlem Nights (1989), and appeared on television in an episode of The Cosby Show. Los Angeles Times, May 31, 2003, B22; New York Times, May 30, 2003, A27; Time, June 9, 2003, 24.

Singer, Maria Veteran German character actress Maria Singer died in Aschheim, Bavaria, Germany, on June 4, 2003. She was 89. Singer was born in Altmunster am Traunsee, Austria, on February 1,

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372

Singleton, Penny

Howard “Sandman” Sims

Actress Penny Singleton, who starred as Blondie in a series of films from 1938 to 1950 and was the voice of the animated Jane Jetson, died at a Sherman Oaks, California, hospital of complications from a stroke on November 12, 2003. She was 95. Singleton was born Dorothy McNulty in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on September 15, 1908. She began her career as a singer on the vaudeville stage at the age of seven. She performed on Broadway in Great Temptations with Jack Benny in the 1920s. Billed as Dorothy McNulty, she went to Hollywood in 1930, where she was seen in such films as Good News (1930), Love in the Rough (1930), After the Thin Man (1936), Vogues of 1938 (1937), and Sea Racketters (1937). She became Penny Singleton after her marriage to Lawrence Singleton, a dentist, in 1937. They were divorced two years later. She was subsequently married to Robert Sparks from 1941 until his death in 1963. As Penny Singleton she appeared in the films Swing Your Lady (1938), Outside of Paradise (1938), Racket Busters (1938), Men Are Such Fools (1938), Mr. Chump (1938), Boy Meets Girl (1938), Secrets of an Actress (1938), Campus Cinderella (1938), Garden of the Moon (1938), The Mad Miss Manton (1938), and Hard to Get (1938). In 1938 she began starring as Blondie Bumstead, long suffering wife of Dagwood, played by Arthur Lake, in a popular series of films and radio programs that included Blondie (1938), Blondie Meets the Boss (1939), Blondie Takes a Vacation (1939), Blondie Brings Up Baby (1939), Blondie on a Budget (1940), Blondie Has Servant Trouble (1940), Blondie Plays Cupid (1940), Blondie Goes Latin (1941), Blondie in Society (1941), Blondie Goes to College (1942), Blondie’s Blessed Event (1942),

Maria Singer

1914. She began her career on stage in the early 1930s. She also made several films during her career including Professor Columbus (1969), Scrounged Meals (1977), Atemnot (1984), ’38 (1987), Abraham’s Gold (1989), Der Nachbar (1993), and Rillenfieber (2000). Singer also made numerous appearance on television from the 1970s.

Penny Singleton’s “Blondie” and “Jane Jetson”

373 Blondie for Victory (1942), It’s a Great Life (1943), Footlight Glamour (1943), Leave It to Blondie (1945), Life with Blondie (1946), Blondie’s Lucky Day (1946), Blondie Knows Best (1946), Blondie’s Big Moment (1947), Blondie’s Holiday (1947), Blondie in the Dough (1947), Blondie’s Anniversary (1947), Blondie’s Reward (1948), Blondie’s Secret (1948), Blondie’s Big Deal (1949), Blondie Hits the Jackpot (1949), Blondie’s Hero (1950), and Beware of Blondie (1950). She was also seen in the films Go West, Young Lady (1941), and Young Widow (1946). From 1962 Singleton was the voice of Jane, George Jetson’s wife, in the cartoon series The Jetsons and several animated films including The Jetsons Christmas Carol (1985), The Jetsons Meet the Flintstones (1987), and Jetsons: The Movie (1990). Singleton was featured in the 1964 film adaptation of Gore Vidal’s The Best Man, and appeared on television in episodes of Pulitzer Prize Playhouse, Death Valley Days, The Twilight Zone, and Murder, She Wrote. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 14, 2003, B12; New York Times, Nov. 15, 2003, C16; Time, Oct. 24, 2003, 23; Variety, Nov. 24, 2003, 49.

2003 • Obituaries

Colin Skinner

Skinner, Colin Canadian actor and comedian Colin Skinner died of cancer in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, on May 22, 2003. He was 67. A leading stage actor in British Columbia, he was also seen as Arthur “Sherlock” Holmes in the 1981 film Prep School. Skinner appeared in the tele-films The Glitter Dome (1984) and Sherlock Holmes in The Hound of London (1993) as Inspector Lestrade.

Skinner, Edna Actress Edna Skinner, who was best known for her role as neighbor Kay Addison on the television sit-com Mister Ed from 1961 to 1963, died of heart failure at her home in North Bend, Indiana, on August 8, 2003. She was 82. Skinner was born in Washington, D.C., on May 23, 1921. She appeared in a handful of films from the late 1940s including The Kissing Bandit (1948), Easy to Love (1953), The Long, Long Trailer (1954), The Second Greatest Sex (1955), Friendly Persuasion (1956), and Footsteps in the Night (1957). She was also seen in the Topper television series as Mag-

Edna Skinner

gie from 1954 to 1955, and appeared in episodes of The Beverly Hillbillies and Daniel Boone. Skinner was also noted as a champion angler and the

Obituaries • 2003

374

author of numerous articles for fishing and sports magazines. Variety, Oct. 20, 2003, 58.

Skouen, Arne Norwegian film director and writer Arne Skouen died in Oslo, Norway, on May 24, 2003. He was 89. Skouen was born in Oslo on October 18, 1913. His first novel was published in 1937. A leading filmmaker from the late 1940s, he helmed such features as Boys from the Streets (1949), Cirkus Fandango (1954), The Flame (1955), Nine Lives (1957), The Master and His Servants (1959), Omringet (1960), Bussen (1961), About Tilla (1963), Vaktpostene (1965), and An-Magritt (1969).

Michael Small

Arne Skouen

Small, Michael Film composer Michael Small died in New York on November 24, 2003. He was 64. Small was born on January 1, 1939. He worked in films from the late 1960s, scoring such movies as Out of It (1969), Jenny (1970), Light (1970), Puzzle of

a Downfall Child (1970), The Revolutionary (1970), The Sporting Club (1971), Klute (1971), Child’s Play (1972), Dealing: Or the Berkeley-toBoston Forty Brick Lost-Bag Blues (1972), Love and Pain and the Whole Damn Thing (1973), The Parallax View (1974), The Stepford Wives (1975), Night Moves (1975), The Drowning Pool (1975), Marathon Man (1976), Audrey Rose (1977), Pumping Iron (1977), The Driver (1978), Girlfriends (1978), Comes a Horseman (1978), Going in Style (1979), Those Lips, Those Eyes (1980), The Postman Always Rings Twice (1981), Continental Divide (1981), Rollover (1981), The Star Chamber (1983), Kidco (1984), Firstborn (1984), Target (1985), Dream Lover (1986), Brighton Beach Memoirs (1986), Black Widow (1987), Jaws: The Revenge (1987), Orphans (1987), Heat and Sunlight (1987), 1969 (1988), See You in the Morning (1989), Mountains of the Moon (1990), Mobsters (1991), Consenting Adults (1992), Wagons East (1994), Into My Heart (1998), and Endurance: The Shackleton’s Legendary Antarctic Expedition (2000). Small also scored the tele-films The Lathe of Heaven (1980), The Boy Who Drank Too Much (1980), Chiefs (1983), Nobody’s Child (1986), Poodle Springs (1998), and South Pacific (2001), and composed for the 2001 A Nero Wolfe Mystery television series.

375 Los Angeles Times, Dec. 6, 2003, B17; New York Times, Dec. 15, 2003, B10.

Smight, Jack Film and television director Jack Smight died of cancer in Los Angeles on September 1, 2003. He was 78. Smight was born on March 9, 1926. He began his career in television in the 1950s, helming episodes of such series as Goodyear Television Playhouse, Climax!, Naked City, Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone, Route 66, The Defenders, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Arrest and Trial, and East Side/West Side. He also began directing films in the mid–1960s, including such features as I’d Rather Be Rich (1964), The Third Day (1965), Harper (1966) with Paul Newman, Kaleidoscope (1966), The Secret War of Harry Frigg (1968), No Way to Treat a Lady (1968), Strateg y of Terror (1969), Ray Bradbury’s The Illustrated Man (1969), The Traveling Executioner (1970), Rabbit Run (1970), Airport 1975 (1974), Midway (1976), Damnation Alley (1977), Fast Break (1979), Loving Couples (1980), Number One with a Bullet (1987), and The Favorite (1989). Smight also directed the tele-films Columbo: Dead Weight (1971), The Screaming Woman (1972), The Longest Night (1972), Partners in Crime (1973), Double Indemnity (1973), Linda (1973), Frankenstein: The

Jack Smight

2003 • Obituaries

True Story (1973), Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry (1978), and Remembrance of Love (1982), and episodes of such series as McCloud, Banacek, and Madigan. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 12, 2003, B14; Variety, Sept. 15, 2003, 54.

Smillie, Bill Veteran character actor Bill Smillie died of cancer in Los Angeles on November 12, 2003. He was 81. Smillie was born in Stewarton, Scotland, in 1922. After coming to the United States, Smillie served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He began his career on stage, and appeared in the Broadway musicals Porg y and Bess and Catch a Rising Star. He appeared in numerous tele-films during his career including The Great Ice Rip-Off (1974), The Missing Are Deadly (1975), The Dead Don’t Die (1975), The Quest: The Longest Drive (1976), Wild and Wooly (1978), Kate Bliss and the Ticker Tape Kid (1978), And Baby Makes Six (1979), Marathon (1980), The Comeback Kid (1980), The Princess and the Cabbie (1981), In the Custody of Strangers (1982), Mysterious Two (1982), Dead Solid Perfect (1988), In the Arms of a Killer (1992) and the 1993 mini-series When Love Kills: The Seduction of John Hearn. Smillie was also seen in the films Piranha (1978), When

Bill Smillie

Obituaries • 2003

376

Time Ran Out (1980), Underground Aces (1980), Yes, Giorgio (1982), The Philadelphia Experiment (1984), Housekeeping (1987), Die Hard 2 (1990), And You Thought Your Parents Were Weird (1991), Singles (1992), Save Me (1993), and Soulkeeper (2001). His television credits also include episodes of The Bill Cosby Show, Search, Rhoda, The Waltons, Starsky and Hutch, Charlie’s Angels, The Love Boat, Eight Is Enough, Lou Grant, Simon and Simon, Matt Houston, Married … with Children, Caroline in the City, Charmed, and The West Wing.

Smith, Constance Irish actress Constance Smith died in Islington, London, England, in June of 2003. She was 75. Smith was born in Limerick, Ireland, on January 22, 1928. She began her film career in England in the late 1940s, appearing in such features as Jassy (1947), The Perfect Woman (1949), Now Barabbas (1949), Murder at the Windmill (1949), Room to Let (1950), The Mudlark (1950), I’ll Get You for This (1950), Don’t Say Die (1950), The 13th Letter (1951), Red Skies of Montana

Constance Smith

(1952), Lure of the Wilderness (1952), Taxi (1953), Treasure of the Golden Condor (1953), Man in the Attic (1953), Impulse (1954), The Big Tip Off (1955), Tiger by the Tail (1955), The Violent Patriot (1960), and Conspiracy of the Borgias (1958).

Smith, Elliott Singer and songwriter Elliott Smith died of a self-inflicted knife wound at his Los Angeles apartment on October 21, 2003. Smith had a history of drug addiction problems. He was 34. He was born in Omaha, Nebraska, on August 6, 1969. He was best known for the Oscar-nominated song “Miss Misery,” heard in the 1997 film Good Will Hunting. His songs were also heard in the films Zero Effect (“Rest My Head Against the Wall”) (1998), Keeping the Faith (“Pitseleh”) (2000), AntiTrust (“Son of Sam”) (2001), and The Royal Tenenbaums (“Needle in the Hay”) (2001). Los Angeles Times, Oct. 23, 2003, B14; New York Times, Oct. 23, 2003, C13; People, Nov. 10,

Elliott Smith

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2003, 125; Time, Nov. 3, 2003, 24; Variety, Oct. 27, 2003, 67.

Sofovich, Hugo Argentine film and television writer Hugo Sofovich died of cancer in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on January 12, 2003. He was 63. Sofovich was born in Argentina on December 18, 1939. Often working with his brother Gerardo, Sofovich wrote for the Argentine television series Balamicina from 1963 and Operacion Ja-Ja from 1967. He wrote and directed numerous films in the 1970s and 1980s including La Noche del Hurto (1976), Expertos en Pinchazos (1979), Unlikely Roommates (1970), El Manosanta esta Cargado (1987), and The Inheritance of Uncle Pepe (1998).

Alberto Sordi

Hugo Sofovich

Sordi, Alberto Italian actor Alberto Sordi died of a heart attack at his home in Rome, Italy, on February 25, 2003. He was 82. Sordi was born in Rome on June 15, 1920. He began his career in films in the late 1930s, dubbing voices for the Italian releases

of films, including Laurel and Hardy comedies. He soon began appearing in front of the cameras in such films as Betrayal (1938), The Night of Tricks (1940), Tormented Hearts (1941), The Women Next Door (1952), The Three Pilots (1942), After Casanova’s Fashion (1942), The Za-Burn Circus (1943), Three Girls Looking for Husbands (1944), His Young Wife (1945), The Innocent Casimiro (1945), Who’s Seen Him? (1945), Under the Sun of Rome (1946), The Wind Sang Me a Song (1947), Bullet for Stefano (1950), Flesh Will Surrender (1947), What Times! (1948), Toto and the King of Rome (1951), Position Wanted (1951), The White Sheik (1956), The Piano Tuner Has Arrived (1952), The Young and the Passionate (1953), The Sign of Venus (1953), Two Nights with Cleopatra (1953), Cavalcade of Song (1953), The Anatomy of Love (1954), Lo Scocciatore (1954), Marriage (1954), Great Vaudeville (1954), A Day in Court (1954), An American in Rome (1954), The Cheerful Squadron (1954), The Bachelor (1955), A Hero of Our Times (1955), The Belle of Rome (1955), The Art of Getting Along (1955), The Virtuous Bigamist (1956), Allow Me, Daddy! (1956), Nero’s

Obituaries • 2003

378

Big Weekend (1956), Count Max (1957), A Farewell to Arms (1957), Seventh Heaven (1957), It Happened in Rome (1957), Doctor and the Healer (1957), Venice, the Moon and You (1958), Love on the Riviera (1958), Policarpo (1958), …and the Wild Wild Women (1958), Sunday Is Always Sunday (1958), The Magliari (1959), Winter Holidays (1959), The Moralist (1959), The Great War (1959), Wild Cats on the Beach (1959), Vacations in Majorca (1959), The Traffic Policeman (1960), Everybody, Go Home (1960), Gastone (1960), …And Suddenly It’s Murder! (1960), The Last Judgement (1961), A Difficult Life (1961), The Best of Enemies (1961), Mafioso (1962), The Police Commissioner (1962), The Devil (1963), Il Boom (1963), The Teacher from Vigevano (1963), My Wife (1964), The Flying Saucer (1964), Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines (1965), Complexes (1965), Three Faces of a Woman (1965), Thrilling (1965), The Witches (1969), Gray Flannels (1966), The Queens (1968), Made in Italy (1967), An Italian in America (1967), Will Our Friends Succeed in Finding Their Friend Who Has Mysteriously Disappeared in Africa? (1968), Be Sick … It’s Free (1968), The Conspirators (1969), Help Me My Love (1969), The Couples (1970), Why (1971), A Girl in Australia (1971), Fellini’s Roma (1972), The Scientific Cardplayer (1972), and The Most Wonderful Evening of My Life (1972). Sordi also directed and scripted many of his films from the early 1970s. His credits include Stardust (1973), My Brother Anastasia (1973), While There’s War There’s Hope (1974), Strange Occasion (1976), A Common Sense of Modesty (1976), An Average Little Man (1977), The Witness (1978), The New Monsters (1978), Traffic Jam (1978), Where Are You Going on Holiday? (1978), The Imaginary Invalid (1979), Catherine and I (1981), I Know That You Know That I Know (1982), Journey with Papa (1982), The Taxi Driver (1983), Everybody in Jail (1984), Bertoldo, Bertoldino, and Cascarcenno (1984), I Am an ESP (1985), Great! (1986), A Taxi Driver in New York (1987), A Blast of Life (1988), The Miser (1989), In the Name of the Sovereign People (1990), Christmas Vacation ’91 (1992), Acquitted of Having Committed the Deed (1992), Nestor’s Last Trip (1994), and Forbidden Encounters (1998). Los Angeles Times, Feb. 27, 2003, B14; New York Times, Feb. 26, 2003, A25; Time, Mar. 10, 2003, 18; Variety, Mar. 3, 2003, 77.

Sorel, Jeanne Actress Jeanne Sorel died in Los Angeles on January 27, 2003. She was 89. She was born in Alexandria, Egypt, in 1913. She came to Hollywood in the 1930s where she appeared in small roles in the films American Madness (1932) and Only Yesterday (1933). She gave up her film career after marrying producer Albert J. Cohen. She continued to work on stage and founded the Oxford Theater in Los Angeles. She also made occasional film appearances in such productions as Prehistoric Women (1950) and B.S. I Love You (1971), and appeared on television in episodes of The Monkees, Bewitched, Medical Center and Logan’s Run. Survivors include her daughter, actress Louise Sorel. Variety, Feb. 10, 2003, 57.

Jeanne Sorel

Soulja Slim James Tapp, the rap artist who performed and recorded as Soulja Slim, was shot to death on the lawn of his mother’s home in New Orleans on

379 November 26, 2003. He was 25. Slim was a childhood friend of rappers Master P and C Murder, and recorded four albums for Master P’s No Limit label including 2001’s Streets Made Me.

2003 • Obituaries

to baseball in 1946 and remained with the Boston (later Milwaukee from 1953) Braves until 1964. Spahn was the winningest left handed pitcher in major league history and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1973. Spahn was seen in the 1949 film The Kid from Cleveland and appeared in a cameo role as a German soldier in a 1963 episode of the television series Combat! Los Angeles Times, Nov. 25, 2003, B13; New York Times, Nov. 25, 2003, B9; People, Dec 8, 2003, 145; Time, Dec. 8, 2003, 27.

Spear, Bernard British character actor Bernard Spear died in Sutton, Surrey, England, on May 9, 2003. He was 83. Spear was born in London on September 11, 1919. After serving in the British army during World War II, Spear worked as a radio disc jockey and comedian. He became a popular performer on the English stage in the 1950s. Spear was also

Soulja Slim

Spahn, Warren Legendary baseball pitcher Warren Spahn died at his home in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, on November 24, 2003. He was 82. Spahn was born in Buffalo, New York, on April 23, 1921. He began his major league career in baseball with the Boston Braves in 1942 before three years of military service during World War II. He returned

Warren Spahn (being costumed as a German soldier for Combat! by Beau Vandenecker)

Bernard Spear

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380

featured in several films including Daleks — Invasion Earth 2150 A.D. (1966), Arrivederci, Baby! (1967), Bedazzled (1967), Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968), The Adventures of Barry McKenzie (1972), Secrets of a Door-to-Door Salesman (1973), Wombling Free (1977), Yentl (1983) with Barbra Streisand, Not Quite Paradise (1986), and The Man Who Cried (2000). Spear was also seen in the British television series Quatermass and the Pit (1958), Tomfoolery (1970), Mike and Bernie (1970), The Paul Squire Show, and Albion Market. His other television credits include episodes of The Sweeney, The 10 Percenters, Lovejoy, and My Family. Variety, June 23, 2003, 57.

Stabile, Jeremy Television producer and writer Jeremy Stabile died of a heart ailment in Los Angeles on February 13, 2003. He was 28. Stabile worked on such shows as The Leeza Gibbons Show and The Donny and Marie Show. He was producer of The Dr. Phil Show at the time of his death.

Jeremy Stabile

Stack, Robert Leading actor Roberts Stack, who was best known for his role as crimefighter Eliot Ness in the popular television series The Untouchables, died of a heart attack at his Beverly Hills home on May 14, 2003. He was 84. Stack was born in Los Angeles on January 13, 1919. He began his film career in the late 1930s, co-starring with Deanna Durbin in First Love (1939). He continued to appear in such films as The Mortal Storm (1940), A Little Bit of Heaven (1940), Nice Girl? (1941), Badlands of Dakota (1941), To Be or Not to Be (1942), Eagle Squadron (1942), and Men of Texas (1942). Stack served in the U.S. Navy as an aerial gunnery instructor during World War II. After his military service he resumed his film career in such features as A Date with Judy (1948), Miss Tatlock’s Millions (1948), Fighter Squadron (1948), Mr. Music (1950), Bullfighter and the Lady (1951), My Outlaw Brother (1951), the early 3-D film Bwana Devil (1952), War Paint (1953), Sabre Jet (1953), Conquest of Cochise (1953), The Iron Glove (1954), The High and the Mighty (1954), House of Bamboo (1955), Good Morning, Miss Dove (1955), Great Day in the Morning (1956), Written on the Wind (1956) which earned him an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor, The Tarnished Angels (1958), and John Paul Jones (1959). Stack was also a popular television performer in the 1950s, appearing in such early series as Lights Out, Lux Video Theatre, The 20th Century–Fox Hour, Climax!, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, The Lawless Years, and Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre. Stack starred in the popular television crime drama The Untouchables from 1959 to 1962. He also continued to appear in such films as The Last Voyage (1960), The Gun of Zangara (1960), The Caretakers (1963), Is Paris Burning? (1966), Action Man (1966), The Corrupt Ones (1967), and the 1968 tele-film production of Laura. Stack starred as crime reporter Dan Farrell in the television series The Name of the Game from 1968 to 1970. He was also seen in the films Story of a Woman (1970), Second Wind (1978), Steven Spielberg’s 1941 (1979), Airplane! (1980), Uncommon Valor (1983), Big Trouble (1986), Caddyshack II (1988), Plain Clothes (1988), Dangerous Curves (1988), Joe Versus the Volcano (1990), and Killer Bud (2001). Stack also appeared in numerous tele-films including Strange and Deadly Occurrence (1974), The Honorable Sam Houston

381

2003 • Obituaries

Stahl, Jorge, Jr.

Robert Stack

(1975) as Sam Houston, Adventures of the Queen (1975), Murder on Flight 502 (1975), Undercover with the KKK (1979) as the narrator, the mini-series George Washington (1984) and Hollywood Wives (1985), Midas Valley (1985), Perry Mason: The Case of the Sinister Spirit (1987), The Return of Eliot Ness (1991), Sealed with a Kiss (1999), and H.U.D. (2000). Stack starred as Captain Linc Evers in the 1976 crime series Most Wanted, and was Capt. Frank Murphy in the 1981 series Strike Force. He was Roland Saunders in the nighttime television soap opera Falcon Crest in 1987. Stack hosted the series Unsolved Mysteries from the late 1980s. His other television credits include episodes of Police Story, The Love Boat, Hotel, Murder, She Wrote, Suddenly Susan, Diagnosis Murder, and Cybill. In recent years Stack was also a popular voice actor, being heard in the films Beavis and Butt-head Do America (1996) and Recess: School’s Out (2002), and in episodes of such animated series as Hercules, Butt-Ugly Martians, and King of the Hill. Los Angeles Times, May 16, 2003, B12; New York Times, May 16, 2003, A25; People, June 2, 2003, 111; Time, May 26, 2003, 25; Variety, May 19, 2003, 52.

Mexican cinematographer Jorge Stahl, Jr., died of a respiratory disease at his home in Mexico City on November 24, 2003. He was 82. The son of cinematographer and Mexican film pioneer Jorge Stahl, the younger Stahl worked on nearly 200 films in Mexico and the United States during his career. His numerous film credits include Garden of Evil (1954), Comanche (1956), The Beast of Hollow Mountain (1956), Spring in the Heart (1956), Death in the Garden (1956), A Woman’s Devotion (1956), School for Mothers-in-Law (1958), Enchanted Island (1958), My Private Secretaries (1959), Little Savage (1959), Jet Over the Atlantic (1960), Rebel Without a House (1960), September Storm (1960), Witch’s Mirror (1962), One Day in December (1962), Santo vs. the Martian Invasion (1966), Sor Ye-Ye (1968), The Desperate Mission (1969), Pancho Tequila (1970), Zachariah (1971), The Day of Love (1971), Jory (1972), The Holy Office (1974), I Will Fight No More Forever (1975), The Sexorcist (1975), Letters from Marusia (1976), The Minister and Me (1976), Matinee (1977), Desperate Women (1978), Mr. Horn (1979), A Rumor of War (1980) and Las Computadoras (1982).

Stanley, Florence Character actress Florence Stanley died in a Los Angeles hospital of complications from a stroke on October 3, 2003. She was 79. She was born in Chicago, Illinois, on July 1, 1924. Stanley was best known for her role as Bernice Fish, Abe Vigoda’s wife, in the television sit-coms Barney Miller from 1975 to 1977 and Fish from 1977 to 1978. She also starred as Aunt Josephine in the 1975 comedy series Joe and Sons, was Judge Margaret Wilbur in My Two Dads from 1987 to 1990, and was the voice of Grandma Ethyl on Dinosaurs in 1991. She also starred as Dr. Riskin in the series Nurses from 1991 to 1992, and was Muriel Lipschitz in the 1998 series The Simple Life. Stanley also appeared in films from the late 1960s including Up the Down Staircase (1967), The Day of the Dolphin (1973), The Prisoner of Second Avenue (1975), The Fortune (1975), Outrageous Fortune (1987), Trouble Bound (1992), Trapped in Paradise (1994), The Odd Couple II (1998), Bulworth

Obituaries • 2003

382

Edwin Starr Florence Stanley

(1998), Vulture (1998), The Brainiacs.com (2000), According to Spencer (2001), and Down with Love (2003). She was also the voice of Wilhelmina Bertha Packard in the Disney animated film Atlantis: The Lost Empire in 2001, and was featured in the tele-films Mickey and Nora (1987), Maybe Baby (1988), A Quiet Little Neighborhood, a Perfect Little Murder (1990), and Carson’s Vertical Suburbia (1998). Stanley’s other television credits include episodes of Studio One, Lights Out, East Side/West Side, Harry O, Night Court, Mr. Belvedere, Civil Wars, Cybill, 1998’s Fantasy Island, Malcolm in the Middle, NYPD Blue, and Dharma & Greg. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 10, 2003, B13; New York Times, Oct. 21, 2003, 27; People, Oct. 27, 2003, 99; Variety, Oct. 20, 2003, 58.

Starr, Edwin Soul singer Edwin Starr died of a heart attack at his home in Nottingham, England, on April 2, 2003. He was 61. He was born Charles

Hatcher in Nashville, Tennessee, on January 21, 1942. He served in the U.S. Army before he began his career in music in the 1960s. He gained fame for such soul hits as “Agent Double-0 Soul” and “Twenty-Five Miles.” He was best known for his 1970 hit song “War,” with the refrain “What is It Good For? Absolutely Nothing!” He was awarded a Grammy for the song. Starr moved to England in the 1970s where he continued to perform in various revues. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 3, 2003, B15; New York Times, Apr. 4, 2003, A19 People, Apr. 21, 2003, 113; Time, Apr. 14, 2003, 27; Variety, Apr. 14, 2003, 38.

Steig, William Cartoonist and illustrator William Steig died at his home in Boston, Massachusetts, on October 3, 2003. He was 95. Steig was born in New York City on November 14, 1907. Steig began working as a staff cartoonist for the New Yorker in the early 1930s. He later began writing children’s books including the 1970 Caldecott Medal winner Sylvester and the Magic Pebble, Amos and Boris, Roland, the Minstrel Pig, Do-

383

William Steig

minic, The Amazing Bone, and Doctor De Soto. His 1990 book Shrek!, about a green ogre, became an Oscar-winning animated film in 2001. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 5, 2003, B16; New York Times, Oct. 6, 2003, A17; People, Oct. 20, 2003, 107; Time, Oct. 13, 2003, 25; Variety, Oct. 13, 2003, 42.

Steinbeck, Elaine Elaine Anderson Steinbeck, the widow of Nobel Prize–winning author John Steinbeck, died in New York City on April 27, 2003. She was 88. She was born in Austin, Texas, on August 14, 1914. She married actor Zachary Scott in 1934 and she accompanied him to New York. She appeared in small roles in the films Seven Days Ashore (1944) and A Night of Adventure (1944). She was also one of the first females to work as a stage manager on Broadway in the 1940s. She and Scott divorced in 1949 and she married acclaimed author John Steinbeck the following year. They were together until his death in 1968. She was the executor of Steinbeck’s estate, working to keep his books in print.

2003 • Obituaries

Elaine Steinbeck

Los Angeles Times, Apr. 29, 2003, B10; New York Times, Apr. 29, 2003, C19; Variety, May 5, 2003, 83.

Stern, David David Stern, whose novel Francis, the Talking Mule inspired a popular film series starring Donald O’Connor in the 1950s, died in New Orleans, Louisiana, on November 22, 2003. He was 94. Stern was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1909. He worked in the newspaper business after graduating from Harvard and was instrumental in the publication of the serviceman’s newspaper Stars and Stripes during World War II. He was publisher of the newspaper The New Orleans Item from 1949 until 1958. Stern adapted his popular Francis the Talking Mule character for the screen in 1950’s Francis, with Chill Wills as the voice of Francis. Several sequels followed including Francis Goes to the Races (1951), Francis Goes to West Point (1952), Francis Covers the Big Town (1953), Francis Joins the WACS (1954), Francis in the Navy (1955), and Francis in the Haunted House (1956).

Obituaries • 2003

384 Stewart get established in Nashville, where he wrote and recorded songs in the 1970s. He scored his first hit with the song “Drinkin’ Thing” and had a hit album with 1975’s Out of Hand. The album also included the No. 1 hit song “She’s Actin’ Single (I’m Drink’ Doubles)”. He continued to record such popular albums as Steppin’ Out (1976), Your Place or Mine (1977), and Cactus and a Rose (1980). His career faded in the 1980s, but he returned to record Brand New at the end of the decade. That album was followed by Battleground (1990) and I’m a Texan (1993). He continued to perform until the death of his wife of 43 years in November of 2003. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 2, 2004, B11; New York Times, Dec. 20, 2003, B22; People, Jan. 12, 2004, 117.

David Stern’s Francis, the Talking Mule

Los Angeles Times, Nov. 26, 2003, B10; New York Times, Nov. 26, 2003, B8.

Stewart, Gary Country singer Gary Stewart was found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at his home in Fort Pierce, Florida, on December 16, 2003. He was 58. Stewart was born in Letcher, County, Kentucky, on May 28, 1945. He began performing in bars around the Fort Pierce area while in his teens. Country star Mel Tillis helped

Stewart, Graham British actor Graham Stewart died on July 29, 2003. He was 75. Stewart was born in Scotland on September 5, 1927. He worked in films from the mid–1950s, appearing in The Cockleshell Heroes (1955), Black Tide (1957), The Man Who Wouldn’t Talk (1958), The Man Upstairs (1958), Carry on Sergeant (1958), Carry on Nurse (1959), and The Unstoppable Man (1960). He was also seen on television in episodes of The Adventures of Robin Hood and Danger Man. He subsequently left acting to work in film and television production. He was instrumental in creating the BBC television series Dr. Finlay’s Casebook in 1962.

Stewart, Redd

Gary Stewart

Country singer and songwriter Henry “Redd” Stewart, who was best known for co-writing the classic song “Tennessee Waltz,” died in Louisville, Kentucky, on August 3, 2003. He was 80. Stewart was born in Ashland City, Tennessee, in 1923. He performed as a member of Pee Wee King’s Golden West Cowboys and also recorded as a solo performer. He wrote numerous other country songs including “Bonaparte’s Retreat,” “Slow Poke,” “You Belong to Me,” and “Soldier’s Last Letter.” Los Angeles Times, Aug. 6, 2003, B11; New York Times, Aug. 7, 2003, A23; Variety, Aug. 11,

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2003 • Obituaries

Redd Stewart

2003, 43.

Stocker, Walter Actor Walter Stocker died in a Ventura, California, hospital on December 5, 2003. He was 78. Stocker was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on September 1, 1925. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II and was a teacher at several colleges after the war. A model and actor from the 1950s, he appeared on television in episodes of such series as Tales of Wells Fargo, Men Into Space, Sea Hunt, Perry Mason, Lassie, Kojak and Diff ’rent Strokes. He also appeared in the science fiction cult classic They Saved Hitler’s Brain (aka Madmen of Mandoras) (1964). Stocker’s other film credits include Lassie’s Great Adventure (1965), Cipher in the Snow (1973), and The Sunshine Boys (1975), and the tele-films Hunter (1973), The Specialists (1975), and Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy (1981). Stocker also produced and directed the 1978 film Till Death.

Walter Stocker

Stojanovich, Paul Paul Stojanovich, the creator of the popular television series Cops, died in a fall from a cliff into the Pacific Ocean near Manzanita, Oregon, on March 15, 2003. He was 47. Stojanovich was a field producer for the ABC news magazine 20/20 and was a creative consultant on Oliver Stone’s film Natural Born Killers (1994). He created Cops for Fox in 1989. He also produced the reality series American Detective (1991), World’s Scariest Police Chases (1997), World’s Wildest Police Videos (1998), and Emergency Videos (2001). Los Angeles Times, Apr. 5, 2003, B21; Variety, Mar. 24, 2003, 81.

Obituaries • 2003

386

Paul Stojanovich

Stokey, Mike Pioneer television game show host Mike Stokey died of complications of liver disease in Las Vegas, Nevada, on September 7, 2003. He was 84. Stokey was born in Shreveport, Louisiana, on September 14, 1918. He served in the Army Air Force during World War II. After the war, Stokey appeared in small roles in several films including Swell Guy (1946), I’ll Be Yours (1947), Time Out of Mind (1947), A Double Life (1947), The Senator Was Indiscreet (1947), and Are You with It? (1948). He produced and hosted the early television game show Pantomime Quiz, which earned him one of the original Emmy awards in the late 1940s. The quiz show aired on various networks for the next two decades, though was renamed Stump the Stars in the 1960s. Stokey also produced a 1949 television production of The Christmas Carol and the 1949 series Armchair Detective. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 12, 2003, B15; New York Times, Sept. 13, 2003, A12.

Mike Stokey

Stokke, Tor Norwegian actor Tor Stokke died of cancer in Norway on June 13, 2003. He was 74. Stokke was born in Trondheim, Norway, on August 23, 1928. He starred in numerous Norwegian films from the 1950s including It Happened One Night (1958), The Chasers (1959), Struggle for Eagle Peak (1960), Operation Camel (1960), Snow Treasure

Tor Stokke

387 (1968), Exit (1970), Fabel (1980), Trees Grow on the Stones Too (1985), Hip Hip Hurra! (1987), and Herman (1990). He also appeared in television productions of Hedda Gabler (1975) and Codename: Kyril (1988), and starred as Grandpa Philip in the 2002 television series Holms.

Stone, Joe Writer Joe Stone died of a heart attack in Yucaipa, California, on November 29, 2003. He was 90. Stone was born in Frizell, Kansas, in 1913. He became a detective in the 1930s and later worked as a journalist with The Wichita Eagle and the San Diego Tribune. His brother, actor Milburn Stone, starred as Doc in the television western Gunsmoke, and Joe Stone wrote three episodes of the series, including one that earned his brother an Emmy Award. He continued to work as a journalist until his retirement in 1977. He returned to writing in 1996, doing a column for The Borrego Sun until his death.

Stone, Peter Screenwriter Peter Stone died of pulmonary fibrosis in New York City on April 26, 2003. He

2003 • Obituaries

was 73. Stone was born in Los Angeles on February 27, 1930, the son of screenwriter John Stone. Peter Stone wrote for television from the early 1950, scripting episodes of such series as Studio One, Espionage and The Defenders, which earned him an Emmy Award. His popular novel Charade (1963) was filmed with Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn in 1963. The following year he earned an Academy Award for the film Father Goose (1964), also starring Cary Grant. Stone continued to write such films as Mirage (1965), Arabesque (1966), The Secret War of Harry Frigg (1968), Jigsaw (1968), Sweet Charity (1969), and Skin Game (1971). In the late 1960s Stone wrote the hit Broadway musical 1776, which earned him his first Tony Award. He also was awarded Tonys for 1981’s Woman of the Year and the 1997 musical Titanic. Stone also continued to work in film, scripting the 1972 film adaptation of his play 1776. His other credits include the films The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974), Silver Bears (1977), Someone Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe (1978), Why Would I Lie? (1980), Grand Larceny (1987), Just Cause (1995), and The Truth About Charlie (2002) which was a revised version of his earlier Charade. Stone also wrote for the 1973 television series Adam’s Rib, and scripted the tele-film One Of My Wives Is Missing (1976). Los Angeles Times, Apr. 29, 2003, B11; New York Times, Apr. 28, 2003, B7; People, May 12, 2003, 181; Time, May 12, 2003, 27; Variety, May 5, 2003, 82.

Stone, Philip

Peter Stone

British character actor Philip Stone died in England on June 15, 2003. He was 79. Stone was born in Kirkstall, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, on April 14, 1924. He began his career on stage after service in the Royal Air Force during World War II. He made his London debut in a 1947 production of The Sleeping Clerg yman. A bout with tuberculosis sidelined his acting career for nearly a decade. By the early 1960s Stone was guest starring in such television series as Top Secret and The Avengers, and television productions of The Ship That Couldn’t Stop (1961) and Jacks and Knaves (1961). He had small roles in the films Unearthly Stranger (1963), Never Mention Murder (1964), and the 1965 James Bond film Thunderball as a SPECTRE agent. Stone starred as Briga-

Obituaries • 2003

388 Strawberry Tree (1996), Dalziel and Pascoe: Deadheads (1997), A Certain Justice (1998), and Doomwatch: Winter Angel (1999). Stone’s other television credits include roles in the series Fraud Squad, Jason King, Star Maidens, Justice, Target, Bergeerac, Yes, Minister, Home to Roost, Heartbeat, and A Touch of Frost.

Storch, Norma

Philip Stone

dier Davidson in the 1966 British television series The Rat Catchers, and appeared in the films Where Eagles Dare (1968), Two Gentlemen Sharing (1969), The Man Who Had Power Over Women (1970), Fragment of Fear (1970), and Carry on Loving (1970). He made his first appearance in a Stanley Kubrick film as Malcolm McDowell’s dad in 1971’s A Clockwork Orange. He also appeared in Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon (1975) and The Shining (1980) with Jack Nicholson. Other film credits include Quest for Love (1971), Carry On at Your Convenience (1971), Hitler: The Last Ten Days (1973) as Gen. Alfred Jodl, Lindsay Anderson’s O Lucky Man! (1973), It Shouldn’t Happen to a Vet (1975), Voyage of the Damned (1976), The Medusa Touch (1978), 1980 version of Flash Gordon, Green Ice (1981), Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984), and The Baby of Macon (1993). He was also seen in television productions of Death in Deep Water (1975), Philby, Burgess and Maclean (1977), S.O.S. Titanic (1979), 1983’s The Phantom of the Opera, Pope John Paul II (1984), Lace (1984), Charters & Caldicott (1985), Lace II (1985), Jenny’s War (1985), Shadowlands (19085), Monsignor Quixote (1985), Harem (1986), Brat Farrar (1986), Moses (1996), Ruth Rendell: The

Norma Storch, the wife of actor Larry Storch and the subject of an Emmy Award–winning 1996 PBS documentary, Secret Daughter, died of cancer at her home in Manhattan on August 28, 2003. She was 81. She was born Norma Greve in Pocatello, Idaho, on April 6, 1922. Her affair with black dancer and singer Jimmy Cross led to the birth of a daughter in 1954. Storch’s decision to have the child raised by a black couple was documented in the PBS film, which was produced by the daughter, June Cross. Norma Storch married actor Larry Storch, who starred in the television comedy western series F-Troop in the 1960s, in 1961. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 15, 2003, B9; New York Times, Sept. 21, 2003, 33.

Norma Storch (left, with daughter June Cross)

Storey, Raymond G. Film and television production designer Raymond G. Storey died of cancer at his home in

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2003 • Obituaries

Glendale, California, on November 2, 2003. He was 75. Storey was born in Ottawa, Canada, in 1928, and moved to Washburn, Maine, as a child. A graduate of USC Film School, he worked as an art director and production designer for independent films from the mid–1950s. His credits include The Time Travelers (1964), the 1964 cult classic Spider Baby, Beach Ball (1965), The Hostage (1967), Fever Heat (1969), Blue Sunshine (1976), Sammy (1977), All the King’s Horses (1977), A Distant Thunder (1978), More American Graffiti (1979), and Baby … Secret of the Lost Legend (1985). Storey also produced the 1974 horror film The House on Skull Mountain. He earned an Emmy Award for his work on the 1981 television mini-series East of Eden. He worked primarily in television from the 1980s on such tele-films as The Million Dollar Face (1981), Marian Rose White (1982), This Is Kate Bennett… (1982), Code of Vengeance (1985), The B.R.A.T. Patrol (1986), 14 Going on 30 (1988), Splash, Too (1988), Parent Trap III (1989), To My Daughter (1990), and The Stranger Within (1990). He also worked on such series as The Rockford Files, Hunter, Baywatch, Christy, and The Bradys.

Strutton, Bill British television writer Bill Strutton died in Palafrugell, Catalonia, on November 23, 2003. He was 80. Strutton was born in Moonta, South Australia, on February 23, 1923. He served in the Australian army during World War II and was a prisoner of war during much of the conflict. He began working as a journalist after the war and published his first novel, A Jury of Angels, in 1957. That was followed by The Secret Invaders in 1958 and The Island of Terrible Friends in 1961. Strutton also began writing for television in the late 1950s, scripting episodes of such series as Ivanhoe, Top Secret, The Avengers, Echo Four Two, The Saint, and The Protectors. He was best known as the creator of the alien Zarbi for the Doctor Who episode “The Web Planet” in 1965. He also wrote the subsequent novelization, Doctor Who and the Zarbi. He continued to write for such television series as R3, Undermind, The Man in Room 17, Riptide, Strange Report, Dr. Finlay’s Casebook, and Paul Temple. He also wrote the 1968 feature film Assignment K. Strutton retired in the mid–1970s.

Bill Strutton’s book, Doctor Who and the Zarbi

Stuart, Jeanne Baroness Eugene de Rothschild, who performed in British films as Jeanne Stuart in the 1930s, died in Monte Carlo, Monaco, on February 12, 2003. She was 94. Stuart was born in London, England, on August 13, 1908. She began her career on stage as a member of a touring dancing troupe and was soon appearing on the London stage in the early 1930s. She also starred in numerous British films during the decade including A Safe Affair (1931), Mischief (1931), The Limping Man (1931), Once Bitten (1932), Life Goes On (1932), Leap Year (1932), The Shadow (1933), White Face (1933), The Medicine Man (1933), My Heart Is Calling You (1934), The King of Paris (1934), The Great Defender (1934), Bella Donna (1934), Murder on the Set (1936), Forget Me Not (1936), Kathleen (1938), Bank Holiday (1938), and Old Mother Riley Joins Up (1939). She subse-

Obituaries • 2003

390

Jeanne Stuart

quently made rare film appearances in Bonnie Prince Charlie (1948), Twice Upon a Time (1953), and The Vanquished (1953). She married Baron Eugene de Rothschild in December of 1952. The couple settled in Monte Carlo in the late 1950s, where they remained until the baron died in April of 1976. New York Times, Feb. 24, 2003, B6. Marvin Sugarman

Stubbs, Charles Child actor Charles Stubbs died in Leucadia, California, on August 23, 2003. He was 77. Stubbs was born in Detroit, Michigan, on March 26, 1926. He was featured in films from the late 1930s including Angels with Dirty Faces (1938) with James Cagney, Boys Town (1938), They Shall Have Music (1939), Stagecoach (1939), and One Million B.C. (1940), and was a voice actor in Disney’s Dumbo in 1941. Stubbs retired from the screen after serving in the military during World War II. He was a successful businessman and civic leader in Los Angeles after the war.

Sugarman, Marvin Television producer Marvin Sugarman, who created the popular children’s television series Captain Kangaroo in the 1950s, died of heart failure in Roslyn Heights, New York, on July 16, 2003. He was 87. He remained active in television, serving as a producer of numerous sports series for all three major networks over the next 50 years. Variety, Sept. 1, 2003, 62.

Suhosky, Robert Television publicist and screenwriter Robert Suhosky died of pancreatic cancer in Tarzana, California, on April 24, 2003. He was 74. Suhosky worked for Fox as a publicist for the television division during the 1960s. He also scripted the 1982 cult horror film The House Where Evil Dwells.

Sullivan, Jean Actress and dancer Jean Sullivan died of cardiac arrest at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on February 27, 2003. She was 79. Sullivan was born in Logan, Utah, on May 26, 1923. She made her film debut opposite Errol Flynn in 1944’s Uncertain Glory. She was also featured in the films Roughly Speaking (1945), and Escape in the Desert (1945). She subsequently abandoned Hollywood for New York, where she danced with the American Ballet Theater. She also became a popular flamenco dancer, performing on stage and in such television variety series as The Jackie Gleason Show

391

2003 • Obituaries

Jean Sullivan William Swetland

and The Steve Allen Show. Sullivan appeared in the television soap opera Somerset as Millie Russell from 1972 to 1973, and was featured in the 1976 horror film Squirm. She was married to actor Tom Poston from 1955 to 1968. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 11, 2003, B10; New York Times, Mar. 12, 2003, C23; Variety, Mar. 17, 2003, 60.

Swetland, William Broadway character actor William Swetland died in Branford, Connecticut, on October 31, 2003. He was 90. He was born in Kalispell, Montana, in 1913. He began his career on stage in regional theatre in Cleveland, Ohio, in the 1930s and made his Broadway debut in a 1936 production of Parnell. His other Broadway roles include 1974’s The National Health and the 1975 revival of Eugene O’Neill’s Ah, Wilderness! Swetland also appeared in television productions of The Widowing of Mrs. Holroyd (1974), The Seagull (1975), Ah, Wilderness! (1976), The Quinns (1977), A Christmas Without Snow (1980), and The Jilting of Granny Weatherall (1980), and the 1978 film Mirrors. New York Times, Nov. 5, 2003, C13.

Swink, George E. Film and television editor George E. Swink died of heart failure in a Mission Viejo, California, hospital on August 22, 2003. He was 81. Swink was born in Rocky Ford, Colorado, in 1922. During his career Swink worked often with producer Irwin Allen, serving as his assistant for 1952’s The Sea Around Us, and as an associate producer for 1957’s The Story of Mankind. Swink worked as a post production supervisor on Allen’s television series Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Lost in Space, Time Tunnel, and Land of the Giants. He also edited Allen’s 1971 tele-film City Beneath the Sea, and his theatrical features The Towering Inferno (1974), The Swarm (1978), and Beyond the Poseidon Adventure (1979). Swink also edited the 1977 bio-film Viva Knievel! He was an associate producer on Allen’s 1980 disaster film When Time Ran Out… and the 1986 tele-film Outrage! Variety, Sept. 8, 2003, 67.

Obituaries • 2003

392

Tabard, Pierre French actor Pierre Tabard died in Paris on September 19, 2003. He was 76. The Egyptianborn Tabard was featured in the 1956 film Trapeze starring Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis. His other film credits include The Fanatics (1957), Les Miserables (1958), The Battle of Austerlitz (1960), The Golem (1967), Letters from Stalingrad (1969), Christs in the Thousands (1971), Where There’s Smoke (1973), Bloody Murder (1974), The Verdict (1974), Barry of the Great St. Bernard (1977), Bobo la Tete (1980), and Le Brasier (1991).

Aysel Tanju

Room in Hell (1961), The Silent War (1961), My Son (1961), I Am Innocent (1961), Love and Fist (1961), Devil’s Sword (1962), and The Black Mulberry (1962). Pierre Tabard

Tanju, Aysel Turkish leading actress Aysel Tanju died of cancer in Istanbul, Turkey, on October 4, 2003. She was 63. Tanju was born in Istanbul on August 15, 1940. She starred in numerous Turkish films from the late 1950s through the 1960s including The Crying Bride (1957), There Is Still

Taradash, Daniel Oscar-winning screenwriter Daniel Taradash died of pancreatic cancer in Los Angeles on February 22, 2003. He was 90. He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on January 19, 1913. Taradash was a playwright in New York before he began working in films in the late 1930s. He coscripted the 1939 film Golden Boy and wrote the films For Love or Money (1939) and A Little Bit of Heaven (1940). His film career was interrupted

393

2003 • Obituaries

the late 1950s, his numerous credits include Messengers of Peace (1957), The Girls in Blue (1957), El Hincha (1958), Life Ahead (1958), Soledad (1959), April in Portugal (1959), College Boarding House (1959), Valentine’s Day (1959), Festival (1961), Rogelia (1962), Beautiful Mimi (1963), The Sun in the Mirror (1963), Fair of the Dove (1963), They Who Play the Piano (1968), I Came, I Saw, I Shot (1968), The Twelve-Handed Men of Mars (1969), The Strangers (1969), S.O.S. Invasion (1969), Vampires of Vogel (1975), Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! (1990), The Dumbfounded King (1992), and Everyone Off to Jail (1993).

Taylor, Don

Daniel Taradash

when he was drafted into the Army in 1941. Taradash worked on numerous army training films with the Signal Corps until his discharge in January of 1946. He resumed working in films, writing The Noose Hangs High (1948), Knock on Any Door (1949), Rancho Notorious (1952), and Don’t Bother to Knock (1952). In 1953 Taradash won the Academy Award for his adaptation of James Jones’ best selling novel From Here to Eternity. He continued to write such films as Desiree (1954), Picnic (1955), Storm Center (1956) which he also directed, Bell, Book and Candle (1958), Morituri (1965), James Michener’s Hawaii (1966), Castle Keep (1969), Doctor’s Wives (1971), The Other Side of Midnight (1977), and the 1980 telefilm Bogie. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 27, 2003, B15; New York Times, Feb. 27, 2003, A29; Variety, Mar. 3, 2003, 77.

Tasso, Jose Maria Spanish actor Jose Maria Tasso died in a Leon, Spain, hospital following surgery on February 9, 2003. He was 69. Tasso was born in Madrid on February 7, 1934. Active in films from

British television director Donald Taylor died of cancer in Banham, Norfolk, England, on November 11, 2003. He was 67. Taylor was born in London on June 30, 1936. He began directing for BBC television in the early 1960s, helming live productions of The Dark Man (1960), The Train Set (1961), and A Suitable Case for Treatment (1962). He produced and directed David Mercer’s Generations trilogy —Where the Difference Begins (1961), A Climate of Fear (1962), and The Birth of a Private Man (1963). He left the BBC after declining to produce the new Doctor Who series in 1963. He continued to direct freelance for BBC including productions of Dan Dan the Charity Man (1965), And Did Those Feet? (1965), The Exorcism (1972), Find Me (1974), and For Tea on Sunday (1978). Taylor also worked often on stage and radio, writing the plays The Roses of Eyam, Women of Troy, and The Road to the Sea.

Tealdi, Hector Argentine stage and film actor Hector Tealdi died of cancer in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on November 7, 2003. He was 87. Tealdi was born in Rosario, Argentina, in 1916. he began his career on the local stage in the 1950s. Tealdi was also a theatrical director. He appeared in several films during his career including Buenos Aires, Verano 1912 (1966), El Habilitado (1971), A Bravo of the 1900s (1971), Kid Head (1975), Diary of a Pig War (1975), Alone (1976), and Mama Querida (1987).

Obituaries • 2003

394

Hector Tealdi

Temchin, Jack Film and theatrical producer Jack Temchin died of a heart attack in New York City on October 26, 2003. He was 57. Temchin was born in Warsaw, Poland, in 1946. He came to the United States as a child. He worked as a producer in New York, staging productions at the American Jewish Theatre and the Manhattan Theatre Club. He produced the hit Off-Broadway play El Grande de Coca-Cola. He also produced Brian DePalma’s 1979 film Home Movies. Temchin founded the Play Company, a troupe dedicated to producing new international plays, in 1998. He also worked in television, scripting episodes of such series as Tales from the Crypt and Freddy’s Nightmares. New York Times, Oct. 28, 2003, C15; Variety, Nov. 3, 2003, 51.

Ternes, Edward Make-up artist Edward Ternes died of a heart attack in Encino, California, on September 10, 2003. He was 61. Born in Duluth, Minnesota, he began working in films and television in the mid–1970s. Ternes was a make-up artist on the 1970s Wonder Woman television series, and worked on the films Kentucky Fried Movie (1977), John Hus (1977), John Carpenter’s The Fog (1980), Loving Couples (1980), Rich and Famous (1981), Grandview, U.S.A. (1984), Choose Me (1984), Trouble in Mind (1986), Who’s That Girl? (1987), Made in Heaven (1987), Scenes from the Class Struggle in Beverly Hills (1989), Desperate Hours (1990), The Maid (1991), Harley Davidson and the

Edward Ternes

Marlboro Man (1991), White Sands (1992), Crimebroker (1993), Once You Meet a Stranger (1996), and Carolina (2003). He also worked on the telefilms Portrait of a Showgirl (1982), Another Woman’s Child (1983), Blood & Orchids (1986), Apolog y (1986), Napoleon and Josephine: A Love Story (1987), Out of Time (1988), Bed of Lies (1992), Love, Lies & Lullabies (1993), End of Summer (1996), Knots Landing: Back to the Cul-de-Sac (1997), Witch Hunt (1999), Jesus (1999), Britannic (2000), and Dancing at the Harvest Moon (2002). Variety, Sept. 29, 2003, 76.

Terol, Pedro Spanish tenor Pedro Terol died of heart failure in Madrid, Spain, on August 19, 2003. He was 94. Terol was born in Orihuela, Spain, on October 22, 1908. He studied singing in Milan, Italy, and performed his first concert in 1929. He went on a concert tour of Spain and also starred in numerous films in the 1930s including Carceleras (1932), Hatred (1935), La Reina Mora (1936), Heroes of the District (1937), Diego Corrientes (1937), and Windmills (1939). Terol retired from performing in 1965.

395

Pedro Terol

2003 • Obituaries

Dewey Terry

Terry, Dewey Dewey Terry, half of the 1950s singing duo Don and Dewey, died of cancer in a Los Angeles hospital on May 11, 2003. He was 65. He and Don Harris began performing together in 1955 with the group The Squires. The following year he and Harris became known as Don and Dewey. They wrote and performed the popular songs “I’m Leaving It All Up to You” and “Farmer John.” Terry continued to perform until several years before his death. Don Harris died in 1999. Los Angeles Times, May 24, 2003, B30.

Tewksbury, Peter Television director Peter Tewksbury died in Brattleboro, Vermont, on February 20, 2003. He was 79. Tewksbury was born in Cleveland, Ohio, on March 31, 1923. After serving in the army during World War II, Tewksbury began working at

Peter Tewksbury

Obituaries • 2003

396

a California radio station as a program director. He subsequently founded the Porterville Barn Theater, serving as the company’s director from 1947. He began directing for television in the 1950s, helming episodes of Father Knows Best, How to Marry a Millionaire, My Three Sons, Nanny and the Professor, Nichols, and The Fitzpatricks. He also directed several films including Sunday in New York (1963), Emil and the Detectives (1964), Doctor, You’ve Got to Be Kidding (1967), two films starring Elvis Presley —Stay Away, Joe (1968) and The Trouble with Girls (1969), and the 1972 tele-film Second Chance. He left Hollywood in the early 1970s and became known as Henry Tewksbury. He worked as a farmer and a rancher before becoming manager of the cheese department at the Brattleboro Food Co-op. He also authored the 2002 book The Cheeses of Vermont: A Gourmet Guide to Vermont’s Artisanal Cheesemakers. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 24, 2003, B9; Variety, Mar. 3, 2003, 79.

Thigpen, Lynne Tony Award–winning actress Lynne Thigpen died of a heart attack at her Los Angeles home on March 12, 2003. She was 54. Thigpen was born in Joliet, Illinois, on December 22, 1948. A popular stage actress from the 1970s, she was featured on Broadway in productions of The Night That Made America Famous, A Month of Sunday’s, Fences, The Magic Show, and But Never Jam Today. She was nominated for a Tony Award for the 1981 musical Tintypes, and won the Tony in 1998 for her role in An American Daughter. She reprised her performance in a 2000 television adaptation of the play. Thigpen was also featured in numerous films from the 1970s including Godspell (1973), The Warriors (1979), Amazing Graces (1981), Tootsie (1982), Streets of Fire (1984), Sweet Liberty (1986), Hello Again (1987), Running on Empty (1988), Lean on Me (1989), Impulse (1990), Article 99 (1992), Bob Roberts (1992), Naked in New York (1994), The Paper (1994), Blankman (1994), Just Cause (1995), Random Hearts (1999), The Insider (1999), Bicentennial Man (1999), Shaft (2000), Novacaine (2001), and Anger Management (2003). She was also featured in the telefilms When Hell Freezes Over, I’ll Skate (1979), Working (1982), Freedom to Speak (1982), The Files on

Lynne Thigpen

Jill Hatch (1983), The Recovery Room (1985), Rockabye (1986), Fear Stalk (1989), Separate but Equal (1991), Cagney & Lacey: The View Through the Glass Ceiling (1995), A. Philip Randolph: For Jobs and Freedom (1996), A Mother’s Instinct (1996), Pretty Poison (1996), Chance of a Lifetime (1998), and Night Ride Home (1999). She starred as Nancy in the television sit-com Love, Sidney from 1982 to 1983, and was Naomi Sayers in the short-lived sit-com FM in 1989. She starred as the Chief on the children’s television series Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? in the early 1990s, and was District Attorney Ruby Thomas on L.A. Law from 1991 to 1992. Thigpen was Grace Keefer on the television soap opera All My Children from 1993 to 2000. She appeared as Ella Farmer in the popular television crime series The District from 2000 until her death. Thigpen’s other television credits include episodes of Gimme a Break!, The Ellen Burstyn Show, The Equalizer, Frank’s Place, Roseanne, thirtysomething, Hunter, The Cosby Show, L.A. Law, Law & Order, Promised Land, King of the Hill, and Cosby. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 14, 2003, B12; New York Times, Mar. 14, 2003, C11; People, Mar. 31, 2003, 81; Time, Mar. 24, 2003, 20; Variety, Mar. 17, 2003, 60.

397

2003 • Obituaries

Thomas, Sailor Art

Thomas, Dick

Sailor Art Thomas, a leading wrestling star for over three decades, died of cancer in a Fitchburg, Wisconsin, hospital on March 20, 2003. He was 79. Thomas served in the merchant marines and was a professional bodybuilder and weightlifter from the 1950s. He soon became one of the first leading black wrestlers. He held the NWA Texas championship several times in 1962 and 1963, competing against such stars The Mummy, El Medico II, Sweet Daddy Siki, and Bill Watts. He teamed with Bobo Brazil to capture the NWA World Tag Team Title in Detroit in the mid–1960s. He remained a leading competitor through the 1970s. He retired from the ring in 1980, settling in Madison, Wisconsin.

Singer and musician Dick Thomas died of heart failure in an Abington, Pennsylvania, hospice on November 22, 2003. He was 88. Thomas was born Richard Thomas Goldhahn in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on September 5, 1915. He began singing, yodeling and playing the guitar on the radio and nightclubs in the 1930s. He recorded several hits in the 1940s leading Dick Thomas and His Nashville Ramblers. He was best known for writing and recording the country music hit record “Sioux City Sue” in 1945. The song also became a hit for such artists as Bing Crosby and Gene Autry. Thomas also wrote the songs “The Beaut from Butte,” “Weary Nights and Broken Dreams,” “Give Me Back My Heart,” and “I’ve Got a Gal in Laramie.”

Dick Thomas

Thomason, Reg Sailor Art Thomas

British actor Reg Thomason died in his sleep in England on August 30, 2003. He was 84. Thomason was born in Aldgate, East London, on November 29, 1918. He began his film career after

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serving in the military during World War II. He was featured in a small role in David Lean’s Great Expectations in 1946. Thomason had bit parts in hundreds of British films and television productions including Brighton Rock (1947), Passport to Pimlico (1949), Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949), Goldfinger (1964), A Man for All Seasons (1966), Battle of Britain (1969), Chariots of Fire (1981), Gandhi (1982), A Passage to India (1984), and The Last of the Blonde Bombshells (2000). He was stunt double for actor Kenneth Williams and was featured in numerous comedies in the Carry On film series. Thomason was also seen on television in episodes of The Dick Emery Show, Z Cars, The Avengers, Some Mothers Do ’Ave ’Em, Yes, Minister, Minder, The Sweeney, and Inspector Morse.

Thompson, Francis Documentary filmmaker Francis Thompson died of pneumonia in a New York City hospital on December 26, 2003. He was 95. Thompson was born in Titusville, Pennsylvania, in 1908. A pioneer in multi-screen films, Thompson was awarded an Oscar for best short documentary for his 1965 film To Be Alive!, about children in Italy, Africa and the United States. He also directed the

Francis Thompson

documentaries N.Y., N.Y. (1957), On the Wing (1986), and several IMAX films. He retired from filmmaking in 1987. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 31, 2003, B10; New York Times, Dec. 29, 2003, B6.

Thompson, Tony Rock drummer Tony Thompson died of renal cell cancer in Los Angeles on November 12, 2003. He was 48. Thompson was born in New York City on November 15, 1954. He was a founding member of the disco funk band Chic with Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards in 1976. Over the next several years the band recorded such disco hits as “Le Freak,” “Good Times” and “Dance Dance Dance (Yowsah, Yowsah, Yowsah)”. After Chic disbanded in 1983 Thompson worked as a session musician with such artists as David Bowie, Madonna, Mick Jagger, and Diana Ross. Joining with Robert Palmer and Duran

Tony Thompson

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Duran members Andy and John Taylor, he played with the 1980s supergroup Power Station, recording the hit singles “Some Like It Hot” and “Get It On (Bang a Gong)”. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 25, 2003, B12; New York Times, Nov. 24, 2003, A21.

Thomsen, Knud Leif Danish film director and writer Knud Leif Thomsen died in France on October 13, 2003. He was 79. Thomsen was born in Denmark on September 2, 1924. A leading director from the early 1960s, Thomsen helmed such features as Duellen (1962), School for Suicide (1964), Stefan Danielsen (1965), Venom (1966), Three Men in Search of a Troll (1967), They Are All Like That (1968), Jazz All Around (1969), The Liar (1970), The Woolen Stocking Peddler (1971), Lina’s Wedding (1973), and The Gatefold Girl (1974).

Floyd Tillman

was born in Ryan, Oklahoma, on December 8, 1914. He began playing the guitar and writing songs in the early 1930s and was soon performing and recording with Leon Selph’s Blue Ridge Playboys. Tillman’s song “It Makes No Difference Now” was a hit for Cliff Bruner and his band in 1938. Tillman also recorded the hit song “They Took the Stars Out of Heaven” in 1944. He led the band Floyd Tillman and All the Gang in the late 1940s, and recorded the hit “Slippin’ Around” in 1949. Other popular songs by Tillman include “G.I. Blues,” “I Gotta Have My Baby Back,” “I’ll Never Slip Around Again,” and “Please Don’t Pass Me By.” His last song to make the charts was 1960’s “It Just Tears Me Up,” but he continued to perform and record. He was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1984. New York Times, Sept. 29, 2003, B6.

Tilvern, Alan Knud Leif Thomsen

Tillman, Floyd Country singer and songwriter Floyd Tillman died of leukemia at his home near Houston, Texas, on August 22, 2003. He was 88. Tillman

British character actor Alan Tilvern died in London on December 17, 2003. He was 85. Tilvern was born in London on November 5, 1918. He began his career on stage after service in the Army during World War II. During the 1950s he appeared in productions of such plays as Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Pal Joey, and The Trial of Mary Dugan. Tilvern also began appearing in small

Obituaries • 2003

400

Tinniswood, Peter British radio and television comedy writer Peter Tinniswood died of cancer in London on January 9, 2003. He was 66. Tinniswood was born in Manchester, England, on December 21, 1936. He wrote for the BBC radio program Tales from the Long Room, and scripted for such British television programs as The Frost Report, That Was the Week That Was, Never Say Die, I Didn’t Know You Cared, South of the Border, Mog, Heartbeat and My Uncle Silas. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 11, 2003, B17.

Alan Tilvern

roles in films from the late 1940s including The Hideout (1948), Night and the City (1950), Cairo Road (1950), Captain Horatio Hornblower (1951), Knights of the Round Table (1953), The Master Plan (1955), Bhowani Junction (1956), The Bespoke Overcoat (1956), House of Secrets (1956), Chase a Crooked Shadow (1957), A Tale of Two Cities (1958), Tank Force (1958), Four Desperate Men (1959), Desert Mice (1959), Sands of the Desert (1960), The Malpas Mystery (1960), Danger On My Side (1962), Shadow of Fear (1963), Rasputin, the Mad Monk (1966), Khartoum (1966), The Frozen Dead (1966), The Revolutionary (1970), Percy’s Progress (1974), Love and Death (1975), The Stick-Up (1977), Superman (1978), Ralph Bakshi’s animated The Lord of the Rings (1978) as the voice of the Innkeeper, Meetings with Remarkable Men (1979), Brass Target (1979), Firefox (1982), 1919 (1985), the 1986 musical Little Shop of Horrors, A Time of Destiny (1988), and Who Framed Roger Rabbit? (1988) as studio head R.K. Maroon. Tilvern also appeared often on British television, usually in tough guy roles. His numerous credits include episodes of The Invisible Man, Interpol Calling, Danger Man, Crane, Doctor Who, The Saint, Out of the Unknown, Dad’s Army, UFO, The Sweeney, The Professionals, Citizen Smith, and Boon. He was also seen in television productions of Reunion at Farnborough (1985) and Porg y and Bess (1993).

Peter Tinniswood

Tirard, Ann British character actress Ann Tirard died in England on August 12, 2003. She was 86. Tirard appeared in such films as The Full Treatment (1961), The Frozen Dead (1966), The Conqueror Worm (1968), Perfect Friday (1970), Tess (1979), Memoirs of a Survivor (1981), Moonlighting (1982), The Chain (1984), The Witches (1994), and In Your Eye (1994). She was also seen in television productions of Schalken the Painter (1979), Oliver Twist (1982), and Devil’s Advocate (1995), and

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vesting in a hotel in Lakewood, New Jersey. He and his brother, Bob, purchased other hotels and, in 1961, took control of Loews Theaters. Under the Tischs Loews expanded to take control of Bulova Watch Co. and the tobacco company Lorillard. Tisch gained control of CBS Inc. in 1986, serving as chief executive officer and chairman of the board for the next nine years. CBS was purchased by Westinghouse Electric in 1995. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 16, 2003, B20; New York Times, Nov. 16, 2003, 43; Time, Oct. 24, 2003, 23; Variety, Nov. 24, 2003, 49.

Tokos, Lubor

Ann Tirard

episodes of The Avengers, Doctor Who, The Saint, Upstairs, Downstairs, Bergerac, and The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles.

Czech actor Lubor Tokos died of Zlin, Czech Republic, on September 29, 2003. He was 80. Tokos was born in Hodonin, Czechoslovakia, on February 7, 1923. A leading character actor from the late 1950s, Tokos was seen in the films The Fabulous World of Jules Verne (1958), Witchhammer (1969), The Ear (1970), Forbidden Dreams (1986), Mag (1987), The Flying Sneaker (1990), and The Fortress (1994).

Tisch, Laurence Laurence A. Tisch, the former chairman of CBS, died of cancer in New York City on November 15, 2003. He was 80. Tisch was born in Brooklyn, New York, on March 5, 1923. He began his successful business career in 1946, in-

Lubor Tokos

Toscan du Plantier, Daniel

Laurence Tisch

French film producer Daniel Toscan du Plantier died of a heart attack in Berlin, Germany, while attending the Berlin Film Festival on February 11, 2003. He was 61. Toscan du Plantier was born in Chambery, Savoie, France, on April 7, 1941. He was chairman of the French film promotion group Unifrance, and was producer of such films as Querelle (1982), Under the Sun of Satan (1987), The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover (1989), Boris Godunov (1989), Korczak

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402

Daniel Toscan du Plantier

Ed Townsend

(1990, The Branches of the Tree (1990), The Visitor (1991), In the Country of Juliets (1992), Dead Tired (1994), The Flood (1994), Seven Saturdays (1995), Madame Butterfly (1995), Desire (1996), Quadrille (1997), The Pelvis of John Wayne (1997), The Chambermaid on the Titanic (1998), A Civilized People (1999), Workers for the Good Lord (2000), Bellyful (2000), The Marcorelle Affair (2000), Karmen Gei (2001), Tosca (2001), and Le Grand Appartement (2003). Toscan du Plantier was also president of the French film academy that presents the Cesars, France’s leading film award. His wife, Sophie, was murdered in Ireland in December of 1996. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 15, 2003, B23; New York Times, Feb. 12, 2003, C15.

subsequently performed with Horace Heidt’s band before returning to the United States. He wrote and recorded the popular 1958 ballad “For Your Love.” Townsend recorded two albums with Capitol records, New in Town and Glad to Be Here, with Nelson Riddle and His Orchestra. From the early 1960s Townsend concentrated more on writing songs, including “How Can I Forget?”, “Tears of Joy,” and “Since I Found You.” In the early 1970s he worked often with Marvin Gaye, writing the hit song “Let’s Get It On.” Townsend also wrote and produced the Impressions hit “Finally Got Myself Together (I’m a Changed Man)”. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 16, 2003, B19; New York Times, Aug. 20, 2003, A19; Variety, Nov. 3, 2003, 51.

Townsend, Ed Songwriter Ed Townsend died in San Bernardino, California, on August 11, 2003. He was 74. Townsend was born in Fayetteville, Tennessee, on April 16, 1929. He served in the Marines during the Korean War in the early 1950s. He

Toy, Noel Chinese-American fan dancer Noel Toy, who danced nude in leading clubs in New York and San Francisco in the late 1930s, died of complications from a stroke in San Francisco on De-

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2003 • Obituaries

cember 24, 2003. She was 84. Toy was raised in Inverness, California. She began dancing at Charlie Low’s Forbidden City, a Chinese nightclub in San Francisco, in 1939. Toy became known as the Chinese Sally Rand because of her provocative dance numbers. Toy also appeared in small roles in several films in the 1950s including Anne of the Indies (1951), Soldier of Fortune (1955) with Clark Gable, How to Be Very, Very Popular (1955), and The Left Hand of God (1955). She was also seen in episodes of several television series including Studio 57, TV Reader’s Digest, Cavalcade of America, Crusader, Family Affair, and M*A*S*H. Toy continued her film career through the 1980s and 1990s in such features as S.O.B. (1981), John Carpenter’s Big Trouble in Little China (1986), FrameUp II: The Cover-Up (1996), and Midnight Temptations 2 (1997).

Treff, Alice German actress Alice Treff died in Berlin on February 8, 2003. She was 96. Treff was born in Berlin on June 4, 1906. She began her career on

Noel Toy

Alice Treff

Obituaries • 2003

404

stage in the 1920s and made her film debut in 1932’s Peter Voss Who Stole Millions. She continued to perform for the next 70 years, appearing in over 100 films and numerous stage and television productions. Her film credits include Right to Happiness (1932), Hilde Petersen: General Delivery (1937), The Girl Irene (1936), My Life Is at Stake (1936), Night of Fate (1938), The Lucky Seven (1940), Where Is Mr. Belling? (1945), In Those Days (1947), Street Acquaintances (1948), Girls Behind Bars (1949), Dangerous Guests (1949), Mr. Bruggs’ Strange Life (1951), The Border of Sin (1951), Dancing Stars (1952), Flower of Hawaii (1953), Ball of the Nations (1954), Canaris: Master Spy (1954), Children, Mother and the General (1955), Swedish Girl (1955), Saintly Lie (1955), One Woman Is Not Enough? (1955), The Ambassador’s Wife (1955), Anastasia: The Czar’s Last Daughter (1956), Kitty and the Great Big World (1956), Confessions of Felix Krull (1957), Of All Loved (1957), Will o’ the Wisp (1958), The Csardas Princess (1958), The Girl of the Moors (1958), The Young Go Wild (1959), The Black Abbot (1963), Holiday in St. Tropez (1964), Don’t Tell Me Any Stories (1964), Condemned to Sin (1964), The Racetrack Murders (1964), Witness Out of Hell (1967), The Fire Tongue Bowl (1970), Rhinegold (1978), Haus am See (1991), and The Middle of Nowhere (2001).

Man’s Family in 1950. He also starred as Inspector Richard Queen in the detective series The Adventures of Ellery Queen from 1958 to 1959, and was also Major Stone on The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin from 1958 to 1959. He was also a popular character actor in films, appearing in such features as The Blue Veil (1951), The Racket (1951), Francis Goes to West Point (1952), It Grows on Trees (1952), I Love Melvin (1953), Dream Wife (1953), the 1953 science fiction classic The War of the Worlds as Maj. Gen. Mann, Susan Slept Here (1954), A Man Called Peter (1955), The Lieutenant Wore Skirts (1956), The Unguarded Moment (1956), Everything but the Truth (1956), The Monolith Monsters (1957), The Perfect Furlough (1959), Say One for Me (1959), Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest (1959) as the Auctioneer, The Monster of Piedras Blancas (1959), The Angry Red Planet (1960), The Gallant Hours (1960), The Story of Ruth (1960), Shoot Out at Big Sag (1962), The Slime People (1962), Goldfinger (1964) as the voice of a radio newsman, The Fortune Cookie (1966), Creature of Destruction (1967), Strawberries Need Rain (1970), Fangs (1974), Quest (1983), and Attack of the B-Movie Monster (1985). A popular voice actor, Tremayne also narrated such films as Forbidden Planet (1956), the U.S. version of Rodan (1956), The Wings of Eagles (1957), and King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962). He was heard often

Tremayne, Les Veteran character actor Les Tremayne died in California on December 19, 2003. He was 90. Tremayne was born in London, England, on April 16, 1913, and came to the United States with his mother, actress Dolly Tremayne, at the age of four. He had began his professional career in a silent film in England the previous year. Tremayne performed on stage and in vaudeville, and began his career in radio in the Chicago in 1930. He performed on an estimated 30,000 broadcasts during his 60+ year career. Tremayne starred on such series as The First Nighter (1933–1943), Grand Hotel (1934–1940), Betty and Bob (1935– 1939), Old Gold Show (1943–1945), and The Falcon (1946–1949). He also starred on The Jackie Gleason/Les Tremayne Show and co-hosted the morning talk program, The Tremaynes, in the 1940s. He moved to television in the early 1950s, starring as Bill Herbert in the drama series One

Les Tremayne

405 on the cartoon series Mister Magoo, and was the voice of the Ghost of Christmas Present in 1962’s Mister Magoo’s Christmas Carol. He was the voice of Churchy La Femme and Beauregard in 1969’s The Pogo Special Birthday Special and the voice of Humbug in the 1970 animated film The Phantom Tollbooth. He was also heard in The Cricket in Times Square (1973), Oliver Twist (1981), Daffy Duck’s Movie: Fantastic Island (1983), Challenge of the GoBots (1984), The 13 Ghosts of Scooby-Doo (1985), Rainbow Brite and the Star Stealer (1985), and Starchaser: The Legend of Orin (1985), and the cartoon series The Smurfs, Jonny Quest, and Pirates of Darkwater. Tremayne also starred as Mentor, Billy Batson/Captain Marvel’s mentor, on the live-action children’s series, Shazam!, from 1974 to 1976. His numerous television credits also include episodes of The Philco Television Playhouse, The Millionaire, The 20th Century–Fox Hour, Navy Log, Bachelor Father, The Jack Benny Show, Perry Mason, The Texan, The Rifleman, The DuPont Show with June Allyson, M Squad, Wagon Train, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Rawhide, Mister Ed, Zane Grey Theater, Whispering Smith, Checkmate, Bonanza, The Andy Griffith Show, The Wide Country, The Dakotas, My Living Doll, Dr. Kildare, Mr. Novak, 77 Sunset Strip, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, The Beverly Hillbillies, The Virginian, My Favorite Martian, and The Dukes of Hazzard. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 23, 2003, B10; New York Times, Dec. 24, 2003, B7; Variety, Jan. 12, 2004, 60.

2003 • Obituaries

Trenier, Claude Singer and dancer Claude Trenier died of cancer in a Las Vegas hospice on November 17, 2003. He was 84. Trenier was born in Mobile, Alabama, on July 14, 1919. Trenier and his twin brother, Cliff, began performing in the 1930s. They formed the Trenier Brothers in 1947 with Don Hill. They had a popular song “Go, Go, Go” in 1951. They were a popular act in Las Vegas during the 1950s and appeared in the films The Girl Can’t Help It (1956), Don’t Knock the Rock (1956), Calypso Heat Wave (1957), and Juke Box Rhythm (1959). They also appeared on television on variety shows hosted by Ed Sullivan, Red Skelton, Jackie Gleason and others. His brother, Cliff, died in 1983. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 21, 2003, B19; New York Times, Nov. 22, 2003, B7; Variety, Dec. 15, 2003, 67.

Trenchev, Ivaylo Bulgarian cinematographer Ivaylo Trenchev died in Sofia, Bulgaria, on January 8, 2003. He was 65. Trenchev was born in Sofia on August 7, 1937. He worked in films as a camera operator from the early 1960s and was director of photography for the 1965 film Doze. He was cinematographer for such Bulgarian films as Tango (1969), Armando (1969), I Beg to Differ (1970), The End of a Song (1971), Third Planet in the Solar System (1972), Bread (1972), Eternal Times (1974), House Without Fences (1974), Squared Accounts (1974), A Cricket in the Ear (1976), The Swimming Pool (1977), Is the Bagpipe an Instrument? (1978), Fists in the Soil (1980), and The Soloist (1980).

Claude Trenier (right, with his brother, Cliff )

Trieste, Leopoldo Italian actor and screenwriter Leopoldo Trieste died of a heart attack in a Rome hospital on January 26, 2003. He was 85. Trieste was born in Reggio Calabria, Italy, on May 3, 1917. He began working in films after World War II, writing and starring in his debut feature, Love Prelude, in 1946. Trieste appeared in over 100 films during his career including The White Sheik (1952), Where Is Freedom? (1952), The Young and the Passionate (1953), The Sign of Venus (1953), Via Padova 46

Obituaries • 2003

406 (1979), Malamore (1982), Trenchcoat (1983), Henry IV (1984), Momo (1986), The Name of the Rose (1986), Cinema Paradiso (1988), Don Bosco (1988), Stradivari (1989), The Star Maker (195), Marianna Ucria (1996), The Prince’s Manuscript (2000), and The Council of Eg ypt (2002). Variety, Feb. 3, 2003, 77.

Trigg, Margaret

Leopoldo Trieste (left, with Alberto Sordi, from Fellini’s I Vitelloni)

(1954), A Day in Court (1954), An American in Rome (1954), A Hero of Our Times (1955), Destination Piovarolo (1955), Il Coraggio (1955), City at Night (1956) which he also wrote and directed, A Farewell to Arms (1957), Everyone’s in Love (1959), Boys of the Parioli (1959), The Moralist (1959), The Joy of Living (1960), Divorce — Italian Style (1961) with Marcello Mastroianni, The Success (1963), The Eye of the Needle (1963), A Matter of Honor (1964), Undercover Rogue (1964), Love Factory (1964), A Maiden for a Prince (1965), A Question of Honour (1965), Shoot Loud, Louder … I Don’t Understand (1966), Weekend Wives (1966), We Still Kill the Old Way (1967), Escalation (1968), The Shoes of the Fisherman (1968), The Family Doctor (1968), The Chastity Belt (1969), The Sicilian Clan (1969), Vacation (1969), The Secret of Santa Vittoria (1969), The Adventures of Gerard (1970), Rose Spot (1970), Pussycat, Pussycat, I Love You (1970), Mario Bava’s Twitch of the Death Nerve (1971), Trastevere (1971), Delusions of Grandeur (1971), Stress (1971), Touch and Go (1971), Master of Love (1972), Pulp (1972), Every Little Crook and Nanny (1972), My Pleasure Is Your Pleasure (1973), Don’t Look Now (1973), The Lady Has Been Raped (1973), Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather: Part II (1974), The Profiteer (1974), Instant Coffee (1974), A Virgin Named Mary (1975), Private Lessons (1975), Caligula (1979), The Black Stallion (1979), Flatfoot in Eg ypt

Comedian and actress Margaret Trigg died in New York City on November 16, 2003. She was 39. Trigg was born in Bastrop, Texas, on May 30, 1964. She moved to New York City in 1989 where she worked as a stand-up comedian. She was seen in the films R.O.T.O.R. (1989) and Dream House (1997), and an episode of television’s Homicide: Life on the Street. She also starred as Cookie Brody in the 1996 science fiction comedy series Aliens in the Family.

Margaret Trigg

407

Trintignant, Marie French actress Marie Trintignant died in a Neuilly, Hauts-de-Seine, France, hospital on August 1, 2003, several days after having suffered serious head injuries in a Vilnius, Lithuania, hotel room during a fight with her boyfriend, French rock singer Bertrand Cantat. She was 41. Trintignant was born in Boulogne-Billancourt, Paris, France, on January 21, 1962. The daughter of French actor Jean-Louis Trintignant and director Nadine Trintignant, Marie began her film career at the age of four in 1967’s My Love, My Love, starring her father and directed by her mother. She continued to appear in such films as It Only Happens to Others (1971), Forbidden to Know (1973), The Honeymoon Trip (1976), First Voyage (1979), The Terrace (1980), Deep Water (1981), The Islands (1983), Next Summer (1985), Widow’s Walk (1987), Jeanne’s House (1988), The Story of Women (1988), Wings of Fame (1990), Summer Night in Town (1990), Alberto Express (1990), The Lovers on the Bridge (1991), Against Oblivion (191), Betty (1992), Wild Target (1993), The Groundhogs (1993), Les Apprentis (1995), The Fugitive (1995),

Marie Trintignant

2003 • Obituaries

News from the Good Lord (1996), Ponette (1996), Shadow Play (1996), White Lies (1998), Le Cousin (1998), Deep in the Woods (2000), Harrison’s Flowers (2000), The Prince of the Pacific (2000), Les Blancs (2000), A Long Long Long Night of Love (2001), Dead Man’s Hand (2002), Total Kheops (2002), Lost Seamen (2003), and Janis et John (2003) as Janis Joplin. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 2, 2003, B20; New York Times, Aug. 5, 2003, A3; Variety, Aug. 11, 2003, 43.

Troobnick, Eugene Comedian and actor Eugene Troobnick died in Seattle, Washington, on February 19, 2003. He was 76. Troobnick was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on August 23, 1926. He began his career on stage in the 1950s and was a founding member of the Second City comedy ensemble in 1959. In the early 1960s Troobnick began appearing on television in such series as Car 54, Where Are You? and That Was the Week That Was. He was also seen in a handful of films including Harvey Middleman, Fireman (1965), California Split (1974), Funny Lady (1975), All That Jazz (1979), Paternity (1981), The Imported Bridegroom (1990), and Reconstructing Harry (1997). He was featured as Uncle Stavros Kouperakis in the daytime television soap opera Guiding Light from

Eugene Troobnick

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408

1991 to 1995. Troobnick’s other television credits include the 1974 tele-film Tell Me Where It Hurts and episodes of East Side/West Side, The Bob Newhart Show, Temperatures Rising, Banacek, Hawaii Five-O, Kojak, and Law & Order.

Tun Tun Indian singer and comedienne Tun Tun died in Mumbai, India, after a long illness on November 24, 2003. She was 80. She was born Uma Devi Khatri in Uttar Pradesh, India, in 1923. She performed as a singer from her teens and made her film debut in 1947’s Pain. She sang in over a dozen films including Drama (1947), Strange Charm (1948), and Falling in Love (1949). She became known as Tun Tun in 1950 and continued to work in films primarily as a comedienne. Her credits include On Opposite Sides (1954), Mr. and Mrs. 55 (1955), Full Moon (1960), Street Singer (1965), Sacrifice (1981), and One Man (1988). Variety, Dec. 8, 2003, 74.

Turner, Othar Blues musician Othar Turner died of complications from pneumonia at his daughter’s home in Gravel Springs, Mississippi, on February 26, 2003. He was 94. Turner was the son of Jackson County, Mississippi, sharecroppers and began playing a cane fife while in his teens. He was the leader of the Rising Star Fife and Drum Band. Musicologist Alan Lomax recorded Turner for his 1978 documentary The Land Where the Blues Began. He began touring in the 1970s and recorded his first album, Everybody Hollerin’ Goat in 1998. He teamed with a group of African musicians for the 1999 album From Senegal to Senatobia. Turner’s song, “Shimmy She Wobble,” was heard on the soundtrack for the 2002 film Gangs of New York. New York Times, Mar. 1, 203, A16.

Othar Turner

Tuttle, Fred

Tun Tun

Fred Tuttle died of a heart attack in Tunbridge, Vermont, on October 4, 2003. He was 84. Tuttle was born in Tunbridge on July 18, 1919. A retired Vermont dairy farmer, he played himself in the 1996 film A Man with a Plan, in which he ran for and won a seat in Congress. In 1998 Tuttle campaigned for the Republican nomination to the U.S. Senate. Spending only $16 against a millionaire, Tuttle scored an upset victory. He

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Wesley Tuttle

Fred Tuttle

lost the general election to incumbent Senator Patrick Leahy, with Tuttle himself voting for Leahy. Tuttle was also featured in the 1997 film Pressure Point. New York Times, Oct. 7, 2003, A29; Time, Oct. 20, 2003, 22.

Tuttle, Wesley Country singer and musician Wesley Tuttle died of heart failure in Sylmar, California, on September 29, 2003. He was 85. Tuttle was born in Lamar, Colorado, on December 13, 1917. He performed with the Red River Valley Boys in the early 1940s, and led The Texas Stars later in the

decade. Tuttle had a hit country song with 1945’s “With Tears in My Eyes.” He also recorded the popular songs “Detour” and “Tho’ I Tried.” Tuttle also performed in a handful of Western films in the 1940s including Law of the Northwest (1943), Arizona Trail (1943), Oklahoma Raiders (1944), Song of the Range (1944), Terror Trail (1946), and Rainbow Over the Rockies (1947). During the 1950s Tuttle was musical director and often performed on the California-based country music television series Town Hall Party. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 3, 2003, B13.

Tyrell, Stephanie Songwriter and music producer Stephanie Manteris Tyrell died of cancer in Los Angeles on October 27, 2003. She was 54. She was best known for the 1992 hit record “How Do You Talk to an Angel” and as the lyricist for “Remember the Dream,” the theme for Black Entertainment Television (BET). Her songs have been recorded by such artists as Ray Charles and Diana Ross and were heard in numerous films. Survivors include her husband, musician and singer Steve Tyrell. Variety, Nov. 3, 2003, 51.

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410

Stephanie Tyrell

Ucak, Fikret Turkish film director T. Fikret Ucak died in Istanbul, Turkey, on July 11, 2003. He was 69. Ucak was born in Samsun, Turkey, on December 23, 1933. He wrote and directed numerous films in Turkey from the late 1950s including Merhamet (1959), Yigit Kani (1966), and 3 Mighty Men (aka Captain America and Santo vs. Spider-Man (1973), which was likely an unlicensed use of the characters.

Urbano, Carl Animator Carl Urbano died on October 16, 2003. He was 94. Urbano began his career in the 1930s. He was an animator on the Oscar-nominated first Tom and Jerry cartoon, Puss Gets the Boot, in 1940. He also animated such MGM shorts as The Bear That Couldn’t Sleep (1939), Chips Off the Old Block (1942), and The Stork’s Holiday (1943). He later worked on numerous animated television series including Challenge of the Super Friends, The All-New Popeye Hour, Casper and the Angels, Scooby and Scrappy-Do, The Kiwcky Koala Show, The Jetsons, and Gravedale High. He also worked on the animated features Scooby-Doo Meets the Boo Brothers (1987) and Jetsons: The Movie (1990).

Fikret Ucak’s film Captain America and Santo vs. Spider-Man

Uris, Leon Novelist Leon Uris died of kidney failure on Shelter Island, New York, on June 21, 2003. He was 78. Uris was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on August 3, 1924. He served in the U.S. Marines during World War II, and his experiences served as he inspiration for his first novel, Battle Cry in 1953. Uris also scripted the 1955 film version of the novel. He worked on the script for the 1957 western classic Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, and his novel The Angry Hills was filmed in 1959. Uris, who was a correspondent during the ArabIsraeli wars in 1956, was best known for his 1958 novel Exodus about the formation and early years of the nation of Israel. Paul Newman starred in Otto Preminger’s film version in 1960. Uris’ 1967 novel Topaz was filmed by Alfred Hitchcock in 1969, and his 1970 novel QB VII was adapted as a television mini-series in 1974. Uris also wrote the 1971 Broadway musical Ari and the novels Trinity (1976) and The Haj (1984). His final

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Jiri Vala

Vale, Raul

Leon Uris

novel, O’Hara’s Choice, was scheduled to be published posthumously. Los Angeles Times, June 25, 2003, B12; New York Times, June 25, 2003, A25; People, July 7, 2003, 83; Time, June 30, 2003, 18; Variety, June 30, 2003, 46.

Vala, Jiri Czech actor Jiri Vala died of cancer in Prague, Czech Republic, on November 15, 2003. He was 76. Vala was born in Poprad, Czechoslovakia, on November 27, 1926. A leading actor from the early 1950s, Vala was seen in such films as September Nights (1957), Suburban Romance (1958), Desire (1958), Kral Sumavy (1959), The Borrowed Face (1965), Captain Korda (1970), and Vitr v Kapse (1982).

Mexican comedian and actor Raul Vale died of lung cancer in a Houston, Texas, hospital on December 7, 2003. He was 59. Vale was born in Maracaibo, Venezuela, on April 20, 1944. A musician and composer, he wrote several musical comedies and performed in the films War of the Pastries (1978), Mexican Mechanic (1994), and A Woman’s Revenge (1995).

Valez, Kippee Vanda “Kippee” Palumbo, who appeared in several films in the 1940s as Kippee Valez, died of lung cancer at her home in Merion, Pennsylvania, on July 28, 2003. She was 83. She was born Vanda Bozzacco in Racine, Wisconsin, in 1920 and worked as a nightclub dancer at the age of 14. She went to Hollywood in the late 1940s where, as Kippee Valez, she was featured in several films including Brute Force (1947), Mexican Hayride (1948), Criss Cross (1949), The Daring Caballero (1949), The Big Wheel (1949), The Milkman (1950), and Southside 1-1000 (1950). She left Hollywood after her marriage to leading Philadelphia restauranteur Frank Palumbo, Sr.

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Raul Vale

Billy Van

on the 1971 Canadian comedy series The Hilarious House of Frightenstein with Vincent Price. He also appeared in such Canadian and U.S. television series as The Ray Stevens Show, The Party Game, Rollin’ on the River, The Ken Berry “Wow” Show, The Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour, The Hudson Brothers Razzle Dazzle Show, And That’s the News, Goodnight, The Bobby Vinton Show, Bizarre, and Bits and Bytes. He was the voice of the Scarecrow in a 1982 animated version of The Wizard of Oz, and appeared in the tele-films The Hearst and Davies Affair (1985), A Deadly Business (1986), I’ll Take Manhattan (1987), The Trial of Red Riding Hood (1992), and Net Worth (1995). Van was also seen in the films Family Reunion (1988) and This Is My Life (1992).

Kippee Valez

Van, Billy Canadian comedian Billy Van died of cancer in a Toronto, Canada, hospital on January 8, 2003. He was 68. Van starred in numerous roles

van Avermaet, Daniel Belgian actor Daniel van Avermaet died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Brussels, Belgium, on July 18, 2003. He was 61. Van Avermaet was born in Rumst, Belgium, on December 20, 1941. He was featured in several films during his career in-

413

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Tito Vandis

Daniel van Avermaet

cluding Brussels by Night (1983), Istanbul (1985), The Wall (1999), and Piranha Blues (1999).

Vandis, Titos Veteran character actor Titos Vandis died of cancer in an Athens, Greece, hospital on February 23, 2003. He was 86. Vandis was born in Kavala, Greece, in 1917. He began his career on the Greek stage in the late 1930s. He also appeared in numerous Greek films and was featured with Melina Mercouri in Jules Dassin’s 1960 film Never on Sunday. Vandis’ other screen credits include The Promise (1961), Dawn on the Third Day (1962), It Happened in Athens (1962), Island of Love (1963), Topkapi (1964), Stiletto (1969), Woody Allen’s Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex but Were Afraid to Ask (1972), The Exorcist (1973) as Father Karras’ Uncle, Once Upon a Scoundrel (1973), Newman’s Law (1974), Harrad Summer (1974), Black Samson (1974), Smile (1975), Alex and the Gypsy (1976), Gus (1976), Oh, God! (1977), The Other Side of Mid-

night (1977), A Piece of the Action (1977), Harold Robbins’ The Betsy (1978), A Perfect Couple (1979), National Lampoon Goes to the Movies (1981), Young Doctors in Love (1982), Against the Storm (1984), and Fletch Lives (1989). Vandis also appeared in numerous tele-films including Genesis II (1973), Get Christie Love! (1974), The Last Angry Man (1974), In Tandem (1974), Satan’s Triangle (1975), Roger & Harry: The Mitera Target (1977), The San Pedro Beach Bums (1977), The 3,000 Mile Chase (1977), Mad Bull (1977), The President’s Mistress (1978), And Your Name Is Jonah (1979), The Miracle Worker (1979), Homeward Bound (1980), The Star Maker (1981), Terror at Alcatraz (1982), and The First Olympics: Athens, 1896 (1984). His other television credits include episodes of Mission: Impossible, Hawaii Five-O, Banacek, The Rookies, M*A*S*H, Barney Miller, Baretta, Kojak, The Bob Newhart Show, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Wonder Woman, Charlie’s Angels, How the West Was Won, Nero Wolfe, Hart to Hart, Airwolf, Night Court, and The A-Team. In his later years he returned to Greece, where he was featured often on Greek television.

Vargas, Vic Filipino actor Vic Vargas died of a stroke in a Pasay City, Philippines, hospital on July 19, 2003. He was 64. Vargas was born Jose Maria

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Vic Vargas

Manuel Vazquez Montalban

Marfori Asuncion in the Philippines on March 28, 1939. He began his career in films in the 1960s with Sampaguita Pictures. He was a popular film star for the next two decades in such features as Tansas vs. Tarsan (1963), Bird of Paradise (1963), Balisong 29 (1963), Quinto de Alas (1968), Kumander Dimas (1968), Destination Vietnam (1968), Kalinga (1968), Darna and the Planetman (1969), Reaching the Top (1971), I Shall Return (1973), No Tears for the Brave (1974), Day of the Bullets (1976), Intrusion Cambodia (1981), In Dis Korner (1982), King and Emperor (1987), and Vigilante (1988). In recent years he was featured in several Filipino television drama series. His final screen credit was in 2002’s Lapu-Lapu.

der in the Central Committee (1982), The Greek Labyrinth (1991), The Pianist (1998), and The Galindez File (2003). Several Pepe Carvalho books were adapted as tele-films in Spain in 1999.

Vazquez Montalban, Manuel Spanish author Manuel Vazquez Montalban died of a heart attack at the Bangkok, Thailand, airport on October 18, 2003. He was 64. Vazquez was born in Barcelona, Spain, on July 27, 1939. He was best known for his series of novels about gourmet private detective Pepe Carvalho. Many of his works were adapted to film including Mur-

Velasco, Antonio Mexican actor Antonio Velasco was killed during an accidental shooting while filming a low-budget action movie, The Scorpion’s Vengeance, in a Cuernavaca, Mexico, hotel on August 16, 2003. He was 42. Velasco was shot to death when fellow actor Flavio Peniche was given a gun with real bullets instead of blanks during filming. Variety, Sept. 1, 2003, 52.

Verinis, James A. Capt. James A. Verinis, the co-pilot of the World War II bomber the Memphis Belle, died in Jupiter, Florida, on March 3, 2003. He was 86. Verinis was born in Stamford, Connecticut, on October 23, 1916. He appeared in William Wyler’s 1944 documentary The Memphis Belle: A

415

2003 • Obituaries

Vianna, Wilson Brazilian actor Wilson Vianna died of a heart attack in Bonito, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, on May 3, 2003. He was 75. Vianna was born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on February 27, 1928. An actor from the 1950s, Vianna was best known as the super hero Captain Aza on the Brazilian children’s series TV Tupi from 1966 to 1979. He was also featured in the films Simon the One-Eyed (1952), O Grande Pintor (1955), Curucu, Beast of the Amazon (1956), Love Slaves of the Amazon (1957), Fiery Women (1958), 8000 Leagues Over the Amazon (1958), The Super HeMan (1960), The Treasures of Zapata (1968), and The Bunglers and the Wizard of Oroz (1984).

James A. Verinis

Story of a Flying Fortress, which focused on the 25th, and last, bombing mission of the Memphis Belle.

Viana, Jose Portuguese actor Jose Viana was killed in an automobile accident in Lisbon, Portugal, on January 8, 2003. He was 80. Viana was born in Lisbon on December 6, 1922. A popular stage actor in Portugal, Viana was also seen in numerous films including O Cerro do Enforcados (1954), The Message (1972), Love Letters of a Portuguese Nun (1977), The Island (1990), The End of the World (1992), Morte Macada (1997), and Senhor Jeronimo (1998).

Wilson Vianna as Captain Aza

Viveros, Sonia Jose Viana

Chilean television star Sonia Viveros died in a La Serena, Chile, hospital, of complications from lupus on September 22, 2003. She was 53.

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416

Sonia Viveros

She starred in over a dozen television dramas from the 1980s including La Madrastra (1981), La Torre 10 (1984), La Villa (1986), Trampas y Caretas (1992), Top Secret (1994), and Santiago City (1997).

Boris Volkoff

Volkoff, Boris Frank Zela, who wrestled professionally as Boris Volkoff in the 1950s and 1960s, died of congestive heart failure in Las Vegas on October 15, 2003. He was 76. He was born in Calumet City, Illinois, on May 9, 1927. His interest in physical fitness led him to open several gyms in Calumet City in the 1950s. Zela soon began wrestling professionally under a mask as the Masked Destroyer. He subsequently joined Nicoli Volkoff in the ring as his “brother” Boris. The duo won several NWA tag team championships during their career, competing against such opponents as Dick the Bruiser and the Crusher. Zela retired from the ring in 1968.

Volz, Nedra Veteran character actress Nedra Volz, who was best known for her role as housekeeper Adelaide Brubaker in the Diff ’rent Strokes television sit-com in the early 1980s, died of complications

Nedra Volz

from Alzheimer’s disease in Mesa, Arizona, on January 20, 2003. She was 94. Volz was born in Montrose, Iowa, on June 18, 1908. She worked in vaudeville and radio from the 1930s, but found fame in her later years as a character actress play-

417 ing “old lady” parts in such television series as Good Times, One Day at a Time, A Year at the Top, Eight Is Enough, All in the Family, Hanging In, Alice, Maude, WKRP in Cincinnati, Hart to Hart, and Gimme a Break! She also appeared regularly as Miz Emma Tisdale, the postmistress, on television’s The Dukes of Hazzard from 1981 to 1983 and starred as Winona “Mother B” Beck on the short-lived comedy series Filthy Rich in 1982. She was also seen as Pearl Sperling in The Fall Guy from 1985 to 1986 and as Mrs. Newman in the 1991 series Babes. Volz appeared in a handful of films during her career including Your Three Minutes Are Up (1973), Mule Feathers (1977), 10 (1979), Little Miss Marker (1980), Moving Violations (1985), Lust in the Dust (1985), Earth Girls Are Easy (1988), Mortuary Academy (1988), Betrayal of the Dove (1993), The Silence of the Hams (1994), and The Great White Hype (1996). Other television credits include the tele-films They Only Come Out at Night (1975), Condominium (1980), Last of the Great Survivors (1984), and For Love or Money (1984), and episodes of Scarecrow and Mrs. King, The A-Team, Night Court, Who’s the Boss?, ALF, It’s a Living, Mr. Belvedere, Designing Women, The Super Mario Bros. Super Show!, Dear John, The Commish, Step by Step, and Coach. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 29, 2003, B10.

2003 • Obituaries

stant Life” in 1960, and coined the term Sea Monkeys to describe the powder-like creatures that would come to life once water was added. They have remained popular over the past 40 years and were the suject of a 1992 CBS cartoon series, The Amazing Live Sea-Monkeys. Von Braunhut’s other creations, also marketed in comic books, include the X-Ray Specs, Crazy Crabs, and Amazing Hair-Raising Monsters. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 28, 2003, B18; New York Times, Dec. 21, 2003, 58.

Von Poppenheim, Kurt Professional wrestler Kurt Von Poppenheim died in Oregon on May 1, 2003. He was 89. Von Poppenheim competed in the ring from 1937 until 1964. He held the NWA Pacific Northwest Tag Team Title several times from the early 1950s through the early 1960s, teaming with Leo Wallick, Henry Lenz, Jack O’Reilly, Kurt Von Himmler, Dan Manoukian, Fritz Von Brauner and Soldat Gorky. He also held the Pacific Coast Junior Heavyweight Title several times in the mid–1950s, and was NWA Pacific Northwest champion in June of 1959.

von Braunhut, Harold Harold von Braunhut, the creator and marketer of Amazing Sea Monkeys graced the back covers of countless comic books in the 1960s, died at his home in Indian Head, Maryland, on November 28, 2003. He was 77. He was born Harold Nathan Braunhut in Memphis, Tennessee, on March 31, 1926, and was raised in New York City. He began marketing dried brine shrimp as “In-

Harold von Braunhut and his Sea Monkey family

Kurt Von Poppenheim

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418

Voudouris, Roger Singer and guitarist Roger Voudouris died at his home in Land Park, California, on August 3, 2003. He was 48. Voudouris was born in Sacramento, California, on December 29, 1954. He formed a band during his high school years and released his first album in 1978. His second album the following year, Radio Dream, featured the popular hit “Get Used to It.” Other albums followed including A Guy Like Me (1980) and On the Heels of Love (1981). Voudouris wrote the lyrics to the 1983 film The Lonely Lady starring Pia Zadora. He retired from performing and recording soon afterwards but subsequently formed a recording company, Artful Balance.

Riyad Wadia

Wald, Eliot

Roger Voudouris

Wadia, Riyad Indian filmmaker Riyad Vinci Wadia died of tuberculosis in a Bombay, India, hospital on November 30, 2003. He was 36. He was the grandson of J.B.H. Wadia, the founder of Wadia Movietone film studio and production company in the 1930s. One of India’s first openly gay filmmakers, Wadia depicted gay life in India with the 1996 film BOMgAY. He also directed the films Fearless: The Hunterwali Story (1993) and A Mermaid Called Aida (1996), about Indian transsexual Aida Banaji.

Film and television writer-producer Eliot Wald died of liver cancer in a Tarzana, California, hospital on July 12, 2003. He was 57. Wald was born in New York City in 1946. Wald worked as a journalist in Chicago, where he was instrumental in uniting movie critics Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel in the television review show Siskel & Ebert at the Movies. Wald worked in television as co-producer and creator of the public television series Soundstage. Wald worked as a writer for Saturday Night Live in the 1980s, and scripted the 1988 tele-film Hot Paint. He also wrote the films See No Evil, Hear No Evil (1989), Camp Nowhere (1994), and Down Periscope (1996). Los Angeles Times, July 16, 2003, B11; New York Times, July 15, 2003, A23; Variety, July 21, 2003, 71.

Walker, Alexander British film critic Alexander Walker died in England on July 15, 2003. He was 73. Walker was born in Portaown, County Armagh, on March

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2003 • Obituaries

22, 1930. He began working as a journalist in the 1950s at the Birmingham Gazette before becoming a film critic with the Birmingham Post. He joined the London Evening Standard in 1960. He became one of Britain’s leading critics over the next 40 years. Walker also wrote over 20 books about films and their stars, including biographies of Marlene Dietrich, Bette Davis, Katharine Hepburn, and Vivien Leigh. Walker also wrote the 1971 book Stanley Kubrick, Director, with the cooperation of his friend, Kubrick. Los Angeles Times, July 17, 2003, B13; Variety, July 21, 2003, 71.

Walker, Hal Television journalist Harold W. “Hal” Walker died of prostate cancer in Reston, Virginia, on November 25, 2003. He was 70. Walker was born in Darlington, South Carolina, in 1933. He was the first black journalist to work for a major television network in the United States Eliot Wald

Alexander Walker Hal Walker

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when he joined CBS News as a correspondent in 1968. He was CBS’s Washington correspondent until 1977. He subsequently worked at ABC until his retirement in 1995. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 27, 2003, B17; New York Times, Nov. 27, 2003, B11; Time, Dec. 8, 2003, 27.

Walker, Johnny Indian comedian and actor Johnny Walker died in Mumbai, India, on July 29, 2003. He was 80. He was born Badruddin Qazi in Srinagar, Kashmir, India, on May 15, 1923. He took his screen name from Johnny Walker whiskey after playing the drunken sidekick in the 1954 film Taxi Driver. He was feat