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Obituaries in the Performing Arts, ¡999

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Obituaries in the Performing Arts, ¡999 Film, Television, Radio, Theatre, Dance, Music, Cartoons and Pop Culture by

HARRIS M. LENTZ III

McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers Je›erson, North Carolina, and London

Front cover, clockwise from top left: DeForest Kelley, Madeline Kahn, Gene Rayburn and Ellen Corby

ISSN ¡087-96¡7 / ISBN 0-7864-0748-4 (softcover : 50# alkaline paper)

©2000 Harris M. Lentz, III. All rights reserved No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Manufactured in the United States of America

McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers Box 6¡¡, Je›erson, North Carolina 28640 www.mcfarlandpub.com

This book is dedicated to the memory of my close friend Nina W. He‡ngton and to other friends and family members who passed in ¡999 — Bill Boveri, Vic Vescovo, Corinne Walton, Cheryl Hall, Bill Gossett, John Ball, Diane Cara, Rose Berretta and Lauri Fiedler

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I greatly appreciate the assistance of my good friend, Carla Clark, and my mother, Helene Lentz. Special thanks also go to Bob King at Classic Images, for granting permission to use information from my columns, and to the people at Jerry Ohlinger’s for digging up many of the photographs appearing herein. Also, thanks to Andrew I. Porter at the Science Fiction Chronicle, Rosa Burnett and the sta› at State Technical Institute library, Tom Weaver, Fred Davis, Forrest J Ackerman, Mike Fitzgerald, John Beifuss, Eric Rohr, Ray Neilson, John Whyborn, Boyd Magers, Larry Tauber, Andrew “Captain Comics” Smith, Nikki and

Jimmy Walker, Bettye Dawson, Tony Pruitt, Bobby Mathews, Kent Nelson, Dale Warren, Dr. Mark He‡ngton, Nathan and Jake He‡ngton, Mark and Glinda Gressell, Anne Taylor, Dia Barbee, Andy Branham, John Nelson, Richard Allynwood, Louise Bianco, Frank de Azpillaga, Joy Martin, Denise Tansil, Gary Holder, Hal Stansbury, John Janovich, Jenny Byczek, Jake Miller, Kelley Moore, Blaine Lester, Todd Simpson, Laura Hunt, the fine folks at J. Alexander’s, Tommy Gattas, James Gattas, the Fox & Hound, the University of Memphis Library and the Memphis and Shelby County Public Libraries.

vii

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgments vii Introduction ¡ Reference Bibliography 3 The ¡999 Obituaries

ix

5

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INTRODUCTION The year ¡999 saw the passing of numerous individuals in the world of show business and the performing arts. No genre was left untouched. The incomparable film director Stanley Kubrick will unfortunately not see the year 200¡. Nor will screen legends George C. Scott, Victor Mature, Dirk Bogarde, Oliver Reed, Faith Domergue, Rory Calhoun, Anthony Newley, Ruth Roman, Bob Peck and Sylvia Sidney. The Starship Enterprise is now short its first original regular crewman with the loss of Star Trek’s Dr. McCoy — DeForest Kelley. Fans of singing cowboys, still reeling from the passing of Gene Autry and Roy Rogers last year, saw the loss of Eddie Dean, Rex Allen and Tito Guizar. Western fans also saw the passing of television’s best known lawman, Clayton “the Lone Ranger” Moore, and leading Native American star Iron Eyes Cody. The screen’s first Superman, Kirk Alyn; the creator of the Phantom and Mandrake, Lee Falk; and the voice of Wilma Flintstone, Jean Vander Pyl, also died in ¡999. Major music figures Hank Snow, Yehudi Menuhin, Boxcar Willie, Hoyt Axton and Al Hirt, and familiar television faces Allen Funt, Ross Elliott, Shirley Hemphill, Mabel King, Madeline Kahn, Henry Jones, Ellen Corby, David Strickland, Dana Plato, and Peggy Cass are also listed in this volume. The world of sports lost Wilt Chamberlain and Joe DiMaggio, and sports entertainment saw the passing of professional

wrestlers Rick Rude, Gorilla Monsoon, the Renegade and Owen Hart. The ranks are also reduced of Dead End Kids/Bowery Boys (Huntz Hall, William Benedict), Little Rascals (Harold Wertz) and Oz’s Munchkins (Murray Wood and Harry Monty). Also found in these pages are James Bond’s master gadgeteer Q, Desmond Llewelyn; the Godfather’s literary father, Mario Puzo; directors Charles Crichton and Edward Dmytryk, Italian horror filmmakers Joe D’Amato and Riccardo Freda, legendary striptease artist Lili St. Cyr, and magazine publisher and former First Son, John F. Kennedy, Jr. This book provides a single source that notes the deaths of all major, and many minor, figures in the fields of film, television, cartoons, theatre, music and popular literature. The obituaries within this volume contain pertinent details of deaths, including date, place and cause, of 578 celebrities. Biographical information and career highlights and achievements are also provided. I have also included a complete-as-possible filmography for film and television performers. Most obituaries are followed by citations to major newspapers and periodical stories reporting the death. A photograph has been included for many of the individuals. I have been writing obituaries of film personalities for over twenty years, beginning with a column in Forry Ackerman’s Famous Monsters

¡

Introduction of Filmland in the late ¡970s. Many of the film obituaries in the work are taken from my monthly column in Classic Images (P.O. Box 809, Muscatine, IA 5276¡), a newspaper devoted to classic films and their performers. I also write a small column on science fiction film-related deaths for the Science Fiction Chronicle (P.O. Box 022730, Brooklyn, NY ¡¡202). Information on the passing of the individuals found in this volume has been gathered from a myriad of sources. Primary sources, as previously noted, are listed in the individual bibliographies, including The New York Times,

2 The Los Angeles Times, The Times (of London), The Washington Post, Variety, Time, People, TV Guide and Newsweek. Other sources include Boyd Mager’s Western Clippings, The Memphis Commercial Appeal, The Hollywood Reporter, The (Manchester) Guardian, The Comics Buyer’s Guide, Locus, The Boston Globe, Pro Wrestling Torch, Psychotronic Video, The Comics Journal and Facts on File. Several sources on the internet have also been helpful, including You’re Outta Here! (http://www.cnjetworks. com/~roryb/outta.html) and the Internet Movie Database, Ltd. (http://us.imdb.com/).

REFERENCE BIBLIOGRAPHY DeLong, Thomas A. Radio Stars. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡996. Dimmitt, Richard Bertrand. An Actors Guide to the Talkies. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, ¡967. Two volumes. Erickson, Hal. Television Cartoon Shows. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡995. Everman, Welch. Cult Science Fiction Films. New York: Citadel Press, ¡995. Fetrow, Alan G. Feature Films, ¡940–¡949. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡994. _____. Feature Films, ¡950–¡959. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡999. _____. Sound Films, ¡927–¡939. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡992. Fischer, Dennis. Horror Films Directors, ¡93¡– ¡990. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡99¡. Hunter, Allan, ed. Chambers Concise Encyclopedia of Film and Television. New York: W. & R. Chambers, ¡99¡. Katz, Ephraim. The Film Encyclopedia, 2d ed. New York: HarperPerennial, ¡994. Maltin, Leonard, ed. Movie and Video Guide ¡995. New York: Signet Books, ¡994. Marill, Alvin H. Movies Made for Television. Westport, CT: Arlington House, ¡980. Mathis, Jack. Republican Confidential, Vol. 2: The Players. Barrington, IL: Jack Mathis Advertising, ¡992. McNeil, Alex. Total Television. New York :

Books The Academy Players Directory. Beverly Hills, Calif.: Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science, ¡978–¡995. Alyn, Kirk. A Job for Superman. Hollywood: Alyn, ¡97¡. The American Film Institute Catalog: Feature Films, ¡9¡¡–20. Patricia King Hansen, ed. Berkeley: University of California Press, ¡988. American Film Institute Catalog: Feature Films, ¡92¡–30. Kenneth W. Munden, ed. New York: R.R. Bowker, ¡97¡. The American Film Institute Catalog: Feature Films, ¡93¡–40. Patricia King Hansen, ed. Berkeley: University of California Press, ¡993. American Film Institute Catalog: Feature Films, ¡96¡–70. Richard P. Krafsur, ed. New York: R.R. Bowker, ¡976. Brooks, Tim. The Complete Directory of Prime Time TV Stars. New York : Ballantine Books, ¡987. Brown, Les. The New York Times Encyclopedia of Television. New York: Times Books, ¡977. Bushnell, Brooks. Directors and Their Films. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡993. Ciment, Michael. Kubrick. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, ¡984.

3

Reference Bibliography Penguin Books, ¡996. Monaco, James. Who’s Who in American Film Now. New York: Zoetrope, ¡988. Nash, Jay Robert, and Stanley Ralph Ross. The Motion Picture Guide. ¡0 vols. Chicago: Cinebooks, ¡985. Nowlan, Robert A., and Gwendolyn Wright Nowlan. The Films of the Eighties. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡99¡. Oliviero, Je›rey. Motion Picture Players’ Credits. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡99¡. Parish, James Robert. Actors’ Television Credits ¡950–¡972. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, ¡973. _____. Film Actors Guide: Western Europe. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, ¡977. Ragan, David. Who’s Who in Hollywood, ¡900– ¡976. New Rochelle, N.Y.: Arlington House, ¡976. Rovin, Je›. The Fabulous Fantasy Films. South Brunswick, NJ: A.S. Barnes, ¡977. Sullivan, Steve. Va Va Voom! Bombshells, Pinups, Sexpots and Glamour Girls. Los Angeles: General Publishing Group, ¡995. Terrace, Vincent. Encyclopedia of Television Series, Pilots and Specials, ¡937–¡973. New York: Zoetrope, ¡986. _____. Encyclopedia of Television Series, Pilots and Specials, ¡974–¡984. New York : Zoetrope, ¡986. Walker, John, ed. Halliwell’s Filmgoer’s and

4 Video Viewer’s Companion, ¡0th ed. New York: HarperPerennial, ¡993. Watson, Elena M. Television Horror Movie Hosts. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡99¡. Weaver, Tom. Attack of the Monster Movie Makers: Interviews with 20 Genre Giants. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡994. _____. Interviews with B Science Fiction and Horror Movie Makers. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡988. _____. It Came from Weaver Five: Interviews with 20 Zany, Glib and Earnest Moviemakers in the SF and Horror Traditions of the Thirties, Forties, Fifties and Sixties. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡994. _____. John Carradine: The Films. Je›erson, NC.: McFarland, ¡999. _____. Monsters, Mutants and Heavenly Creatures. Baltimore : Midnight Marquee Press, ¡996. _____. Science Fiction and Fantasy Film Flashbacks. Je›erson, NC.: McFarland, ¡998. _____. Science Fiction Stars and Horror Heroes. Je›erson, NC: McFarland, ¡99¡. _____. They Fought in the Creature Features: Interviews with 23 Classic Horror, Science Fiction and Serial Stars. Je›erson, NC : McFarland, ¡994. Willis, John, ed. Screen World. New York : Crown Publishers, ¡958–¡996.

OBITUARIES IN THE PERFORMING ARTS, 1999

Obituaries • 1999

6

Ackles, David Singer and actor David Ackles died of cancer in Pasadena, California, on March 2, 1999. He was 62. Ackles was born in Rock Island, Illinois, on February 20, 1937. He began performing in vaudeville at the age of four. In the late 1940s Ackles appeared as Tuck Worden in the Rusty film series, including Rusty Leads the Way (1948), My Dog Rusty (1948), Rusty’s Birthday (1949) and Rusty Saves a Life (1949). Ackles began writing television scripts in the 1960s, scripting episodes of the television comedy series The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis. He also got a song-writing contract with Elektra Records and recorded several albums including David Ackles, Subway to the Country and American Gothic. Ackles also wrote the 1981 tele-film Word of Honor. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 10, 1999, A15.

Joey Adams

David Ackles

Adams was a frequent guest on such television variety series as The Ed Sullivan Show and The Jackie Gleason Show, and appeared in a episode of the drama series Philco Television Playhouse. He also hosted the 1953 series Back That Fact. He was the author of over 20 books including From Gags to Riches (1946) and The Roast of the Town (1987). He also wrote a long running column, Just for Laughs, for the New York Post. Adams also appeared in several films during his career including Ringside (1945), Singing in the Dark (1956) and Don’t Worry, We’ll Think of a Title (1966). Los Angeles Times, Dec. 4, 1999, A22; New York Times, Dec. 3, 1999, C23; Time, Dec. 13, 1999, 33.

Adams, Joey Comedian and writer Joey Adams died of heart failure at a New York hospital on December 2, 1999. He was 88. Adams was born Joseph Abramowitz in Brooklyn on January 6, 1911. He began his career in vaudeville and was a popular performer in the Catskills. During the 1950s

Agronsky, Martin Television news correspondent Martin Agronsky died of congestive heart failure at his home in Washington, D.C. on July 25, 1999. He was 84. Agronsky was born in Philadelphia on

7

1999 • Obituaries

William Alfred

run. Hogan’s Goat was also adapted for television in 1971. Alfred’s other works include Cry for Us All (1970) and The Curse of an Aching Heart (1982). New York Times, May 22, 1999, c16.

Allan, Richard Martin Agronsky

January 12, 1915. He began working as a reporter after his graduation in 1936. He joined NBC as a correspondent in 1940. Over the next several decades he worked with the news departments of all three major networks and PBS. He was also known as one of the first innovators of the “talking heads” format of news reporting, when newsmen would discuss issues among themselves on the syndicated program Agronsky & Company from 1969 to 1987. Los Angeles Times, July 26, 1999, A18; New York Times, July 27, 1999, A17; Variety, Aug. 2, 1999, 44; Washington Post, July 26, 1999, B5.

Actor Richard Allan died of lung cancer in Louisville, Kentucky, on September 6, 1999. He was 76. Allan was born in Jacksonville, Illinois,

Alfred, William Playwright William Alfred died at his home in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on May 20, 1999. He was 76. Alfred was born in Brooklyn on August 16, 1922. He began writing verse plays in 1954 with Agamemnon. He was best known for his 1965 play Hogan’s Goat, which starred Faye Dunaway and Ralph Waite in its Off-Broadway

Richard Allan (with Marilyn Monroe in Niagara).

Obituaries • 1999 on June 22, 1923. He began his film career in the late 1940s with 20th Century–Fox. Allan danced with Esther Williams in the films Neptune’s Daughter (1949) and Duchess of Idaho (1950), and with Betty Grable in Wabash Avenue (1950), My Blue Heaven (1950) and Call Me Mister (1951). He was also featured in such films as The Frogmen (1951), The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1952) where he lured Ava Gardner from Gregory Peck with a sexy Spanish dance, Dreamboat (1952), Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952), With a Song in My Heart (1952), Niagara (1953) as Marilyn Monroe’s lover, The Egyptian (1954) and The Racers (1955). In the late 1950s Allan went to Germany, where he appeared in such films as …und Abends in die Scala (1958), Der Czardas-Konig (1958), Kleine Leute — Grosse Reise (1958) and The Rest Is Silence (1959). Allan subsequently returned to the United States where he teamed with Diane Hartman in a popular nightclub act.

Allen, David Special effects director David Allen died in Santa Ana, California, after a long fight with cancer on August 16, 1999. He was 54. Allen was born on October 22, 1944. He began working in films in the mid–1960s, doing stop motion animation effects for Clokey Studios’ Gumby and Davey and Goliath. Allen also worked in commercials, animating Mrs. Butterworth and the Pillsbury Doughboy. He provided effects for the 1967 independent horror film Equinox and worked on the 1970 Hammer prehistoric feature

David Allen

8 When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth. Allen also assisted with the 1972 cult classic Flesh Gordon. His other film credits include The Crater Lake Monster (1977), Laserblast (1977), Witches’ Brew (1979), The Howling (1980), The Day Time Ended (1980), the 1981 prehistoric comedy Caveman with Ringo Starr, Q (1982), White Dog (1982), The Hunger (1983), Twilight Zone — The Movie (1983), The Stuff (1985), Young Sherlock Holmes (1985), which earned him an Academy Award nomination, *batteries not included (1987), Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (1989), Enemies: A Love Story (1989), Ghostbusters II (1989) and Freaked (1993). Allen worked often on Charles Band’s Full Moon features from the 1980s, contributing to The Dungeonmaster (1984), Dolls (1987), Ghoulies II (1988), Puppet Master (1989), Puppet Master II (1990) which he also directed, Robot Jox (1990), Crash and Burn (1990), Puppet Master III: Toulon’s Revenge (1990), Subspecies (1991), Bride of Re-Animator (1991), Doctor Mordrid (1992), Robot Wars (1993), Prehysteria (1993), Beanstalk (1994), Oblivion (1994), Puppet Master V (1994), Prehysteria! 2 (1994), Galgameth (1996) and Backlash: Oblivion 2 (1996). Allen, who preferred to use stop-motion effects to computer-generated animation, continued to work on his long-term project, The Primevals, until the time of his death. Variety, Aug. 30, 1999, 166.

Allen, Rex Rex Allen, one of the last of the singing cowboy stars, died in a Tucson, Arizona, hospital after he was injured in his driveway when a friend and caregiver accidentally backed her Cadillac over him. He was 77. Allen was born in Willcox, Arizona, on December 31, 1922. He began his career as a singer on the radio in the late 1940s, performing on National Barn Dance. Allen made his film debut in Republic Pictures’ The Arizona Cowboy in 1950. He went on to star in over 30 films astride his horse, Ko-Ko, as a singing cowboy. Often accompanied by Slim Pickens or Buddy Ebsen, Allen’s film credits include Hills of Oklahoma (1950), Redwood Forest Trail (1950), Trail of Robin Hood (1950), Under Mexicali Stars (1950), Rodeo King and the Senorita (1951), Silver City Bonanza (1951), Thunder in God’s Country (1951), Utah Wagon Train (1951), Border Saddlemates (1952), Colorado Sundown

9

1999 • Obituaries

Allyn, William Film and television producer William Allyn died in Los Angeles of complications of heart disease on January 3, 1999. He was 71. Allyn began his career as a stage actor, appearing on Broadway in A Flag Is Born with Marlon Brando while still in his teens. Allyn began producing for television in the 1960s and was responsible for the popular Peyton Place television series. He also produced the tele-films The Last Child and And No One Could Save Her. He produced the popular 1981 film Rich and Famous and, in 1988, remade the 1975 French film Cousin, Cousine as Cousins. He was involved in a remake of the 1937 film Stage Door at the time of his death. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 8, 1999, B6; Variety, Feb. 1, 1999, 74.

Rex Allen

(1952), The Last Musketeer (1952), Old Oklahoma Plains (1952), South Pacific Trail (1952), Down Laredo Way (1953), Iron Mountain Trail (1953), Old Overland Trail (1953), Red River Shore (1953), Shadows of Tombstone (1953), The Phantom Stallion (1954), For the Love of Mike (1960) and Tomboy and the Champ (1961). Allen also starred as Dr. Bill Baxter in the western television series Frontier Doctor in 1958. He was also seen on television in episodes of The Red Skelton Show and The Men from Shiloh, and was an occasional host of Five Star Jubilee in 1961. He also had several hit songs including “Crying in the Chapel” and “Don’t Go Near the Indians.” From the 1960s Allen was narrator of numerous Walt Disney wildlife films including The Legend of Lobo (1962), Charlie, the Lonesome Cougar (1967), Vanishing Wilderness (1974) and The Secret of Navajo Cave (1976). Allen also narrated 1963’s The Incredible Journey and the 1973 animated classic Charlotte’s Web. He continued to make personal appearances in the 1970s and 1980s. His survivors include his son, country music star Rex Allen, Jr. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 19, 1999, A18; New York Times, Dec. 19, 1999, 67; People, Jan. 1, 2000, 105; Variety, Jan. 3, 2000, 90.

Alyn, Kirk Kirk Alyn, the actor who first brought Superman to the screen in the 1948 serial, died in a hospital near his home in The Woodlands, Texas, on March 14, 1999. He was 88. Alyn was born John Feggo, Jr., in Oxford, New Jersey, on October 8, 1910. He began his career on the vaudeville stage in New York. He went to Hollywood

Kirk Alyn (as Superman).

Obituaries • 1999 to begin a film career in the early 1940s, shortly after his friend, comic Red Skelton, had made the move. Alyn met actress and dancer Virginia O’Brien, whom he married in 1942. The couple divorced 12 years later. Alyn appeared in supporting roles in such films as You Were Never Lovelier (1942), Lucky Jordan (1942), Pistol Packin’ Mama (1943), Overland Mail Robbery (1943), Mystery Broadcast (1943), The Man from Rio Grande (1943), A Guy Named Joe (1943), The Girl Who Dared (1944), Four Jills in a Jeep (1944), Forty Thieves (1944), Call of the Rockies (1944), Once Upon a Time (1944), The Time of Their Lives (1946) and The Trap (1947). Alyn co-starred with Lorna Gray (aka Adrian Booth) in the 1946 Republic serial The Daughter of Don Q. He was best known for his role two years later as Daily Planet reporter Clark Kent and his alter ego in Columbia’s Superman serial. Noel Neill co-starred as fellow reporter Lois Lane and Carol Forman was the villainous Spider Lady. Alyn reprised his role as the “Man of Steel” in 1950’s Atom Man vs. Superman, this time facing Lyle Talbot as the evil Lex Luthor. Alyn also had leading roles in the serials Federal Agents vs. Underworld, Inc. (1949) and Radar Patrol vs. Spy King (1950), and starred as another comic book hero, Blackhawk, in 1952. He also had small roles in several films including Bride of Vengeance (1949), Gambling House (1950) and When Worlds Collide (1951). Alyn left Hollywood to return to the New York stage in the early 1950s. He appeared in various Broadway productions and made numerous commercials. Alyn became a popular figure on the nostalgia circuit in the 1970s, appearing at conventions and on college campuses. He and his serial co-star, Noel Neill, were given small roles as the young Lois Lane’s parents on the train in the 1978 Superman film starring Christopher Reeves. Alyn also played a small role in Fred Olen Ray’s 1983 horror film Scalps. Alyn had been in poor health for the past several years. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 17, 1999, A14; New York Times, Mar. 20, 1999, C16; People, May 5, 1999, 131.

Angel, Daniel British film producer Daniel Angel died in London on December 13, 1999. He was 88. Angel was born in England on May 14, 1911. He was

10

Daniel Angel

crippled with polio while serving in the British army in 1942. Paralyzed from the waist down, Angel learned to walk with crutches. He produced three short films about his recovery —All the King’s Horses, All the King’s Men and All the King’s Music. Angel continued in films, producing such features as Murder at the Windmill (1949), Miss Pilgrim’s Progress (1950), The Body Said No! (1950), Mr. Drake’s Duck (1951), Another Man’s Poison (1952), Break to Freedom (1953), The Sea Shall Not Have Them (1954), Escapade (1955), Reach for the Sky (1956) about the life of British aviator Douglas Bader, The Beast of Marseilles (1957), Cast a Dark Shadow (1957), The Sheriff of Fractured Jaw (1958), Carve Her Name with Pride (1958) and We Joined the Navy (1962). Angel’s movement was again restricted to a wheelchair in 1971. He produced his final film, The Romantic Englishman, starring Michael Caine and Glenda Jackson, in 1975. Times (of London), Dec. 17, 1999, 27a.

Archer, John Actor John Archer died of lung cancer in Redmond, Washington, on December 5, 1999. He was 84. Archer was born Ralph Bowman in Osceola, Nebraska, on May 8, 1915. He began his career by winning an RKO contract on the Gateway to Hollywood radio program in 1938. He and co-winner Alice Eden appeared together in the 1939 film Contract. Over the next decade he appeared in numerous films including Letter of Introduction (1938), Flaming Frontiers (1938), Dick Tracy Returns (1938), Overland Stage Raiders

11

1999 • Obituaries Man’s Woman (1955), Emergency Hospital (1956), Rock Around the Clock (1956), She Devil (1957), Decision at Sundown (1957), Affair in Reno (1957), Three Brave Men (1957), Ten Thousand Bedrooms (1957) and City of Fear (1959. He was also seen often on television in episodes of such series as Your Show Times, Science Fiction Theatre, Suspense, Cheyenne, Perry Mason, Man and the Challenge, The Californians, Zane Grey Theatre, Broken Arrow, Laramie, Riverboat, Colt .45, Tales of Wells Fargo, Wagon Train, The Twilight Zone, The Tall Man, Bonanza, Maverick, Temple Houston, Batman and The Virginian. He co-starred with Elvis Presley in 1961’s Blue Hawaii, and appeared in the films Apache Rifles (1964), William Castle’s I Saw What You Did (1965) and How to Frame a Figg (1971). He also appeared in several tele-films in the 1970s including Columbo: Requiem for a Falling Star (1974), Thursday’s Game (1974) and Amelia Earhart (1976).

John Archer

(1938), Barnyard Follies (1940), Curtain Call (1940), Scattergood Baines (1941), Paper Bullets (1941), Mountain Moonlight (1941), City of Missing Girls (1941), Cheers for Miss Bishop (1941), King of the Zombies (1941), Scattergood Survives a Murder (1942), Hi, Neighbor (1942), Bowery at Midnight (1942), Police Bullets (1942), Shantytown (1943), The Purple V (1943), Guadalcanal Diary (1943), Hello, Frisco, Hello (1943), Sherlock Holmes in Washington (1943), Crash Dive (1943), The Eve of St. Mark (1944), I’ll Remember April (1945), The Lost Moment (1947), White Heat (1949) with James Cagney, Colorado Territory (1949), High Lonesome (1950) and The Great Jewel Robbery (1950). Throughout the 1940 Archer also continued to work in radio. His voice was heard weekly as the announcer for The Shadow, asking “Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?” in 1944 and 1945. He was also featured in the radio drama The FBI in Peace and War and the soap opera Amanda of Honeymoon Hill. Archer starred as Jim Barnes in George Pal’s 1950 science fiction classic Destination Moon. He continued to appear regularly on screen during the 1950s in such films as Santa Fe (1951), Best of the Badmen (1951), My Favorite Spy (1951), A Yank in Indochina (1952), Sea Tiger (1952), Rodeo (1952), The Big Trees (1952), Sound Off (1952), The Stars Are Singing (1953), Dragon’s Gold (1954), No

Armitage, Graham British actor Graham Armitage died at his home in South Africa on March 6, 1999. He was 63. Armitage was born in Manchester, England in 1935. He began his career on stage at an early age. He was best known on film for his role as King Louis XIII in Ken Russell’s The Devils in 1971. Armitage also appeared in three other films directed by Russell including The Music Lovers (1971), The Boy Friend (1971) and Strauss. His other film credits include The Fiction Makers (1967), Crime of Defeat (1969), The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970), Games That Lovers Play (1970), Take Me High (1973), Spanish Fly (1975), Zulu Dawn (1979), A Game for Vultures (1979), Ajen and the Lost City (1987), My African Adventure (1987), Oddball Hall (1990), Kickboxer 5 (1994), Fleshtone (1994) and Cry, the Beloved Country (1995). Armitage appeared on British television in such series as The Naked Civil Servant, The Avengers, Doctor Who, The Saint and My Partner, the Ghost. He was also seen in the 1984 mini-series Shaka Zulu. After moving to South African Armitage often directed and performed in stage productions. He was starred as Sherlock Holmes on radio for over five years. Variety, Apr. 5, 1999, 158.

Obituaries • 1999

Armstrong, William H. Writer William H. Armstrong died at his home in Kent, Connecticut, on April 11, 1999. He was 87. Armstrong was best known for writing the novel Sounder, about a black sharecropper community in the Shenandoah valley. The novel received the Newberry Medal in 1970 and was adapted into a film starring Cicely Tyson in 1972. Armstrong also wrote the novels Sour Land, The MacLeod Place and The Mills of God. New York Times, Apr. 25, 1999, 47.

12 appearing in such films as Red Angel (Akai Tenshi) (1966). He was also a leading Japanese television performer.

Askey, Anthea British actress Anthea Askey died of cancer in England on February 28, 1999. She was 65. She was born on March 2, 1933, the daughter of British comedian Arthur Askey. She began performing on stage and the BBC radio before making her television debut with her father in Before Your Very Eyes in the 1950s. She also appeared in the television series Dickie Henderson Half Hour in the early 1960s. Ms. Askey was featured in a couple of films in the 1950s including The Love Match (1955) and Ramsbottom Rides Again (1956). She continued to perform on stage until shortly before her death.

William H. Armstrong

Ashida, Shinsuke Japanese actor Shinsuke Ashida died in a Tokyo hospital of liver cancer on January 9, 1999. He was 81. Ashida began his career on stage in Japanese-controlled Manchuria in the late 1930s. He became a popular action film performer in the 1950s and 1960s with the Nikkatsu company,

Anthea Askey

13

1999 • Obituaries

Atlas, Jack Film publicist Jack Atlas died at his home in West Los Angeles on February 26, 1999. He was 81. Atlas began working with MGM’s publicity department in the late 1930s. He was a pioneer in the development of movie trailers and previews. He continued to work with MGM until 1960, when he moved to Columbia as vice president of promotions. He remained there until 1973 when he formed the Atlas Organization, which made film trailers and previews for Ted Turner’s television productions. Atlas retired in 1983. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 3, 1999, A15.

Avallone, Michael Writer Michael Avallone died of heart failure at his Los Angeles home on February 26, 1999. He was 74. Avallone was born on October 27, 1924. He began writing in the mid–1940s and was best known for his series of detective novels featuring the private eye character Ed Noon. The series began with The Tall Dolores in 1953 and continued through his final novel, High Noon at Midnight, in 1988. Avallone wrote over 200 other books during his career. He authored original novels based on the popular television series The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Partridge Family and Hawaii Five-O. He also wrote the novelizations for the films Beneath the Planet of the Apes and Shock Corridor. Avallone’s other works include horror stories, westerns and children’s mysteries. He often wrote under such pseudonyms as Mark Dane and Steve Michaels, and authored Gothic romances under the name Edwina Noone. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 1, 1999, A14; New York Times, Mar. 1, 1999, A18; Variety, Mar. 8, 1999, 75.

Axton, Hoyt Actor and singer Hoyt Axton died of complications from a heart attack at his ranch home in Victor, Montana, on October 26, 1999. Axton had suffered a crippling stroke three years earlier and had been confined to a wheelchair since that

Hoyt Axton

time. He was 61. Axton was born in Duncan, Oklahoma, on March 25, 1938. His mother, Mae Boren Axton, was the writer of Elvis Presley’s hit song “Heartbreak Hotel.” Hoyt began singing folksongs in San Francisco clubs in the late 1950s. He penned numerous songs including such hits as Three Dog Night’s “Joy to the World,” “Steppenwolf ’s “The Pusher,” which was heard in the 1969 film Easy Rider, and Ringo Starr’s “No Song.” He also began acting in the mid–1960s, appearing on television in episodes of Bonanza, Iron Horse and I Dream of Jeannie. He also appeared in he 1966 film Smokey. The burly Axton was a well known character actor from the late 1970s appearing in the films The Black Stallion (1979), Cloud Dancer (1980), Liar’s Moon (1981), Junkman (1982), Endangered Species (1982), Heart Like a Wheel (1983), Deadline Autotheft (1983), The Black Stallion Returns (1983), Gremlins (1984), Retribution (1988), Dixie Lanes (1988), We’re No Angels (1989), Disorganized Crime (1989), Alien Invasion (1990), Harmony Cats (1993), Season of Change(1994), Number One Fan (1995) and King Cobra (1998). He starred as Cactus Jack Slade in the 1983 television series The Rousters and was Rip Steele in the short-lived sitcom Domestic Life in 1984. He also appeared in the tele-films Dallas: The Early Years (1986), Act of Vengeance (1986), Guilty of Innocence: The Lenell Geter Story (1987), Christmas Comes to

Obituaries • 1999

14

Willow Creek (1987), Desperado: Avalanche at Devil’s Ridge (1988), Buried Alive (1990), Doorways (1993) and Kingfish: A Story of Huey P. Long (1995). His other television credits include episodes of McCloud, The Bionic Woman, Faerie Tale Theatre’s production of Goldilocks and the Three Bears, the D5B — Steel Collar Man pilot, WKRP in Cincinnati and Murder, She Wrote. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 27, 1999, A3; New York Times, Oct. 27, 1999, A25; People, Nov. 15, 1999, 69; Time, Nov. 8, 1999, 33; Variety, Nov. 1, 1999, 105.

Baba, Shohei “Giant” Japanese professional wrestler Giant Baba died of liver failure in a Tokyo hospital on January 31, 1999. He was 61. Shohei Baba was born in the Niigata Prefecture on January 23, 1938. He made his wrestling debut in Japan in 1960. He was billed as 6 foot, 9 inches, and over 280 pounds. His large size made him a leading attraction at wrestling events in Japan. Baba briefly held the NWA World title on three occasions in 1974, 1979 and 1980. Baba founded All Japan Pro Wrestling Co. in 1972. He remained president of the company and continued to perform in the ring up until his death.

Shohei “Giant” Baba

Robin Bailey

Bailey, Robin British character actor Robin Bailey died in London of respiratory failure on January 15, 1999. He was 79. Bailey was born in Hucknall, Nottingham, England, on October 5, 1919. He appeared in numerous British films from the 1940s including Private Angelo (1949), Portrait of Clare (1951), His Excellency (1952), Folly to Be Wise (1952), Sailor of the King (1953), Just My Luck (1957), Hell Drivers (1957), Another Time, Another Place (1958), The Mouse on the Moon (1963), Having a Wild Weekend (1965), The Whisperers (1966), Danger Route (1968), See No Evil (1971), The Gathering Storm (1974), If You Go Down in the Woods Today (1981), Screamtime (1983), Jane and the Lost City (1987) and Number 27 (1988). He was also a popular performer on British television, starring in the 1963 mini-series Dimension of Fear and 1965’s The Newcomers as Andrew Kerr. He also appeared in the 1973 mini-series Lord Peter Wimsey: Murder Must Advertise and was featured as Uncle Mort in 1975’s I Didn’t Know You Cared. Bailey appeared in the 1977 tele-film The Four Feathers and starred in the comedy series Potter from 1983 to 1984. He was also featured in the tele-films Tales from Hollywood (1992) and Dalziel and Pascoe: An Autumn Shroud. His other television credits include episodes of The Adventures of Robin Hood, Upstairs, Downstairs, Rumpole of the Bailey, U.F.O., The Gay Cavalier, Redcap, Man in the Suitcase and KYTV. Times (of London), Jan. 18, 1999, 23a.

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1999 • Obituaries

Paul Baillargeon (third from right, with brothers).

Baillargeon, Paul Canadian professional wrestler Paul Baillargeon died on October 17, 1999. He was 78. He was one of six brothers who wrestled in Canada during the 1940s and 1950s. Often teaming with one of his brothers, he held several tag team titles in Canada and with the NWA in the United States in the 1950s. The 6'3", 240 pound wrestler was billed as one of the strongest men alive. He was said to be able to climb a telephone pole with a horse strapped to his back. Baillargeon later retired from the ring to open a hotel in Canada.

Baker, Kenny British jazz trumpeter Kenny Baker died in Chicester, England, on December 7, 1999. He was 78. Baker was born in Yorkshire, England, on March 1, 1921. He came from a musical family and was performing at an early age. He played with several big bands in London from the late 1930s and joined the Royal Air Force Fighter Command band during World War II. He joined Ted Heath’s Orchestra after the war, composing the popular song “Bakerloo Non-Stop” for the band. Baker was featured in the 1953 British comedy Genevieve with Kay Kendall and Kenneth More. He also composed the score and appeared on screen as the bandleader in the 1954 film Face the Music. He appeared regularly on the BBC series Let’s Settle for Music, leading the studio band, Kenny Baker’s Dozen, from 1951 to 1959. Baker continued to perform over the next three decades, appearing with such musicians as Gerry Mulli-

Kenny Baker

gan and Benny Goodman. He recorded the album, The Boss Is Home, in 1994. Times (of London), Dec. 10, 1999, 29a.

Balkan, Adele Costume designer Adele Balkan died of cancer in Los Angeles on November 20, 1999. She was 92. Balkan began her career in the 1940s, designing costumes for such films as Bodyguard (1948), The Arizona Ranger (1948), The Boy with Green Hair (1948), Mighty Joe Young (1949), They Live by Night (1949), Seven Cities of Gold (1955), The Ten Commandments (1956), The Way to the Gold (1957), Three Brave Men (1957), The Fiend Who Walked the West (1958), The Young Lions (1958), the 1958 horror classic The Fly, Blue Denim (1959), The Blue Angel (1959), Flaming Star (1960) with Elvis Presley, The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965) and John Goldfarb, Please Come Home (1965). She retired in 1972. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 26, 1999, A54.

Ball, Warren Character actor Warren “Bob” Ball died of a heart attack in his car near Hollywood on December 17, 1999. He was 60. Ball was best known for his roles on stage, appearing on Broadway in a production of The Caine Mutiny Court Martial.

Obituaries • 1999 He also appeared often in regional productions. He appeared in several films in the 1960s and 1970s including The Harem Bunch (1968), The Corpse Grinders (1972) and Big Apple Birthday (1978).

Bannen, Ian Scottish actor Ian Bannen was killed in a car crash near Loch Ness, Scotland, on November 3, 1999. He was 71. Bannen was born in Airdrie, Lanarkshire, Scotland, on June 29, 1928. He began his career on stage in the late 1940s and joined the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1951. He was featured as Macduff in a television production of Macbeth in 1954. He made his feature film debut two years later and was seen in such movies as The Long Arm (1956), Private’s Progress (1956), Miracle in Soho (1957), The Birthday Present (1957), The Yangtse Incident (1957), She Didn’t Say No! (1958), Behind the Mask (1958), A Tale of Two Cities (1958), Carlton-Browne of the F.O. (1959), Suspect (1960), A French Mistress (1960), Macbeth (1961), On Friday at Eleven (1961), Station Six Sahara (1963), Psyche ’59 (1964), Rotten to the Core (1965), Mister Moses (1965) with Robert Mitchum, The Hill (1965) with Sean Connery, The Flight of the Phoenix (1965) which earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor, Penelope (1966), The Sailor from Gibraltar (1967), Lock Up Your Daughters! (1969), Too Late the Hero (1970), Fright (1971), The Deserter (1971), Doomwatch (1972), From Beyond the Grave (1973), The Offence (1973), The Mackintosh (1973), The Gathering Storm (1974) as Adolf Hitler, The Driver’s Seat (1974), The Voyage

16 (1974), Bite the Bullet (1975), Sweeney! (1977), Counterfeit Commandos (1977), Ring of Darkness (1979), The Watcher in the Woods (1980), Night Crossing (1981), Eye of the Needle (1981), Gandhi (1982), The Prodigal (1983), Gorky Park (1983), Defence of the Realm (1985), Lamb (1986), Hope and Glory (1987), The Courier (1988), Witch Story (1989), George’s Island (1989), Ghost Dad (1990), Circles in a Forest (1990), The Big Man (1990), Speaking of the Devil (1991), The Gamble (1991), Fatale (1992), A Pin for the Butterfly (1994) and Braveheart (1995) as the leper Lord Allandale. Bannen received acclaim for playing aging Irish con artist Jackie O’Shea in the popular 1998 film Waking Ned Devine (1998). His final performances were seen in Something to Believe In (1998), To Walk with Lions (1999), The Testimony of Taliesin Jones (1999) and Best (1999) as Sir Matt Busby. Bannen also appeared on television as Jim Prideaux in the 1980 mini-series adaptation of John LeCarre’s Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy and was Dr. Alexander Cameron in the Doctor Finlay television series in 1993. He was also featured in such tele-films and mini-series as Jane Eyre (1970), Won’t Write Home Mom — I’m Dead (1975), Death in Deep Water (1976), Jesus of Nazareth (1977), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1981), The Lady and the Highwayman (1989), Perry Mason: The Case of the Desperate Deception (1990), Ashenden (1991), Uncle Vanya (1991), Common Pursuit (1992), Alexander Bell: The Sound and the Silence (1993), Measure for Measure (1994), The Politician’s Wife (1995) and Original Sin (1996). His other television credits include episodes of Orson Welles’ Great Mysteries and Ray Bradbury Theatre. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 4, 1999, B7; New York Times, Nov. 4, 1999, B15; People, Nov. 22, 1999, 177; Time, Nov. 15, 1999, 35; Variety, Nov. 8, 1999, 52.

Baron, Alexander

Ian Bannen

British television writer and novelist Alexander Baron died on December 5, 1999. He was 82. Baron was born on December 4, 1917. He began writing after serving in the infantry during World War II. His first novel, From the City, based on his wartime experiences, was published in 1948. Baron subsequently wrote a second novel based on the war, There’s No Home (1950), and a collection of short stories, The Human Kind

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1999 • Obituaries

Alexander Baron

(1953), which was adapted into a film, The Victors, in 1963. He also wrote the historical novels Golden Princess (1954) and Queen of the East (1956). Baron also scripted several films including Robbery Under Arms (1957), Four Desperate Men (1959) and The Siege of Sidney Street (1960). He also continued to write such novels as King Dido (1969), Gentle Folk (1976) and Franco Is Dying (1977). During the 1970s and 1980s Baron adapted numerous literary works as mini-series for British television. His credits include Poldark II (1978), A Horseman Riding By (1978), Jane Eyre (1983), Sense and Sensibility (1985), Oliver Twist (1985) and Vanity Fair (1987). Times (of London), Dec. 8, 1999, 25a.

Barr, Robert British television writer Robert Barr died in London on January 30, 1999. He was 89. Barr was born in Glasgow, Scotland, on December 22, 1909. He began his career as a journalist and was a BBC war correspondent during World War II. He remained in television after the war, producing such documentaries as Report on Germany.

Robert Barr

He began writing dramatic scripts in the 1950s, working on such British series as Pilgrim Street, Medico, Spycatcher, Moonstrike, Maigret, Z Cars and Spy Trap. He also created the series Gazette and Hadleigh for Yorkshire TV in the 1970s. Times (of London), Feb. 9, 1999, 19a.

Bart, Lionel Composer Lionel Bart died of cancer in London on April 3, 1999. He was 68. Bart was born on August 1, 1930. He began writing musicals in the late 1950s, producing Fings Ain’t Wot They Used t’Be and Lock Up Your Daughters in 1959. He had a major success the following year with the musical Oliver!, based on Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist. It was released in 1960 to great success, earning Bart a Tony Award for the music and lyrics. There were successful revivals in 1967 and 1977 and a film version was made by Carol Reed in 1968. Subsequent musicals were not as successful, including Blitz! (1962), Maggie May (1964) and Lionel (1977). Bart also composed scores and songs for several films including In the

Obituaries • 1999

18 ber. Beck was also a founding member of the Writers Guild of America. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 21, 1999, A24.

Bedford, Patrick Actor Patrick Bedford died of cancer in a Manhattan hospital on November 20, 1999. He was 67. Bedford was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1932. He came to the United States in the mid– 1960s and appeared on the Broadway stage. He was nominated to a Tony award for his performance in the 1966 play Philadelphia, Here I Come! The following year he starred with Sandy Dennis in the film version of Up the Down Staircase. He was also featured in Orson Welles’ Chimes at Midnight, which was released in 1967 as Falstaff. He appeared on stage in numerous productions during his career and also appeared with Sean Connery in the 1976 film The Next Man. He appeared on television in the 1960s in episodes of Redcap and Counterstrike. New York Times, Dec. 15, 1999, B13. Lionel Bart

Nick (1960), Black Beauty (1971), The Optimists (1973) and the 1973 musical tele-film version of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde starring Kirk Douglas. Bart also wrote the title song for the 1963 James Bond film From Russia With Love. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 4, 1999, B5; New York Times, Apr. 5, 1999, A19; Times (of London), Apr. 5, 1999, 23a; Variety, Apr. 12, 1999, 75.

Beck, George Screenwriter George Beck died in Los Angeles on October 6, 1999. He was 92. Beck was born in New York City in 1907. He began his career in films as an actor, appearing in the 1936 movie Unlucky Jim. Beck soon turned to writing, creating the stories for the films There Goes My Girl (1937), Forgotten Girls (1940), and Hired Wife (1940) and Take a Letter, Darling (1942), both starring Rosalind Russell. Beck also scripted and directed 1951’s Behave Yourself. He wrote the story and served as associate producer for Bob Hope’s 1966 film Boy, Did I Get a Wrong Num-

Benedict, Billy Character actor William “Billy” Benedict, who was best known as Whitey in the Bowery Boys films, died following heart surgery at a Los Angeles hospital on November 25, 1999. He was 82. Benedict was born in Haskell, Oklahoma, on April 16, 1917. He made his film debut in the mid–1930s, playing numerous small parts. Benedict was featured in such films as Your Uncle Dudley (1935), Way Down East (1935), Steamboat ’Round the Bend (1935), Show Them No Mercy! (1935), The Farmer Takes a Wife (1935), Doubting Thomas (1935), College Scandal (1936), Three Kids and a Queen (1935), Theodora Goes Wild (1936), Meet Nero Wolfe (1936), The Witness Chair (1936), The County Doctor (1936), Ramona (1936), M’Liss (1936), Crack-Up (1936), Libeled Lady (1936), Tim Tyler’s Luck (1937), Tramp Trouble (1937), That I May Live (1937), They Wanted to Marry (1937), Rhythm in the Clouds (1937), The Last Gangster (1937), Laughing at Trouble (1937), Love in a Bungalow (1937), Young Fugitives (1938), Walking Down Broadway (1938), Bringing Up Baby (1938), King of the Newsboys (1938), Hold

19

William Benedict

That Co-ed (1938), There’s Always a Woman (1938), Newsboys’ Home (1939), Little Tough Guys in Society (1938) as Trouble, Man of Conquest (1939), Call a Messenger (1939), Code of the Streets (1939), Timber Stampede (1939), Stage to Chino (1940), Second Chorus (1940), Rhythm on the River (1940), Prairie Law (1930), Legion of the Lawless (1940), Lucky Partners (1940), Give Us Wings (1940), The Young People (1940), My Little Chickadee (1940), the 1940 serial Adventures of Red Ryder, Melody Ranch (1940), Jesse James at Bay (1941), The Mad Doctor (1941), Tuxedo Junction (1941), In Old Cheyenne (1941), The Great Mr. Nobody (1941), The Confessions of Boston Blackie (1941), Citadel of Crime (1941), Bowery Boy (1941), the 1941 serial Adventures of Captain Marvel as Whitey Murphy, Dressed to Kill (1941), Unholy Partners (1941), Wildcat (1942), Rings on Her Fingers (1942), On the Sunny Side (1942), Lady in a Jam (1942), the 1942 serials Perils of Nyoka and Junior G-Men of the Air, Home in Wyomin’ (1942), The Glass Key (1942), Get Hep to Love (1942), The Talk of the Town (1942), Clancy Street Boys (1943), Moonlight in Vermont (1943), Aerial Gunner (1943), Adventures of the Flying Cadets (1943), Hangmen Also Die (1943), The Ox-Bow Incident (1943), Thank Your Lucky Stars (1943) and Whispering Footsteps (1943). He made his debut with the East Side Kids playing Skinny Benny in 1943’s Ghosts on the Loose (aka The East Side Kids Meet

1999 • Obituaries Bela Lugosi). Benedict’s credits also include The Whistler (1944), They Live in Fear (1944), That’s My Baby (1944), I Won’t Play (1944), Goodnight Sweetheart (1944), Million Dollar Kid (1944), Cover Girl (1944), Follow the Boys (1944), Follow the Leader (1944), The Lady and the Monster (1944), Block Busters (1944), Janie (1944), Bowery Champs (1944), Patrick the Great (1945), Docks of New York (1945), Brenda Starr, Reporter (1945), Hollywood and Vine (1945), The Story of G.I. Joe (1945), Mr. Muggs Rides Again (1945), Come Out Fighting (1945), Road to Utopia (1946), No Leave, No Love (1946), Do You Love Me (1946), A Boy, a Girl and a Dog (1946), The Kid from Brooklyn (1946), Without Reservation (1946), The Pilgrim Lady (1947), The Hucksters (1947) and Secret Service Investigator (1948). He joined Leo Gorcey, Huntz Hall and the rest of the Bowery Boys as Whitey in the mid–1940s, appearing with them in Spook Busters (1946), Live Wires (1946), In Fast Company (1946), Bowery Bombshell (1946), Mr. Hex (1946), Hard Boiled Mahoney (1947), News Hounds (1947), Bowery Buckaroos (1947), Trouble Makers (1948), Smugglers’ Cove (1948), Angels’ Alley (1948), Jinx Money (1948), Fighting Fools (1949), Hold That Baby! (1949), Angels in Disguise (1949), Master Minds (1949), Triple Trouble (1950), Lucky Losers (1950), Blonde Dynamite (1950), Blues Busters (1950), Bowery Battalion (1951), Ghost Chasers (1951), Let’s Go Navy! (1951) and Crazy Over Horses (1951). Benedict continued his career as a character actor after leaving the Bowery Boys. He was featured in such films as The Magnetic Monster (1953), The Killing (1956), Ed Wood’s Bride of the Monster (1956), Rally ’Round the Flag, Boys! (1958), Lover Come Back (1961), Big Daddy (1965), The Hallelujah Trail (1965), What Am I Bid? (1967), Hello, Dolly! (1969), The Dirt Game (1972), The Sting (1973), Homebodies (1974), Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976) and Born Again (1978). Benedict was featured as Willie Trankis on the television sit-com Petticoat Junction in 1963. His other television credits include the tele-films The Over-the-Hill Gang (1969), Call Her Mom (1972), Adventures of Nick Carter (1972), The Big Rip-Off (1974), The Girl on the Late, Late Show (1974), Cop on the Beat (1975), Sherlock Holmes in New York (1976), The Last Hurrah (1977) and Computercide (1982). He also appeared in episodes of numerous series including The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok, Perry Mason, Tales of Wells Fargo, The

Obituaries • 1999 Rifleman, The Twilight Zone, Branded, I Dream of Jeannie, Gunsmoke, Hondo, The Monkees, The Big Valley, The Brady Bunch, Land of the Giants, The Guns of Will Sonnett, Alias Smith and Jones, Here’s Lucy, The Immortal, All in the Family, Mission: Impossible, Ark II, Man from Atlantis, The Incredible Hulk, Charlie’s Angels, The Streets of San Francisco, The Dukes of Hazzard, Little House on the Prairie, Highway to Heaven and Hill Street Blues. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 29, 1999, B8; New York Times, Nov. 30, 1999, B13; Variety, Dec. 13, 1999, 121.

Bennewitz, Rick Television director Rick Bennewitz died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on January 9, 1999. He was 62. Bennewitz was born in Kansas in 1936. He settled in Los Angeles in the 1960s, working as a cameraman at a local television station. He received an Emmy Award for directing The Andersonville Trial for PBS’ Hollywood Television Theater. He also directed the American Playhouse production of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof starring Tommy Lee Jones and co-directed Pippin with Bob Fosse in 1981. He was director of numerous episodes of the Land of the Lost children’s adventure series in the mid–1970s. Bennewitz subsequently directed numerous daytime soap operas including The Young and the Restless, Santa Barbara and General Hospital. He received two more Emmy Awards for his work on Sunset Beach in recent years. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 15, 1999, B6; Variety, Jan. 25, 1999, 87.

20 MGM and Columbia. He served as executive producer on the television series Hart to Hart and In the Heat of the Night. He also produced the tele-films Harpy (1970), Hunters Are for Killing (1970), The Brotherhood of the Bell (1970), The Eyes of Charles Sand (1972), Shirts/Skins (1973), Honky Tonk (1974), Woman of the Year (1976), Contract on Cherry Street (1977), A Fire in the Sky (1978), The Dream Merchants (1980), Goliath Awaits (1981), Louis L’Amour’s The Shadow Riders (1982), The Other Lover (1985), Daughter of the Streets (1990), Back to Hannibal: The Return of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn (1990), Danielle Steel’s Changes (1991), Shadow of a Stranger (1992), Danielle Steel’s Missing from Nam (1993), Liz: The Elizabeth Taylor Story (1995) and A Season of Hope (1995). Los Angeles Times, Nov. 2, 1999, A24; Variety, Nov. 1, 1999, 105.

Bentley, Muriel Ballet dancer Muriel Bentley died of heart failure and complications from asthma at a Woodland Hills, California, hospital on March 8, 1999. She was 82. Bentley was born in New York in 1916. She danced with Jose Greco’s company and the Fokine Ballet before joining the American Ballet Theatre in the 1940s. She was best known for her roles in Jerome Robbins’ works including Fancy Free and Interplay. She was also noted for performances in Agnes De Mille’s Fall River Legend and Antony Tudor’s Pillar of Fire. She performed with Robbins’ Ballets: USA from 1959, appearing in productions of Moves, Events and The Concert. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 12, 1999, A22; New York Times, Mar. 14, 1999, 48.

Benson, Hugh Television producer Hugh Benson died of cancer in Reseda, California, on October 28, 1999. He was 82. Benson was born in New York City on September 7, 1917. He worked as a publicist in Manhattan before going to Hollywood in 1955 to head Warner’s publicity department. He became executive assistant to Warner television producer William T. Orr the following year. He remained with Warner until the early 1970s. Benson subsequently worked with Screen Gems,

Berggren, Wes Rock musician Wes Berggren was found dead in his Dallas, Texas, apartment on October 27, 1999. He was 28. Berggren was pianist and guitarist for Tripping Daisy, a psychedelic rock group. His fellow band members included Mark Pirro on bass, Tim DeLaughter on guitar, Ben Curtis on drums and Phil Karnats on guitar and trumpet. The band’s 1995 single “I Got a

21

1999 • Obituaries

Muriel Bentley

Girl” was a pop hit. Albums include “I Am an Elastic Firecracker” and “Jesus Hits Like the Atom Bomb.”

Bergman, Mary Kay Leading voice actor Mary Kay Bergman was found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to her head at her home in Los Angeles on November 11, 1999. She was 38. Bergman was born on June 5, 1961. Bergman began her career doing radio commercials in the mid–1980s. She was best

Wes Berggren

known for voicing most of the female characters on the South Park television series and the 1999 animated feature film South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut. She was heard as such characters as Sheila Broflovski, Mrs. Cartman, Wendy Testaburger, Mayor McDaniels and Principal Victoria. Bergman had roles in numerous animated series including Captain Planet and the Planeteers, Beauty and the Beast, The Funtastic Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor, The Twisted Adventures of Felix the Cat, Rugrats and Family Dog. She was also heard

Obituaries • 1999

22

Mary Kay Bergman (Fox Kids).

in the films Scooby Doo on Zombie Island (1998) and Scooby Doo and the Witch’s Ghost (1999) as Daphne, and was Barbara Gordon and Batgirl in 1998’s Batman and Mr. Freeze: Sub Zero. Her other film credits include Beauty and the Beast (1991), Annie: A Royal Adventure (1995), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996), Hercules (1997), Annabelle’s Wish (1997), Mulan (1998) and The Iron Giant (1999). She was seen in several television series including Walker, Texas Ranger, Touched by an Angel and Promised Land. She also voiced characters for numerous video games including Leisure Suit Larry, Goosebumps: Attack of the Mutant, The Curse of Monkey Island, South Park and Star Wars Episode I — The Phantom Menace. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 21, 1999, B5; New York Times, Nov. 25, 1999, C17; Time, Nov. 29, 1999, 29; Variety, Nov. 22, 1999, 95.

Berle, Phil Phil Berle, the older brother of comedian Milton Berle, died in Tampa, Florida, on January 2, 1999. He was 97. Berle was born Phil Berlinger in New York in 1901. He began working in show business as a booking agent for vaudeville acts in the 1920s. He subsequently became the manager of singer Rudy Vallee and was also instrumental in furthering the careers of The Three Stooges. He produced and directed the

Phil Berle

Stooges original television pilot, Jack of All Trades, for ABC in 1949. Berle also appeared as an extra in several films including 1980’s Hollywood Knights. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 6, 1999, A14; Variety, Jan. 11, 1999, 124.

Bernhardt, Steven Film producer and writer Steven Bernhardt died of cancer at his Los Angeles home on August 23, 1999. He was 62. Bernhardt, the son of famed director Curtis Bernhardt, was born in Los Angeles in 1937. He began working in films as an assistant to Charles Bloch after graduating from UCLA. In the 1960s Bernhardt served as an assistant director on such television series as Maverick, Batman, Peyton Place and The Time Tunnel. He formed Pearlayne Prods. in 1964, co-producing the Fred MacMurray comedy Kisses for My President. Bernhardt was an assistant director for the 1969 film Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. He also produced Brian DePalma’s early comedy film Get to Know Your Rabbit in 1970. He was also a producer on the 1981 horror film The Funhouse and Paul Mazursky’s Tempest in 1982. Bernhardt was assistant director on the 1988 television series Murphy’s Law. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 26, 1999, A20.

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1999 • Obituaries

Berriault, Gina Author Gina Berriault died after a brief illness in a Greenbrae, California, hospital on July 15, 1999. She was 73. Berriault was born Arline Chandling in Long Beach, California, in 1926. She published her first novel, The Descent, in 1960. Her other novels include Conference of Victims (1962), The Son (1966) and The Lights of Earth (1984). She adapted her short story, The Stone Boy, for the screen in 1984, with Robert Duvall and Glenn Close starring. Her collection of short stories, Women in Their Beds, was awarded the 1997 National Book Critics Circle award. Los Angeles Times, July 23, 1999, A26; New York Times, July 23, 1999, A25.

Berry, John

Morey Bernstein

Bernstein, Morey Morey Bernstein, the amateur hypnotist whose experiments in age regression in the 1950s resulted in the best-selling book The Quest for Bridey Murphy, died of cardiac arrhythmia in Pueblo, Colorado, on April 2, 1999. He was 79. Bernstein was a leading Colorado businessman when he became interested in hypnotism. His experiments with housewife Virginia Tighe in 1952 resulted in the woman “remembering” a past life as 19th-century Irish woman Bridey Murphy. A best-selling book was released in 1956 and a movie was made the same year with Louis Hayward as Bernstein and Teresa Wright as Ms. Tighe, called Ruth Simmons to protect her privacy. Bernstein abandoned hypnotism after the event and became something of a recluse. Ms. Tighe died of cancer in 1995. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 17, 1999, A22; New York Times, Apr. 11, 1999, 39; Washington Post, Apr. 8, 1999, B6.

Film director John Berry died of pleurisy in Paris on November 29, 1999. He was 82. Berry was born Jak Szold in the Bronx, New York, in 1917. He joined Orson Welles’ Mercury Theater Troupe in 1937, appearing in productions of Julius Caesar and Five Kings. He remained in New York after Welles went to Hollywood to direct Citizen Kane, serving the manager of the company. Berry subsequently went to Hollywood himself, where he served as an assistant director for Billy Wilder. He was soon directing such films as Tuesday in November (1945), From This Day Forward (1946), Cross My Heart (1946), Miss Susie Slagle’s (1946), Casbah (1948), Tension (1949), and John Garfield’s final film He Ran All the Way (1951). Berry subsequently moved to Paris to avoid testifying before the House Un-American Activities Committee. A victim of the Hollywood blacklist, Berry remained in France for over a decade, directing and scripting such films as It Happened in Paris (1953), There Goes Barder (1954), Don Juan (1956), Tamango (1957) and Oh! Que Mambo (1959). He returned to the United States in the early 1960s, directing episodes of the television series The Defenders and Eastside/Westside. He also directed the films Maya (1966), Breaking It Up (1967), Claudine (1974) with Dihann Carroll, Thieves (1977), The Bad News Bears Go to Japan (1978) and A Captive in the Land (1990). Berry also directed such tele-films as Sparrow

Obituaries • 1999

24

Edvin Biukovic

John Berry

(1978), Angel on My Shoulder (1980), Sister, Sister (1982) and Honeyboy (1982). He recently completed filming an adaptation of Athol Fugard’s Bosman and Lena at the time of his death. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 1, 1999, A26; New York Times, Dec. 1, 1999, C31; Times (of London), Dec. 11, 1999, 24a; Variety, Dec. 6, 1999, 96.

Black, Joe British comedian Joe Black died in England on August 12, 1999. He was 81. Black was born

Biukovic, Edvin Comic artist Edvin Biukovic died of a brain tumor in Zagreb, Croatia, on December 5, 1999. He was 30. Biukovic was born in Croatia on June 22, 1969. He began illustrating comics in the mid–1990s and was awarded the Russ Manning Best Newcomer Award in 1995. Biukovic served as artist for several Grendel Tales and Star Wars comics for Dark Horse and The Human Target for DC.

Joe Black

25 in Yeadon, England, on May 6, 1918. He began performing juggling and acrobatic tricks with his parents at variety shows while in his teens. He was soon doing comedy sketches and routines. During World War II performed in Ralph Reader’s RAF Gang Show, entertaining the troops in Britain and North Africa. He continued his career after the war, often performing at the London Palladium. He also appeared often on British television variety shows and starred in Are You Ready Mr. Magill?, an ITV tele-play, during the 1970s. Black continued to entertain through the 1980s, appearing as British comic Charlie Naughton in the theatrical production of Underneath the Arches, a musical biography of comics Bud Flanagan and Chesney Allen. Times (of London), Aug. 25, 1999, 21a.

Blades, James British percussionist James Blades died in Cheam, England, on May 19, 1999. He was 97. Blades was born in Peterborough, England, on September 9, 1901. He began performing in a circus and was soon working in cinema house symphonies. He was best known as the drummer for the “V for Victory” theme for the BBC during World War II. He also recorded the gong sound featured in J. Arthur Rank studios opening credits. Blades was the author of several books including Orchestral Percussion Technique (1961), Percussion Instruments and Their History (1971),

James Blades

1999 • Obituaries and an autobiography, Drum Roll (1977). He retired from public performances in 1971. Los Angeles Times, May 26, 1999, A22; New York Times, May 25, 1999, B10; Times (of London), May 25, 1999, 23A.

Bloom, Harold Jack Screenwriter Harold Jack Bloom died on August 27, 1999. He was 75. Bloom began scripting films in the early 1950s. His credits include Arena (1953), The Naked Spur (1953), The Yellow Tomahawk (1954), Land of the Pharaohs (1955), Foreign Intrigue (1956) and Behind the High Wall (1956). He also provided story material for the 1967 James Bond film You Only Live Twice and the 1969 tele-film Any Second Now. Bloom also wrote 1971 western film A Gunfight, and the telefilms Hardcase (1971), Emergency (1971), The Log of the Black Pearl (1975), Shell Game (1975) and Stuck with Each Other (1989). Bloom was creator of the 1972 television series Emergency! and writer and producer for the western series Hec Ramsey with Richard Boone. He also scripted episodes of Bonanza, Time Tunnel and Project UFO.

Bloom, John Huge character actor John Bloom died of heart failure on January 15, 1999. He was 54. The 7'4" Bloom appeared as the Frankenstein monster in Al Adamson’s 1971 horror film Dracula vs. Frankenstein with J. Carrol Naish and Lon Chaney, Jr. He also appeared in the horror films The Incredible Two-Headed Transplant (1970), Brain of Blood (1971), The Dark (1979) and The Hills Have Eyes, Part Two (1985) as the Reaper. Bloom made his screen debut in the 1969 adult western Hard Trail (aka Hard on the Trail) with Lash LaRue. His other film credits include Bachelor Party (1984), Runaway Train (1985), Harry and the Hendersons (1987), The Great Outdoors (1988), Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991) as an alien, and Frozen Assets (1992). Bloom appeared as “Tiny” in the television series Paradise and Guns of Paradise from 1988 till 1991. He was also featured in the tele-films The Cartier Affair (1984) and Stark (1985).

Obituaries • 1999

26

John Bloom

Bogarde, Dirk British actor Sir Dirk Bogarde died of a heart attack in London on May 8, 1999. He was 78. Bogarde was born Derek Icks Gaspard Niven Van den Bogaerde in Hampstead, London, England, on March 28, 1921. He made his debut on the stage in 1939, but his career was largely postponed due to his military service during World War II. He returned to the stage after the war and was signed to a film contract by Rank. He was featured in such films as Dancing with Crime (1947), Once a Jolly Swagman (1948), Esther Waters (1948), Quartet (1949), Dear Mr. Prohack (1949), Boys in Brown (1949), The Woman in Question (1950), So Long at the Fair (1950), The Blue Lamp (1950), Blackmailed (1950), The Stranger in Between (1952), Penny Princess (1952), The Gentle Gunman (1952), They Who Dare (1953), Desperate Moment (1953), Appointment in London (1953), The Sleeping Tiger (1954), The Sea Shall Not Have Them (1954) and For Better, for Worse (1954). He played Dr. Simon Sparrow in a series of British comedies including Doctor in the House (1954), Doctor at Sea (1955), Doctor at Large (1957) and Doctor in Distress (1963). Bogarde was also featured in Simba (1955), The Spanish Gardener (1956), Cast a Dark Shadow (1957), Campbell’s Kingdom (1957), I’ll Met by Moonlight (1957), The Wind Cannot Read (1958), 1958’s A Tale of Two Cities as Sydney Carton, Libel (1959),

Dirk Bogarde

The Doctor’s Dilemma (1959), The Angel Wore Red (1960) and Song Without End (1960). Bogarde became an international star in the early 1960s, appearing in such features as Victim (1961), The Singer Not the Song (1961), We Are in the Navy Now (1962), The Password Is Courage (1962), Damn the Defiant! (1962), Joseph Losey’s The Servant (1963), The Mind Benders (1963), I Could Go on Singing (1963), King and Country (1964), Agent 8∫ (1964), Darling (1965) with Julie Christie, The High Bright Sun (1965), Modesty Blaise (1966), Our Mother’s House (1967), Accident (1967), Sebastian (1968), The Fixer (1968), Justine (1969), The Damned (1969), Oh! What a Lovely War (1969), Death in Venice (1971), Night Flight from Moscow (1972), The Night Porter (1974), Permission to Kill (1975), A Bridge Too Far (1977), Providence (1977), Despair (1978), The Vision (1987) and Daddy Nostalgia (1990). Bogarde also appeared as Roald Dahl in the 1981 tele-film The Patricia Neal Story and was featured in the 1986 tele-film May We Borrow Your Husband?, which he also scripted. Bogarde was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease in 1986 and suffered a major stroke ten years later. He was knighted in 1992. Los Angeles Times, May 9, 1999, B6; New York Times, May 9, 1999, 38; People, May 24, 1999, 115; Time, May 17, 1999, 25; Times (of

27 London), May 10, 1999, 23A; Variety, May 17, 1999, 76; Washington Post, May 9, 1999, C8.

Bostwick, Bud Henry “Bud” Bostwick, Jr., died of a cerebral hemorrhage and cardiac arrest in Monsey, New York, on December 7, 1999. He was 86. Bostwick was the father of actor Barry Bostwick. He began acting at the age of 79, appearing with his son in the tele-film My Best Friend. He was also seen in several films including Jade (1995), Nine Months (1995) and Down Periscope.

Bouchier, Chili British actress Chili Bouchier died in England on September 9, 1999. She was 89. She was born Dorothy Irene Boucher in London on September 12, 1909. She began appearing on stage at an early age. She became a model for Harrods department store at the age of 15, where she worked until being fired for having an affair with a fellow employee. In 1927 her striking beauty led to her appearance in Anthony Asquith’s film Shooting Stars. The following year the lovely brunette became a major star in America with the British film You Know What Sailors Are. She continued

1999 • Obituaries to appear in such films as Downstream (1929), City of Play (1929), The Silver King (1929), Call of the Sea (1930), The Kissing Cup Race (1931), Carnival (1931), Brown Sugar (1931), Ebb Tide (1932), The Blue Danube (1932), Summer Lightning (1933), Purse Strings (1933), The King’s Cup (1933), To Be a Lady (1934), The Office Wife (1934), It’s a Cop (1934), The Mad Hatters (1935), Lucky Days (1935), Get Off My Foot (1935), Death Drives Through (1935), Royal Cavalcade (1935), The Ghost Goes West (1935), Where’s Sally? (1936), Southern Roses (1936), Mr. Cohen Takes a Walk (1936), Faithful (1936), The Minstrel Boy (1937), Mayfair Melody (1937), Gypsy (1937), Change for a Sovereign (1937), The Singing Cop (1938), The Return of Carol Deane (1938), Mr. Satan (1938), Everything Happens to Me (1938), The Dark Stairway (1938) and The Mind of Mr. Reeder (1939). Ms. Bouchier signed a contract with Warner Bros., but her dislike of Hollywood led her to return to England without making a single film. Studio head Jack Warner retaliated by virtually blacklisting her in the United States. She continued to make films in England, but her international stardom was finished. Her subsequent films include My Wife’s Family (1941), Facing the Music (1941), Query (1945), The Laughing Lady (1946), Old Mother Riley’s New Venture (1949), The Case of Charles Peace (1949), The Counterfeit Plan (1957), The Boy and the Bridge (1959) and Dead Lucky (1960). Ms. Bouchier continued to remain active on stage, becoming an acclaimed character actress in her later years. While in her early 80s she was featured as Lady Pinkington Powell in the BBC television comedy Flip in 1991. She authored her memoirs, Shooting Star, in 1996, and was working on a dramatization of her life at the time of her death. Times (of London), Sept. 11, 1999, 22c.

Bower, Dallas

Chili Bouchier

British television director Dallas Bower died at his home in London on October 18, 1999. He was 92. Bower was born in London on July 25, 1907. He was director of BBC-TV from 1936 until 1939, directing early television productions of Julius Caesar (1938), The Tempest (1939) and The Taming of the Shrew (1939). He subsequently served as supervisor of the British Ministry of Information film production from 1940 until 1942.

Obituaries • 1999

28

Lester Bowie

garde jazz.” Bowie continued to perform until poor health forced him to cut short a London tour earlier in 1999. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 11, 1999, A28; New York Times, Nov. 11, 1999, B15; Time, Nov. 22, 1999, 37; Times (of London), Nov. 11, 1999, 31a; Variety, Nov. 22, 1999, 95.

Bowles, Paul

Dallas Bower

Bower directed the 1950 version of Alice in Wonderland and directed The Second Mrs. Tanqueray in 1952. He also produced the 1950s British television series The Adventures of Sir Lancelot. Variety, Oct. 25, 1999, 55.

Bowie, Lester Jazz trumpeter Lester Bowie died of liver cancer at his Brooklyn, New York, home on November 8, 1999. He was 58. Bowie was born in Frederik, Maryland, on October 11, 1941. He began playing the trumpet at an early age and was performing with bands in Chicago from the 1960s. He was an innovator of free form “avante

Novelist Paul Bowles died of a heart attack in a Tangiers, Morocco, hospital on November 18, 1999. He was 88. Bowles was born in New York on December 30, 1910. He was best known as the author of the best-selling novel The Sheltering Sky, which was filmed by director Bernardo Bertolucci in 1990, with Bowles as the narrator. His novels, The Story of Lahsen and Idir, Call at Corazon, Allal, were filmed in 1995 as Paul Bowles — Halbmond, with Bowles in a featured role. He was also the subject of the 1994 documentary Paul Bowles: The Complete Outsider. Bowles other works include the novels Let It Come Down (1952) and The Spider’s House (1955). He also wrote Next to Nothing: Collected Poems, 19261977, and composed Concerto for Two Pianos, Winds and Percussion, A Picnic Cantata, and Yerma, an operatic version of Garcia Lorca’s poem. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 19, 1999, A32; New York Times, Nov. 19, 1999, B14; People, Dec. 6, 1999, 117; Time, Nov. 29, 1999, 29; Times (of London), Nov. 19, 1999, 31a; Variety, Dec. 13, 1999, 121.

29

1999 • Obituaries

Patricia Bowman Paul Bowles

Bowman, Patricia Ballerina Patricia Bowman died in Las Vegas, Nevada, on March 18, 1999. She was in her mid–90s. She began studying dance at an early age and was taught by choreographer Michel Fokine. Bowman made her debut on the New York stage in 1930s’ George White’s Scandals. She became the prima ballerina with the Radio City Music Hall in 1932 and appeared in the Ziegfeld Follies in 1934. She joined the American Ballet Theater upon its founding in 1940, and performed in productions of Swan Lake, Giselle and Les Sylphides. She appeared in the 1944 Broadway production of Rhapsody and, in 1951, hosted the CBS television series Patricia Bowman Show. She taught ballet in New York from 1957 until her marriage in 1977 and subsequent move to Las Vegas. New York Times, Apr. 27, 1999, B8.

Box, Betty E. British film producer Betty Evelyn Box died in England on January 15, 1999. She was 78. Box was born in Beckenham, Kent, England, on September 25, 1920. She began her film career in the early 1940s when she joined the company formed by her brother, producer Sydney Box. She became one of England’s most successful film producers in the post World War II period, often teaming with director Ralph Thomas. Box’s credits include When the Bow Breaks (1947), Dear Murderer (1947), Miranda (1948), Here Come the Huggetts (1948), Vote for Huggett (1949), Marry Me (1949), It’s Not Cricket (1949), The Huggetts Abroad (1949), Don’t Ever Leave Me (1949), So Long at the Fair (1950), The Clouded Yellow (1951), Appointment with Venus (1951), The Assassin (1952), Mad About Men (1954), Doctor in the House (1954), Doctor at Sea (1955), The Iron Petticoat (1956), Checkpoint (1956), Campbell’s Kingdom (1957), Doctor at Large (1957), The Wind Cannot Read (1958), A Tale of Two Cities (1958), Upstairs and Downstairs (1959), The Thirty-Nine Steps (1959), Conspiracy of Hearts (1960), Doctor

Obituaries • 1999

30 Force, where he served 22 years. After his retirement he returned to music, adopting a hobo persona with a battered hat and overalls. He wrote a song called Boxcar Willie, and took the name for himself professionally. He toured Great Britain in the late 1970s, becoming a popular country music figure there. He joined the Grand Ole Opry in 1981 and recorded the album King of the Road the following year. He also appeared regularly on the Hee Haw television show in the early 1980s and was featured in the 1985 film Sweet Dreams, about the life of singer Patsy Cline. He settled in Branson, Missouri, in 1986, and continued to perform at the Boxcar Willie Theater. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 14, 1999, A22; New York Times, Apr. 14, 1999, C27; People, Apr. 26, 1999, 89; Time, Apr. 26, 1999, 23; Times (of London), Apr. 14, 1999, 21a; Variety, Apr. 19, 1999, 57; Washington Post, Apr. 14, 1999, B4.

Betty E. Box

in Love (1960), No My Darling Daughter (1961), No Love for Johnnie (1961), The Wild and the Willing (1962), A Pair of Briefs (1962), Doctor in Distress (1963), Agent 8∫ (1964), A Date with Death (1965), Carnaby, M.D. (aka Doctor in Clover) (1966), Deadlier Than the Male (1967), The High Commissioner (aka Nobody Runs Forever) (1968), Some Girls Do (1969), Doctor in Trouble (1970), Percy (1971) and The Love Ban (aka Anyone for Sex?) (1973). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 19, 1999, A20; New York Times, Jan. 24, 1999, 41; Times (of London), Jan. 18, 1999, 23a; Variety, Feb. 22, 1999, 166. Boxcar Willie

Boxcar Willie Country singer and songwriter Boxcar Willie died of leukemia at his Branson, Missouri, home on April 12, 1999. He was 67. He was born Lecil Travis Martin in Sterrett, Texas, on September 1, 1931. He began playing at Texas jamborees while in his teens. He performed as Marty Martin in the 1950s, recording the album Marty Martin Sings Country Music and Stuff Like That. He subsequently enlisted in the United States Air

Boyd, Jonathan Professional wrestler Jonathan Boyd died of a heart attack on August 7, 1999. He was 56. Boyd teamed with Norman Frederick Charles as the Royal Kangaroos in the Pacific Northwest in the early 1970s. The duo held several title belts there and in Canada. In the early 1980s Boyd teamed with Luke Williams as the Sheepherders, wrestling in Tennessee and Alabama.

31

Jonathan Boyd (right, with Norman Frederick Charles).

Braden, Joan Joan Braden, the wife of columnist Tom Braden, and inspiration for his book Eight Is Enough, died of a heart attack in Washington, D.C., on August 30, 1999. She was 77. Joan Braden was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1922. She wrote for magazines, was a television interviewer and served as an aide to John F. Kennedy and Nelson Rockefeller. She and Tom Braden where the parents of eight children and he based his book on their busy household. The book served the basis for a popular ABC television series, airing from 1977 until 1981, starring Dick Van Patten and Diana Hyland as Tom and and Joan Bradford. Ms. Hyland died of cancer shortly after the series began airing and the show continued with Van Patten’s character as a widower. Joan Braden is survived by her husband and seven of their children. A son, Tom, died in 1994. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 1, 1999, A22; New York Times, Sept. 1, 1999, B11; People, Sept. 20, 1999, 226; Time, Sept. 13, 1999, 25; Washington Post, Aug. 31, 1999, B1.

1999 • Obituaries

Joan Braden

Bradley, Marion Zimmer Leading science fiction writer Marion Zimmer Bradley died at a Berkeley, California, hospital of a heart attack on September 25, 1999. She

Marion Zimmer Bradley

Obituaries • 1999

32

was 69. Ms. Bradley was born in Albany, New York, on June 3, 1930. She began writing in the early 1950s and was best known for her popular Darkover series and the Arthurian novel The Mists of Avalon. The latter book was optioned by actor James Coburn for development as a television mini-series. Bradley authored over 70 novels during her career and was editor of Marion Zimmer Bradley’s Fantasy Magazine until her death. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 30, 1999, A24; New York Times, Sept. 29, 1999, A25.

Bresson, Robert French film director Robert Bresson died at his home in Droue-sur-Drouette, near Paris, France, on December 22, 1999. He was 98. Bresson was born in Bromont-Lamothe, France, on September 25, 1901. He became interested in film as a photographer and screenwriter in the early 1930s. He directed his first film, a satirical short entitled Public Affairs, in 1934. Bresson served in the French army in the early days of World War II and was imprisoned by the German occupation forces in 1940. He was held for over a year. He directed his first feature film, Angels of the Streets, during the German occupation in 1943. He received critical acclaim for his next film, The Ladies of the Bois de Boulogne, in 1945. Bresson next directed Diary of a Country Priest in 1950, earning the Grand Prix at the Venice Film Festival. Subsequent works include A Man Escaped (1956), Pickpocket (1959), The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962), Balthazar (1966), Mouchette (1967), A Gentle Creature (1969), Four Nights of a Dreamer (1971), Lancelot du Lac (1974), The Devil Probably (1977) and Money (1983). Though Bresson only produced a handful of films during his 40year-career, he was considered one of the leading French directors of his generation. Times (of London), Dec. 22, 1999, 17a; Variety, Jan. 3, 2000, 93.

Bring, Robert Film and television editor Robert Benjamin Bring died of brain cancer at his Valley Village, California, home on August 4, 1999. He was 60. Bring had worked as an editor for over 40 years, working on such films as Justin Morgan Had a

Robert Bresson

Horse (1972), Charley and the Angel (1973), Where the Red Fern Grows (1974), The Sky’s the Limit (1975), The Shaggy D.A. (1976), Return to Witch Mountain (1978), Force: Five (1981) and Dangerous Curves (1988). Bring also worked often on television, editing the tele-films The Young Runaways (1978), Stolen: One Husband (1990) and Jailbirds (1991). He was nominated for an Emmy Award for his work on the Matt Houston series in 1983 and received a second Emmy nomination for Dark Mirror in 1984. Bring also worked on the revival of the Burke’s Law series in 1994 and Pacific Palisades. Variety, Aug. 23, 1999, 120.

Brooke, Hillary Actress Hillary Brooke died in Bonsall, California, on May 25, 1999. She was 84. Ms. Brooke

33

Hillary Brooke

was born Beatrice Peterson in New York City on September 8, 1914. The elegant blond began her film career in the late 1930s and was featured in such films as Eternally Yours (1939), The Philadelphia Story (1940), Married Bachelor (1941), Maisie Was a Lady (1941), The Lone Rider Rides On (1941) with George Houston and Al “Fuzzy” St. John, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941) with Spencer Tracy, The Lone Rider in Frontier Fury (1941), Unfinished Business (1941), To the Shores of Tripoli (1942), Sleepytime Gal (1942), Ship Ahoy (1942), Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror (1942), CounterEspionage (1942), Calling Dr. Gillespie (1942), Wake Island (1942), Sherlock Holmes Faces Death (1943), Happy Go Lucky (1943), The Crystal Ball (1943), Standing Room Only (1944), Jane Eyre (1944) with Orson Welles, And the Angels Sing (1944), Lady in the Dark (1944), Ministry of Fear (1944), Practically Yours (1944), The Woman in Green (1945), Road to Utopia (1945) with Bob Hope and Bing Crosby, The Enchanted Cottage (1945), The Crime Doctor’s Courage (1945), Up Goes Maisie (1946), The Strange Woman (1946), The Gentleman Misbehaves (1946), Strange Journey (1946), Monsieur Beaucaire (1946), Strange Impersonation (1946), Big Town (1947), I Cover Big Town (1947), Big Town After Dark (1947),

1999 • Obituaries Let’s Live Again (1948), The Fuller Brush Man (1948), Big Town Scandal (1948), Alimony (1949), Africa Screams (1949) with Abbott and Costello, Bodyhold (1949), Vendetta (1950), Unmasked (1950), Beauty on Parade (1950), The Admiral Was a Lady (1950), Lucky Losers (1950), Skipalong Rosenbloom (1951), The Lost Continent (1951), Never Wave at a WAC (1952), Confidence Girl (1952), Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd (1952), the 1953 science fiction classic Invaders from Mars, The Maze (1953), Heat Wave (1954), Bengazi (1955), Alfred Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956) and Spoilers of the Forest (1957). Ms. Brooke also appeared frequently on television in the 1950s. She was Lou Costello’s girlfriend on The Abbott and Costello Show in 1952 and was Roberta Townsend, the romantic interest of Margie’s father, Vernon Albright, played by Charles Farrell, on the My Little Margie comedy series from 1952 until 1954. She also played Laura Renault in the drama series Richard Diamond, Private Detective from 1959 until 1960. Her other television credits include episodes of Racket Squad, Dark Adventure, Four Star Playhouse, Twilight Time, Pepsi Cola Playhouse, Cavalcade Theatre, Public Defender, Fireside Theatre, The Millionaire, Crossroads, Screen Directors Playhouse, Private Secretary, I Love Lucy, West Point, Perry Mason, Meet McGraw, December Bride, Michael Shayne and Yancy Derringer. She retired from acting in the early 1960s. Los Angeles Times, June 1, 1999, A22; New York Times, June 8, 1999, C28; Variety, June 7, 1999, 52.

Brooking, Dorothea British television producer Dorothea Brooking died in England on March 23, 1999. She was 82. Ms. Brooking was born on December 7, 1916. She began her career as a stage actress before joining the BBC as an announcer in 1943. In 1950 she began working on the BBC’s new children’s series The Children’s Hour, adapting The Secret Garden. She subsequently produced adaptations of such stores as Great Expectations, Thursday’s Child, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Prince and the Pauper and Little Women. She produced a later version of The Secret Garden for the BBC in 1975 and scripted and directed the 1978

Obituaries • 1999

34

David Brooks Dorothea Brooking

children’s series The Moon Stallion. She retired in the late 1970s. Times (of London), Apr. 22, 1999, 27a.

Brooks, David Actor David Brooks died at a Manhattan, New York, hospital on March 31, 1999. He was 83. Brooks was born in Portland, Oregon, in 1916. Trained as a baritone, Brooks made his Broadway debut in a production of Bloomer Girl in 1945. He created the lead role of Tommy Albright in the hit Lerner and Lowe Broadway musical Brigadoon in 1947. Brooks moved to Italy in the early 1950s, where he produced and directed plays, including the works of Samuel Beckett and Eugene Ionesco. He continued to directed after returning to the United States, helping to form Rooftop Productions. He also worked with Leonard Bernstein on the 1955 musical Trouble in Tahiti. Brooks also appeared on television in the early 1950s. New York Times, Apr. 4, 1999, 29.

Broome, John Veteran comic writer John Broome died of a heart attack in New York on March 14, 1999. He was 85. Broome worked with DC Comics from the 1940s, writing for the first team of superheroes, The Justice Society of America. Broome, who sometimes wrote under the pseudonyms Edgar Ray Merritt and John Osgood, also wrote the series Detective Chimp and Atomic Knights. He was instrumental in creating the modern version of the character Green Lantern in the 1950s and also wrote many of the early Silver Age Flash stories. He retired in 1970. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 22, 1999, B6.

Brough, Peter British ventriloquist Peter Brough died in England on June 3, 1999. He was 83. Brough was born in Shepherds Bush, West London, England, on February 26, 1916, the son of ventriloquist Arthur Brough. The younger Brough began his

35

1999 • Obituaries

Gre Brouwenstijn

Peter Brough

career as a singer and comedian on the radio in the early 1940s. He performed with his dummy, Archie Andrews, on the radio program Navy Mixture during World War II. Brough and Archie were given their own series, Educating Archie, in 1950. The popular comedy program remained on the air until 1960. Brough also appeared in two short lived television series in the 1950s. He largely retired from show business in the 1960s, though he made occasional guest appearances on radio and television. Times (of London), June 5, 1999, 24c.

Brouwenstijn, Gre Dutch operatic soprano Gre Brouwenstijn died in Amsterdam on December 14, 1999. She was 84. She was born Gerarda Benthina van Swol-Brouwenstijn in Den Helder, the Netherlands, on August 26, 1915. She began singing in the 1930s and was a founding member of the Nederlandse Opera after World War II. She

starred in performances of Oberon, Eugene Onegin and Wagner’s Flying Dutchman. She also performed in England, singing in Prince Igor and Aida. She remained with the Nederlandse Opera until her retirement in the early 1970s. Times (of London), Jan. 7, 1999, 25a.

Brown, Charles Blues singer and pianist Charles Brown died of congestive heart failure at an Oakland, California, hospital on January 21, 1999. He was 76. Brown was born in Texas on September 13, 1922. he was popular for his “cool blues” sound in the 1940s and 1950s. He was best known for his rendition of “Merry Christmas, Baby.” He also recorded the hits “Hard Times” and “Black Night.” Though largely retired for the past several decades, Brown was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame shortly after his death. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 24, 1999, B5; New York Times, Jan. 25, 1999, A20; People, Feb. 8, 1999, 105; Times (of London), Feb. 20, 1999, 22c; Variety, Feb. 1, 1999, 74.

Obituaries • 1999

36

Dennis Brown

Brown, Vanessa

Charles Brown

Stage and film actress Vanessa Brown died of cancer at the Motion Picture Country Home in Woodland Hills, California, on May 21, 1999. She was 71. Ms. Brown was born Smylla Brind in Vienna, Austria, on March 23, 1928. She fled the Nazis with her family during the 1930s and settled in New York. She was cast in the Broadway production of Watch on the Rhine at the age of 13. She was soon appearing regularly on the Quiz

Brown, Dennis Jamaican reggae singer Dennis Brown died of respiratory failure in a Kingston, Jamaica, hospital on July 1, 1999. He was 42. Brown was born in Kingston in February of 1957. He began singing as a child and had his first hit record at the age of 12 with “No Man Is an Island.” Brown was dubbed the “Crown Prince of Reggae,” recording such hits as “Westbound Train,” “Baby Don’t Do It,” “The Look of Love” and “Here I Come (With Love and Not Hatred).” He recorded over 50 albums during his career, and his 1994 album Light My Fire was nominated for a Grammy Award. Los Angeles Times, July 2, 1999, A32; New York Times, July 4, 1999, 25; Times (of London), July 5, 1999, 23a. Vanessa Brown (with Lex Barker as Tarzan).

37 Kids radio program in Chicago. She subsequently moved to Los Angeles, where she made her film debut in 1944’s Youth Runs Wild. She continued to appear in such films as The Girl of the Limberlost (1945), Margie (1946), I’ve Always Loved You (1946), Mother Wore Tights (1947), The Foxes of Harrow (1947), The Late George Apley (1947), The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947), The Secret of St. Ives (1949), Big Jack (1949), The Heiress (1949), Three Husbands (1950), Tarzan and the Slave Girl (1950) as Jane to Lex Barker’s Tarzan, The Basketball Fox (1951), The Fighter (1952) and The Bad and the Beautiful (1952). She also appeared on television as a panelist on Leave It to the Girls from 1949 until 1954, and was Liz Cooper in My Favorite Husband in 1955. She was also seen in episodes of The Sunday Mystery Hour, Pulitzer Prize Playhouse, Robert Montgomery Presents, Philco Television Playhouse, Stage 7, Schiltz Playhouse of the Stars, The Loretta Young Show, Zane Grey Theatre, Matinee Theatre, The Red Skelton Show, Goodyear Theatre, G.E. Theatre, Lights Out, One Step Beyond, Wagon Train, Perry Mason, The Millionaire and Climax! She largely retired from acting in the mid–1950s after her marriage to television director Mark Sandrich, Jr. She remained active in politics and as a writer. She returned to films in 1968’s Rosie! and was featured in Bless the Beasts and Children (1971) and The Witch Who Came from the Sea (1976). She played Peggy Horner in the short-lived 1977 series All That Glitters and was Mrs. DeFreest in the television soap opera General Hospital in 1979. Her final performances were in a 1985 episode of the new Twilight Zone series and an episode of Murder, She Wrote in 1989. Los Angeles Times, May 24, 1999, A16; New York Times, May 25, 1999, B10; Variety, May 31, 1999, 47; Washington Post, May 25, 1999, B5.

Browne, Eileen British children’s television hostess Eileen Browne died in England on April 14, 1999. She was 78. Ms. Browne was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on August 5, 1923. She began working with the BBC radio in 1946 and began narrating the children’s show Listen with Mother in 1950. She continued on into television with Watch with Mother in 1953. She also hosted the BBC program Adventures in Music and was a puppet voice

1999 • Obituaries

Eileen Browne

in the children’s program The Woodentops. Ms. Browne left the BBC in 1960. Times (of London), Apr. 23, 1999, 27a.

Browne, Howard Screenwriter Howard Browne died in San Diego on October 28, 1999. He was 92. Brown was born in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1907. He began writing for pulp fiction magazines in 1939 and became an editor with Ziff-Davis publishing two years later. Browne wrote numerous novels under his name and as John Evans. He scripted several crime films including Capone, The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre and Portrait of a Mobster. He also scripted episodes of such television series as 77 Sunset Strip, Longstreet, Alias Smith and Jones, Mannix and Columbo. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 1, 1999, A20.

Brox, Bobbe Bobbe Brox, who with her sisters Lorayne and Patricia formed the Brox Sisters singing trio popular in the 1920s, died in Glens Falls, New York, on May 2, 1999. She was 98. She was born

Obituaries • 1999

38

Jaki Byard Bobbe Brox

Dagmar Brox in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1901. Raised in Canada, the sisters first achieved prominence singing Irving Berlin’s “Everybody Step” in the first Music Box Revue on Broadway in 1921. They performed in subsequent Music Box Revues and productions of Lazy and Who. They were also featured in several films including Down South (1927), Headin’ South (1928), The Hollywood Revue of 1929 (1930), The King of Jazz (1930) and Spring Is Here (1930). They retired in the early 1930s. Sister Patricia died in 1988 and Lorayne in 1993. Los Angeles Times, May 12, 1999, A16; New York Times, May 15, 1999, A15; Variety, July 26, 1999, 45.

Los Angeles Times, Feb. 16, 1999, A18; New York Times, Feb. 15, 199, B8; Times (of London), Mar. 15, 1999, 23a.

Byrd, Charlie Jazz guitarist Charlie Byrd died of cancer at his Annapolis, Maryland, home on November 3,

Byard, Jaki Jazz pianist Jaki Byard was found shot to death at his home in Queens, New York, on February 11, 1999. He was 76. Byard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on June 15, 1922. He began the trumpet and trombone at night clubs while in his teens. Byard served in the Army during World War II. He resumed his musical career after the war, playing the saxophone with Pomeroy’s Jazz Workshop Orchestra. He went to New York in the 1950s, where he played the piano at various clubs. He joined Charles Mingus’ group in 1962 and recorded the album Out Front! He also performed with Mingus on the albums Mingus, Mingus, Mingus, Mingus, Mingus and The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady. Byard joined with saxophonist Michael Marcus in the early 1990s and the duo recorded the album This Happening.

Charlie Byrd

39 1999. He was 74. Byrd was born in Suffolk, Virginia, in 1925. He learned to play the guitar as a child and performed with his family on local radio shows. After serving in the Army during World War II Byrd began performing in New York. He recorded the album Jazz Recital in 1957 and followed it with Classical Byrd, including renditions of 16th century musical compositions, in 1958. He was best known for 1962’s Jazz Samba, with saxophonist Stan Gets and bassist Keter Betts. Byrd also composed the scores to several films including Dead to the World (1861) and Bleep (1970). He received a Grammy nomination for his 1981 album Brazilian Soul. Byrd continued to record and perform until his death. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 3, 1999, A36; New York Times, Dec. 4, 1999, A15; Time, Dec. 13, 1999, 33; Variety, Dec. 13, 1999, 121.

Byrnes, Johnny Rock guitarist Johnny Byrne died at his home in Liverpool, England, on August 18, 1999. He was 59. Byrne played with the British band Rory Storm and the Hurricanes with future Beatles’ drummer Ringo Starr.

Cadicamo, Enrique Musician and tango composer Enrique Cadicamo died in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on December 3, 1999. He was 99. Cadicamo was best known for the songs “Bubbles of Soap,” “Ruby,” and “The Little House of My Parents.” He also wrote several plays in the 1940s and scripted the 1949 film The History of Tango. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 8, 1999, A26.

Calhoun, Rory Actor Rory Calhoun died in a Burbank, California, hospital of complications from emphysema and diabetes on April 28, 1999. He was 76. He was born Francis Timothy Durgin in Los Angeles on August 8, 1922. Calhoun was often in trouble with the law during his youth, spending time in a federal reformatory for theft. A Catholic priest was instrumental in influencing

1999 • Obituaries

Rory Calhoun (from Marco Polo).

Calhoun to turn his life around. A chance meeting with actor Alan Ladd while riding horses in the Hollywood Hills convinced Calhoun to try his hand at acting. Sometimes billed as Frank McCown, he appeared in small roles in such films as Sunday Dinner for a Soldier (1944), Something for the Boys (1944), Nob Hill (1945), The Great John L (1945), The Bullfighters (1945), That Hagen Girl (1947), The Red House (1947), Adventure Island (1947) and Miraculous Journey (1948). His rugged looks brought him to the attention of agent Henry Willson, who felt he would be ideal in westerns. Calhoun appeared in numerous western and adventure films over the next decade including Massacre River (1949), Sand (1949), A Ticket to Tomahawk (1950), Rogue River (1950), Return of the Frontiersman (1950), County Fair (1950), Meet Me After the Show (1951), I’d Climb the Highest Mountain (1951), With a Song in My Heart (1952), Way of the Gaucho (1952), The Silver Whip (1953), Powder River (1953), How to Marry a Millionaire (1953), The Yellow Tomahawk (1954), River of No Return (1954), Four Guns to the Border (1954), Dawn at Socorro (1954), A Bullet Is Waiting (1954), The Treasure of Pancho Villa (1955), The Spoilers (1955), The Looters (1955), Ain’t Misbehavin’ (1955), The Red Sundown (1956), Flight to Hong Kong (1956), Raw Edge (1956), The Hired Gun (1957), The Domino Kid (1957) which he also produced, directed and scripted, Utah Blaine (1957), The Big Caper (1957), Apache Territory (1958) and The Saga of Hemp Brown (1958). Calhoun starred as Bill Longley in the television western series The Texan from 1958 to 1960. He was also featured as a guest star in such series as Zane Grey Theater, Telephone Time, Ford Theatre, Climax!, Screen Director’s

Obituaries • 1999 Playhouse, December Bride, Wagon Train, The Dick Powell Show, The Greatest Show on Earth, Death Valley Days, Bonanza, The Virginian, Gunsmoke, Burke’s Law, Rawhide, I Spy, Gilligan’s Island, Custer and Lancer. Calhoun also hosted the syndicated Western Star Theater, which was largely composed of episodes of Zane Grey Theater. He also continued to appear in such films as Thunder in Carolina (1960), Marco Polo (1961) in the title role, The Colossus of Rhodes (1961), The Treasure of Monte Cristo (1961), The Gun Hawk (1963), Face in the Rain (1963), The Young and the Brave (1963), Finger on the Trigger (1965), Black Spurs (1965), Our Man in Baghdad (1966), Apache Uprising (1966), Operation Delilah (1967), Dayton’s Devils (1968) and Operation Cross Eagles (1969). His turbulent 21-year marriage to actress Lita Baron ended in 1970 and Calhoun took several years off from acting. He was quoted in the New York Times as saying “I figured the more I worked, the more alimony I had to pay her. So I stayed idle.” He returned to the screen to face giant killer rabbits in 1972’s The Night of the Lepus. He continued to play character roles in such films as Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976), Kino, the Padre on Horseback (1977), Love and the Midnight Auto Supply (1978), Mission to Glory (1979), The Main Event (1979), Smokey and the Judge (1980) and the 1980 horror film Motel Hell as a chain saw–wielding farmer with a special sausage recipe. He also appeared in the tele-films Flight to Holocaust (1976), The Rebels (1979), Flatbed Annie & Sweetiepie: Lady Truckers (1979) and the 1982 mini-series The Blue and the Gray as General George Meade. His other television appearances included episodes of Alias Smith and Jones, The Doris Day Show, Petrocelli, Owen Marshall, Counselor at Law, Hec Ramsey, Circle of Fear, Fantasy Island, Police Story, Starsky and Hutch, Jigsaw John, Alfred Hitchcock Presents and Tales from the Crypt. He starred as patriarch Judson Tyler in the CBS soap opera Capitol from 1982 until 1987 and appeared in the 1985 telefilm Half Nelson. Calhoun co-starred as Kit Carson in 1984’s Angel and the 1985 sequel Avenging Angel. His later film credits also include Hell Comes to Frogtown (1987) with wrestler Rowdy Roddy Piper, Roller Blade Warriors: Taken By Force (1989), Bad Jim (1990) and Pure Country (1992). Los Angeles Times, Apr. 29, 1999, A22; New York Times, Apr. 30, 1999, C21; People, May 17,

40 1999, 127; Time, May 10, 1999, 25; Times (of London), May 4, 1999, 23a; Variety, May 3, 1999, 100.

Calindri, Ernesto Italian stage, film and television actor Ernesto Calindri died of a stroke in a Milan, Italy, hospital on June 8, 1999. He was 90. Calindri was born in Certaldo, Italy, on February 5, 1909. began his career on stage in the late 1920s, performing in plays by Shakespeare, Pirandello, Chekov, and many others. He also appeared in numerous films from the 1940s including Ho Sognato il Paradiso (1949), Canzoni per le Strade (1949), L’Ultimo Amante (1955), The Most Beautiful Moment (1957) with Marcello Mastroianni, Rascel Marine (1958), Policarpo, Ufficiale de Scrittura (1958), Le Olimpiadi dei Mariti (1960), Tototruffa ’62 (1961) with Toto, La Ragazza di Mille Mesi (1961), Mariti a Congresso (1961), Tiger of the Seven Seas (1962), Eye of the Needle (1963), Le Massaggiatrici (1963) and Il Grande Maestro (1967). He was also a popular performer on television, including many commercial appearances. Calindri appeared in the 1989 film The Icicle Thief, and remained active on stage, appearing in a production of Moliere’s Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme earlier in 1999. Variety, June 21, 1999, 91.

Cammermans, Paul Belgian actor and director Paul Cammermans died in Zernst, Belgium, on January 22, 1999. He was 71. Cammermans was born in Belgium on July 10, 1927. He appeared in the films The Knife (1961), Spuit Elf (1964) which he also directed, The Judge’s Friend (1979) and Laat de Dokter Maar Schuiven (1980). He also starred in the 1983 television series Willem van Oranje. Cammermans directed the Belgian features The Von Paemel Family (1987) and Hong Kong (1988).

Canasta, Chan British magician Chan Canasta died in England on April 22, 1999. He was 79. He was born

41 Chananel Mifelew in Cracow, Poland, on January 9, 1920. He emigrated to Palestine to study at the University of Jerusalem in the late 1930s. Canasta joined the Royal Air Force in 1940, serving throughout World War II. He began working on his magic act during the war. He primarily specialized in card tricks, using psychology and memory as much as sleight of hand in his presentations. He starred in several BBC television programs during the 1950s and performed regularly in Las Vegas. He was also seen on U.S. television variety shows hosted by Ed Sullivan, Jack Parr and Steve Allen. He largely retired from performing in the mid–1960s to become a successful painter.

Candido, Candy Voice actor Candy Candido died in North Hollywood on May 19, 1999. He was 85. He was born in New Orleans on December 25, 1913. He began his career as a singer during the big band era. He also appeared in a handful of films including Sadie McKee (1934), Roberta (1935), Something to Sing About (1937), The Cowboy from Brooklyn (1938), Only Angels Have Wings (1939), Rhythm Parade (1943), Campus Rhythm (1943), Sarge Goes to College (1947), Smart Politic (1948) and Riding High (1950). In the 1950s Candido was a regular guest on The Jimmy Durante Show. He became a popular voice actor for Disney, performing the role of the Indian Chief in the 1953 animated Peter Pan. Candido was also heard in such films as Sleeping Beauty (1959), The Phantom Tollbooth (1969), Robin Hood (1973), Heavy Traffic (1973), Hey Good Lookin’ (1982) and The Great Mouse Detective (1986). Los Angeles Times, May 26, 1999, A22.

1999 • Obituaries cember of 1996. She was featured in such Italian films as The Basilisks (1963), The Beach Hut (1977), The Messiah (1978) and The End of the World in Our Usual Bed in the Night Full of Rain (1978). Los Angeles Times, Apr. 22, 1999, B6; Variety, May 31, 1999, 47.

Carr, Allan Musical producer Allan Carr died of liver cancer in Beverly Hills, California, on June 29, 1999. He was 62. Carr began working in the entertainment industry after college and was a creator of the Playboy Penthouse television series. He also produced various stage productions for the Civic Theatre in Chicago and served as manager for numerous entertainers including Ann-Margret, Peter Sellers, Melina Mercouri, Tony Curtis, Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass, Paul Anka, Rosalind Russell and Peggy Lee. Carr produced the 1969 film The First Time with Jacqueline Bisset and C.C. and Company (1970) with Joe Namath and Ann-Margret. Carr’s greatest success came with the 1978 film musical Grease starring John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John. He also produced the 1980 musical Can’t Stop the Music featuring the Village People and a 1982 sequel Grease 2. Carr received a Tony Award for

Carabella, Flora Italian actress Flora Carabella, the widow of Marcello Mastroianni, died in Rome of bone cancer on April 19, 1999. She was 72. She was born in Rome on February 15, 1926. Ms. Carabella worked with director Luchino Visconti early in her career. She married Mastroianni in 1948. The couple separated in 1970, but never divorced. The remained close friends until his death in De-

Allan Carr (AFD).

Obituaries • 1999

42

producing the Broadway musical La Cage aux Folles. He produced the films Cloak & Dagger and Where the Boys Are ’84 in 1984. He also produced the 1989 Academy Awards program, notable for the duet of Rob Lowe and Snow White singing “Proud Mary,” which resulted in critical reviews and legal action from the Walt Disney Company. His activities had been curtailed in recent years due to health problems. Los Angeles Times, June 30, 1999, A18; New York Times, July 1, 1999, B9; People, July 19, 1999, 111; Time, July 12, 1999, 21; Variety, July 12, 1999, 52.

Carroll, Gladys Hasty Novelist Gladys Hasty Carroll died at a York, Maine, hospital on April 1, 1999. She was 94. Ms. Carroll was born in Rochester, New Hampshire, in 1904. She was best known for her 1933 novel As the Earth Turns. The novel was adapted into a film by Warner the following year starring Donald Woods and Jean Muir. She authored more than 20 other books including the novels A Few Foolish Ones and Neighbor to the Sky. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 5, 1999, A18; New York Times, Apr. 9, 1999, A21.

Carter, Anita Country singer Anita Carter died at her home in Goodlettsville, Tennessee, on July 29, 1999. She was 66. Carter was born Ina Anita Carter in Maces Springs, Virginia, on March 13, 1933. She was the daughter of Maybelle and Ezra Carter, the co-founders of the Carter Family singing group. Anita began singing with her family as a child. She continued to perform with her mother and two sisters, Helen and June, as Mother Maybelle and the Carter Singers, performing with the Grand Ole Opry in the 1950s and 1960s. She was best known for her renditions of the songs “Bluebird” with Hank Snow and “I Got on You” with Waylon Jennings, and appeared on television on such variety series as The Kate Smith Evening Hour. Los Angeles Times, July 31, 1999, A20; New York Times, Aug. 2, 1999, A13; People, Aug. 16, 1999, 91; Variety, Aug. 23, 1999, 120.

Anita Carter

Casadesus, Gaby French pianist Gaby Casadesus died in Paris on November 11, 1999. She was 98. She was born Gaby L’Hote in Marseilles, France, in 1901. She married pianist Robert Casadesus in the early 1920s. She and her husband performed interpretations of his compositions including “Concerto for Two Pianos” in 1930 and “Six Pieces” in 1938. Casadesus was also a noted piano teacher in Europe and the United States. She helped to form the Robert Casadesus International Piano Competition after her husband’s death in 1972. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 26, 1999, A54; New York Times, Nov. 20, 1999, C16.

43

1999 • Obituaries was also well known for her television appearances, guesting often on The Jack Paar Show and as a regular panelist on the quiz shows Keep Talking and To Tell the Truth in the 1950s and 1960s. She also starred as Elinor Hathaway in the 1961 sit-com The Hathaways, playing opposite Jack Weston and a band of chimpanzees. She was also featured in an episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents. She appeared in a handful of other films including Gidget Goes Hawaiian (1961), If It’s Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium (1969), Age of Consent

Gaby Casadesus (with husband Robert and son Jean Michel).

Cash, Alvin Singer Alvin Cash died in Chicago on November 21, 1999, after suffering from stomach problems. He was 60. Cash was born in St. Louis in 1939. He began performing with his brothers in the tap dancing group the Step Brothers. He subsequently formed the singing group Alvin Cash and the Registers, and had the hit 1963 dance song “It’s Twin Time.” The group performed on television on Dick Clark and Ed Sullivan’s variety shows. They also recorded the dance songs “The Ali Shuffle,” “The Funky Washing Machine” and “The Philly Freeze.” Los Angeles Times, Dec. 2, 1999, B8.

Cass, Peggy Actress Peggy Cass died of heart failure at a Manhattan hospital on March 8, 1999. She was 74. She was born Mary Margaret Cass on May 21, 1924, in Boston, Massachusetts. She began her career appearing in U.S.O. shows before being cast in the national tour for Born Yesterday in the late 1940s. She made her Broadway debut in George Abbott’s Touch and Go in 1949. She continued to perform on stage and was featured in the 1952 film The Marrying Kind. She was best known for her role as Agnes Gooch in the 1956 Broadway production of Auntie Mame. She received a Tony Award for best supporting actress. Cass reprised the role in the 1958 film version, and was nominated for an Academy Award. She

Peggy Cass

(1969) and Paddy (1970). She was Eve Shipley on the short-lived 1987 sit-com Women in Prison and was featured in the 1995 tele-film Danielle Steel’s “Zoya.” Her other television credits include episodes of Tales from the Darkside and Remember WENN. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 11, 1999, A22; New York Times, Mar. 10, 1999, C23; People, Mar. 29, 1999, 124; TV Guide, July 10, 1999, 6; Variety, Mar. 15, 1999, 58; Washington Post, Mar. 11, 1999, B5.

Obituaries • 1999

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Castellano, Franco Italian film director and writer Franco Castellano died of lung cancer in Rome on December 28, 1999. He was 74. Castellano was born in Rome on June 20, 1925. He began his career in films in the late 1950s scripting such features as Los Dos Rivales (1958), Marinai, Donne e Guai (1958), Noi Siamo Due Evasi (1959), My Wife’s Enemy (1959), Toto, Fabrizi e i Giovani d’Oggi (1960), Tototruffa ’62 (1961), La Ragazza Sotto il Lenzuolo (1961), The Fascist (1961), Crazy Desire (1962), I Motorizzati (1962) and The Hours of Love (1963). He began his long-standing partnership with fellow writer-director Giuseppe “Pipolo” Moccia in 1963, working together on the science fiction/comedy I Marziani Hanno Dodici Mani (aka The Martians Arrived ). The duo wrote and directed many popular Italian comedies, many starring comic actor Adriano Celentino, including Mani di Velluto (1979), Sabato, Domenica e Venerdi (1979), Il Bisbetico Domato (1980), Asso (1981), Innamorato Pazzo (1981), Grand Hotel Excelsior (1982), Segni Particolari Bellissimo (1983) and Il Burbero (1986). Castellano and Pipolo’s other films include Mia Moglie e Una Strega (1980), Attila, Flagello di Dio (1982), Il Ragazzo di Campagna (1984), College (1984) and Grandi Magazzini (1986). They also made the Italian television series Il Vigile Urbano in 1989.

Cato, Bob Album cover designer Bob Cato died in New York of complications from Alzheimer’s Disease on March 19, 1999. He was 75. Cato began his career as an artist at Harper’s Bazaar magazine in 1947. He became art director at CBS-Columbia in the 1960s. His cover designs for Barbra Streisand’s People (1964) and Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits (1967) earned him Grammy Awards. Cato also used designs from such artists as Andy Warhol and Robert Crumb for album covers, including Crumb’s work on Janis Joplin’s Cheap Thrills album. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 21, 1999, B5; New York Times, Mar. 20, 1999, C16.

Bob Cato (Linda Moser).

Chamberlain, Wilt Basketball superstar Wilt Chamberlain was found dead of a likely heart attack at his Bel-Air, California, home on October 12, 1999. He was 63. Chamberlain was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on August 21, 1936. He began his professional career with the Harlem Globetrotters in 1958. Known as “Wilt the Stilt” at 7'1", he began playing with the NBA the following year. He was one of the sports leading participants and the only player ever to score 100 points during a single game. He retired from the court in 1973. Chamberlain appeared as the warrior Bombaata in the 1984 film Conan the Destroyer with Arnold Schwarzenegger. He also appeared as himself in a 1992 episode of The Commish. His controversial

Wilt Chamberlain (from Conan the Destroyer) (Universal ).

45 autobiography, A View from Above, was published in 1991. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 13, 1999, A1; New York Times, Oct. 13, 1999, A1; People, Oct. 25, 1999, 76; Time, Oct. 25, 1999, 48; Washington Post, Oct. 13, 1999, A1.

Chapman, Marguerite Actress Marguerite Chapman died in Burbank, California, on August 31, 1999. She was 81. Ms. Chapman was born in Chatham, New York, on March 9, 1918. She made her film debut in 1940 and was featured in nearly 20 films over the next three years. Her credits include On Their Own (1940), Charlie Chan at the Wax Museum (1940), Navy Blues (1941), The Body Disappears (1941), You’re in the Army Now (1941), A Girl, a Guy and a Gob (1941), Submarine Raider (1942), Spy Smasher (1942), The Spirit of Stanford (1942), Parachute Nurse (1942), A Man’s World (1942), The Daring Young Man (1942), One Dangerous Night (1943), My Kingdom for a Cook (1943) and Murder in Times Square (1943). She starred with Edward G. Robinson in 1943’s Destroyer and was George Sanders’ leading lady in Appointment in Berlin, also in 1943. She continued to appear in

Marguerite Chapman

1999 • Obituaries such films as Strange Affair (1944), CounterAttack (1945), The Walls Came Tumbling Down (1946), One Way to Love (1946), Pardon My Past (1946), Mr. District Attorney (1947), Relentless (1948), The Gallant Blade (1948), Coroner Creek (1948), The Green Promise (1949), Kansas Raiders (1950), the 1951 science fiction film Flight to Mars, Sea Tiger (1952), Man Bait (1952) and Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952). She appeared in a supporting role as a secretary in Marilyn Monroe’s 1955 film The Seven Year Itch. She starred in her final film, the science fiction feature, The Amazing Transparent Man, in 1960. Ms. Chapman also made occasional appearances on television in episodes of such series as Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Perry Mason, Rawhide, Hawaii Five-O and Marcus Welby, M.D. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 4, 1999, B5; New York Times, Sept. 6, 1999, B7; Times (of London), Sept. 6, 1999, 21a; Variety, Sept. 6, 1999, 76.

Chiaki, Minoru Japanese actor Minoru Chiaki died of acute respiratory and coronary failure in Tokyo on

Minoru Chiaki (from The Hidden Fortress).

Obituaries • 1999

46

November 1, 1999. He was 82. Chiaki was born Katsuji Sasaki in Hokkaido, Japan, on July 30, 1917. He began his film career in the late 1940s, appearing in Akira Kurosawa’s 1949 feature Stray Dog. He was also seen in Rashomon (1950), The Idiot (1951) and Doomed (1952). Chiaki was best known for starring as one of the title characters in Kurosawa’s 1954 classic The Seven Samurai. He was the last survivor of the seven lead actors. The following year he starred in the sequel to the horror classic Godzilla, Gigantis, the Fire Monster. Chiaki also appeared in I Live in Fear (1955), Throne of Blood (1957), The Lower Depths (1957), The Hidden Fortress (1958), The Youth and His Amulet (1961) and The Face of Another (1966). Chiaki suffered a cerebral hemorrhage in 1975, but recovered sufficiently to renew his career. He subsequently became a familiar face on Japanese television. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 2, 1999, A24; Variety, Nov. 8, 1999, 52.

Chiao, Roy Hong Kong actor Roy Chiao died of a heart attack in Seattle, Washington, on April 16, 1999. He was 72. Chiao was born in Shanghai in 1927. He made his film debut in a small role in Li Ying’s 1949 feature Ah Li Shan. He became a major figure in the Hong Kong film industry from the mid–1950s. His film credits include Fresh Peony (1956), Ferry to Hong Kong (1959), Five Golden Dragons (1967), A Touch of Zen (1969), The Fate of Lee Khan (1973), Enter the Dragon (1973) with Bruce Lee, Golden Needles (1974), The Valiant One (1974), Operation Foxbat (1977), Follow the Star (1977), Old Soldiers Never Die (1978), Enter the Fat Dragon (1978), Game of Death (1978), Ghost of the Ninja (1980), Krazy Kops (1981), The Protector (1985), Aces Go Places IV (1986), Chocolate Inspector (1986), Above the Law (1987), Three Brothers (1987), Bloodsport (1988), Above the Law II (1989), Burning Ambition (1989), The Last Message (1990), A Kid from Tibet (1991), Shadow of China (1991), Cheating Technique (1992), Cageman (1993), American Shaolin (1994), The Age of Miracles (1995), Only Fools Fall in Love (1995) and All’s Well, Ends Well (1997). Chiao was also featured in Steven Spielberg’s 1984 film Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. Chiao left Hong Kong to settle in Seattle in 1996. He had returned to

Roy Chiao

Hong Kong earlier in the year to appear in the religious film City of Angels, which was completed shortly before his death. Variety, May 10, 1999, 150.

Cinquegrana, August Stephen Filmmaker August Stephen Cinquergrana died of cancer in San Francisco on August 16, 1999. He was 58. Cinquergrana began working in San Francisco television in the 1970s. He soon began producing documentary films after receiving the American Film Institute Independent Filmmaker’s Award in 1977. His documentary about boxing clubs in Los Angeles, Goodnight, Miss Ann, was nominated for an Academy Award. Cinquegrana subsequently directed several documentaries for HBO and PBS, including the forthcoming The Digital Divide, concerning the impact of computers on modern society. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 10, 1999, A22.

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1999 • Obituaries

Cirillo, Charles Actor Charles Cirillo died at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on December 4, 1999. He was 91. Cirillo was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1908. He began his career in show business on the vaudeville stage, performing dance and comedy routines with his three brothers. Cirillo went to Hollywood in the 1940s where he appeared in small parts in numerous films including Night Song (1947), The Paleface (1948), Sorrowful Jones (1949), Square Dance Jubilee (1949), Hollywood Varieties (1950), The Wild One (1954), Guys and Dolls (1955), The Geisha Boy (1958), The Great Escape (1963), The Unsinkable Molly Brown (1964), The Dirty Dozen (1967) and The Sting (1973). He was also a stand-in for actor Charles Bronson in many films. Cirillo was also seen on television in episodes of I Love Lucy, Perry Mason, Mission: Impossible, Highway to Heaven and Murder, She Wrote.

Clementi, Pierre French actor Pierre Clementi died in Paris of liver cancer on December 27, 1999. He was 57. Clementi was born in Paris on September 28, 1942. He began his career in films in 1960, appearing in Chien de Pique. He was also seen in Luchino Visconti’s The Leopard (1963), How Not to Rob a Department Store (1965), Brigade Antigangs (1965), As Ilhas Encantadas (1965), Belle de Jour (1967) with Catherine Deneuve, Shock Troops (1967), Partner (1968), Benjamin (1968), Pigpen (1969), The Milky Way (1969), The Conformist (1970), Cabezas Cortadas (1970), The Designated Victim (1971), The Pacifist (1971), The Inner Scar (1972), Sweet Movie (1974), Steppenwolf (1974), The Red Poster (1976), Les Apprentis Sorciers (1977), Little Lips (1978), La Chanson de Roland (1978), Le Pont du Nord (1981), L’Amour des Femmes (1981), Quartet (1981), Exposed (1983), Dog Day (1984) with Lee Marvin, A Child Called Jesus (1987), Hard to Be a God (1989), L’Autrichienne (1989) and The Pelvis of John Wayne (1997). His most recent appearance with in Jane Campion’s 1998 feature Hideous Kinky (1998).

Del Close

Close, Del Actor and director Del Close died of heart and respiratory problems at a Chicago hospital on March 4, 1999. He was 64. Close was born in Kansas on March 9, 1934. He was a guiding force with Chicago’s Second City improvisational comedy troupe. Second City launched the careers of many actors and comics including John Belushi and Bill Murray. Close was also featured as a character actor in a dozen films including Beware! The Blob (1972), American Graffiti (1973), Thief (1981), Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986), Light of Day (1987), The Big Town (1987), The Untouchables (1987), The Blob (1988), Next of Kin (1989), Fat Man and Little Boy (1989), Opportunity Knocks (1990) and The Public Eye (1992). Close also appeared on television in episodes of My Mother, the Car, Get Smart and Sable. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 7, 1999, B5; New York Times, Mar. 16, 1999, B9.

Clothier, Robert Canadian character actor Robert Clothier died in a hospital in North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, on February 10, 1999. He was

Obituaries • 1999 77. Clothier was born on October 22, 1921. He appeared in several films including Finders Keepers (1984), The Journey of Natty Gann (1985), North of Pittsburgh (1992) and Max (1994). He was better known for his work on television, appearing in the tele-films Sidney Sheldon’s A Stranger in the Mirror (1993), Frostfire (1994), The Disappearance of Vonnie (1994), Courting Justice (1995) and Shadow of a Doubt (1995). He also starred as Daddy Johnson in the 1995 television series Jake and the Kid and was Joe Da Vinci in the 1998 series Da Vinci’s Inquest. Clothier’s other television credits include episodes of The Ray Bradbury Theatre, The X Files, Due South, The Outer Limits and Poltergeist: The Legacy.

Cody, Iron Eyes Native American actor Iron Eyes Cody died at his home in Los Angeles on January 4, 1999. He was 94. According to his biography, he was born Oscar Cody on an Oklahoma farm in April 3, 1904 (some sources indicate 1907 and 1915), of part–Cherokee and part–Cree descent. His father, Thomas Longplume Cody, brought the family to Hollywood in 1920 where he worked as a technical advisor on silent Westerns. The younger Cody appeared in bit parts in several

Iron Eyes Cody

48 films before getting a role in the 1923 Western The Covered Wagon. He also appeared in John Ford’s 1924 railroad drama The Iron Horse. Cody subsequently toured with cowboy actor Tim McCoy in a stage show. He returned to Hollywood, where he appeared in Victor Fleming’s The Wolf Song. Cody’s other film and serial credits include The Road to Yesterday (1925), Fighting Caravans (1931), 99 Wounds (1931), Oklahoma Jim (1931), Whistlin’ Dan (1932), Texas Pioneers (1932), Fighting with Kit Carson (1933), The Return of Chandu (1934), Rustlers of Red Dog (1935), The Farmer Takes a Wife (1935), Toll of the Desert (1936), The Phantom Rider (1936), Ride, Ranger, Ride (1936), Custer’s Last Stand (1936), Treachery Rides the Range (1936), Boss Rider of Gun Creek (1936), Wild West Days (1937), Prairie Thunder (1937), Riders of the Whistling Skull (1937), Old Louisiana (1937), Wild Bill Hickok (1938), Hawk of the Wilderness (1938), Flaming Frontier (1938), The Lone Ranger (1938), The Oregon Trail (1939), Overland with Kit Carson (1939), The Kid from Texas (1939), Union Pacific (1939), Crashing Thru (1939), Young Buffalo Bill (1940), Young Bill Hickok (1940), Pony Post (1940), Kit Carson (1940), Green Hell (1940), Colorado (1940), King of the Stallions (1940), Too Many Girls (1940), Outlaws of Cherokee Trail (1941), In Old Cheyenne (1941), Saddlemates (1941), King of the Texas Rangers (1941), Valley of the Sun (1942), Springtime in the Rockies (1942), Ride ’Em Cowboy (1942), Perils of Nyoka (1942), The Omaha Trail (1942), Perils of the Royal Mounted (1942), Don Winslow of the Navy (1942), My Gal Sal (1942), Under Nevada Skies (1946), Plainsman and the Lady (1946), The Senator Was Indiscreet (1947), The Last Round Up (1947), Unconquered (1947), Bowery Buckaroos (1947), The Paleface (1948), Indian Agent (1948), The Gallant Legion (1948), Tulsa (1949), The Cowboy and the Indians (1949), Massacre River (1949), Sand (1949), California Passage (1950), Broken Arrow (1950), Cherokee Uprising (1950), North of the Great Divide (1950), Red Mountain (1951), The Big Carnival (1951), Apache Country (1952), Ford Osage (1952), Son of Paleface (1952) with Bob Hope, Lost in Alaska (1952) with Abbott and Costello, Night Raiders (1952), Montana Belle (1952), Meet Me At the Fair (1953), Fast Company (1953), Sitting Bull (1954), White Feather (1955), Gun for a Coward (1956), The Wild Dakotas (1956), Westward Ho the Wagons! (1956), Gun Fever (1958), Alias Jesse James

49 (1959), Black Gold (1963), The Great Sioux Massacre (1965) and The Fastest Guitar Alive (1967). Cody became best known in the early 1970s for a public service commercial against pollution. He paddles a canoe down a polluted stream to a highway, and a single tear rolls down his cheek when a passing car tosses a pile of litter at his feet. Cody continued to appear in such films as A Man Called Horse (1970), El Condor (1970), Cockeyed Cowboys of Calico County (1970), Grayeagle (1978), Ernest Goes to Camp (1987) and The Spirit of ’76 (1990). He also appeared on television in the tele-films Something for a Lonely Man (1968), The Quest (1976) and the 1978 mini-series How the West Was Won. His other television credits include episodes of The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok, The Cisco Kid, Sergeant Preston of the Yukon, Wyatt Earp, The Saga of Andy Burnett, The Restless Gun, The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, Maverick, Rawhide, The Tall Man, Zane Grey Theater, The Rebel, The Virginian, Branded, Hondo, Gunsmoke, Bonanza, The Immortal and Fantasy Island. Cody authored his autobiography Iron Eyes: My Life as a Hollywood Indian in 1982. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 5, 1999, B1; New York Times, Jan. 5, 1999, A15; People, Jan. 18, 1999, 71; Time, Jan. 18, 1999, 25; Times (of London), Jan. 6, 1999, 19a; TV Guide, Mar. 20, 1999, 8; Variety, Jan. 11, 1999, 124.

1999 • Obituaries directed, and Barbarian Queen II: The Empress Strikes Back (1992). Los Angeles Times, Apr. 13, 1999, A24.

Colen, Beatrice Actress Beatrice Colen died of lung cancer in Los Angeles on November 18, 1999. She was 51. Colen was the granddaughter for famed playwright George S. Kaufman. She was best known for her work on television, playing Marsha, the roller-skating carhop, on the Happy Days series from 1974 to 1976, and Corporal Etta Candy for the first season of Wonder Woman in 1976. Colen was also seen in the films Lifeguard (1976), High Anxiety (1977) and Who’s That Girl? (1987), and the tele-films Schoolboy Father (1980), Brave New World (1980) and Roseanne and Tom: Behind the Scenes (1994). Her other television credits include episodes of Kolchak: The Night Stalker, All in the Family, Barney Miller, CHiPs, Alice, Baywatch and The Wonder Years. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 21, 1999, B5.

Cohen, Howard R. Director and screenwriter Howard R. Cohen died of a heart attack in a Los Angeles hospital on April 3, 1999. He was 57. Cohen worked for Playboy magazine as party joke editor in the 1960s. He began writing for low-budget films in the early 1970s. His credits include Unholy Rollers (1972), Cover Girl Models (1975), Death Force (1978) and Vampire Hookers (1979). He scripted and directed the 1981 horror spoof Saturday the 14th and directed the 1988 sequel Saturday the 14th Strikes Back. He also directed and scripted the sci-fi film Space Raiders (1983) and directed 1989’s Time Trackers. Cohen also provided scripts for Stryker (1983), Rainbow Brite and the Star Stealers (1985), Barbarian Queen (1985), Emmanuelle 5 (1987), Lords of the Deep (1989), Deathstalker III: Deathstalker and the Warriors from Hell (1989), Alien Invasion (1990), Deathstalker IV: Match of Titans (1990) which he also

Beatrice Colen

Collins, Charles Actor Charles Collins died of pneumonia at a Montecito, California, hospital on June 26, 1999. He was 95. Collins began his career on stage

Obituaries • 1999 as a dancer in the mid–1920s and made his Broadway debut in Artists and Models in 1927. He appeared in numerous theatrical productions over the next several decades, often with his wife, actress Dorothy Stone. Collins also appeared in several films including Paree Paree (1934), The Dancing Pirate (1936), The Steel Trap (1952) and A Blueprint for Murder (1953).

Conley, Frances Bain Actress Frances Bain Conley died of pneumonia in Culver City, California, on January 15, 1999. She was 74. Conley was born in St. John, New Brunswick, Canada, in 1924. She began her career on stage in the World War II musical comedy Meet the Navy. She made her film debut in the 1948 feature The Big Clock with Ray Milland. Conley also appeared on television in the 10-part biblical series The Living Book. She subsequently retired from acting to become an interior decorator. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 19, 1999, A20.

Conrad, Charles “Pete” Astronaut Charles “Pete” Conrad, the third man to walk on the moon, died at a Ojai, California, hospital of injuries received in a motor-

50 cycle accident on July 8, 1999. He was 69. Conrad was born in Philadelphia on June 2, 1930. A navy test pilot, he became an astronaut in 1962. Conrad, who flew two Gemini missions in the 1960s and was commander of NASA’s first space station, Skylab, in 1973, walked on the moon as part of the crew of Apollo 12 in November of 1969. Conrad also appeared in the 1975 tele-film Stowaway to the Moon and was the narrator of the 1989 documentary For All Mankind. Los Angeles Times, July 10, 1999, A18; New York Times, July 10, 1999, C15; People, July 26, 1999, 87; Time, July 19, 1999, 25; Times (of London), July 10, 1999, 22c; Washington Post, July 10, 1999, B6.

Cooke, Daniel Daniel N. Cooke, a retired police officer with the Los Angeles Police Department, died of cancer in Los Angeles on April 30, 1999. He was 72. Cooke was a the department’s press relations officers, serving as a technical advisor to numerous film and television productions from the mid–1960s until his retirement in 1988. He became friends with actor/producer Jack Webb and worked with him on the production of the Dragnet series. Los Angeles Times, May 5, 1999, A26.

Copp, DeWitt Samuel Novelist DeWitt Samuel Copp died in Burlington, Vermont, on November 29, 1999. He was 80. Copp began writing for the radio in the late 1930s. He served in the Army Air Corps during World War II. He resumed his career after the war, writing scripts for television’s Kraft Theater, Bell Telephone Hour and Hallmark Hall of Fame. Copp wrote his first novel, Radius of Action, in 1960. He co-authored the Betrayal at the U.N. (1961) and The Odd Day (1962) with journalist Marshall Peck, Jr. His books, often focusing on the cold war, also include Incident at Boris Gleb, Overview and Famous Soviet Spies.

Charles Conrad

51

Tom Corbett

Corbett, Tom

1999 • Obituaries decade. She began acting in the mid–1940s and appeared in over 100 films during her career, often playing busybodies and spinsters. She was nominated for an Academy Award for her performance in the 1947 film version of I Remember Mama. Her screen credits also include Cornered (1945), The Truth About Murder (1946), Till the End of Time (1946), The Scarlet Horseman (1946), Sister Kenny (1946), Love Come Back (1946), The Locket (1946), In Old Sacramento (1946), Cuban Pete (1946), The Dark Corner (1946), Bedlam (1946), The Spiral Staircase (1946), The Fabulous Joe (1946), It’s a Wonderful Life (1946), They Won’t Believe Me (1947), Forever Amber (1947), Driftwood (1947), Born to Kill (1947), Beat the Band (1947), The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer (1947), Strike It Rich (1948), The Noose Hangs High (1948), If You Knew Susie (1948), The Dark Past (1948), Fighting Father Dunne (1948), Mighty Joe Young (1949), Rusty Saves a Life (1949), Madame Bovary (1949), Captain China (1949), A Woman’s Secret (1949), Little Women (1949), Peggy (1950), Harriet Craig (1950), Edge of Doom (1950), Caged (1950), The Gunfighter (1950), Ma and Pa Kettle Go to Town (1950), The Sea Hornet (1951), On Moonlight Bay (1951), Goodbye, My Fancy (1951), Angels in the Outfield (1951), The Mating Season

British clairvoyant Tom Corbett died in England on June 17, 1999. He was 81. Corbett was born in Limerick, Ireland, on October 12, 1917. He claimed to have developed psychic powers after nearly dying of pneumonia at the age of 10. Corbett went to London in his early 20s where he became a popular medium and psychic at nightclubs and holiday camps. He also was a ghost-hunter at many of the stately homes and mansions in England. Corbett was briefly the astrology columnist for News of the World in 1969 and was co-author of The Dreamer’s Dictionary. Times (of London), July 26, 1999, 21a.

Corby, Ellen Character actress Ellen Corby, best known for her role as the grandmother on television’s The Waltons, died in Woodland Hills, California, on April 14, 1999. She was 87. Corby was born Ellen Hansen in Racine, Wisconsin, on June 3, 1911. Ms. Corby went to Hollywood in the early 1930s where she worked as a script girl for over a

Ellen Corby

Obituaries • 1999 (1951), Here Comes the Groom (1951), The Barefoot Mailman (1951), Fearless Fagan (1952), The Big Trees (1952), The Woman They Almost Lynched (1953), The Vanquished (1953), Shane (1953), Monsoon (1953), A Lion Is in the Streets (1953), About Mrs. Leslie (1954), Untamed Heiress (1954), The Bowery Boys Meet the Monsters (1954), Sabrina (1954), Susan Slept Here (1954), Illegal (1955), Stagecoach to Fury (1956), Slightly Scarlet (1956), The Go-Getter (1956), The Seventh Sin (1957), Rockabilly Baby (1957), God Is My Partner (1957), All Mine to Give (1957), Night Passage (1957), Vertigo (1958), Macabre (1958), As Young As We Are (1958), Visit to a Small Planet (1960), Pocketful of Miracles (1961), Saintly Sinners (1962), The Caretakers (1963), 4 for Texas (1963), The Strangler (1964), Hush…Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964), The Ghost and Mr. Chicken (1965), The Family Jewels (1965), The Glass Bottom Boat (1966), The Night of the Grizzly (1966), The Gnome-Mobile (1967), The Legend of Lylah Clare (1968), Angel in My Pocket (1969), A Fine Pair (1969), Support Your Local Gunfighter (1971) and Napoleon and Samantha (1972). Miss Corby began her role as Grandma Walton in the 1971 tele-film The Homecoming: A Christmas Story. She continued her performance as the family’s matriarch, opposite Will Geer’s Grandpa Walton, when the series debuted the following year. Miss Corby received Emmy Awards for her work in 1973, 1975 and 1976. She suffered a stroke in 1977 which prevented her from appearing on the show for most of the year. She recovered sufficiently to resume her role until 1979. She appeared in the reunion tele-films A Day for Thanks on Walton Mountain (1982), A Wedding on Walton Mountain (1982), A Walton Thanksgiving Reunion (1993), A Walton Wedding (1995) and A Walton Easter (1997). Miss Corby had previously starred as Martha O’Reilly in the 1965 sit-com Please Don’t Eat the Daisies. She also appeared in the tele-films A Tattered Web (1971), The Story of Pretty Boy Floyd (1974) and All the Way Home (1981). Her numerous television credits also include episodes of The Millionaire, The Roy Rogers Show, Ford Theatre, Telephone Time, Matinee Theatre, You Are There, Mystery Show, I Love Lucy, Wyatt Earp, Mr. Adams and Eve, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Perry Mason, Restless Gun, Peter Gunn, Jim Bowie, Wagon Train, Lassie, The Betty Hutton Show, Hennesey, Follow the Sun, The Bob

52 Cummings Show, Boris Karloff ’s Thriller, The Rifleman, Frontier Circus, Decision, The Texan, Cheyenne, The Tall Man, Fair Exchange, Bonanza, The Andy Griffith Show, The Rebel, Tales of Wells Fargo, Hazel, McKeever and the Colonel, The Lucy Show, The Beverly Hillbillies, Gomer Pyle, USMC, Destry, The Fugitive, The Virginian, The Invaders, Girl from U.N.C.L.E., Mr. Terrific, Ben Casey, The Littlest Hobo, The Addams Family as Mother Lurch, The Donna Reed Show, Daniel Boone, Rango, The Farmer’s Daughter, The F.B.I., Honey West, Get Smart, Batman, The Big Valley, The High Chaparral, The Guns of Will Sonnett, Lancer, Nanny and the Professor, Cannon, Night Gallery, Hawaii Five-O and Tenafly. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 17, 1999, A22; New York Times, Apr. 18, 1999, 47; People, May 3, 1999, 93; Variety, Apr. 26, 1999, 59.

Cordic, Rege Radio personality and actor Rege Cordic died of brain cancer and complications from pneumonia at a Los Angeles hospital on April 16, 1999. He was 72. Cordic was born in Pennsylvania in 1926. He began working in radio in Pittsburgh in the early 1940s and became a leading on air personality for several decades. He moved to California in 1965 as a disk jockey for KNX, but his show was canceled after a year and a half due to poor ratings. Cordic began a career as a character actor, often playing doctors or judges. He was featured in several films including Woody Allen’s Sleeper (1973), Newman’s Law (1974), The Wild Party (1975), Obsession (1976), Telefon (1977), John Hus (1977) and Americathon (1979). He also appeared in numerous television productions including the tele-films Ritual of Evil (1969), The Priest Killer (1971), The Face of Fear (1971), Death Takes a Holiday (1971), A Death of Innocence (1971), Target Risk (1975), Law of the Land (1976), The Man with the Power (1977), The Testimony of Two Men (1977), Standing Tall (1978) and The Golden Gate Murder (1979). His other television credits include episodes of The Outsider, The Flying Nun, Gunsmoke, The Name of the Game, Night Gallery, Emergency!, The Sixth Sense, Kung Fu, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, The Streets of San Francisco, The Six Million Dollar Man, The Hardy Boys/ Nancy Drew Mysteries, Future Cop, Wonder Woman,

53

1999 • Obituaries

Logan’s Run, The Incredible Hulk and Young Maverick. Cordic was also a popular voice actor performing the role of the Clock in 1977’s The Mouse and His Child. He was also heard in such series as The Scooby-Doo/Dynomutt Hour, Spider-Man, The Transformers, Challenge of the Go-Bots and Pirates of Darkwater. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 19, 1999, A14.

Corea, Nicholas J. Television producer, director and writer Nicholas J. Corea died of cancer in Burbank, California, on January 17, 1999. He was 56. Corea began his career as a writer with the 1973 police novel A Cleaner Breed. He began working in television in the late 1970s, producing and scripting many episode of The Incredible Hulk series from 1978 through 1982. Corea also worked as producer, scripter, and sometimes director for such series as Baa Baa Black Sheep, Airwolf, Street Hawk, Outlaws, Hard Time on Planet Earth, Gavilan and Renegades. Corea also produced, directed and scripted the 1981 tele-film Archer: Fugitive from the Empire. He served as executive producer and screenwriter for the J.O.E. & the Colonel telefilm in 1985 and also directed The Incredible Hulk Returns in 1988. Corea had been a writer and consultant on Chuck Norris’ Walker, Texas Ranger series since 1994. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 22, 1999, A28.

Corio, Ann Burlesque queen Ann Corio died in an Englewood, New Jersey, hospital on March 1, 1999. She was 85. The auburn-haired performer was born in Hartford, Connecticut, and began dancing in burlesque while still in her teens. She became one of the leading names in striptease acts, ranking with Gypsy Rose Lee, Georgia Southern and Lili St. Cyr. Her popularity led to several film roles in the 1940s including Swamp Woman (1941), Sarong Girl (1942), Jungle Siren (1942), The Sultan’s Daughter (1944) and Call of the Jungle (1944). Ms. Corio also toured with stage productions of White Cargo, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and Rain. She conceived the long-running show This Was Burlesque in 1962, opening Off-Broad-

Ann Corio

way with Ms. Corio as writer, director and star. It remained popular in several incarnations over the next two decades and was filmed for HBO. New York Times, Mar. 9, 1999, C27.

Costa e Silva, Manuel Portuguese film director Manuel Costa e Silva died in Lisbon of heart failure on January 25, 1999. He was 60. Costa e Silva was born on March 19, 1938. He began working in films as a cinematographer on such Portuguese features as Se Deus Quiser (1966), Uma Abelha na Chuva (1971), Doomed Love (1978), O Barao de Altamira (1986), Solo de Violino (1990), Family Portrait (1991), Clouds (1991), Ladrao Que Rouba a Anao Tem Cem Anos de Prisao (1992) and A Viagem (1994). He also directed a handful of films including Um Caso de Agricultura de Grupo (1970), A Escola Tecnica de Enfermeiras (1970), A Grande Roda (1970), Eleicoes 75 (1975), Junho no Alto Aletejo (1978) and Moura Encantada (1985).

Couch, Bill Stuntman Bill Couch died in late February of 1999. Couch began his career in films in the

Obituaries • 1999

54

late 1950s. He worked on numerous films including The King’s Pirate (1967), The Split (1968), Logan’s Run (1976), King Kong (1976), Thank God It’s Friday (1978), The Last Embrace (1979), Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979), Meteor (1979), The First Deadly Sin (1980), The Final Countdown (1980), The Blues Brothers (1980), Dead and Buried (1981), Earthbound (1981), Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982), Strange Brew (1983), Brainstorm (1983), Ghostbusters (1984), Into the Night (1985), Explorers (1985), Poltergeist II: The Other Side (1986) and Hiding Out (1987). He also worked on the tele-film Police Story: The Freeway Killings (1987) and Montana (1990), and such series as Wild Wild West and The Munsters.

Craigie, Jill Jill Craigie

British documentary film director Jill Craigie died of a heart condition in a London hospital on December 13, 1999. She was 85. Craigie was born in London on March 7, 1914. She was best known for writing and directing the 1946 documentary The Way We Live, depicting the rebuilding of the town of Plymouth following the damage caused by World War II. She also directed 1949’s Blue Scar, about the life of Welsh coal miners. Craigie also directed 1944’s Out of Chaos and scripted the films The Million Pound Note (1953) and Windom’s Way (1958). She is survived by her husband, Michael Foot, the former leader of the British Labour Party. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 26, 1999, B5; New York Times, Dec. 19, 1999, 67; Times (of London), Dec. 15, 19a.

and Double Dynamite (1951). He began writing for television in the early 1950s, supplying jokes and comedy routines for such stars as Milton Berle, Abbott and Costello, Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, Danny Thomas, Henny Youngman and Red Skelton. He was the principal writer for the Jackie Gleason Cavalcade of Stars variety show, where he created the comedy sketch in 1951 that evolved into the popular television series The Honeymooners. Crane continued to write jokes until becoming seriously ill earlier in the year. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 15, 1999, A22; New York Times, Sept. 20, 1999, A15; Time, Sept. 27, 1999, 33; Variety, Sept. 20, 1999, 100.

Crichton, Charles Crane, Harry Comedy writer Harry Crane died of cancer at his Beverly Hills home on September 13, 1999. He was 85. Crane was born in Brooklyn in 1914. He began his career as a standup comic in the early 1930s. He subsequently went to Hollywood, working at MGM as a writer. Crane scripted the 1943 Laurel and Hardy comedy Air Raid Wardens. He also worked on the scripts for such films as Lost in a Harem (1944), Two Sisters from Boston (1946), The Harvey Girls (1946), Song of the Thin Man (1947), Take Me Out to the Ball Game (1949)

British film director Charles Crichton died at his home in London after a brief illness on September 14, 1999. He was 89. Crichton was born in Wallasey, England, on August 6, 1910. He began his career in films as an editor in the 1930s, working on such productions as Sanders of the River (1935), Things to Come (1936), Elephant Boy (1936) and Old Bill and Son (1940), The Thief of Bagdad (1940). He made his directoral debut on the 1941 short The Young Veterans, and directed his first feature, For Those in Peril for Ealing in 1944. The following year he directed a segment of the classic British horror anthology film Dead

55 of Night. His other films include The Girl on the Canal (1945), Hue and Cry (1947), Against the Wind (1948), Another Shore (1948), a segment of Train of Events (1949), Dance Hall (1950), The Lavender Hill Mob (1951), The Stranger in Between (1952), The Titfield Thunderbolt (1953), The Love Lottery (1954), The Divided Heart (1954), Decision Against Time (1956), Law and Disorder (1958), Floods of Fear (1958) which he also scripted, The Battle of the Sexes (1959), The Boy Who Stole a Million (1960), The Third Secret (1964) and He Who Rides a Tiger (1965). Crichton was scheduled to direct Burt Lancaster in Birdman of Alcatraz in 1963, but a dispute with the star led to him leaving the picture in mid-production. From the mid–1960s Crichton primarily worked in television, directing episodes of The Avengers, Man of the World, Secret Agent, Man in a Suitcase, Man of the World, The Protectors, The Adventures of Black Beauty, The Protectors, Space: 1999, Shirley’s World, The Strange Report, The Professionals, Dick Turpin, The Return of the Saint and Smuggler. He returned to directing films when John Cleese convinced him to direct the 1988 comedy A Fish Called Wanda, also starring Jamie Lee Curtis and Kevin Kline. Crichton was nominated for an Academy Award for his efforts.

1999 • Obituaries Los Angeles Times, Sept. 16, 1999, A22; New York Times, Sept. 16, 1999, C24; People, Oct. 4, 1999, 115; Time, Sept. 27, 1999, 33; Times (of London), Sept. 15, 1999, 19a; Variety, Sept. 20, 1999, 100.

Crisp, Quentin British writer and performer Quentin Crisp died at his London home on November 21, 1999.

Quentin Crisp

Charles Crichton

He was 90. He was born Denis Pratt in Sutton, England, on December 28, 1908. Known for his eccentric behavior and open homosexuality, Crisp was best known for his 1968 autobiography, The Naked Civil Servant. The book was filmed starring John Hurt in 1975. Crisp came to New York in the early 1980s, where he was a popular lecturer and talk show guest. He appeared as Dr. Zalhus in the 1985 version of Frankenstein, The Bride, starring Sting and Jennifer Beals. He also appeared as Queen Elizabeth I in the 1992 film adaptation of Virginia Woolf ’s Orlando. Crisp also had roles in To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar (1995), Desolation Angels (1995) and Homo Heights (1998), and was featured as himself in the films Resident Alien (1991), Naked in New York (1994) and The Celluloid

Obituaries • 1999 Closet (1995). He also appeared in a 1987 episode of The Equalizer on television. Crisp was also the author of several other books including How to Become a Virgin and New York Diaries. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 22, 1999, A20; New York Times, Nov. 22, 1999, A29; People, Dec. 6, 1999, 117; Time, Dec. 6, 1999, 41; Times (of London), Nov. 22, 1999, 21a; Variety, Nov. 29, 1999, 68.

Croft, Mary Jane Actress Mary Jane Croft Lewis died of natural causes in Century City, California, on August 24, 1999. She was 83. Croft was best known as Lucille Ball’s comic sidekick, Mary Jane Lewis, on the television series The Lucille Ball Show and Here’s Lucy in the 1960s. Croft previously starred with Lyle Talbot as Clara and Joe Randolph, the next-door neighbors on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet from 1956 to 1966. She also appeared as Daisy Enright in Our Miss Brooks from 1952 to 1954 and was the voice of Cleo the Basset Hound on The People’s Choice in 1955. She was featured as Betty Ramsey in Lucille Ball’s first television series, I Love Lucy, in 1957, and appeared in the 1958 film Kathy O’. Ms. Croft began her career on radio in Cincinnati before moving to Los Angeles.

56 Los Angeles Times, Aug. 25, 1999, A16; People, Sept. 13, 1999, 103; Variety, Aug. 30, 1999, 166.

Cucciola, Riccardo Italian actor Riccardo Cucciola died in Italy on September 17, 1999. He was 75. Cucciola was born in Bari, Italy, on September 5, 1924. He began his career in radio and became one of the Italian film industry’s leading voice dubbers. He was also a popular television performer, appearing in a production of Treasure Island in 1954. Cucciola appeared in numerous films from the 1950s, notably Attack and Retreat (1965), Francesco d’Assisi (1966), Six Days a Week (1966), Bandits in Rome (1968), The Sexual Revolution (1968), Grand Slam (1968), Dirty Money (1971), Sacco and Vanzetti (1971) as Nicola Sacco, The Sensual Sicilian (1973), The Assassination of Matteotti (1973), Sexy Relations (1974), Mario Bava’s Rabid Dogs (1974), Blood on the Streets (1974), It Is Raining on Santiago (1975) and The Boy from Ebalus (1984). He was also seen in the tele-film Sophia Loren: Her Own Story (1980) and the 1982 miniseries Marco Polo. Cucciola remained active in Italian films and television until shortly before his death.

Riccardo Cucciolla

D’Amato, Joe

Mary Jane Croft

Italian film director Aristide Massaccesi, who directed numerous horror films under the names Joe D’Amato, Peter Newton, Kevin Mancuso, David Hills and other pseudonyms, died of a heart attack in Rome on January 23, 1999. He

57

1999 • Obituaries

Joe D’Amato

was 62. Massaccesi was born on December 15, 1936. He began directing films in the late 1960s with a handful of spaghetti westerns including Per mille dollari al giorno (aka Renegade Gunfighter) (1966), Passa Sartana … e l’ombra della tua morte (aka Sartana and His Shadow of Death) (1968), Una Lunga fila di croci (aka Hanging of Django) (1969) and Per una bara piena di dollari (aka A Barrel Full of Dollars) (1970). He also directed numerous crime thrillers and adult features. D’Amato was best known for his gory horror and science fiction features including The Devil’s Wedding Night (1972), Death Smiles on a Murderer (1973), Francoise and Emmanuelle — The Little Sisters (1976), Black Cobra (1976), Trap Them and Kill Them (1978), Erotic Nights of the Living Dead (1979), Buried Alive (1979), Porno Holocaust (1980), Voodoo Baby (1980), The Grim Reaper (aka Anthropophagous) (1981), Caligula II: The Untold Story (1981), Monster Hunter (aka Absurd) (1982), Ator, the Fighting Eagle (1983), 2020 Texas Gladiators (1984), Raptors (1987), Quest for the Mighty Sword (1990) and Frankenstein 2000 (1992).

Jill Dando

Dando, Jill British BBC television personality Jill Dando was shot to death during an attack by an unknown assailant on her doorstep in Fulham, west London, on April 26, 1999. She suffered a single gunshot wound to the brain. She was 37. Ms. Dando was born in Somerset, England, on November 9, 1961. She began her career as a journalist with the Weston and Somerset newspaper in 1980. Five years later she moved to the BBC radio as a newscaster and the following year she began appearing on television. She was presenter for the BBC’s Breakfast News from 1988. The lovely blonde became known as the “Golden Girl of Television.” She was soon hosting the Six O’Clock News, Holiday and Crimewatch. The latter show was similar to U.S. television’s America’s Most Wanted. Ms. Dando recently began hosting a new show as well, Antiques Investigator. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 30, 1999, A32; Times (of London), Apr. 27, 1999, 23a; Variety, May 3, 1999, 100.

Obituaries • 1999

Danko, Rick Canadian rock musician Rick Danko, who was bass player and singer with the rock group The Band, died in his sleep at his home in Woodstock, New York, on December 10, 1999. He was 56. Danko was born in Simcoe, Ontario, Canada, on December 9, 1943. He began his career at the age of 17, playing with Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks. Danko, with musicians Levon Helm, Robbie Robertson, Garth Hudson and Richard Manuel, backed up Bob Dylan before recording the 1968 album Music from Big Pink. They played at the original Woodstock concert in 1969. The Band recorded such popular rock anthems as “Up on Cripple Creek,” “The Weight” and “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down.” Other albums include The Band, Rock of Ages and The Last Waltz. The Band broke up after in 1976, and Danko began a solo career. The group reunited in 1983. They were inducted into the Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame in 1994. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 11, 1999, A30; New York Times, Dec. 12, 1999, 65; Time, Dec. 20,

58 1999, 39; Times (of London), Dec. 13, 1999, 19a; Variety, Dec. 13, 1999, 121.

Darras, Jean-Pierre French actor Jean-Pierre Darras died of cancer in Paris on July 5, 1999. He was 71. Darras was born in France on November 26, 1927. He was a popular actor from the 1960s, appearing in such films as A New World (1966), Caroline Cherie (1967), Le Tatoue (1968), La Coqueluche (1969), L’Alliance (1970), La Vieille Fille (1971), Elle Court, Elle Court la Banlieue (1972), Le Viager (1972), L’Emmerdeur (1973), Beyond Fear (1974), Let’s Make a Dirty Movie (1975), La Carapate (1978), Signe Furax (1980), For a Cop’s Hide (1981), Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme (1982) and Le Journal d’un Fou (1987). Darras was also a voice actor for the 1985 animated film Asterix Versus Caesar, and narrated the films La Gloire de Mon Pere (1990) and Le Chateau de Ma Mere (1990).

Davidow, Ruth Documentary filmmaker Ruth Davidow died in San Francisco on June 28, 1999. She was 87. Davidow was born in Russia and came to the United States with her mother at the age of three. Davidow served in the anti-Fascist Lincoln Battalion as a nurse during the Spanish Civil War in the mid–1930s. She began making films in the 1980s, creating over 20 documentaries on such subjects as geriatrics, the women’s movement and other political issues. Davidow was featured in the 1991 Oscar-nominated documentary film Forever Activists: Stories from the Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade. She also appeared in the 1983 documentary The Good Fight. Los Angeles Times, July 17, 1999, A18.

Davis, Martin

Rick Danko

Martin Davis, the former chairman of Paramount, died in New York City of a heart attack on October 4, 1999. He was 72. Davis began working in the entertainment industry as an office boy with Samuel Goldwyn Prods. in 1947. He joined Gulf + Western in 1958, and two decades

59

1999 • Obituaries (1950), No Questions Asked (1951), The Turning Point (1952), Guys and Dolls (1955), Which Way to the Front? (1970), Love at First Bite (1979), Loose Shoes (1980), The Sting II (1983), Flicks (1987), Rock ’n’ Roll High School Forever (1990), The Dark Backward (1991), Life Stinks (1991) and Ed Wood (1994). Dayton appeared regularly as Hank Pivnik in the All in the Family television series from 1977 until 1979, and reprised the role in the sequel series Archie Bunker’s Place from 1979 until 1981. He was also featured in the tele-films Kill Me If You Can (1977), Advice to the Lovelorn (1981), Shannon’s Deal (1989) and 83 Hours ’Til Dawn (1990). His other television credits include episodes of Joey Faye’s Frolics, Keep on Talking, Texaco Star Theater, Barney Miller, Charlie’s Angels, Wonder Woman, CHiPs, M*A*S*H, Police Squad!, Mama’s Family, Dallas, Father Dowling Mysteries, ER, The Nanny, Mad About You, Caroline in the City and Friends. Dayton was also a Clio Award-winning director of television commercials. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 11, 1999, A28; New York Times, Feb. 12, 1999, B11; People, Mar. 1, 1999, 89; Variety, Feb. 15, 1999, 74.

Martin Davis

later he replaced company founder Charles Bluhdorn as chairman. Davis restructured the company, which owned Paramount Films, in the 1980s and what remained of the company was renamed Paramount in 1989. Paramount merged with Viacom in 1994 and Davis stepped down as chairman. He remained on the board of directors. He formed a private investments firm in 1995. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 6, 1999, C5; New York Times, Oct. 6, 1999, B14; Time, Oct. 18, 1999, 41; Variety, Oct. 11, 1999, 166.

Dayton, Danny Actor Danny Dayton died of emphysema in Los Angeles on February 6, 1999. He was 75. Dayton was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, in 1924. He began his career on Broadway after serving in World War II. He performed in productions of such plays as A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum and High Button Shoes. He made his film debut in the early 1950s, appearing in such features as At War with the Army

Danny Dayton

Dean, Eddie Eddie Dean, a singing cowboy star of the 1930s and 1940s, died in Newhall, California, on

Obituaries • 1999

60 (1948), The Hawk of Powder River (1948), Prairie Outlaws (1948), The Tioga Kid (1948), Tornado Range (1948) and The Westward Trail (1948). Dean also starred as the Marshal in the shortlived 1950 ABC Western series The Marshal of Gunsight Pass and played a policeman in several episodes of The Beverly Hillbillies in 1963. Dean was a popular guest at Western and nostalgia conventions over the past several decades. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 5, 1999, A22; Variety, Apr. 5, 1999, 158.

De Hoyos, Kitty

Eddie Dean

March 4, 1999. He was 91. Dean was born Edgar Dean Glosup in Posey, Texas, in 1907. He began his career performing on radio in the Midwest before moving to Hollywood in 1936. Dean starred in numerous westerns over the next several decades including Western Jamboree (1938), Law of the Pampas (1939), The Llano Kid (1939), the 1939 serial The Lone Ranger Rides Again, Range War (1939), Renegade Trail (1939), The Golden Trail (1940), Hidden Gold (1940), Knights of the Range (1940), The Light of Western Stars (1940), Oklahoma Renegades (1940), Santa Fe Marshal (1940), The Showdown (1940), Stagecoach War (1940), Down Mexico Way (1941), Gauchos of El Dorado (1941), Kansas Cyclone (1941), Pals of the Pecos (1941), Rollin’ Home to Texas (1941), Sierra Sue (1941), Trail of the Silver Spurs (1941), Arizona Stagecoach (1942) Fighting Bill Fargo (1942), The Lone Rider and the Bandit (1942), Raiders of the West (1942), Stagecoach Express (1942), King of the Cowboys (1943), Song of Old Wyoming (1945), Wildfire (1945), The Caravan Trail (1946), Colorado Serenade (1946), Driftin’ River (1946), Romance of the West (1946), Stars Over Texas (1946), Tumbleweed Trail (1946), Wild West (1946), Range Beyond the Blue (1947), Shadow Valley (1947), West to Glory (1947), White Stallion (1947), Wild Country (1947), Black Hills (1948), Check Your Guns

Mexican actress Kitty De Hoyos died of cancer in Mexico City on December 28, 1999. She was 62. She began her career on Mexican television in the mid–1950s and starred in several Mexican films in the 1960s. Her credits include The Masked Avengers (1963), Adventures in the Center of the Earth (1964), The She Wolf (1965), Heroina (1965), Los Cuervos Estan de Luto (1965), Le Sorelle Zorro (1966) and Los Jinetes de la Bruja (1966).

Kitty De Hoyos (as The She Wolf ).

De Normanville, Peter British documentary filmmaker Peter de Normanville died in England on March 7, 1999. He was 76. De Normanville was born on June 29,

61

Peter De Normanville

1922. He joined the London Shell Film Unit after serving in the Royal Air Force during World War II. Working with the unit de Normanville was involved in the production of numerous awardwinning science documentaries including High Speed Flight (1956), Man and Computer (1967), Let There Be Light (1969), Steel Research (1973) and Energy in Perspective (1977). He and his wife, Sarah, also directed the award-winning 1975 documentary about Calcutta, India, Living City. Times (of London), Mar. 27, 1999, 24c.

1999 • Obituaries Yum Tree (1963), The Wheeler Dealers (1963), Good Neighbor Sam (1964), Send Me No Flowers (1964), Hush…Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964) for another Academy Award nomination, Cat Ballou (1964), The Flight of the Phoenix (1965), The Glass Bottom Boat (1966), Texas Across the River (1966), The Ballad of Josie (1967), Caprice (1967), The Dirty Dozen (1967), The Happening (1967), Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967) receiving another Oscar nomination, The Legend of Lylah Clare (1968), Krakatoa, East of Java (1969), Ulzana’s Raid (1972), Emperor of the North (1973), The Longest Yard (1974), Doc Savage (1975), Hustle (1975), Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo (1977), The Frisco Kid (1979), Herbie Goes Bananas (1980) and …All the Marbles (1981). DeVol’s scores where also heard in numerous television series including My Three Sons, Family Affair, The Delphi Bureau, The Brady Bunch, To Rome with Love, The Love Boat, America 2-Night and Highcliffe Manor. He also composed scores for the tele-films The Reluctant Heroes (1971), Female Artillery (1972), Murdock’s Gang (1973), Key West (1973), Panache (1976), The Ghosts of Buxley Hall (1980), Tales of the Apple Dumpling Gang (1982) and The Wild Women of Chastity Gulch (1982). DeVol was also

DeVol, Frank Film and television composer Frank DeVol died of congestive heart failure at a Lafayette, California, nursing home on October 27, 1999. He was 88. DeVol was born in Moundsville, West Virginia, on September 20, 1911. He began performing in his father’s band while in his teens. He performed on radio from the 1930s and was musical director to such stars as Rudy Vallee and Jack Carson. He began working in films in 1954, composing the score to Robert Aldrich’s World for Ransom. He received his first Academy Award nomination for his composition. DeVol’s other scores were heard in the films Kiss Me Deadly (1955), The Big Knife (1955), Attack (1956), The Ride Back (1957), Pillow Talk (1959) which earned him another Oscar nomination, Lover Come Back (1961), Boys’ Night Out (1962), What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962), For Love or Money (1963), The Thrill of It All (1963), Under the Yum

Frank DeVol

Obituaries • 1999 seen on television as the orchestra leader in the series College of Musical Knowledge, The Lux Show Starring Rosemary Clooney, The Betty White Show, The George Gobel Show and The Dinah Shore Chevy Show. He appeared as Myron Bannister in the 1962 comedy series I’m Dickens — He’s Fenster and was band leader Happy Kyne in the 1977 comedy series Fernwood 2-Night. DeVol also appeared in the films The Parent Trap (1961), A Very Special Favor (1965), The Big Mouth (1967) and The Frisco Kid (1979), and in episodes of such television series as Petticoat Junction, I Dream of Jeannie, Bonanza, The Brady Bunch and Charles in Charge. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 29, 1999, A3; New York Times, Oct. 30, 1999, B10; People, Nov. 15, 1999, 225; Variety, Nov. 8, 1999, 52.

Dias Gomes, Alfredo Brazilian screenwriter Alfredo de Freitas Dias Gomes was killed in a tax-bus collision in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on May 18, 1999. He was 77. He was born in Bahia, Brazil, on October 19, 1922. Dias Gomes began writing plays in the early 1940s. His best known play was O Pagador de Promessas (The Payer of Vows), which he adapted into an award-winning film in 1962. He also wrote the popular Brazilian soap operas Roque Santeiro, O Bem Amado and Saramandaia. Los Angeles Times, May 21, 1999, B4; Variety, May 31, 1999, 47.

62 Trial: History-Making Trials from Socrates to Oppenheimer. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 19, 1999, A22; Variety, Mar. 1, 1999, 95.

DiMaggio, Joe Baseball legend Joe DiMaggio died at his home in Hollywood, Florida, after a long battle with lung cancer on March 8, 1999. He was 84. DiMaggio was born in Martinez, California, on November 25, 1914. He began playing professional baseball in the early 1930s and was signed by the Yankees in 1936. The outfielder led the team to nine World Series championships and earned the nicknames Joltin’ Joe and The Yankee Clipper. Military service during World War II interrupted his baseball career for several years. He returned to the Yankees after the war and continued to play under his retirement in 1951. DiMaggio’s career totals were a .325 average and 361 home runs. He was inducted into the

Dickler, Gerald Attorney Gerald Dickler, who represented many show business personalities during the era of the McCarthy blacklist, died of pneumonia at a New York City hospital on February 13, 1999. He was 86. Dickler received his law degree in 1933 and soon became involved as legal counsel to the first radio workers’ union. His work there soon led to an association with broadcaster Lowell Thomas and film director Mike Todd, who he assisted in the promotion of the Cinerama widescreen format. Dickler also represented John Henry Faulk when he was dismissed from CBS radio following allegations of Communist sympathies. He also authored the 1962 book Man on

Joe DiMaggio

63 National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955. DiMaggio was briefly married to legendary Hollywood beauty Marilyn Monroe in 1954. He also appeared as himself in the 1951 fantasy film Angels in the Outfield. Over the next four decades DiMaggio remained in the public eye with a series of product endorsements, notably his commercials for the Mr. Coffee coffee-maker. He was also immortalized by Simon and Garfunkel in the words to “Mrs. Robinson,” the theme for The Graduate—“Where have you gone Joe DiMaggio? A nation turns its lonely eyes to you.” DiMaggio was honored with “Joe DiMaggio Day” on the last day of the 1998 regular baseball season, where he made his last appearance at Yankee Stadium. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 9, 1999, A1; New York Times, Mar. 9, 1999, A1; People, Mar. 29, 1999, 110; Time, Mar. 22, 1999, 92; Times (of London), Mar. 9, 1999, 25a; Washington Post, Mar. 9, 1999, A1.

DiMona, Joseph Author Joseph DiMona died of liver cancer at his Brentwood, California, home on November 6, 1999. He was 76. DiMona was born in

Joseph DiMona

1999 • Obituaries Haddonfield, New Jersey, in 1923. He began his writing career with a collection of short stories, Husbands Who Love Their Wives Are Best, in 1955. DiMona wrote the screen adaptation for Don Knotts’ 1964 partly-animated fantasy film The Incredible Mr. Limpet. He also worked with burlesque queen Ann Corio on her theatrical production This Was Burlesque. He and Corio also produced the photo book The History of Burlesque in the U.S. in 1968. DiMona’s other works include the novels 70 Sutton Place (1972), Last Man at Arlington (1973), The Benedict Arnold Connection (1977) and To the Eagle’s Nest (1978). He coauthored former White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman’s Watergate memoir, The Ends of Power, in 1978. He also collaborated on Frank Costello: Prime Minister of the Underworld (1974) and Coroner at Large (1986) with Los Angeles medical examiner Thomas Noguchi. New York Times, Nov. 11, 1995, B15.

Dmytryk, Edward Film director Edward Dmytryk died of heart and kidney failure at his home in Encino, California, on July 1, 1999. He was 90. Dmytryk was born in Grand Forks, British Columbia, Canada, on September 4, 1908. He began working at Paramount Studios as a messenger while in his teens and began editing films in the early 1930s. He made his directoral debut a few years later, directing The Hawk in 1935. Dmytryk’s other film credits include Television Spy (1939), Golden Gloves (1939), Mystery Sea Raider (1940), Emergency Squad (1940), Her First Romance (1940), Under Age (1941), Sweetheart of the Campus (1941), Secrets of the Lone Wolf (1941), The Devil Commands (1941), Confessions of Boston Blackie (1941), The Blonde from Singapore (1941), Seven Miles from Alcatraz (1942), Hitler’s Children (1942), Counter-Espionage (1942), Tender Comrade (1943), The Falcon Strikes Back (1943), Captive Wild Woman (1943) and Behind the Rising Sun (1943). He received acclaim for his director of the 1944 film noir classic Murder My Sweet starring Dick Powell. He continued to direct such films as Cornered (1945), Back to Bataan (1945), Till the End of Time (1946), So Well Remembered (1947) and Crossfire (1947) until he was investigated by the House Un-American Activities Committee for Communist affiliations.

Obituaries • 1999

64 in a symposium about the blacklist, but his fellow guests refused to share the platform with him. Dmytryk also authored two autobiographies, It’s a Hell of a Life but Not a Bad Living and Odd Man Out, A Memoir of the Hollywood Ten. His survivors include his wife of over fifty years, actress Jean Porter. Los Angeles Times, July 3, 1999, A1; New York Times, July 3, 1999, B6; Times (of London), July 3, 1999, 24c; Variety, July 12, 1999, 52; Washington Post, July 4, 1999, C6.

Edward Dmytryk

Dmytryk became known as one of the “Hollywood Ten” (also including Herbert Biberman, Adrian Scott, Alvah Bessie, Lester Cole, Ring Lardner Jr., John Howard Lawson, Albert Maltz, Samuel Ornitz and Dalton Trumbo). All were cited for contempt of Congress when they refused to answer questions regarding their political affiliations. Dmytryk and the others served a year in jail, after which he went into self-imposed exile in England. He directed the films Give Us This Day (1949) and The Hidden Room (1949) while there. Dmytryk returned to the United States in 1951 and became a friendly witness for the House Un-American Activities Committee. By naming names of other leftist sympathizers in the film industry, Dmytryk’s own name was removed from the blacklist and he was again allowed to direct films in the United States. He subsequent credits include Mutiny (1952), The Sniper (1952), Eight Iron Men (1952), The Juggler (1953), The Caine Mutiny (1954), Broken Lance (1954), The End of the Affair (1954), Soldier of Fortune (1955) with Clark Gable, The Left Hand of God (1955) with Humphrey Bogart, The Mountain (1956), Raintree County (1957) with Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift, The Young Lions (1958), Warlock (1959), The Blue Angel (1959), The Reluctant Saint (1962), Walk on the Wild Side (1962), The Carpetbaggers (1964), Where Love Has Gone (1964), Mirage (1965), Alvarez Kelly (1966), Anzio (1968), Shalako (1968), Bluebeard (1972) with Richard Burton, The Human Factor (1975) and He Is My Brother (1976). Dmytryk apparently never regretted his testimony to the committee, though he was reviled by many of his contemporaries. He was invited to appear as a guest at the Barcelona Film Festival in 1988 and take part

Dodson, Kenneth Military historian Kenneth M. Dodson died of congenital heart disease in Stanwood, Washington, on May 24, 1999. He was 91. Dodson served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He wrote the 1954 book Away All Boats, an account of his wartime activities. The book was filmed two years later starring Jeff Chandler, Lex Barker and Julie Adams. He subsequently wrote the books Stranger to the Shore, China Pirates and Hector the Stowaway Dog, the latter which was also filmed. Dodson completed his final book The Poet and the Sailor, shortly before his death. Los Angeles Times, June 3, 1999, A26; New York Times, June 10, 1999, B12.

Domergue, Faith Faith Domergue, the lovely brunette leading lady of science fiction and western films in the 1950s, died of cancer in Santa Barbara, California, on April 4, 1999. She was 74. Domergue was born in New Orleans on June 16, 1925, and came to California with her family at an early age. She was signed to a contract at RKO by Howard Hughes when she was 15 years old, but years passed before she made her screen debut in Young Widow in 1946. It was several years later before Hughes cast her in a leading role in 1950’s Vendetta. She also starred in such films as Where Danger Lives (1950), The Duel at Silver Creek (1952), The Great Sioux Uprising (1953), This Is My Love (1954) and Santa Fe Passage (1955). She was best known for starring in several classic science fiction films of the period, notably This Island Earth (1954) with Rex Reason and Jeff Mor-

65

1999 • Obituaries

Philip Donnellan Faith Domergue (with aliens Lance Fuller and Jeff Morrow).

row, It Came from Beneath the Sea (1955) and Cult of the Cobra (1955). She appeared in a handful of other films in the 1950s including Soho Incident (1956), The Atomic Man (aka Timeslip) (1956), Violent Stranger (1957) and Escort West (1958). Her screen appearances were infrequent over the next two decades, appearing in California (1963), Voyage to the Prehistoric Planet (1965), Track of Thunder (1965), the 1969 Italian film Una sull’altra (aka One on Top of the Other), The Gamblers (1969), The Man with Icy Eyes (1971), Legacy of Blood (1971) and So Evil, My Sister (aka Psycho Sisters) (1972). Her last film appearance was in the 1974 low-budget horror film The House of Seven Corpses. Ms. Domergue also guest-starred in numerous television series in the late 1950s and early 1960s including episodes of The Rifleman, Sugarfoot, Perry Mason, Cheyenne, Bronco, Colt .45, The Tall Man, Tales of Wells Fargo, Bonanza and Have Gun Will Travel. She was married to Argentine director Hugo Fregonese from 1947 until their divorce in 1961. She later married Italian agent and businessman Paola Cossa. The couple lived primarily in Europe until his death in 1992. Her survivors include her two children, Diana and John Fregonese. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 17, 1999, A22.

Donnellan, Philip British documentary filmmaker Philip Donnellan died in England on February 15, 1999. He was 75. Donnellan was born in Surrey, England, on February 9, 1924. He began his career as an

announcer with the BBC in 1948. He became known for his interviews with the common people and produced such documentaries as Shoals of Herring (1972), The Fight Game (1973), The Big Hewer (1973), Pure Radio and Gone for a Soldier (1980). Many of the documentaries he produced incorporated folk music traditions. He retired in 1981.

Douglas, Robert British actor Robert Douglas died at his Encinitas, California, home on January 11, 1999. He was 89. Douglas was born Robert Douglas Finlayson in Bletchley, England, on November 9, 1909. He began his career on stage in the late 1920s, performing in a production of Many Waters in 1928 and A Bill of Divorcement in 1929. He made his Broadway debut in the early 1930s, appearing in The Last Enemy (1930), Ten Minute Alibi (1933) and Men in White (1934). Douglas made his film debut in the 1931 film version of Many Waters (1931). He was also featured in the films Dr. Josser, K.C. (1931), Blarney Kiss (1933), Death Drives Through (1935), Britain’s first Technicolor feature Over the Moon (1936), Our Fighting Navy (1937), London Melody (1937), The Challenge (1938), The Lion Has Wings (1939) and The Chinese Den (1940). Douglas served in the Royal Navy as a pilot during World War II. After the war he went to Hollywood, where he continued his film career in such features as The End of the River (1947), The Decision of Christopher Blake (1948), Adventures of Don Juan (1948), The Lady Takes a Sailor (1949), Homicide (1949), The Fountainhead (1949), This Side of the Law (1950), Spy Hunt (1950), Mystery Submarine (1950), Kim

Obituaries • 1999

66 Future Cop, Quincy, Streets of San Francisco and Barnaby Jones. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 18, 1999, A24; New York Times, Jan. 16, 1999, C16; Times (of London), Feb. 10, 1999, 19a; Variety, Jan. 25, 1999, 87.

Doyle, Robert Carr

Robert Douglas

(1950), Barricade (1950), Buccaneer’s Girl (1950), The Flame and the Arrow (1950), Thunder on the Hill (1951), Target Unknown (1951), The Prisoner of Zenda (1952), At Sword’s Point (1952), Ivanhoe (1952) with Elizabeth Taylor and Robert Taylor, Flight to Tangier (1953), Fair Wind to Java (1953), The Desert Rats (1953), Saskatchewan (1954), King Richard and the Crusaders (1954), The Scarlet Coat (1955), Good Morning, Miss Dove (1955), The Virginia Queen (1955), Helen of Troy (1956), Tarzan, the Ape Man (1959) and The Young Philadelphians (1959). Douglas also began directing for the stage and television in the 1950s, helming episodes of Twilight Zone, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, 77 Sunset Strip, Hawaiian Eye, Surfside 6, Maverick, Lost in Space, Mission: Impossible, The Virginian, The Monroes and The Invaders. He also directed the 1964 British film Night Train to Paris. Douglas continued to perform, appearing in episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Boris Karloff ’s Thriller, One Step Beyond, Adventures in Paradise, Maverick and The Invisible Man. Douglas appeared in the 1968 film Secret Ceremony and was featured in the tele-films The Questor Tapes (1973) and Columbo: Troubled Waters (1975) and the 1978 Centennial mini-series. Douglas primarily directed during the 1970s and 1980s, helming episodes of The Immortal, Big Hawaii, Shazam!,

Television producer Robert Carr Doyle died of pneumonia in a Washington, D.C. hospital on May 21, 1999. He was 78. Doyle worked with NBC news from 1946 to 1953, where he produced the news program The Huntley-Brinkley Report. He earned an Emmy Award for his work there. He was also involved in the earliest televised productions of national political conventions. Doyle subsequently worked with the National Geographic Society, producing their television specials from 1962 until 1972. Los Angeles Times, May 26, 1999, A22; New York Times, May 24, 1999, B9; Washington Post, May 23, 1999, C6.

Dubelman, Richard S. Richard S. Dubelman died in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, on July 1, 1999. He was 69. Dubelman primarily worked in commercials, earning five Clio Awards for such products as Crackerjacks, Polaroid and the “Hey Mikey” ads for Life Cereal. Dubelman produced the awardwinning NBC tele-film The Execution of Private Slovik in 1974. Variety, Aug. 23, 1999, 120.

Dufour, Yvon French actor Yvon Dufour died on February 11, 1999. He was featured in several films from the early 1970s including Red (1970), Les Beaux dimanches (1974), King Solomon’s Treasure (1977), Angela (1977), The Lucky Star (1980), The Coffin Affair (1980), A Day in a Taxi (1982) and The Boys (1997).

67

Duncan, Robert L. Writer Robert L. Duncan died of pneumonia in Norman, Oklahoma, on January 28, 1999. He was 71. Duncan was the author of over two dozen novels including Brimstone, Firestorm and Dragons at the Gate. He also scripted documentaries and, often with his wife Wanda, episodes of such series as The U.S. Steel Hour, G.E. Theater, The Man from Blackhawk, Riverboat, One Step Beyond, Two Faces West, Dr. Kildare, Bonanza, The Virginian, Custer, Slattery’s People, Lost in Space, Land of the Giants, Time Tunnel and Have Gun, Will Travel. The duo also scripted the films The Marshal’s Daughter (1953) and Black Gold (1963). Los Angeles Times, Feb. 5, 1999, A27.

Durden, Thomas Songwriter Thomas Durden, who wrote the lyrics to the Elvis Presley hit recording “Heartbreak Hotel,” died of cancer at his home in Houghton Lake, Michigan, on October 17, 1999. He was 79. Durden was born in Morgan County, Georgia, on December 15, 1919. He began playing the guitar professionally with the group Smiling Jack Herring and His Swing Billies in the 1950s. Durden also played with such performers as Tex Ritter and Johnny Cash. He penned the song “Heartbreak Hotel” with Mae Boren Axton, the mother of singer Hoyt Axton, in 1956. Durden also recorded two gospel albums —I Believe and Tommy Durden Moods. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 22, 1999, A34; New York Times, Oct. 24, 1999, 45.

1999 • Obituaries Jake the Plumber. Dvorska retired from films with the advent of the talkies. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 31, 1999, A25.

Edison, Sweets Jazz trumpeter Harry “Sweets” Edison died of cancer at his home in Columbus, Ohio, on July 27, 1999. He was 83. Edison was born in Columbus on October 10, 1915. He began performing professionally in the early 1930s, playing with the Jeter-Pillars Orchestra. He went to New York in 1937 and soon joined Count Basie’s orchestra. He played with Basie’s band on such notable recordings as “Swingin’ the Blues,” “Every Tub” and “Sent for You Yesterday.” Edison also recorded with Billie Holiday in the late 1930s. Basie’s band broke up in 1950 and Edison relocated to Los Angeles. He played with bands led by Quincy Jones, Buddy Rich and Henry Mancini. He continued to perform and record through the 1990s. Los Angeles Times, July 28, 1999, A14; New York Times, July 29, 1999, C25; Time, Aug. 9, 1999, 19; Times (of London), July 29, 1999, 25a; Variety, Aug. 23, 1999, 120.

Dvorska, Jesse Vaudeville and silent film performer Jesse Dvorska died in a Westwood, California, hospital on December 27, 1999. He was 101. Dvorska was born in Kovno, Lithuania, in 1898. He immigrated to the United States in 1914, where he began dancing at vaudeville shows. He went to Hollywood in 1920, appearing as a dancer in a Lon Chaney film. He continued to perform in silent films, starring in a series of shorts called

Sweets Edison

Edwards, Ben Broadway stage designer Ben Edwards died of pneumonia and lymphoma at his Manhattan home on February 12, 1999. He was 82. Edwards

Obituaries • 1999

Ben Edwards

was born in Union Springs, Alabama, in 1916. He studied to become a scenic designer and worked on productions at the Federal Theater on Broadway in the late 1930s. He resumed his career after serving in the Army Air Corps during World War II. He created sets for productions of Medea, A Matter of Gravity and West Side Waltz. Edwards was one of Broadway’s most prolific set designers, working on Time of the Cuckoo, Waltz of the Toreadors, More Stately Mansions, Purlie Victorious, and revivals of Death of a Salesman with Dustin Hoffman, The Iceman Cometh and Long Day’s Journey into Night. Edwards also designed sets for the films Lovers and Other Strangers (1970), Fort Apache, the Bronx (1981) and Sweet Liberty (1986). He continued to work on Broadway through the 1990s, designing Vita and Virginia and the 1996 revival of A Thousand Clowns. Often nominated to Tony Awards, he was given the Lifetime Achievement Award in 1998. New York Times, Feb. 16, 1999, C12.

68 Edwards was born in New Jersey in 1918. He was a rodeo rider before injuries ended his riding career. He became a New York model before going to Hollywood in the early 1940s. He was featured in such films as The Hard Way (1942), The Gay Sisters (1942), Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), Now, Voyager (1942), Adventures in Iraq (1943), You Can’t Ration Love (1944), Our Hearts Were Young and Gay (1944), Hail the Conquering Hero (1944), Duffy’s Tavern (1945), Our Hearts Were Growing Up (1946), Miss Susie Slagle’s (1946), The Virginian (1946), Danger Street (1947), Trail of the Yukon (1949), Ladies of the Chorus (1949), Home in San Antone (1949), The Fighting Stallion (1950), Border Outlaws (1950) and The First Legion (1951). Edwards became a successful painter and illustrator in the 1950s. He still continued to make occasional films including The Naked Truth (1957), The Mouse That Roared (1959), the 1959 science fiction film First Man Into Space, Floods of Fear (1959), The War Lover (1962), The Primitives (1962), The Mouse on the Moon (1963), The Bedford Incident (1965), A Married Couple (1969) and Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970). He was also seen on television in episodes of Bonanza and Big Hawaii. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 4, 2000, A17.

Bill Edwards (left, with Marla Landi and Marshall Thompson from First Man Into Space).

Edwards, Bill

Edwards, Meredith

Actor Bill Edwards died in Newport Beach, California, on December 21, 1999. He was 81.

Welsh character actor Meredith Edwards died in Denbighshire, Wales, on February 8,

69

1999 • Obituaries and the tele-films The Christmas Stallion (1992) and Christmas Reunion (1993). He also remained a leading performer on the Welsh stage and Welsh-language television. Times (of London), Feb. 18, 1999, 25a.

Edwards, Paddi

Meredith Edwards

1999. He was 81. Edwards was born in Rhosllannerchrugog, Wales, on June 10, 1917. He began his career on the stage in Wales and, later, Liverpool. He made his film debut in the 1950 Ealing comedy A Run for Your Money. He remained a familiar face in such British films as Midnight Episode (1950), The Magnet (1950), The Blue Lamp (1950), Where No Vultures Fly (1951), The Lavender Hill Mob (1951), The Gambler and the Lady (1952), The Cruel Sea (1953), To Dorothy a Son (1954), Meet Mr. Malcolm (1954), Mad About Men (1954), Burnt Evidence (1954), Lost (1955), Peril for the Guy (1956), The Long Arm (1956), Circus Friends (1956), Law and Disorder (1958), Dunkirk (1958), The Electronic Monster (1958), Tiger Bay (1959), The Trials of Oscar Wilde (1960), Doctor in Love (1960), Flame in the Streets (1961), Mix Me a Person (1962), Only Two Can Play (1962), This Is My Street (1963), Go to Blazes! (1963), The Great St. Trinian’s Train Robbery (1966) and Gulliver’s Travels (1977). Edwards was also featured in episodes of numerous British television series from the 1960s including The Adventures of Robin Hood, The Baron, Coronation Street, Gideon’s Way, One Step Beyond, The Saint, Z Cars, My Partner, the Ghost and Sky. His more recent credits include the 1987 film Going Home

Voice performer Paddi Edwards died of respiratory failure at her Encino, California, home on October 18, 1999. She was 67. Edwards was born in England in 1932. Her raspy voice made her a popular performer in animated films and television series. She was heard as Flotsam and Jetsam, the villainous eel sidekicks in the 1989 Disney film The Little Mermaid, and was heard in Disney’s 101 Dalmatians (1996) and Hercules (1997). Edwards was also the voice of Gozer in the 1984 comedy Ghostbusters. She also voiced roles in the Disney television series Pepper Ann and Hercules. Edwards was also seen on screen in the films Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982), To Be or Not to Be (1983), Blue City (1986), Surrender (1987), Stewardess School (1987) and Caged Fear (1992). She was also featured in the tele-films Rape and Marriage: The Rideout Case (1980), Life of the Party: The Story of Beatrice (1982), Wait Till You Mother Gets Home! (1983), One Cooks, the Other Doesn’t (1983), The Murder

Paddi Edwards

Obituaries • 1999 of Sherlock Holmes (1984), Fatal Vision (1984), It Came Upon the Midnight Clear (1984), Under the Influence (1986), The Last Fling (1987), Deadly Care (1987), Secret Witness (1988) and Casualties of Love: The Long Island Lolita Story (1993). Her other television credits include episodes of CHiPs, Newhart, Tales of the Gold Monkey, Voyagers!, Murder, She Wrote, Cheers, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Veronica Clare, Night Court, Married … with Children and Ellen.

Elliott, Ross Veteran character actor Ross Elliott died of cancer at the Motion Picture Home in Calabasas, California, on August 12, 1999. He was 82. Elliott began his career on radio in the late 1930s. He worked with Orson Welles’ Mercury Theater and was featured in Welles’ famed radio production of War of the Worlds. Elliott served in the army during World War II and was featured in both the stage and film productions of Irving Berlin’s This Is the Army. He continued acting after the war, appearing in such films as The Burning Cross (1947), Angel on the Amazon (1948), The Gal Who Took the West (1949), Woman on the Run (1950), Tyrant of the Sea (1950), Dynamite Pass (1950), the 1950 serial Cody of the Pony Express, Chinatown at Midnight (1950), Desert of Lost

Ross Elliott

70 Men (1951), Chicago Calling (1951), I Can Get It for You Wholesale (1951), Hot Lead (1951), Affair in Trinidad (1952), Tumbleweed (1953), Problem Girls (1953), The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953), Ma and Pa Kettle at Home (1954), Dragnet (1954), Massacre Canyon (1954), Tarantula (1955), Carolina Cannonball (1955), Women’s Prison (1955), The Indestructible Man (1956) with Lon Chaney, Jr., D-Day the Sixth of June (1956), Chain of Evidence (1957), African Manhunt (1957), Monster on the Campus (1958), As Young As We Are (1958), Never So Few (1959), Tammy Tell Me True (1961), The Final Hour (1962), The Crawling Hand (1963), The Lively Set (1964), Wild Seed (1965), Day of the Evil Gun (1968), Kelly’s Heroes (1970), Skyjacked (1972), Rape Squad (1974), The Towering Inferno (1974) and Gable and Lombard (1976). Elliott was best known for his work on television, appearing in recurring roles on The Jack Benny Show and I Love Lucy as Ricky Ricardo’s agent. He appeared in several episodes of Wyatt Earp as brother Virgil in 1959. He was also featured as Lee Baldwin on the daytime soap opera General Hospital from 1963 to 1965 and was Sheriff Abbott on The Virginian from 1966 to 1970. Elliott’s other television credits include episodes of Superman, The Lone Ranger, Broken Arrow, The Adventures of Jim Bowie, Science Fiction Theatre, Zane Grey Theater, The Thin Man, Fury, Panic, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, One Step Beyond, Men into Space, Trackdown, Perry Mason, The M Squad, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Mystery Show, Boris Karloff ’s Thriller, Michael Shayne, Private Detective, The Texan, Rawhide, Gunsmoke, Pony Express, Maverick, The Rebel, Mr. Lucky, Laramie, Stagecoach West, Adventure Theater, Death Valley Days, Cheyenne, Colt .45, The Andy Griffith Show, Mr. Ed, Hawaiian Eye, Surfside Six, Wagon Train, Sugarfoot, The Twilight Zone, The Dakotas, A Man Called Shenandoah, The Dick Van Dyke Show, Petticoat Junction, The Rifleman, Bonanza, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Pistols ’n’ Petticoats, Time Tunnel, The Invaders, I Spy, The Mod Squad, Wild Wild West, The Men from Shiloh, Kung Fu, Mission: Impossible, The F.B.I., Ironside, Emergency!, Shazam!, Here’s Lucy, The New Adventures of Perry Mason, Columbo, The Bionic Woman, The Six Million Dollar Man, Wonder Woman, Little House on the Prairie and The A-Team. He was also seen in the tele-films Crowhaven Farm (1970), Paper Man (1971), See the Man Run (1971), The Track-

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1999 • Obituaries

ers (1971), The Longest Night (1972), The Victim (1972), Runaway! (1973), Linda (1973) and 1985’s Alfred Hitchcock Presents. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 18, 1999, A18; New York Times, Aug. 24, 1999, B11; People, Sept. 13, 1999, 103; Variety, Sept. 27, 1999, 161.

Enders, Ruth Children’s television personality Ruth Enders Tripp died in New York after a long illness on July 28, 1999. She was 79. She was born in Ridgefield, Park, New Jersey, in 1920. She began her career on stage and made her Broadway debut in the production of George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart’s The American Way. She was married to Paul Tripp, and assisted her husband in the publication of his classic children’s story Tubby the Tuba. She and her husband subsequently worked on various children’s shows for television. They co-starred on the CBS series Mr. I. Magination from 1949 until 1952, and hosted Birthday House from 1963 to 1969. Tripp also appeared in the 1965 film The Christmas That Almost Wasn’t. Variety, Aug. 9, 1999, 52.

Ernst, Robert L. Film and television editor Robert L. Ernst died of cancer in Los Angeles on January 14, 1999. He was 70. Ernst worked as a still photographer before getting into film. He served as an editor on such 1950s television productions as The Lone Ranger and Kingdom of the Sea. Ernst also worked with John Wayne’s Batjac Productions and Medallion TV. He edited the 1985 film Hell Squad and recently completed the film Hollywood Mafia.

Etcheverry, Michel French actor Michel Etcheverry died in Paris in March of 1999. He was 79. Etcheverry was born in Saint Jean de Luz, France, on December 16, 1919. He was featured in such French films as Sans Laisser d’Adresse (1951), La Tour de Nesle (1954), Rasputin (1954), The Sorceress (1955), Caroline and the Rebels (1955), Toute la Ville Accuse (1956), Honore de Marseille (1956), The Hunch-

Michel Etcheverry (right, with Fabrice Luchini from Percival).

back of Notre Dame (1956) with Anthony Quinn, The Horror Chamber of Dr. Faustus (aka Eyes Without a Face) (1959), Un Temoin Dans la Ville (1959), Double Agents (1959), Signe Arsene Lupin (1959), Julie the Redhead (1959), Les Amours Celebres (1961), The Golem (1966), Is Paris Burning? (1966), Female Prisoner (1968), The Milky Way (1969), Perceval (1978), I … Comme Icare (1979), Tangos, l’Exile de Gardel (1985) and Une Femme Francaise (1995).

Everett, Francine Black actress, singer and dancer Francine Everett died in a Bronx, New York, nursing home on May 27, 1999. She was 79. Everett was born in North Carolina on April 13, 1917. She began appearing on stage in the early 1930s and was soon appearing with the Federal Theater in Harlem. She moved to Hollywood after marrying actor Rex Ingram, though she refused to appear in films in stereotypical black roles of the time. She divorced Ingram in 1939 and returned to New York, where she began starring in allblack films including Paradise in Harlem (1939), Keep Punching (1939) with boxer Henry Armstrong, Big Timers (1945), Tall, Tan, and Terrific (1946), and Dirty Gertie from Harlem U.S.A. (1946). She was also featured as a singer in

Obituaries • 1999

72 from 1938 until the late 1940s and also hosted the television incarnation of the program in the early 1950s. Fadiman hosted several other television shows in the 1950s and early 1960s including What’s in a Word, This Is Show Business and Alumni Fun. Los Angeles Times, June 22, 1999, A24; New York Times, June 21, 1999, B8; People, July 5, 1999, 152; Time, July 5, 1999, 29; Variety, June 28, 1999, 83.

Francine Everett

numerous short musical films including Ebony Parade (1947). She ended her film career in Hollywood with performances in Lost Boundaries (1949) and 1950’s No Way Out with Sidney Poitier. Following her retirement from show business, she worked as a Harlem Hospital clerk until 1985. Los Angeles Times, June 22, 1999, A24; New York Times, June 20, 1999, 39; Variety, June 28, 1999, 83.

Fadiman, Clifton Writer, editor and radio and television personality Clifton Fadiman died of pancreatic cancer in Sanibel Island, Florida, on June 20, 1999. He was 95. Fadiman was born in Brooklyn, New York, on May 15, 1904. Fadiman was an editor at Simon & Schuster publishers for many years and was also the book editor for The New Yorker magazine from 1933 until 1943. He served as host of the popular radio program Information Please

Clifton Fadiman

Fadiman, William Film producer William James Fadiman died at a Los Angeles hospital of injuries suffered in a fall on July 30, 1999. He was 90. Fadiman, the younger brother of writer Clifton Fadiman, began working in Hollywood as a story editor at RKO in the 1940s. Fadiman began his career in films as a story editor at RKO. He served as executive assistant to Dore Schary from 1947 before becoming a producer at Columbia, where he produced the films Bad for Each Other (1954), Jubal (1956) and The Last Frontier (1956). He also produced 1963’s Rampage. He subsequently served as Columbia’s executive story editor. In the early 1960s he worked with Seven Arts as a literary advisor. He was the author of the books Hollywood Now, Shivering in the Sun and The Clay Oscar. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 3, 1999, A14; New York Times, Aug. 7, 1999, C16.

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1999 • Obituaries

Fairbairn, Bruce Actor Bruce Fairbairn died in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, on May 17, 1999. He was 52. Fairbairn was born on February 19, 1947. He starred as Officer Chris Owens in the television drama series The Rookies from 1974 through 1976 and was Bobby Danzig in the television drama Behind the Screen in 1981. He also played Ray Geary in the prime-time soap opera Knots Landing in 1984. Fairbairn was also featured in a handful of films including Vampire Hookers (1979), Nightstick (1987), The Hanoi Hilton (1987) and Cyclone (1987). He also appeared in the 1989 tele-film Do You Know the Muffin Man? and was seen in episodes of such television series as Charlie’s Angels, The Incredible Hulk, Knight Rider, Baywatch and Matlock. Lee Falk

Bruce Fairbairn

Falk, Lee Lee Falk, the creator of the popular syndicated comic strips Mandrake the Magician and The Phantom, died of congestive heart failure in Manhattan on March 13, 1999. He was 82. Falk was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on April 28, 1911. He created the crime fighting magician and hypnotist Mandrake and his assistant Lothar while still in college. The comic strip was syndicated

by King Features from 1934. Phil Davis served as artist until his death in 1964. Fred Fredericks has been drawing the strip ever since. Mandrake was adapted into a serial in 1939 starring Warren Hull, and Coe Norton played the magician in a 1954 television pilot. A 1979 tele-film Mandrake the Magician, starred Anthony Herrera as Mandrake and Ji-Tu Cumbuka as Lothar. Falk developed purple-suited champion of jungle justice, The Phantom, in 1936. Known as “the GhostWho-Walks,” the current Phantom, Kit Walker, is one of a long-line of heroes who have passed the mantle from father to son. The Phantom was also adapted into a serial starring Tom Tyler in 1943, and Billy Zane played the character in the 1996 film of the same name. Both Mandrake and The Phantom have also been popular in cartoons, comic books and novels. Falk was also a theatrical producer and director in the 1940s and 1950s and scripted several musicals including Happy Dollar and Mandrake the Magician and the Enchantress. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 16, 1999, A18; New York Times, Mar. 15, 1999, B8.

Feast, Fred British character actor Fred Feast died of abdominal cancer in Bridlington, Yorkshire,

Obituaries • 1999

74 (1941), Honeymoon for Three (1941), Navy Blues (1941), The Great Mr. Nobody (1941), Desperate Journey (1942), All Through the Night (1942), Watch on the Rhine (1943), In Our Time (1944), The Conspirators (1944), Between Two Worlds (1944), Devotion (1946), A Stolen Life (1946), Nobody Lives Forever (1946), Humoresque (1946), The Voice of the Turtle (1947), Possessed (1947), Romance on the High Seas (1948), John Huston’s Key Largo (1948), The Inspector General (1949), Beyond the Forest (1949), The Girl from Jones Beach (1949), Rocky Mountain (1950), The Damned Don’t Cry (1950), I Confess (1953), House of Wax (1953), Alfred Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder (1954) and Land of the Pharaohs (1955). Fehr also served as head of post-production at Warner from 1951 until his retirement in 1976. He subsequently worked with Francis Ford Coppola’s Zoetrope Studios. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 20, 1999, A24; Variety, May 10, 1999, 150.

Fred Feast

England, on June 25, 1999. He was 69. Feast was born in Scarborough, Yorkshire, on October 5, 1929. Feast was best known for his role as barman Fred Gee in the popular British television series Coronation Street from 1975 until 1984. Feast also appeared as Jeff Mallock in the series All Creatures Great and Small and was featured in the 1998 film Little Voice. Times (of London), June 29, 1999, 23a.

Fehr, Rudi Film editor Rudi Fehr died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on April 16, 1999. He was 87. Fehr began his career in Berlin in the early 1930s, but left Germany when the Nazis came to power. He edited Sam Spiegel’s 1935 Buster Keaton film The Invader (aka An Old Spanish Custom) in England before coming to the United States in 1936. He initially worked for Warner Brothers as a translator of German films into English. He soon became an assistant editor and subsequently edited the 1940 film My Love Came Back. He also served as editor on such films as Million Dollar Baby

Fest, Manfredo Brazilian jazz pianist Manfredo Fest died while awaiting a liver transplant in Palm Harbor, Florida, on October 8, 1999. He was 63. Fest, who was legally blind from birth, was an early pioneer of the bossa nova music movement in the 1960s. He came to the United States in 1967, where he continued to perform Brazilian and American jazz. He spent two years with Sergio Mendes’ Brazil 66 as a keyboard player and arranged. Variety, Oct. 18, 1999, 55.

Fitfield, Elaine Australian ballerina Elaine Fitfield died in Perth, Australia, on May 11, 1999. She was 68. Fitfield was born in Australia on October 28, 1930. She studied dance from an early age and joined the Sadler’s Wells Theatre Ballet in 1947. She received acclaim for her starring role in John Cranko’s comedy ballet Pineapple Poll in 1951. She continued to perform in England until returning to Australia in 1957. She danced with the Australian ballet until retiring the following year. She returned to the stage in 1964, performing in pro-

75

1999 • Obituaries Cello Concerto. She studied with Pablo Casals in 1950 before returning the England to tour with the Fidelio Ensemble. She won several international competitions and continued to study and perform during the 1950s and 1960s. She formed the Fleming String Trio in the mid–1960s and performed with pianist Bernard Roberts and violinist Manoug Parikian in the 1970s. A stroke in 1993 forced her to retired from concerts, though she continued to teach. New York Times, Aug. 2, 1999, A13; Times (of London), July 30, 1999, 27a.

Forrest, George Songwriter George Forrest died in Miami, Florida, on October 10, 1999. He was 84. He was born George Forrest Chichester, Jr., in Brooklyn, on July 31, 1915. Forrest and partner Richard Wright scored the 1937 Nelson Eddy–Jeannette MacDonald film Maytime for MGM. They were best known for the songs “Stranger in Paradise” and “Baubles, Bangles and Beads” from the 1958 hit Broadway musical Kismet, which earned them

Elaine Fitfield

ductions of Rudolf Nureyev’s Raymonda, Frederick Ashton’s The Dream, Giselle and Coppelia, before again retiring in 1971.

Fleming, Amaryllis Cellist Amaryllis Fleming died on July 27, 1999. She was 73. She was born in Chelsea, England, on December 10, 1925, the illegitimate daughter of famed painter Augustus John and socialite hostess Eve Fleming. Her half-brothers included James Bond creator Ian Fleming and explorer and travel writer Peter Fleming. Amaryllis began playing the cello in 1934, and made her professional debut in 1944, performing Elgar’s

George Forrest

Obituaries • 1999 a Tony Award. Forrest and Wright also received Oscar nominations for the songs “Always and Always,” “It’s a Blue World” and “Pennies for Peppino.” They also wrote songs for theatrical productions of The Song of Norway, Magdalena, Anya and 1989’s Grand Hotel. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 13, 1999, A16; New York Times, Oct. 12, 1999, B13; Time, Oct. 25, 1999, 48; Variety, Oct. 18, 1999, 55.

76 and a Sailor (1944), Bathing Beauty (1944), You Came Along (1945), Sing Along with Me (1952), The Louisiana Hussy (1959) and Emergency (1962). Los Angeles Times, July 13, 1999, A18; New York Times, July 13, 1999, A15; People, July 26, 1999, 87; Times (of London), July 15, 1999, 29a; Variety, July 19, 1999, 40.

Forrest, Ray Forrest, Helen Big band singer Helen Forrest died of congestive heart failure at the Motion Picture and Television Country Home in Woodland Hills, California, on July 11, 1999. She was 82. Ms. Forrest was born Helen Fogel in Atlantic City, New Jersey, on April 12, 1918. Ms. Forrest began singing in the 1930s, performing with such top big band leaders as Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman and Harry James. She recorded over 500 songs during her career including the hits “All the Things You Are,” “Any Old Time,” “Taking a Chance on Love,” “I Don’t Want to Walk Without You” and “The Man I Love.” She also appeared in a handful of films including Ghost City (1932), Springtime in the Rockies (1942), Two Girls

Helen Forrest

Pioneer television personality Ray Forrest died at a hospital near his Kinnelon, New Jersey, home on March 11, 1999. He was 83. Forrest was born Raymond Feuerstein in Germany in 1915. He came with his family to the United States in 1923. He was working with NBC radio when regular television programming was inaugurated at the New York World’s Fair in April of 1939. He soon became the first regular announcer for NBC’s experimental station W2XBS. Forrest covered the first televised political convention in 1940 and did the first live television commercial for Adam hats in 1941. He also announced the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor the following December. Forrest’s career was interrupted by World War II. He returned to television after the war, hosting the 1947 cooking show In the Kelvinator Kitchen and TV Screen Magazine in 1948 and 1949. Forrest hosted the educational Children’s Theater on WNBC from 1949 until 1960. Forrest left television when that program went

Ray Forrest

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1999 • Obituaries

off the air and subsequently worked in his family’s jewelry business in Paterson, New Jersey. New York Times, Mar. 21, 1999, 47.

France, Van Arsdale Van Arsdale France, the long-time trainer of employees at Disneyland, died of pneumonia at a Newport Beach, California, hospital on October 13, 1999. He was 87. France was born near Seattle, Washington, in 1912. He worked in labor relations before being hired by Disney to set up an employee training program for Disneyland, which opened in 1955. France created the manual that trained people in guest reception while dressed as Mickey Mouse or Snow White. He continued to head what came to be called the Disney University until his retirement in 1978. He remained a consultant with Disney until his death. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 15, 1999, A30; New York Times, Oct. 25, 1999, A29; Variety, Oct. 25, 1999, 55.

Anne Francine

Francine, Anne

Van Arsdale France

Actress and singer Anne Francine died at a London, Connecticut, hospital on December 3, 1999. She was 82. Francine was born in Philadelphia on Aug. 8, 1917. She began her career in the 1930s as a cabaret performer in New York. She performed throughout Europe in the mid–1940s, singing her renditions of songs by Jerome Kern and Cole Porter. She made her Broadway debut in 1954’s production of By the Beautiful Sea. She also performed in productions of The Great Sebastians, The School for Scandal, 1966’s Mame and the musical’s 1983 revival. She appeared in several films during her career including Stand Up and Be Counted (1972), Savages (1972) and Crocodile Dundee (1986). She was best known on television for her role as Flora Simpson Reilly in

Obituaries • 1999 Barbara Eden’s 1981 sit-com Harper Valley P.T.A. She was also featured in an episode of Mission: Impossible in 1972. She continued to perform until she was crippled by a stroke in 1992. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 9, 1999, A49; New York Times, Dec. 7, 1999, C31.

Frank, Horst German character actor Horst Frank died of heart failure in Heidelberg on May 25, 1999. He was 69. Frank was born in Lubceck, Germany, on May 28, 1929. He began appearing in German films in the late 1950s. He portrayed the evil Dr. Ood in the 1959 horror film The Head. He appeared in numerous other European films, often thrillers, mysteries or spaghetti westerns, including Boomerang (1959), Rebel Flight to Cuba (1959), Rosemary (1960), The Angry Young Men (1960), Dead Run (1961), The Girl of the Moors (1961), Indecent (1962), Pirates of the Mississippi (1963), The Black Panther of Ratana (1963), The White Spider (1963), Cave of Diamonds (1964), Mystery of the Red Jungle (1964), Black Eagle of Santa Fe (1964), Bullets Don’t Argue (1964), Mas-

78 sacre at Marble City (1964), The Corpse of Beverly Hills (1965), I Deal in Danger (1966), Johnny Hamlet (1966), Red-Dragon (1967), The Vengeance of Fu Manchu (1968), Get the Coffin Ready (1968), The Moment to Kill (1968), Deadly Sanctuary (aka Justine) (1968), So Sweet, So Perverse (1969), Hate Thy Neighbor (1969), Cat O’Nine Tails (1971), Blood (1971), The Dead Are Alive (1972), Big Showdown (1972), Carambola (1974), Albino (1976), The Elixirs of the Devil (1976) and Operation Ganymed (1977). Frank remained active in German films and television, appearing often in the Tatort series, up until his death.

Franklin, Harry S. Screenwriter Harry S. Franklin died at a Los Angeles hospital after short illness on March 7, 1999. He was 88. Franklin was in the special services under General Douglas MacArthur during World War II, where he wrote and produced documentaries including The Army Big Picture series. Franklin went to Hollywood after the war, where he directed the 1952 film Red Snow and scripted 1956’s The Brave One. He also worked in television on such series as The Cisco Kid, Meet McGraw, Sea Wolf and Maverick. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 16, 1999, A18; Variety, May 24, 1999, 85.

Freda, Riccardo

Horst Frank

Italian film director Riccardo Freda died in Roma, Queensland, Australia, on December 20, 1999. He was 90. Freda was born of Italian parents in Alexandra, Egypt, on February 24, 1909. He worked as a sculptor and journalist before beginning his career in films in the late 1930s as a screenwriter. He made his directoral debut a few years later, helming such Italian features as Don Cesare di Bazan (1942), Non Canto Piu (1943), Tutta la Citta Canta (1945), The Black Eagle (1946), Les Miserables (1947), Il Cavaliere Misterioso (1947), Guarany (1948), Double Cross (1949), Son of d’Artagnan (1949), Il Conte Ugolino (1949), O Cacula do Barulho (1949), See Naples and Die (1951), Spartaco (1952), La Leggenda del Piave (1952) and Theodora, Slave Empress (1954). Freda was a pioneer in the Italian horror film genre,

79

1999 • Obituaries Iguana with a Tongue of Fire (1971), Liz and Helen (1972), Superhuman (1979) and 1980’s Unconscious (aka Fear, Delirium and Murder Obsession). Freda largely retired from films in the early 1980s.

Frederick, Hazel Hazel Frederick, who was seen as the puzzled looking woman in the opening segment of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, died at a Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, hospital on November 28, 1999. She was 91. Frederick’s face was captured on film while a crew shot the opening for Moore’s show in 1969. Frederick remained anonymous until 1996, when she joined Mary Tyler Moore at a book signing. Moore referred to her as “my co-star,” as they both signed autographs. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 1, 1999, A28.

Fredericks, Dean Actor Dean Fredericks, who was best known for starring as comic book hero Steve Canyon in the 1950s television series, died of cancer on June 30, 1999. Fredericks was born Frederick J. Foote in Los Angeles on January 21, 1924. FredRicardo Freda

directing 1956’s I Vampiri (aka The Devil’s Commandment). Freda was also billed under the pseudonym Robert Hampton when his films were released in the United States. He was also credited on occasion as George Lincoln, Willy Pareta and Robert Davidson. He directed Trapped in Tangiers in 1957, followed by the horror classic, Caltiki, the Immortal Monster (1959), with Italian horror legend Mario Bava as his assistant and cinematographer. Freda’s other film credits include The White Warrior (1959), The Giants of Thessaly (1960), The Witch’s Curse (1960), Samson and the Seven Miracles of the World (1961), The Seventh Sword (1962), The Horrible Dr. Hichcock (1962), The Ghost (1963), The Magnificent Adventurer (1963), 1964’s Romeo and Juliet, The Two Orphans (1965), the 1965 spy thriller The Exterminators, Tap for the Assassin (1966), Coplan III (1966), Death Does Not Count the Dollars (1967), Between the Nets (1967), Double Face (1969), The

Dean Fredericks (as Steve Canyon).

Obituaries • 1999

80

ericks began his film career in the mid–1950s. Billed as Norman Frederic in his early roles, he was featured as Kassim in the 1955 television series Jungle Jim. He also appeared in the films Rails into Laramie (1954), Them! (1954), Utah Blaine (1957), The Disembodied (1957), The Lone Ranger and the Lost City of Gold (1958) and The Light in the Forest (1958). He portrayed Lt. Col. Steve Canyon for a season in 1958 and was Crowfeather in the Daniel Boone mini-series on Walt Disney Presents in 1960. He starred in the classic science fiction film Phantom Planet in 1961. His other film credits include Wild Harvest (1961), The Final Hour (1962) and Savage Sam (1963). Fredericks was a familiar face on numerous Western television series, appearing in episodes of The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, Cheyenne, Circus Boy, Gunsmoke, Bronco, Rawhide, The Rifleman, Maverick, Laramie, The Deputy and The Virginian.

French, Jacqueline Actress Jacqueline French died in a Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, nursing home on December 7, 1999. She was 80. She was born Jacqueline Sherbondy in Detroit in 1919. She was featured in a handful of films from the 1970s including The Out-of-Towners (1970), The Great Gatsby (1974), Stardust Memories (1980), Good Will Hunting (1997) and Steven Spielberg’s Amistad (1997). She also performed frequently on stage, starring in productions of Macbeth and Oh Dad, Poor Dad, Momma’s Hung You in the Closet and I’m Feelin’ So Sad.

French, Leslie British actor Leslie French died on January 21, 1999. He was 94. French was born in Bromley, Kent, England, on April 23, 1904. French began his career on stage at an early age. He was best known for his performances as Puck in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, a role he began in 1929 and played over 4,000 times. He also appeared in productions of Antony and Cleopatra, Twelfth Night, Much Ado About Nothing, The Taming of the Shrew and King Lear. French was also featured in over a dozen films in England and Italy beginning with 1936’s Peg of

Leslie French (with Nini Theilade).

Old Drury. His other film credits include This England (1941), Orders to Kill (1958), The Scapegoat (1959), The Malpas Mystery (1960), The Singer Not the Song (1961), The Rescue Squad (1963), The Leopard (1963), More Than a Miracle (1967), Death in Venice (1971) and the 1987 James Bond film The Living Daylights with Timothy Dalton. French also appeared on British television in a 1980 production of Henry IV, Part II and in the 1986 mini-series The Singing Detective. His other television credits include episodes of The Protectors, The Avengers, Mystery and Imagination, Jason King, Interpol Calling, Man of the World and Dr. Who. Times (of London), Jan. 25, 1999, 23a.

Fulson, Lowell Blues singer and musician Lowell Fulson died of complications from kidney disease, diabetes and congestive heart failure in Long Beach, California, on March 6, 1999. He was 77. Fulson was born on an Oklahoma Choctaw Indian reservation on March 31, 1921. He began performing

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Funt, Allen

Lowell Fulson

gospel and country music before joining Texas Alexander’s country-blues band in 1939. Fulson served in the Navy during World War II and remained in California after the war. He recorded the hit song “Three O’Clock Blues” in 1948. Fulson performed with such artists as Ray Charles, Ike Turner and King Curtis. His hit recordings include “Blue Shadows” and “Everyday I Have the Blues.” He also wrote hit songs recorded by other artists including Elvis Presley’s “Reconsider Baby” and Otis Redding and Carla Thomas’ “Tramp.” Fulson continued to record and perform through the 1990s. He was nominated for a Grammy Award for his 1995 album Them Update Blues. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 12, 1999, A22; New York Times, Mar. 14, 1999, 48; Times (of London), Apr. 12, 1999, 25a; Variety, Mar. 15, 1999, 58.

Allen Funt, the creator and host of the popular long-running television series Candid Camera, died of complications from a stroke at his Pebble Beach, California, home on September 5, 1999. He was 84. Funt was born in Brooklyn, New York, on September 16, 1914. Funt had worked in radio before serving in the Army during World War II. After the war Funt created the Candid Microphone radio program, which evolved into Candid Camera for early television in 1948. Funt also hosted the program, which would capture unsuspecting people placed in absurd situations on a hidden camera, until ending their befuddlement with the phrase “Smile, you’re on Candid Camera!” The show continued in syndication in several incarnations for nearly 30 years. Funt also created several films with similar themes including What Do You Say to a Naked Lady? (1970) and Money Talks (1972). Funt continued to be involved actively with Candid Camera until a stroke forced his retirement in 1993. Funt’s son, Peter, assumed his father’s position with the show, co-hosting Candid Camera with Suzanne Somers on CBS since 1998. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 7, 1999, A3; New York Times, Sept. 7, 1999, B9; People, Sept. 20, 1999, 259; Time, Sept. 20, 1999, 23; TV Guide, Oct. 9, 1999, 5; Variety, Sept. 20, 1999, 100.

Allen Funt

Obituaries • 1999

Gail, Philippa British actress Philippa Gail died of cancer in England on July 25, 1999. She was 56. Ms. Gail was born in Bishop’s Stortford, England, on August 16, 1942. She was a popular stage performer from the 1960s, starring in numerous productions of Shakespeare including A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Twelfth Night. She was a star on British television as Jane Webb in the popular 1965 series The Troubleshooters. She also appeared in such series as Giants on Saturday, Triangle, Brett, Man in a Suitcase and Coronation Street. Gail also appeared in the films This Is My Street (1963) and Ring of Bright Water (1969), and a television production of A Fatal Inversion in 1991. She continued to perform on stage until her retirement in 1996. Times (of London), Aug. 31, 1999, 19a.

82 Mexican wrestler of the 1940s and 1950s, Galindo appeared in over 20 Mexican wrestling films including La Bestia Magnifica (1953) and Santo vs. the Vampire Women (1962), Santo in the Wax Museum (1963) and Santo and Blue Demon vs. the Monsters (1969).

Galindo, Hector Alejandro Mexican film director Hector Alejandro Galindo died of a heart attack in Mexico City on February 1, 1999. He was 92. Hector Alejandro Galindo Amezcua was born in Monterrey, Mexico, on January 14, 1906. He directed over 70

Philippa Gail

Galindo, Cavernario Mexican wrestler-actor Rodolfo “Cavernario” Galindo Ramirez died of lung cancer in Mexico on July 19, 1999. He was 82. A leading

Hector Alejandro Galindo

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1999 • Obituaries

Mexican films from the late 1930s through the mid–1980s. Galindo began working in films in Hollywood as a editor, assistant director and Spanish translator at MGM. He returned to Mexico in 1930 where he scripted several films. He made his director debut on the 1937 film Almas Rebeldes. His other film credits include Mientras Mexico Duerme (1939), El Monje Loco (1940), Konga Roja (1943), La Sombra de Chuco el Roto (1944), Campeon sin Corona (1945), Una Familia de Tantas (1948), Hay Lugar Para … Dos (1948), Cuatro contra el Mundo (1949), Dona Perfecta (1950), El Ultimo Round (1952), Los Dineros del Diablo (1952), Espaldas Mojadas (1953), La Duda (1953), Tres Melodias de Amor (1955), Hora y Media de Balazos (1956), Manos Arriba (1957), Raffles (1958), El Supermacho (1958), Manana Seran Hombres (1960), Cristo 70 (1969), San Simon de los Magueyes (1972), Crimen de Amor (1972), Que te vaya Bonito (1977), Milagro en el Circo (1978), Dimas de Leon (1979), El Sexo de los Pobres (1981), El Color de Nuestra Piel (1981) and Lazaro Cardenas (1985). Los Angeles Times, Feb. 11, 1999, A28.

Gardner, Joan Actress Joan Gardner Korda died of cancer at her Beverly Hills home on September 17, 1999. She was 84. She was born in Chesham, England, in 1915 and began her film career with Alexander Korda’s London Films in the early 1930s. She was seen in such films as Wedding Rehearsal (1932), The Man Outside (1933), Catherine the Great (1934), The Private Life of Don Juan (1934), Barnacle Bill (1935), Men of Tomorrow (1935), The Scarlet Pimpernel (1935), Dark Journey (1937), Forever Yours (1937), The Man Who Could Work Miracles (1937), The Girl Thief (1938), The Challenge (1939), The Rebel Son (1939) and Wings Over Africa (1939). She married Korda’s brother, director Zoltan Korda, in the mid–1930s and retired from the screen at the end of the decade. She and Korda remained married until his death in 1961. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 3, 1999, B9.

Ricardo Garibay

Garibay, Ricardo Mexican author and screenwriter Ricardo Garibay died of cancer in Mexico on May 4, 1999. He was 76. Garibay was born in Tulancingo, Mexico, on January 18, 1923. He began writing screenplays for Mexican films in the 1940s, scripting such movies as The Soldiers of Pancho Villa (1958) and Little Red Riding Hood (1960). Garibay was also a leading journalist and novelist, whose works include Drinking a Chalice (1965) and The House That Burns at Night (1975). He served as the host of literary programs on television from the mid–1970s.

Garland, Mignon Dancer Mignon Garland died at her San Pablo, California, home on September 15, 1999. She was 91. She was born in Brooklyn, New York,

Obituaries • 1999

84

Gelin, Xavier French actor Xavier Gelin died of cancer in Paris on July 2, 1999. He was 53. Gelin was the son of French stars Daniel Gelin and Daniele Delorme. Gelin appeared in supporting roles in nearly 20 films during his career. His credits include L’Ours et la Poupee (1969), The Devil by the Tail (1969), Macedoine (1971), Claude Lelouche’s Adventure, It’s Adventure (1972), The Mad Adventures of Rabbi Jacob (1973), S*P*Y*S (1974), The Slap (1974), La Belle Emmerdeuse (1977), Signe Furax (1980) and Roulez Jeunesse (1993). Gelin also directed and scripted the films Coup de Jeune (1992) and L’Homme Ideal (1997), and served as a producer on several films including The Woman in Red (1984), The Man with One Red Shoe (1985), Chronicle of a Death Foretold (1987), Mister Frost (1990) and War of the Buttons (1994)

Gershwin, Frances Frances “Frankie” Gershwin Godowsky, the sister of composer George and lyricist Ira Gersh-

Mignon Garland

in 1908, and studied ballet as a child. She trained with Anna Duncan and Irma Duncan, students of legendary dancer Isadora Duncan, and attended Duncan’s Russian school in Moscow in 1931. She returned to the United States in 1933 and helped to form the New Duncan Dancers. Nine years later she founded the Contemporary Duncan Dancers to further promote the legacy of Isadora Duncan’s style and technique. Garland moved to California in 1957 where she continued to teach and perform. Her last public recital was in 1989. New York Times, Sept. 24, 1999, B11. Frances Gershwin

85 win, died in New York City on January 18, 1999. She was 92. Gershwin was born in Manhattan on December 26, 1906. She began performing in Tin Pan Alley shows as a child. She also appeared in several Broadway productions as a singer in the 1920s. Frances assisted her brothers on many of their songs, singing them at George’s apartment in New York. She declined to continue her professional career, marrying Leopold Godowsky, the co-inventor of Kodachrome film, in 1930. She became a successful painter and did not resume singing until the 1970s, recording the 1975 album Frances Sings for George and Ira. She was widowed in 1983. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 21, 1999, A20; New York Times, Jan. 20, 1999, B9; Time, Feb. 1, 1999, 21; Variety, Feb. 1, 1999, 74.

1999 • Obituaries moved to Los Angeles in the 1940s, where she appeared in the films The Red Menace (1949), Undercover Girl (1950), An Annapolis Story (1955), the 1958 horror classic The Fly and The Miracle of the Hills (1959). She was also the narrator for the 1950 Disney film Cinderella. Ms. Gerson was also active on television, appearing in episodes of Perry Mason, Wanted — Dead Or Alive, The Untouchables, 77 Sunset Strip, The Dick Van Dyke Show and Twilight Zone. One of her final roles was as the voice of Francis in the 1997 animated film Cats Don’t Dance. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 15, 1999, B6; People, Feb. 1, 1999, 69; TV Guide, Apr. 3, 1999, 4; Variety, Jan. 18, 1999, 147.

Gil, Alfredo Gerson, Betty Lou Actress Betty Lou Gerson died of a massive stroke at a Los Angeles hospital on January 12, 1999. She was 84. Ms. Gerson was best known as the voice of the evil Cruella De Vil in the 1961 Disney animated classic 101 Dalmations. Gerson was born in Chattanooga, Tennessee, on April 20, 1914. She began her acting career on the radio in the mid–1930s, appearing in such dramas as Grand Hotel and The Lux Radio Theater. She

Mexican singer Alfredo ‘El Guero’ Gil, died of pulmonary emphysema in Mexico City on September 10, 1999. He was 84. Gil, who was born in Puebla, Mexico, in 1915, was the last surviving member of the popular romantic singing trio Los Panchos. He and musicians Chucho Navarro and Hernando Aviles formed the group in New York in the 1940s. The trio became popular with such songs as “Besame Mucho” (“Kiss Me”) and “Sin Ti” (“Without You”). They were also featuring in over 50 Mexican films from the 1940s including Fantasia Andaluza (1954), Aventuras del Barbero de Sevilla (1953), Serrania (1954) and El Hincha (1958). Los Angeles Times, Sept. 12, 1999, B5; New York Times, Sept. 16, 1999, C23.

Gilbert, Edmund

Betty Lou Gerson

Actor and voiceover artist Edmund Gilbert died of lung cancer at his Beverly Hills home on May 8, 1999. He was 67. Gilbert appeared often on television from the 1960s and was featured in episodes of Combat!, The Rogues, Wild Wild West and Mission: Impossible. He was also featured as Fenton Hardy in The Hardy Boys Mysteries from 1977 to 1979. Gilbert also appeared in the films 36 Hours (1964) and Johnny Got His Gun (1971), and the 1982 pilot tele-film for Knight Rider. As a voice actor, Gilbert was heard on numerous animated series including The Transformers, G.I. Joe,

Obituaries • 1999

86 songs for the films Swiss Family Robinson (1960), Savage Sam (1963), The Three Lives of Thomasina (1964), The Moon-Spinners (1964) and The Jungle Book (1967). His popular tune for the latter, “The Bare Necessities,” was nominated for an Academy Award. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 20, 1999, A20; Variety, Oct. 25, 1999, 55.

Gilman, Peter

Edmund Gilbert

The Jetsons, Kissyfur, InHumanoids, BraveStarr, Tale Spin, Captain Planet and the Planeteers, The Toxic Crusaders, The Tick, Aladdin, Spider-Man, Freakazoid!, Road Rovers, Gargoyles and Superman, and was the voice of Emperor Gorganus in the live-action series Tattooed Teenage Alien Fighters from Beverly Hills in 1994. He was also heard in the films Transformers: The Movie (1986), The Rescuers Down Under (1990), Tom and Jerry: The Movie (1992), Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (1993), The Pagemaster (1994), Black Scorpion (1995), Batman & Mr. Freeze: SubZero (1990) and Scooby Doo on Zombie Island (1998). Variety, May 24, 1999, 85.

Novelist Peter Gilman died in Hilo, Hawaii, on September 1, 1999. He was 73. Gilman was working as a reporter for The Honolulu Star-Bulletin in the 1950s when he authored the novel Such Sweet Thunder. The book became a bestseller and was bought by Columbia Pictures in 1959. The following year it was filmed as Diamond Head starring Charlton Heston. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 7, 1999, A22; New York Times, Sept. 6, 1999, B7.

Glanville, Christine Christine Glanville, the British puppeteer who worked with producer Gerry Anderson on

Gilkyson, Terry Songwriter and actor Hamilton “Terry” Gilkyson died in Austin, Texas, on October 15, 1999. He was 82. Gilkyson was born in Mont Clare, Pennsylvania, in 1916. He began his songwriting career in the late 1940s and had his first hit with Frankie Laine’s rendition of “Cry of the Wild Goose” in 1950. Gilkyson also wrote such songs as Dean Martin’s “Memories Are Made of This,” “Greenfields” and “Marianne.” He appeared in the western films Slaughter Trail (1951) and Star in the Dust (1956). He was lyricist for the theme of the 1960 television series Stagecoach West. Gilkyson worked often for Disney, writing

Christine Glanville (being held by Thunderbirds’ Alan Tracy puppet).

87 numerous television series, died on February 28, 1994. She was 74. Ms. Glanville was born Nancy Fletcher in Halifax, West Yorkshire, England, on October 24, 1924. She began working with puppets in the 1950s and joined with Gerry Anderson on his first series, The Adventures of Twizzle in 1957. She continued to work with Anderson on his subsequent series Four Feather Falls, Supercar, Fireball XL5, Stingray, Thunderbirds, Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons, Joe 90 and The Secret Service, designing many of the marionette characters who populated the shows. She also worked on several feature films based on the characters including Thunderbirds Six and Thunderbirds Are Go. During the 1970s she toured with her own puppet show before reuniting with Anderson for Terrahawks in the early 1980s. Ms. Glanville also worked on Dire Straits music video Calling Elvis and the 1998 film version of The Avengers. Times (of London), Apr. 3, 1999, 24c.

1999 • Obituaries

Goff, Ivan

89. Goff was born in Perth, Australia, in 1910. He began writing for the screen in the early 1940s. His film credits include My Love Came Back (1940), Sunset in Wyoming (1941), I Was a Criminal (1945), Prejudice (1948), White Heat (1949) starring James Cagney, Backfire (1950), Goodbye, My Fancy (1951), Come Fill the Cup (1951), Captain Horatio Hornblower (1951), O. Henry’s Full House (1952), White Witch Doctor (1953), King of the Khyber Rifles (1953), Green Fire (1954), Serenade (1956), the 1957 Lon Chaney bio-film Man of a Thousand Faces which earned him an Oscar nomination with frequent writing partner Ben Roberts, Band of Angels (1957), Shake Hands with the Devil (1959), Portrait in Black (1960) and Midnight Lace (1960). Goff and Roberts began writing for television in the 1960s, scripting The Rogues. They created the Charlie’s Angel series in 1976, and also produced such series as Mannix, Logan’s Run, Time Express and 1981’s Nero Wolfe, and the tele-film The Killer Who Wouldn’t Die (1976). Los Angeles Times, Sept. 25, 1999, A20; New York Times, Sept. 25, 1999, B7.

Screenwriter Ivan Goff died in Santa Monica, California, on September 23, 1999. He was

Gold, Ernest

Ivan Goff

Oscar-winning film composer Ernest Gold died of complications from a stroke at a Santa Monica, California, hospital on March 17, 1999. He was 77. Gold was born in Vienna, Austria, on July 13, 1921. He was involved in music from an early age, composing an opera at the age of thirteen. He accompanied his family to the United States following Germany’s annexation of Austria in 1938. He began composing scores for films in the 1940s. His numerous credits include The Girl of the Limberlost (1945), Smooth as Silk (1946), Wyoming (1947), Lighthouse (1947), Exposed (1947), Old Los Angeles (1948), Unknown World (1951), Jennifer (1953), The Naked Street (1955), Running Target (1956), Too Much, Too Soon (1958), Tarzan’s Fight for Life (1958), The Screaming Skull (1958), Wink of an Eye (1958), The Defiant Ones (1958), The Young Philadelphians (1959) and Battle of the Coral Sea (1959). Gold received an Academy Award nomination for his score for On the Beach in 1959, and was awarded an Oscar for his work on Exodus in 1960. The Exodus score also received two Grammy Awards. Gold continued to work on such films as Inherit

Obituaries • 1999

88 1938, and became president of United Paramount Theaters in 1951. He bought the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) network in 1953. Goldenson encouraged Hollywood studios to produce quality programming for television, resulting in such popular series for the network as The Untouchables, 77 Sunset Strip and Leave It to Beaver. During his tenure Goldenson also encouraged such programming as Monday Night Football, Movie of the Week, the first mini-series, Alex Haley’s Roots and Nightline. Goldenson arranged the networks merger with Capital Cities in 1985. He authored his autobiography, Beating the Odds, in 1991. Variety, Jan. 3, 2000, 90.

Ernest Gold

the Wind (1960), The Last Sunset (1961), A Fever in the Blood (1961), Judgment at Nuremberg (1961), Pressure Point (1962), It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (1963) receiving an Oscar nomination for score and best song, A Child Is Waiting (1963), Ship of Fools (1965), the Oscar-nominated The Secret of Santa Vittoria (1969), Fun with Dick and Jane (1977), Cross of Iron (1977), Tom Horn (1977), The Runner Stumbles (1979), Good Luck, Miss Wyckoff (1979) and Safari 3000 (1982). He also worked on the tele-films Marciano (1979), Wallenberg: A Hero’s Story (1985) and Dreams of Gold: The Mel Fisher Story (1986). Los Angeles Times, Mar. 19, 1999, A28; New York Times, Mar. 21, 1999, 47; Time, Mar. 29, 1999, 43; Variety, Mar. 22, 1999, 52.

Goldenson, Leonard Television executive Leonard H. Goldenson died at his Sarasota, Florida, home on December 27, 1999. He was 94. Goldenson was born in Scottdale, Pennsylvania, in 1905. He attended Harvard University, graduating from Harvard Law School. He helped reorganize the film theaters run by the bankrupt Paramount Pictures in

Leonard Goldenson

Goldstone, James Veteran television director James Goldstone, who directed the second pilot episode of the original Star Trek series, died of cancer at his Shaftsbury, Vermont, home on November 5, 1999. He was 68. Goldstone was born in Los Angeles on June 8, 1931. He began working in television in the early 1960s, helming episodes of Highway Patrol, Dr. Kildare, The Fugitive, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, The Outer Limits including the classic two-part episode “The Inheritors,” The Man from U.N.C.L.E. and Honey West. Goldstone directed the Star Trek second pilot episode, “Where No Man Has Gone Before” in 1966. He also helmed the subsequent episode “What Are Little Girls Made Of?” He also directed Code Name: Heraclitus, a two-part presentation on Bob Hope Chrysler Theatre, and the pilot film for

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1999 • Obituaries

Raymond Burr’s Ironside series in 1967. Goldstone’s other credits include the tele-films Scalplock (1966), Shadow Over Elveron (1968), A Clear and Present Danger (1970), Cry Panic (1974), Dr. Max (1974), Things in Their Season (1974), Journey from Darkness (1975), Eric (1975), Studs Lonigan (1979), Kent State (1981) which earned him an Emmy Award, Charles & Diana: A Royal Love Story (1982), Rita Hayworth: The Love Goddess (1983), The Sun Also Rises (1984), Calamity Jane (1984), Sentimental Journey (1984), Dreams of Gold: The Mel Fisher Story (1986), the Disney Sunday Movie presentation of Earth Star Voyager (1988) and The Bride in Black. Goldstone also directed a handful of feature films during his career including Jigsaw (1968), Winning (1969), A Man Called Gannon (1969), Red Sky at Morning (1971), The Gang That Couldn’t Shoot Straight (1971), Brother John (1971), They Only Kill Their Masters (1972), Swashbuckler (1976), Rollercoaster (1977) and When Time Ran Out (1980). Los Angeles Times, Nov. 7, 1999, B5; New York Times, Nov. 15, 1999, A25; Variety, Nov. 15, 1999, 102.

Goldwater, John L. Cartoonist John L. Goldwater died in New York on February 26, 1999. He was 83. He was best known for his role in creating the comic character Archie with artist Bob Montana in 1941. The freckled red-haired character, with his buddy Jughead, rival Reggie, and sometime girlfriends Betty and Veronica, has remained a popular cartoon icon for the past six decades. Goldwater authored the 1973 book Americana in Four Colors and continued to head Archie Comic Publications until his retirement in 1983. His characters were featured in the 1990 tele-film Archie: to Riverdale and Back Again Los Angeles Times, Feb. 28, 1999, B5; New York Times, Mar. 2, 1999, C22; Time, Mar. 8, 1999, 27.

Goodhart, William Playwright and screenwriter William Goodhart died of heart disease on Shelter Island, New York, on October 20, 1999. He was 74. Good-

John L. Goldwater

hart wrote the 1965 play Generation, which was performed on Broadway starring Henry Fonda. Goodhart adapted the play for a 1969 film version starring David Janssen. He also scripted 1977’s Exorcist II: The Heretic, and wrote and produced the 1980 film Cloud Dancer. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 9, 1999, A20; New York Times, Nov. 8, 1999, B11; Variety, Nov. 15, 1999, 102.

Gorman, Shay Irish actor Shay Gorman died on April 19, 1999. He was 76. Gorman was born in Dublin, Ireland, on April 18, 1923. He began his career on stage and made his film debut in the 1955 film Captain Lightfoot with Rock Hudson. Gorman narrated the 1957 British horror film Curse of the Demon. He was also seen in the films The Steel Bayonet (1957), Kill Her Gently (1957), Calculated Risk (1963), The Eyes of Annie Jones (1964), Island of Terror (1966) and Guns in the Heather (1968). Gorman was also seen often on British television,

Obituaries • 1999 appearing in episodes of Scotland Yard, Danger Man, The Saint, Four Just Men, Minder, Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads? and The Sweeney. He also starred as Malloy in the BBC drama Boys from the Blackstuff in 1980.

Gould, Sandra Comic actress Sandra Gould, who was best known for her role as Gladys Kravitz, the Stevens’ nosy next-door neighbor, on the Bewitched television sit-com in the 1960s, died of a stroke following heart surgery at a Burbank, California, hospital on July 20, 1999. She was 73. Ms. Gould was born in New York on July 23, 1926. She began her career on the stage and radio as a child actress. She was featured in numerous radio productions in the 1930s and 1940s, notably as Miss Duffy on the popular Duffy’s Tavern. She made her film debut in the late 1940s, appearing in such features as T-Men (1947), Romance on the High Seas (1948), June Bride (1948), Take One False Step (1949), The Story of Molly X (1949), It’s a Great Feeling (1949), City Across the River (1949), My Dreams Is Yours (1949), Caged (1950), Joe Palooka Meets Humphrey (1950), Fourteen Hours (1951), The Clown (1952), Easy to Love (1953), Teacher’s Pet (1958), Imitation of Life (1959), Boy’s Night

Sandra Gould (with George Tobias from Bewitched).

90 Out (1962), Dear Heart (1964), Honeymoon Hotel (1964) and The Ghost and Mr. Chicken (1965) with Don Knotts. She replaced the late Alice Pearce as neighbor Gladys Kravitz on Bewitched in 1966, remaining with the show until its conclusion in 1972. She also reprised the role in an episode of the sequel, Tabitha, in 1977. She also continued to appear in such films as The Barefoot Executive (1971), Heterosexuals (1973) and Chatterbox (1977). She was also featured in the telefilms Columbo: Suitable for Framing (1971) and The Kid with the 200 I.Q. (1983). Her other television credits include episodes of I Love Lucy, Maverick, Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Mr. Ed, My Three Sons, Twilight Zone, Wagon Train, I Dream of Jeannie, Gilligan’s Island, The Brady Bunch, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, MacGyver and Friends. Her later film credits include Deep Cover (1992) and The Nutt House (1992). Ms. Gould appeared in an episode of Veronica’s Closet earlier in 1999. Los Angeles Times, July 24, 1999, A20; People, Aug. 9, 1999, 107; Time, Aug. 9, 1999, 19; Variety, Aug. 9, 1999, 52.

Graham, Ronny Comedian Ronny Graham died of complications from liver disease in a Los Angeles hospital on July 4, 1999. He was 79. Graham was born Ronald Montcrief Stringer in Philadelphia on August 26, 1919. His parents performed in vaudeville as the comedy team of Steve and Flo, and Graham began his show-business career with them. He began performing at nightclubs in the late 1940s and received a Tony Award for his comedy sketches in the Broadway production of New Faces of 1952. He also appeared on Broadway in the 1954 production of The Tender Trap. Graham appeared in a handful of films during his career, many in collaboration with producer-director Mel Brooks. His films include Hello London (1948), Dirty Little Billy (1972), Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976), The World’s Greatest Lover (1977), Gallipoli (1981), History of the World, Part 1 (1981), To Be or Not to Be (1983), Spaceballs (1987), Life Stinks (1991), Robin Hood: Men in Tights (1993) and The Substance of Fire (1996). Graham also co-scripted To Be or Not to Be (1983), Finders Keepers (1984) and Spaceballs (1987) with Brooks. He was a regular performer

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1999 • Obituaries

Joseph Green

of Beauty. Green directed his first feature film, The Brain That Wouldn’t Die, in 1962. He subsequently founded Joseph Green Pictures, a production company that distributed such foreign films as Claude Chabrol’s A Piece of Pleasure and An Act of Aggression. Green also directed the 1986 feature The Perils of P.K. Variety, Oct. 4, 1999, 98.

Green, Sid Ronny Graham

British comedy writer Sid Green died in England on March 15, 1999. He was 71. Green

on the variety shows The New Bill Cosby Show in 1972 and The Hudson Brothers Show in 1974. Graham also appeared as Ernest Busso on the sit-com The Bob Crane Show in 1975 and was Rev. Bemis on the popular sit-com Chico and the Man from 1975 to 1976. Graham was also a story consultant and scripter for the series M*A*S*H and The Mary Tyler Moore Show. He appeared in several episodes of M*A*S*H and was also featured in episodes of Picket Fences and Chicago Hope. Los Angeles Times, July 9, 1999, A20; New York Times, July 9, 1999, B9; Variety, July 26, 1999, 45.

Green, Joseph Joseph Green, who wrote and directed the 1962 cult horror film The Brain That Wouldn’t Die, died of liver failure at a New York City hospital on September 1, 1999. He was 71. Green was born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1928. He began his career in television in the early 1950s, writing and producing Morey Amsterdam’s series Slaves

Sid Green

Obituaries • 1999 was born in Becontree, Essex, England, on January 24, 1928. He began writing the stage in the late 1940s, where he began a long running partnership with Dick Hills. The duo wrote for BBC television in the mid–1950s, scripting sketches for The Dave King Show, Citizen James and The Eamonn Andrews Show. They worked with comedians Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise from the early 1960s, often appearing on their television shows. They also starred in their own television programs, That Show and Those Two Fellers, and wrote the 1963 comedy film Carry on Cabbie. Hills and Green came to the United States in 1970, where they remained for four years, working on such series as The Don Knotts Show. Hills subsequently returned to England, where he died in 1996. Green remained in the United States, working as a writer for The Johnny Carson Show. He also created the comedy series Mixed Blessing for British television. He soon returned to England, retiring to Frinton-on-Sea. Times (of London), Apr. 6, 1999, 21a.

92 Los Angeles Times, July 14, 1999, A14; New York Times, July 20, 1999, B9.

Greenwald, Harold Psychotherapist Harold Greenwald died at his home in Santa Monica, California, on March 26, 1999. He was 88. Greenwald was born in New York City and educated in psychology at Columbia University. He was best known for his psychological study of prostitutes in the 1950s and authored the book The Call Girl: A Social and Psychoanalytic Study in 1958. The book was adapted for the screen in 1960 as Girl of the Night starring Lloyd Nolan and Anne Francis. Greenwald later taught at Hofstra University and the United States International University at San Diego. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 5, 1999, A18; New York Times, Apr. 2, 1999, A19.

Greenbaum, Everett Television writer Everett Greenbaum died of brain cancer in Los Angeles on July 11, 1999. He was 79. Greenbaum was born in Buffalo, New York, in 1920. He began writing for radio after serving as a Navy pilot during World War II. He was writer, producer and star of the Boston radio program Greenbaum’s Gallery. In 1952 he began working with writer Jim Fritzell on Wally Cox’s Mr. Peepers television sitcom. He and Fritzell continued to work together, writing for such programs as The Real McCoys, The Andy Griffith Show and M*A*S*H. They received four Emmy nominations before Fritzell’s death in 1979. They also scripted several films together, including a couple of vehicles for comic Don Knotts. Their film credits include Good Neighbor Sam (1964), The Ghost and Mr. Chicken (1965), The Reluctant Astronaut (1967), Shakiest Gun in the West (1968), Did You Hear the One About the Traveling Saleslady? (1968) and Angel in My Pocket (1969). Greenbaum was also featured as Judge Katz in several episodes of Andy Griffith’s Matlock series in the early 1990s. He also appeared in episodes of Ellen and On the Air, and the 1992 film Trouble Bound.

Harold Greenwald

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Gregory, Gerald “Bounce” Bass singer Gerald “Bounce” Gregory died in Gary, Indiana, on February 12, 1999. He was 64. Gregory was a founding member of the doowop group The Spaniels in the early 1950s. He was heard on the group’s hit 1950s classic “Goodnight Sweetheart, Goodnight.” The Spaniels remained popular during the 1950s and 1960s. Though members sometimes changed, they continue to perform. Gregory’s last performance with them was in December of 1998. People, Mar. 29, 1999, 102.

Grossman, Sam Film director and writer Sam Grossman died of cancer at his West Los Angeles home on February 22, 1999. He was 53. Grossman was born in New York City on May 27, 1945. He worked with the American Film Institute in the early 1970s where he made the short films At the Edge of the Bed and A Date with Chris. He also directed the 1976 youth comedy The Van starring Danny DeVito and scripted the 1979 horror film The Visitor. Grossman also directed several episodes of Casey Kasem’s pop music documentaries Rock ’n’ Roll Gold Mine in the mid–1980s and scripted several episodes of Ribald Classics and the documentary Playboy’s History of Striptease for Playboy Television. Grossman had recently written and directed Static, which he was completing post-production on at the time of his death. Variety, Mar. 1, 1999, 95.

Grotowski, Jerzy Polish theatrical director Jerzy Grotowski died of leukemia and heart disease at his home in Pontedera, Italy, on January 14, 1999. He was 65. Grotowski was born in Rzeszow, Poland, on August 11, 1933. He studied acting and theater and made his directoral debut with a production of Eugene Ionesco’s Chairs in Krakow in 1959. He later founded the Laboratory Theater. Grotowski left Poland in 1982 and spent several years in the United States. He subsequently moved to Italy, where he formed another theater group. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 16, 1999, B5; New

Jerzy Grotowski

York Times, Jan. 15, 1999, C19; Times (of London), Jan. 20, 1999, 21a; Variety, Jan. 25, 1999, 87.

Guild, Nancy Actress Nancy Guild died of emphysema in East Hampton, New York, on August 16, 1999. She was 73. Ms. Guild was born in Los Angeles on October 11, 1925. She began her career in film in 1946, appearing in Somewhere in the Night. The blonde actress’ film credits also include The Brasher Doubloon (1947), Give My Regards to Broadway (1948), Black Magic (1949), Little Egypt (1951) and Abbott and Costello Meet the Invisible Man (1951). She retired from films after her appearance in Francis Covers the Big Town in 1953. She was also a panelist on the 1952 television quiz show Where Was I?. She made a cameo appearance in 1971’s Such Good Friends. New York Times, Aug. 21, 1999, A11.

Obituaries • 1999

94 in 1929, where he performed at clubs and on the radio. Often attired in sombrero and glittering bolero jacket, Guizar returned to Mexico in 1936. He starred in the western Out There on the Big Ranch, which was popular both in Mexico and the United States. Guizar was also one of the first Mexican stars to make films in Hollywood, appearing in Under the Pampas Moon (1935), Tropic Holiday (1938), The Big Broadcast of 1938 (1938), St. Louis Blues (1939), The Llano Kid (1939), Blondie Goes Latin (1941), Brazil (1944), Mexicana (1945), The Thrill of Brazil (1946) and The Gay Ranchero (1948). Guizar appeared in over fifty films in Mexico and the United States during his career. He continued to perform in the 1990s, appearing on Mexican television in the series Marimar, Maria la del Barrio and La Usurpadora.

Nancy Guild

Guizar, Tito Mexico’s leading singing cowboy, Tito Guizar, died of pneumonia in San Antonio, Texas, on December 24, 1999. He was 91. He was born Federico Arturo Guizar Tolentino in Guadalajara, Mexico, on April 8, 1908. He trained as a singer from an early age and began recording in the late 1920s. He went to New York

Tito Guizar

Guyler, Deryck British film, radio and television actor Deryck Guyler died in Brisbane, Australia, on October 7, 1999. He was 85. Guyler was born in Wallasey, Cheshire, England, on April 29, 1914. He began his career on stage in the 1930s. He achieved prominence with his performance as Frisby Dyke in the popular British radio comedy It’s That Man Again in 1947. Guyler became a familiar face on television from the 1950s, appear-

Deryck Guyler

95 ing in such series as Three Live Wires, All Square, Best of Enemies, Please Sir! as caretaker Norman Potter, Here Come the Double Deckers, and Sykes. He also appeared in a handful of films including Mad About Men (1954) with Glynis Johns, The Fast Lady (1962), Nurse on Wheels (1963), Smokescreen (1964), the Beatles’ first two films A Hard Day’s Night (1964) and Help! (1965), The Big Job (1965), Ferry Cross the Mersey (1965) with the British rock group Gerry and the Pacemakers, Carry on Doctor (1968), Berry Mackenzie Holds His Own (1974) and One of Our Dinosaurs Is Missing (1976). Guyler retired to Australia in the early 1990s.

Haddy, Anne

1999 • Obituaries Times (of London), June 8, 1999, 23a; Variety, July 26, 1999, 45.

Hadfield, John British author John Hadfield died in London on October 10, 1992. He was 92. Hadfield was the editor of numerous literary anthologies and edited The Saturday Book for over 20 years. He wrote the comic novel Love on a Branch Line in 1959, detailing the odd happenings at a stately English home. The book was adapted into a television mini-series by the BBC in 1993. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 9, 1999, A20; New York Times, Nov. 8, 1999, B11.

Australian actress Anne Haddy died of heart and kidney disease in Melbourne, Australia, on June 6, 1999. She was 71. Haddy was born in Quorn, South Australia, on October 5, 1927. She began her career on the radio in the late 1940s. She subsequently moved to England, but was unsuccessful in starting a film career. She returned to Australia, where she became a popular performer on television soap operas. She was featured in such series as Over There, Certain Women, Prisoner: Cell Block H, Sons and Daughters, The Flying Doctors and The Young Doctors. She was best known for her performance as Helen Daniels in the popular soap Neighbours from 1985 until her retirement in 1997. She also appeared in several films during her career including They’re a Weird Mob (1966), The Fourth Wish (1976), Newsfront (1978) and Fighting Back (1982), and was a voice actor in the animated film Dot and the Bunny (1984). John Hadfield

Hall, Ellen

Anne Haddy

Actress Ellen Hall died in Bellevue, Nebraska, on March 24, 1999. She was 77. Ms. Hall appeared in a dozen films in the 1940s including several Westerns with Johnny Mack Brown. Her film credits include Outlaws of Stampede Pass (1943), Brand of the Devil (1944), Call of the Rockies (1944), the 1944 Hopalong Cassidy film

Obituaries • 1999

Ellen Hall

Lumberjack, Raiders of the Border (1944), Range Law (1944), Up in Arms (1944), Voodoo Man (1944) with Bela Lugosi, Having a Wonderful Crime (1945), Wonder Man (1945), Thunder Town (1946) with Bob Steele, and Lawless Code (1949) with Jimmy Wakely. She also appeared on several episodes of television’s The Cisco Kid in the early 1950s. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 30, 1999, A22.

Hall, Huntz Huntz Hall, who starred in over 80 films as one of the Dead End Kids, East Side Kids or Bowery Boys, died of heart failure at his home in North Hollywood on January 30, 1999. He was 78. Hall was born in New York City on August 15, 1999. He made his debut on the Broadway stage when he was 3 months old and performed in vaudeville and on the radio during his childhood. He played Dippy, the stupid friend of Leo Gorcey’s Spit in the 1935 play Dead End. Hall and Gorcey reprised their roles on screen two years later and continued to perform with fellow Dead End Kids Gabriel Dell, Billy Halop and Bobby Jordan in such films as Crime School

96 (1938), Little Tough Guy (1938), They Made Me a Criminal (1939) and Angels with Dirty Faces (1938) with Jimmy Cagney and Pat O’Brien. Hall also appeared in The Return of Dr. X (1939) with Humphrey Bogart, Hell’s Kitchen (1939), Call a Messenger (1939) and The Dead End Kids On Dress Parade (1939). The group became known as the East Side Kids when they moved to Universal in the 1940s, with Hall often playing lamebrained characters with names like Pig, Gyp, Limpy, Glimpy, Skeets, Bolts and Bushy. He appeared in Junior G-Men (1940), Give Us Wings (1940), You’re Not So Tough (1940), Zis Boom Bah (1941), Sea Raiders (1941), Mob Town (1941), Hit the Road (1941), Bowery Blitzkrieg (1941), Spooks Run Wild (1941), Tough As They Come (1942), Smart Alecks (1942), Private Buckaroo (1942), Junior G-Men of the Air (1942), College Sweethearts (1942), Stagecoach Buckaroo (1942), Mr. Wise Guy (1942), Let’s Get Tough! (1942), Neath Brooklyn Bridge (1942), Mug Town (1943), Keep ’Em Slugging (1943), Junior Army (1943), Clancy Street Boys (1943), Kid Dynamite (1943), Ghosts on the Loose (1943), Mr. Muggs Steps Out (1943), Million Dollar Kid (1944), Follow the Leader (1944), Block Busters (1944), Bowery Champs (1944), Wonder Man (1945), Bring on the Girls (1945) and Docks of New York (1945). After World War II Hall and the group moved to Monogram, where they became known as the Bowery Boys. With Hall as Horace Debussy Jones, better known as Sach, and Leo Gorcey, as Slip Mahoney, still leading the gang, the Bowery Boys starred in nearly fifty films over the next 13 years. Their films include Spook Busters (1946), Live Wires (1946), In Fast Company (1946), Bowery Bombshell (1946), Mr. Hex (1946), Hard Boiled Mahoney (1947), News Hounds

Huntz Hall (left).

97 (1947), Bowery Buckaroos (1947), Trouble Makers (1948), Smugglers’ Cove (1948), Angels’ Alley (1948), Jinx Money (1948), Fighting Fools (1949), Hold That Baby! (1949), Angels in Disguise (1949), Master Minds (1949), Triple Trouble (1950), Blonde Dynamite (1950), Lucky Losers (1950), Blues Busters (1950), Bowery Battalion (1951), Ghost Chasers (1951), Let’s Go Navy! (1951), Crazy Over Horses (1951), Hold That Line (1952), Here Come the Marines (1952), Feudin’ Fools (1952), No Holds Barred (1952), Private Eyes (1953), Loose in London (1953), Clipped Wings (1953), Jalopy (1953), Paris Playboys (1954), Jungle Gents (1954), Bowery to Bagdad (1954), The Bowery Boys Meet the Monsters (1954), Spy Chasers (1955), Jail Busters (1955), High Society (1955), Hot Shots (1956), Fighting Trouble (1956), Dig That Uranium (1956), Crashing Las Vegas (1956), Spook Chasers (1957), Hold That Hypnotist (1957), Looking for Danger (1957), Up in Smoke (1957) and In the Money (1958). Hall worked as a character actor from the 1960s, appearing in such films as Second Fiddle to a Steel Guitar (1965), Gentle Giant (1967), The Phynx (1970), Herbie Rides Again (1974), The Sky’s the Limit (1975), Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976), Ken Russell’s Valentino (1977) as producer Jesse Lasky, Gas Pump Girls (1978), The Escape Artist (1982), Cyclone (1987) and Auntie Lee’s Meat Pies (1993). He starred as Dutch in the short-lived television sitcom The Chicago Teddy Bears in 1971. His other television credits include the tele-films Escape (1971) and The Ratings Game (1984), and episodes of such series as Matt Helm, Barefoot in the Park, Diff ’rent Strokes, Good Heavens and Night Heat. Hall’s personal life was troubled with bouts of alcoholism and occasional trouble with the law. Most of his fellow Dead End Kids predeceased him — Bobby Jordan in 1965, Leo Gorcey in 1969, Billy Halop in 1976 and Gabe Dell in 1988. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 1, 1999, A14; New York Times, Feb. 2, 1999, B9; People, Feb. 15, 1999, 77; Time, Feb. 15, 1999, 21; Variety, Feb. 8, 1999, 91.

Hammerstein, James Theatrical producer and director James Hammerstein died of a heart attack in New York on January 7, 1999. He was 67. He was the son of lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II. The younger

1999 • Obituaries

James Hammerstein

Hammerstein producee or directed a number of revivals of the popular musicals created by his father and Richard Rodgers, including The Sound of Music, Oklahoma!, South Pacific, Carousel and The King and I. He also directed the Broadway production of the Rodgers and Hammerstein film musical State Fair in 1996. He had recently produced the Off-Broadway productions I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change and Over the River and Through the Woods. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 10, 1999, B5; New York Times, Jan. , 1999, A13; Variety, Jan. 11, 1999, 124.

Hanlon, R. Brendan R. Brendan Hanlon died of cardiac arrest in Marshfield, Massachusetts, on January 2, 1999. He was 62. Hanlon was an accountant who specialized in the entertainment business. He also appeared on stage in several plays in the Boston area. Hanlon had small parts in a handful of recent films including Dirty Laundry, The Spanish

Obituaries • 1999

98

Prisoner, Good Will Hunting, Meet Joe Black and A Civil Action. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 6, 1999, A14.

Harris, Don “Sugarcane” Rock violinist Don “Sugarcane” Harris was found dead of natural causes at his Los Angeles apartment on November 30, 1999. He was 61. Harris had suffered from pulmonary disease for a long time. He began his professional career in the 1950s with the doo-wop group the Squires. He began performing with Dewey Terry in 1957 as Don & Dewey. The duo wrote and recorded the songs “Justine,” “Big Boy Pete” and “Farmer John.” During the 1960s and 1970s Harris performed with such artists as Frank Zappa and John Mayall. He also formed the short-lived rockblues group Pure Food and Drug Act in the early 1970s. Harris reunited with Terry in 1975, and they continued to perform until poor health forced Harris’ retirement in 1998. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 3, 1999, A40; New York Times, Dec. 10, 1999, C19.

Harris, Hilary Experimental filmmaker Hilary Harris died of kidney failure in a New York City hospital on October 26, 1999. He was 69. Harris began making experimental short films in the early 1950s with Longhorns (1951) and Generation (1956). His 1958 film Highway, featuring images of speeding cars accompanied by a rock ’n’ roll score, was honored at the Brussels International Experimental Film Festival. In 1962 Harris received the Academy Award for best short subject for his documentary of shipbuilding, Seawards the Great Ships. He filmed dancer Betty de Jong in 1966’s Nine Variations on a Dance Theme, and used time-lapsed photograph from 1975’s Organism. New York Times, Nov. 3, 1999, C27; Variety, Nov. 29, 1999, 68.

Harris, Marilyn Former child actress Marilyn Harris died on December 1, 1999. She was 73 and had been in

Marilyn Harris (with Karloff from Frankenstein).

poor health for many years. Harris was featured in the Universal horror classic Frankenstein, playing Maria, the young girl who befriends the Frankenstein monster while throwing petals in a lake. Karloff ’s monster in turn throws Maria in the lake, who drowns instead of floats. She also appeared in a handful of other films including Over the Hill (1931), A Wicked Woman (1934), Show Boat (1936), Henry Aldrich Gets Glamour (1943) and Standing Room Only (1944).

Harris, Peppermint Blues singer Peppermint Harris died in New Jersey on March 19, 1999. He was 73. He was born Harrison D. Nelson, Jr., in Texarkana, Texas, on July 17, 1925. He began performing in Houston in the late 1940s, making his first recording in 1948. He had early success with the song “Raining in My Heart” in 1950 and had a hit with “I Got Loaded” the following year. Harris subsequently moved to California, where he worked for awhile as a lyricist before largely retired from the music business. He remained in obscurity for over two decades before interest in his earlier recording led to his invitation to several blues festivals in the late 1980s. He subsequently

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Peppermint Harris

performed occasionally at local clubs in California.

Hart, Owen Owen Hart, a World Wrestling Federation wrestler, was killed when he fell over 50 feet into the ring while being lowered from the ceiling of an arena in Kansas City, Missouri, during a WWF pay-per-view event on May 23, 1999. He was 44. Hart was born in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on May 7, 1965. He came from a wrestling family, being the youngest son of wrestler and promoter Stu Hart. His older brothers, Brett, Bruce, Dean, Keith, Ross, Smith and Wayne, had all been wrestlers, and his brother-in-laws included wrestlers Davey Boy Smith and Jim “the Anvil” Neidhart. Owen began wrestling in 1986 with his father’s Stampede promotion. He joined the WWF two years later, where he performed as the masked wrestler, the Blue Blazer. It was as the Blue Blazer that he was entering the ring during his fatal fall. Hart held several single and tag team titles during his decade-long association with the WWF, often teaming with other members of his family. His better-known brother, Brett “the Hitman” Hart had left the promotion two years earlier. Owen appeared in the 1998 television documentary about Brett, Hitman Hart: Wrestling with Shadows.

Owen Hart

Los Angeles Times, May 24, 1999, A20; People, June 7, 1999, 176; Time, June 7, 1999, 27.

Hatos, Stefan Television writer Stefan Hatos died of a heart ailment in Toluca Lake, California, on March 2, 1999. He was 78. Hatos began his career in radio as an announcer at Detroit stations. He also scripted episodes of such popular radio series as The Lone Ranger and The Green Hornet. Hatos subsequently moved to New York, where he continued to write for such series as Inner Sanctum and Orson Welles’ Mercury Theater. After serving in the Navy during World War II Hatos returned to radio, directing Lucky Strike Hit Parade and producing the ABC series Ladies Be Seated. He subsequently moved to television, producing the game shows Fun for the Money, Masquerade Party and It Could Be You in the 1950s. In the early 1960s Hatos co-created the popular game show Let’s Make a Deal, with Monty Hall as host. The show remained a fixture on television for the next two decades. He had less success with such subsequent game shows as Chain Letter in 1966 and It’s Anybody’s Guess in 1977.

Obituaries • 1999

100

Los Angeles Times, Mar. 10, 1999, A14; Variety, Mar. 15, 1999, 58.

Heffington, Nina Weintraub Nina Heffington died at her home in Highlands, North Carolina, after a long fight with cancer, on June 30, 1999. She was 42. She was born Nina Gail Weintraub in Memphis, Tennessee, on October 9, 1956. Nina was a performer in numerous local stage productions in the 1970s and 1980s. She continued her interest in theatre in Highlands, where she was active with the community theaters. An avid fan of old films, she worked with this author on several film reference books.

Joseph Heller

Nina Heffington (with the author).

also wrote the play We Bombed in New Haven in 1968. He authored several other novels including Something Happened and 1994’s Closing Time, which revisited some of the characters from Catch 22. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 14, 1999, A1; New York Times, Dec. 14, 1999, A1; Time, Dec. 27, 1999, 49; Times (of London), Dec. 14, 1999, 19a; Variety, Dec. 20, 1999, 72.

Heller, Joseph Author Joseph Heller died of a heart attack at his home in East Hampton, New York, on December 12, 1999. He was 76. Heller was born in Brooklyn, New York, on May 1, 1923. He served in the U.S. Air Force during World War II. Heller began writing his best known work, Catch 22, in 1953. It was published eight years later. The novel, whose title indicated a no-win situation, was based on his wartime experiences. Catch 22 was made into a popular film in 1970, directed by Mike Nichols and starring Alan Arkin and Martin Balsam. Heller also scripted several films himself, including Sex and the Single Girl (1964), the 1967 James Bond spoof Casino Royale (1967) and the 1970 western Dirty Dingus Magee. He

Hemphill, Shirley Black character actress Shirley Hemphill died of natural causes as her West Covina, California, home on December 11, 1999. She was 52. Hemphill was born in Asheville, North Carolina, on July 1, 1947. The heavyweight actress was best known for her role as waitress Shirley Wilson in the television sit-com What’s Happening!! from 1976 to 1979. She reprised to role in the followup series What’s Happening Now!! from 1985 to 1988. Hemphill also played Shirley Simmons in the 1980 comedy series One in a Million. She was also seen in the films CB4 (1993) and Shoot the Moon (1996). Her other television credits include

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1999 • Obituaries

Falcon, Mr. District Attorney and Just Plain Bill. He was also a leading announcer for newsreels during World War II. Herlihy began working as the voice of Kraft Foods in 1947. He also was the announcer for the Kraft Television Theater during the 1950s. Herlihy’s other television credits include Sid Caesar’s Show of Shows, The Perry Como Show, The Tonight Show, and the daytime soap operas As the World Turns and All My Children. He appeared as himself in Martin Scorsese’s 1983 films The King of Comedy, and also worked with Woody Allen on the films Zelig (1983) and Radio Days. His other film credits include The Chosen (1981), Pee-wee’s Big Adventure (1985), Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment (1985), A Fine Mess (1986), Who Framed Roger Rabbit? (1988), Malcolm X (1992) and the 1994 tele-film Don’t Drink the Water. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 5, 1999, A28; New York Times, Feb. 2, 1999, B9; Variety, Feb. 15, 1999, 74. Shirley Hemphill

episodes of The Love Boat, Trapper John, M.D., Martin and Linc’s. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 12, 1999, B8; Variety, Dec. 20, 1999, 72.

Herbert, Bob Bob Herbert, the creator and former manager of the Spice Girls, died of injuries received in an automobile accident in Windsor, England, on August 9, 1999. He was 57. Herbert and his son, Chris, headed Safe Management, which put together the Spice Girls from an ad in 1996. After the group’s success they fired the Herberts in November of 1997. Herbert was managing a teen pop band, Five, at the time of his death. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 11, 1999, A16; People, Aug. 30, 1999, 89; Times (of London), Aug. 12, 1999, 25a; Variety, Aug. 16, 1999, 40.

Herlihy, Ed Veteran radio announcer Ed Herlihy died in New York on January 30, 1999. He was 89. Herlihy was heard often on radio from the 1930s on such shows as America’s Town Meeting, The

Herman, Gilbert Actor and producer Gilbert Herman died in Annapolis, Maryland, on September 6, 1999. He was 80. Herman was born in Philadelphia on September 29, 1918. He began his career on stage in New York. Herman served in the Army Signal Corps during World War II, producing Army training films. He also oversaw the production of the Moss Hart’s Winged Victory on Broadway and was involved in the subsequent film version. Herman remained in the Air Force Reserves after the war, heading the theater arts section. He rose to the rank of major general in 1975. Herman appeared in several films including The Sands of Iwo Jima (1949), When Willie Comes Marching Home (1950), My Friend Irma Goes West (1950), Follow the Sun (1951), Old Overland Trail (1953), Invaders from Mars (1953) and City That Never Sleeps (1953). He also produced various television series including The Alan Young Show, The Steve Allen Show, The Phil Silvers Show, The Eddie Fisher Show, The U.S. Steel Hour, and the game shows What’s My Line? and Truth or Consequences. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 20, 1999, A16.

Obituaries • 1999

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Herndon, Venable Playwright and screenwriter Venable Herndon died of acute leukemia in a Manhattan hospital on December 8, 1999. He was 72. Herndon was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on October 19, 1927. He wrote the play Until the Monkey Comes, which was staged Off-Broadway in 1966. He also collaborated with director Arthur Penn on the 1969 film Alice’s Restaurant, inspired by a song by Arlo Guthrie. Herndon also wrote the 1974 book James Dean: A Short Life. New York Times, Dec. 15, 1999, B14.

Higgins, George V. Novelist George V. Higgins was found dead of natural causes at his Milton, Massachusetts, home on November 6, 1999. He was 59. Higgins was born in the Boston suburb of Brockton on November 13, 1939. He was admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1967 and soon became a prosecutor. He wrote novels based on cases and

George V. Higgins

characters he was involved with. His 1972 novel about a small-time mobster, The Friends of Eddie Coyle, was adapted into a film starring Robert Mitchum and Peter Boyle in 1973. Higgins wrote over 20 other novels including Cogan’s Trade, A City on a Hill and The Digger’s Game. His most recent novel, The Agent, was published in 1999. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 8, 1999, A16; New York Times, Nov. 8, 1999, B10; People, Nov. 22, 1999, 177; Variety, Nov. 15, 1999, 102.

Higgs, Joe Reggae singer Joe Higgs died of cancer at a Los Angeles hospital on December 18, 1999. He was 59. Higgs was raised in Kingston, Jamaica. He recorded his first hit single, “Oh Manny Oh,” in 1960. Higgs also served as a teacher to such future reggae stars as Bob Marley, Jimmy Clift, Bunny Waller and Peter Tosh. He performed with Bob Marley and the Wailers, replacing Bunny Waller for an American tour in 1973. Higgs also

Joe Higgs

103 recorded several songs with Jimmy Clift in the 1970s including “Sound of the City” and “Sons of Garvey. He also recorded his first album, Life of Contradiction, in the mid–1970s. Higgs moved to the United States in the early 1980s, where he recorded the album Blackman Know Yourself with the Wailers in 1990.

Hill, Elaine Welton Actress Elaine Welton Hill died of ovarian cancer in Los Angeles on November 15, 1999. She was 45. Hill was born in Wewoka, Oklahoma, in 1954, and came to Los Angeles in 1976. She was best known for her roles on the Los Angeles stage, appearing in productions of The Elephant Man, Damn Yankees and Light Up the Sky. Hill appeared with Richard Dreyfuss and Amy Irving in the 1980 film The Competition. She was featured in the tele-films Take My Daughters, Please (1988) and A Matter of Justice (1993). Her other television credits include episodes of Murder, She Wrote and Picket Fences. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 24, 1999, A18.

1999 • Obituaries

on July 9, 1999. Hindman was best known for his role as Coach Goodenough in the 1981 teen comedy Porky and the two sequels —Porky’s II: The Next Day (1983) and Porky’s Revenge (1985). He also appeared in the films The Pilot (1979), Absence of Malice (1981), A Night in Heaven (1983), Easy Money (1983) and The Whoopee Boys (1986). Hindman was also featured in the 1978 tele-film Crash and in 1980’s The Ordeal of Dr. Mudd as President Andrew Johnson.

Hirt, Al Leading jazz trumpeter Al Hirt died in New Orleans of liver failure on April 27, 1999. He was 76. Hirt was born Alois Maxwell Hirt in New Orleans on November 7, 1922. He was a popular performer in the 1950s and achieved national fame late in the decade with appearances on television’s Lawrence Welk Show. He remained one of New Orleans’ best known musicians for the next four decades. Hirt appeared as himself in several films in the 1960s including Rome Adventure (1962), What Am I Bid? (1967) and Number One (1969). He also performed often on The Andy Williams Show in the mid–1960s. Hirt was also seen in an episode of Touched by an Angel in 1996.

Elaine Hill

Hindman, Bill Character actor Bill Hindman died of complications following surgery in Hialeah, Florida,

Al Hirt

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Los Angeles Times, Apr. 28, 1999, A24; New York Times, Apr. 28, 1999, C25; People, May 10, 1999, 213; Time, May 10, 1999, 25; Times (of London), Apr. 29, 1999, 25a; Variety, May 3, 1999, 100; Washington Post, Apr. 28, 1999, B6.

Hittleman, Carl K. Screenwriter and producer Carl K. Hittleman died in Encino, California, on September 22, 1999. He was 92. Hittleman was born in New York City on July 28, 1907. He began his career in Hollywood after serving in the Signal Corps during World War II. He produced and scripted the 1946 film The Hat Box Mystery. He produced the 1947 Russell Hayden films Trail of the Mounties and Where the North Begins. He also produced Last of the Wild Horses (1948), The Return of Wildfire (1948) which he also scripted, Grand Canyon (1949), I Shot Jesse James (1949), Tough Assignment (1949), The Baron of Arizona (1950), The Return of Jesse James (1950), Little Big Horn (1951), Kentucky Rifle (1956) which he also directed and scripted, The Buckskin Lady (1957) which he also scripted, and Gun Battle at Monterey (1957) which he also directed. He also directed, produced and wrote 1965’s Big Daddy. Hittleman also wrote the screenplays for two western horror films —Jesse James Meets Frankenstein’s Daughter and Billy the Kid vs. Dracula— in 1966.

Hough, Richard Historian and novelist Richard Hough died in England on October 7, 1999. He was 77. Hough was born in Brighton, England, in 1922. He served in the Royal Air Force during World War II and began his writing career in 1947. He wrote adventures for boys under the pseudonym Bruce Carter. Hough wrote over 90 books during his career. He was best known for his 1972 version of the Bounty mutiny, Captain Bligh and Mr. Christian. This book was adapted for the 1984 film The Bounty, starring Mel Gibson and Anthony Hopkins. He also wrote a popular biography of British war hero Lord Mountbatten, Mountbatten: Hero of Our Times, in 1980.

Richard Hough

New York Times, Oct. 18, 1999, A21; Washington Post, Oct. 10, 1999, C8.

Houghton, Buck Television producer Buck Houghton died of emphysema and Lou Gehrig’s disease in Los Angeles on May 14, 1999. He was 84. He was born Archible Ernest Houghton, Jr., in Denver, Colorado, on May 4, 1919. He began working in films as a reader for producer Val Lewton before becoming a story editor for David Selznick. During World War II Houghton worked on short propaganda films for distribution in Europe. After the war he became a production assistant at RKO, and, four years later, became an assistant story editor at MGM. In the early 1950s Houghton began working in television as story editor of Schlitz Playhouse of the Stars. Houghton served as producer for Dan Duryea’s syndicated series China Smith in 1953. He subsequently produced such shows as Wire Service, Meet McGraw, Yancy Derringer and Man with a Camera. In 1959

105

1999 • Obituaries

Norman Howell, Jr.

ifornia Junior Rodeo Association, worked as an engineer and heavy equipment operator on many film projects. He also appeared in John Wayne’s 1972 film The Cowboys as Weedy. Buck Houghton

Houghton became producer for Rod Serling’s ground-breaking science fiction anthology series The Twilight Zone. He remained with the series for three seasons until CBS temporarily canceled The Twilight Zone in 1962. Houghton did not return to the series when it was eventually renewed, instead taking a position with Four Star Productions. Houghton subsequently produced the anthology series The Richard Boone Show in 1963 and was producer for the western series The High Chaparral in the 1967-1968 season. He also produced the 1976 series Executive Suite. Houghton also produced several films including The Escape Artist (1982), Eternal Evil (1985) and The Wraith (1986). After his retirement he authored the manual What a Producer Does. Los Angeles Times, May 19, 1999, A18.

Howell, Norman Lee, Jr. Norman Lee Howell, Jr., died of cancer at his Wrightwood, California, home on August 23, 1999. He was 59. Howell, the founder of the Cal-

Hudson, Hal Television writer and producer Hal Hudson died in Santa Rosa, California, on February 1, 1999. He was 91. Hudson served as producer for numerous episodes of Zane Grey Theatre in the late 1950s and was co-creator of Black Saddle in 1959. He also served as executive producer for Sam Peckinpah’s short-lived western drama The Westerner in 1960

Hughes, Gordon Television director and writer Gordon Hughes died of heart failure in Santa Barbara, California, on April 19, 1999. He was 89. Hughes began his career in show business on the stage in 1933. He soon began working on radio, directing such programs as Arch Oboler’s Lights Out and the soap opera The Guiding Light. Hughes directed such stars as Frank Sinatra, Lucille Ball and Gene Autry for the CBS radio network. He began working in television in the 1950s, where

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106

he directed, produced or wrote such series as My Little Margie, Charlie My Boy, This Is Your Life and Truth or Consequences. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 22, 1999, B6; Variety, May 24, 1999, 85.

Hull, Rod British comedian Rod Hull died from injuries received when he fell from the roof of his home in Hastings, England, while attempting to adjust a television aerial to watch a soccer match. He was 63. Hull was born on the Isle of Sheppey on August 13, 1935. He was a popular stage and television comedian in England, known for his glove puppet sidekick named Emu. He began his career in Australian television, where he hosted children’s shows in the 1960s. He began performing with the puppet Emu in 1969 and returned to England the following year. Hull hosted several television series in the 1970s and 1980s including Rod Hull and Emu, Emu’s World and EMU-TV. Times (of London), Mar. 19, 1999, 25a.

Indrani

68. She was the daughter of leading dancer Ragini Devi, who taught her the Indian dance styles. She made her debut performance in the United States in 1960 and performed at the White House of President John Kennedy and visiting Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru in 1961. Indrani served on the faculty of the Juilliard School in New York from 1976 until her death. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 10, 1999, A16; New York Times, Feb. 8, 1999, B8.

Jackson, Milt

Rod Hull (with his puppet, Emu).

Indrani Indian dancer Indrani died of a stroke in a New York hospital on February 5, 1999. She was

Jazz musician Milt Jackson died of liver cancer in a New York hospital, on October 9, 1999. He was 76. Jackson was born in Detroit on Jan. 1, 1923. He began playing various musical instruments as a child and began performing professionally after serving in the military during World War II. Jackson soon joined Dizzy Gillespie’s band, where he became a noted jazz vibraphonist. He recorded several songs with Gillespie before forming the Milt Jackson Quartet. In 1952 he, with drummer Kenny Clarke, pianist John Lewis and bassist Percy Heath formed the Modern Jazz Quartet. The group remained popular through the mid–1990s. Jackson received a Grammy award for “That’s the Way It Is” in 1969.

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Milt Jackson

He also worked with such musicians as Quincy Jones, Oscar Peterson and Ray Charles. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 12, 1999, A20; New York Times, Oct. 11, 1999, A17; People, Oct. 25, 1999, 115; Time, Oct. 25, 1999, 48; Variety, Oct. 18, 1999, 55; Washington Post, Oct. 12, 1999, B7.

Jacobs, Werner German film director Werner Jacobs died in Munich on January 29, 1999. He was 89. Jacobs was born in Berlin on April 24, 1909. He began working in films in the 1940s and directed over 50 features during his career. His credits include Modebummel (1951), Andre and Ursula (1955), The Beggar Student (1956), Munchhausen in Afrika (1958), Der Stern von Santa Clara (1958), Die Lustige Witwe (1962), Homesick for St. Pauli (1963), Heidi (1965), Psycho-Circus (1966), Der Morderclub von Broklyn (1967), Charleys Onkel (1969), Unser Willi ist der Beste (1971), Das Fliegende Klassenzimmer (1973) and I Wasn’t a Very Good Student Either (1974).

James, Brion Brion James, the menacing character actor in over 100 films and numerous television series,

1999 • Obituaries

died of a heart attack at the UCLA Medical Center on August 7, 1999. He was 54. The Beaumont, California, native studied acting in New York with Stella Adler after graduation from San Diego State College. He served as the acclaimed drama coach’s cook and butler to earn money for his acting lessons. James appeared in several Off-Broadway plays before returned to California for a career in films. Often cast as a villain, James made his film debut in 1975’s Hard Times with Charles Bronson. He was also featured in Nickelodeon (1976), Blue Sunshine (1976), Harry and Walter Go to New York (1976), Corvette Summer (1978), Southern Comfort (1981), The Postman Always Rings Twice (1981) and The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez (1982). James was Leon, one of the killer replicants being hunted by Harrison Ford, in the science fiction classic Blade Runner in 1982. He also appeared opposite Nick Nolte and Eddie Murphy in 1982’s 48 HRS. He reprised the role of the villainous Ben Kehoe in the sequel eight years later, Another 48 HRS. (1990). He was also seen in A Breed Apart (1984), Silverado (1985), Enemy Mine (1985), Flesh & Blood (1985), Crimewave (1985), Armed and Dangerous (1986), The Wrong Guys (1988), D.O.A. (1988), Red Heat (1988), Tango & Cash (1989) and Red Scorpion (1989). James was also featured in numerous horror and science fiction films including Steel Dawn (1987), Dead Man Walking (1987), Cherry 2000 (1987), The Horror Show (1989) as resurrected serial killer Max Jenke, Street Asylum (1990), Nightmare at Noon (1990), Mom (1990), Mutator (1991), Time Runner (1992), Nemesis (1992), Brain Smasher … A Love Story (1993), Frogtown II (1993), The Dark (1994), Future Shock (1994), Steel Frontier (1994), Scanner Cop (1994), Dominion (1995), Pterodactyl Woman from Beverly Hills (1996), Assault on Dome 4 (1996), Bombshell (1996), Precious Find (1996), Cyberjack (1996), The Killing Jar (1996) and 1997’s The Fifth Element with Bruce Willis. His other film credits include Enid Is Sleeping (1990), Ultimate Desires (1992), Robert Altman’s The Player (1992), Striking Distance (1993), Spitfire (1994), The Soft Kill (1994), Showdown (1994), Savage Land (1994), Hong Kong 97 (1994), F.T.W. (1994), Cabin Boy (1994), Art Deco Detective (1994), Radioland Murders (1994), Nature of the Beast (1995), Malevolence (1995), Evil Obsession (1995), Marco Polo: The Missing Chapter (1996), Billy Lone Bear (1996), American Strays (1996), The Underground

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108 such animated series as Batman, Spawn and Superman. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 18, 1999, A19; Variety, Aug. 23, 1999, 120.

Janaver, Richard

Brion James (from Enemy Mine).

(1997), Back in Business (1997), The Thief and the Stripper (1998), Snide and Prejudice (1998), A Place Called Truth (1998), Brown’s Requiem (1998), Border to Border (1998), Black Sea 213 (1998), In God’s Hands (1998), Kai Rabe vs. the Vatican Killers (1998), The Operator (1999), Farewell, My Love (1999), Dirt Merchant (1999) and Arthur’s Quest (1999). James was featured on television as Ollie Mathers in the short-lived 1995 series The Marshal. He also appeared in numerous tele-films including KISS Meets the Phantom (1978), Killing at Hell’s Gate (1981), Hear No Evil (1982), The Gambler: The Adventure Continues (1983), Annihilator (1986), Love Among Thieves (1987), Desperado: The Outlaw Wars (1989), Black Magic (1992), Overkill: The Aileen Wuornos Story (1992), Precious Victims (1993), Knight Rider 2010 (1994), The Companion (1994), Sketch Artist II: Hands That See (1995) and Men in White (1998). His other television credits include episodes of The Waltons, Benson, CHiPs, Little House on the Prairie, Galactica 1980, The Dukes of Hazzard, The A-Team, Sledge Hammer, Matlock, Hunter, Miami Vice, The Young Riders, Steven Spielberg’s Amazing Stories, Sidekicks, The Hitchhiker, Tales from the Crypt, Renegade, Dark Justice, M.A.N.T.I.S., Silk Stalkings, Highlander, The Magnificent Seven, Millennium, The Sentinel and Vengeance Unlimited. He was also a voice actor in

Actor Richard Janaver died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on February 8, 1999. He was 87. Janaver was born in New York City in 1912. He began his career on stage, appearing in productions of Hamlet and Henry IV in the late 1930s. Janaver also performed on radio in such programs as Our Gal Sunday, Just Plain Bill, Myrt and Marge, Thunder Over Paradise and This Is Your FBI. He was also featured on television in the soap operas Love of Life and Edge of Night, and appeared in the 1961 film One Plus One. Janaver later worked on television gameshows for Goodson-Todman Productions. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 17, 1999, A12.

Jeffrey, Peter British character actor Peter Jeffrey died of cancer in London on December 25, 1999. He was

Peter Jeffrey

109 70. Jeffrey was born in England on April 18, 1929. A veteran of British television and the stage, he made his film debut in 1964’s Becket. He was featured in numerous films during his career including The Early Bird (1965), The Riviera Touch (1966), The Fighting Prince of Donegal (1966), Lindsay Anderson’s If… (1968), The Fixer (1968), Ring of Bright Water (1969), The Best House in London (1969), Anne of the Thousand Days (1969), Goodbye Gemini (1970), Kidnapped (1971), Hammer’s Countess Dracula (1971), The Horsemen (1971), The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971) and the 1972 sequel, Dr. Phibes Rises Again, both with Vincent Price, What Became of Jack and Jill? (1972), O Lucky Man! (1973), The Return of the Pink Panther (1974), Deadly Strangers (1974), The Odessa File (1974), Midnight Express (1978), Britannia Hospital (1982) and The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988). Jeffrey was also a familiar face on British television. He appeared as Inspector Carter in the 1950s series Dixon of Dock Green. He was also featured in such television productions as The Spread of the Eagle (1963), The Seven O’Clock Crunch (1965), A Separate Peace (1966), A Tale of Two Wives (1966), The Making of Jericho (1966), The Cupboard (1967), Wanted, Single Gentleman (1967), Cyrano de Bergerac (1968), The Pistol Shot (1968), W. Somerset Maugham: The Closed Shop (1970), Elizabeth R (1971), The Rainbirds (1971), Oh Fat White Woman (1971), The Common (1973), Napoleon and Love (1974), Jack and the Beanstalk (1974), Come Out, Come Out, Wherever You Are (1974), Cakes and Ale (1975), Mr. & Mrs. Bureaucrat (1978), The Old Crowd (1979), Shakespeare’s All’s Well That Ends Well (1980), By the Sword Divided (1983), Antigone (1984), The Jewel in the Crown (1984), Lace II (1985), The Last Place on Earth (1985), Quartermaine’s Terms (1987), Spirit of Man (1989), The Nightmare Years (1989), Hands of a Murderer (1990) as Mycroft Holmes, Lipstick on Your Collar (1993), Middlemarch (1994) as Bulstrode, Treasure Seekers (1996), The Moonstone (1996), Our Friends in the North (1995), Rasputin (1996), Breakout (1997) and The Tale of Sweeney Todd (1998). Jeffrey was also starred as Maurice Webb in the 1984 television series One by One. His other television credits include episodes of The Saint, The Avengers, Adam Adamant Lives!, Doctor Who, Out of the Unknown, Fraud Squad, The Survivors, The Adventurer, New Scotland Yard, Porridge, The Sweeney, The New Avengers,

1999 • Obituaries

Roald Dahl’s Tales of the Unexpected, Rising Damp, Julie Bravo and Lovejoy. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 30, 1999, A24; Times (of London), Dec. 29, 1999, 19a.

Jennings, Gary Novelist Gary Jennings died of heart failure in Pompton Lakes, New Jersey, on February 13, 1999. He was 70. Jennings was born in Buena Vista, Virginia, in 1928. He was best known for his 1980 novel, Aztec, which told the tale of the Spanish conquest of the native Mexicans. His nine historical novels also include The Journeyer (1984), Spangle (1987) and Raptor (1992). His final novel, Aztec Summer, a sequel to his earlier success, was published in 1997. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 19, 1999, A22; New York Times, Feb. 18, 1999, C23.

Gary Jennings

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110 Pilot of the Future. He was 83. Johnson was born in Birmingham, England, on December 27, 1916. He appeared in a handful of films during his career including Highly Dangerous (1950), The Case of the Red Monkey (1955), Frenzy (1972), Frightmare (1974), Royal Flash (1975), The Great Train Robbery (1979), the 1981 James Bond film For Your Eyes Only, Defense of the Realm (1985) and Withnail and I (1987). He was also seen often on television, appearing in the 1961 science fiction miniseries A for Andromeda and the 1962 sequel The Andromeda Breakthrough. He was also seen in television productions of The Seven Dials Mystery, (1982), Harry’s Game (1982), Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors (1983), Oedipus the King (1984), Antigone (1984) and The Vacillation of Poppy Carew (1995). His other television credits include episodes of Ivanhoe, Secret Agent, Out of the Unknown, Doctor Who, Counterstrike, Fraud Squad and Doomwatch.

Beau Jocque

Jocque, Beau Zydeco accordionist Beau Jocque died of a heart attack at his home in Kinder, Louisiana, on September 10, 1999. He was 42. He was born Andrus Espre in Kinder, Louisiana, in 1957. He began playing the accordion in the late 1980s while recovering from an injury. In 1991 Jocque formed the Zydeco Hi-Rollers, which became a popular New Orleans band. The group recorded several successful albums including Beau Jocque Boogie (1993), Pick Up on This! (1994), My Name Is Beau Jocque (1994), Git It, Beau Jocque! (1995) featuring the hit song “Give Him Cornbread,” Gonna Take You Downtown (1996), Check It Out, Lock It In, Crank It Up (1998) and Zydeco Giant (1999). New York Times, Sept. 13, 1999, A17.

Johnson, Noel British actor Noel Johnson died in England on October 1, 1999. Johnson was best known for playing the title role in the popular British radio serials Dick Barton, Special Agent and Dan Dare:

Noel Johnson

111

Glyn Jones

Jones, Glyn British television producer Glyn Jones died in England on October 4, 1999. He was 71. Jones was born in West Kirby, England, on August 10, 1928. He worked as a reporter as several newspapers before joining the BBC in 1959. He produced such documentaries as Challenge (1962) and Destination Moon (1962). Jones created the long running BBC documentary series Tomorrow’s World in 1965. His career with the BBC ended in the late 1960s following his injuries in a serious automobile accident. After his recovery he continued to work as a free-lance journalist. He returned to television in the early 1980s with Channel 4, where he produced and wrote science programs. Jones also wrote the book The Jet Pioneers, which he produced for television in 1997 as Genius of the Jet.

Jones, Henry Veteran character actor Henry Jones died in Los Angeles on May 17, 1999, of injuries suffered during a fall at his home. He was 86. Jones was born in Philadelphia on August 1, 1912. He began

1999 • Obituaries

his career on the stage in the 1930s and made his Broadway debut as a gravedigger in a production of Hamlet in 1938. Jones appeared in numerous theatrical productions during his career, and received a Tony Award for portraying Franklin Roosevelt’s advisor Louis Howe in Sunrise at Campobello in 1958. Jones made his film debut while serving in the armed forces in Irving Berlin’s This Is the Army in 1943. He continued his film career in the early 1950s in such features as The Lady Says No (1952), The Girl He Left Behind (1956), The Girl Can’t Help It (1956), The Bad Seed (1956) reprising his role from Broadway as the handyman, Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? (1957), 3:10 to Yuma (1957), Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo (1958), Cash McCall (1959), The Bramble Bush (1960), Angel Baby (1961), Never Too Late (1965), The Champagne Murders (1966), Project X (1968), Stay Away, Joe (1968), Rascal (1969), Angel in My Pocket (1969), Support Your Local Sheriff! (1969), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) as the bicycle salesman, Rabbit, Run (1970), Dirty Dingus Magee (1970), Cockeyed Cowboys of Calico County (1970), Skin Game (1971), Support Your Local Gunfighter (1971), Pete ’n’ Tillie (1972), Napoleon and Samantha (1972), Tom Sawyer (1973), The Outfit (1974), Nine to Five (1980), Deathtrap (1982), Balboa (1986), Nowhere to Run (1989), The Grifters (1990), Enid Is Sleeping (1990), Dick Tracy (1990) and Arachnophobia (1990). He also appeared in numerous tele-films including Something for a Lonely Man (1968), Love Hate Love (1970), The Movie Murderer (1970), The Daughters of Joshua Cabe (1972), The Letters (1974), Who Is the Black Dahlia? (1975), Tail Gunner Joe (1977), California Gold Rush (1981), Tales of the Apple Dumpling Gang (1982), The Leftovers (1986), Mastergate (1992), Grass Roots (1992), the 1994 Hallmark Hall of Fame production of Breathing Lessons and Picture Windows (1994). Jones starred as Dean Fred Baker in the shortlived drama series Channing in 1963. He costarred with Sally Field in the comedy fantasy series The Girl with Something Extra in 1973 and was Judge Jonathan Dexter in the Phyllis comedy from 1975 to 1977. He also appeared as Josh Alden in the 1979 detective series Kate Loves a Mystery and was Homer McCoy in the comedy western Gun Shy in 1983. He played Phillips in the 1985 mini-series Codename: Foxfire and was R. Riley Wicker in the 1985 season of Falcon Crest. He also appeared as Hughes Whitney

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112 Los Angeles Times, May 20, 1999, A24; New York Times, May 20, 1999, B10; People, June 7, 1999, 119; Time, May 31, 1999, 29; Variety, May 24, 1999, 85.

Kahn, Jan Jaffe

Henry Jones (with Patty McCormack from The Bad Seed).

Lenox in the short-lived sit-com I Married Dora in 1987. Jones appeared in episodes of numerous television series from the 1950 including Actor’s Studio, Danger, Suspense, You Are There, Lights Out, Tales of Tomorrow, Philco Television Playhouse, Schlitz Playhouse of the Stars, The Web, Kraft Television Theatre, Climax!, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Boris Karloff ’s Thriller, The Jane Wyman Show, Robert Montgomery Presents, Way Out, Playhouse 90, Startime, Goodyear Theatre, The Loretta Young Show, Checkmate, Adventures in Paradise, Best of the Post, The Untouchables, The Twilight Zone, The Real McCoys, Follow the Sun, The Investigators, Wagon Train, The New Breed, Frontier Circus, The du Pont Show, Kraft Suspense Theatre, Bonanza, Honey West, The Outlaws, Amos Burke, Secret Agent, A Man Called Shenandoah, The Tammy Grimes Show, The Second Hundred Years, Tarzan, Bewitched, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Lost in Space, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Mod Squad, The Big Valley, Daniel Boone, The Guns of Will Sonnett, The Name of the Game, Here Come the Brides, Nanny and the Professor, Gunsmoke, The Name of the Game, The Virginian, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Alias Smith and Jones, Circle of Fear, Owen Marshall, Counselor at Law, Barney Miller, Salvage-1, Here’s Boomer, Night Gallery, Emergency!, The Partridge Family, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, B.J. and the Bear, Hec Ramsey, Quincy, McClain’s Law, The Six Million Dollar Man, Fantasy Island, The Littlest Hobo, The Love Boat, Project UFO, Turnabout, Supertrain, Sidekicks, Cagney & Lacey, CHiPs, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, MacGyver, Murder, She Wrote and Empty Nest.

Television writer Jan Jaffe Kahn died of complications from multiple myeloma at a Manhasset, New York, hospital on June 10, 1999. She was 50. She made her writing debut collaborating with her husband, Ronald, on the three-part PBS television series The Prodigious Hickey in 1986. She also wrote A Child’s Cry for Help, which was adapted into a tele-film in 1994. She was working on a screenplay based on James Fenimore Cooper’s The Spy at the time of her death.

Kahn, Madeline Actress Madeline Kahn, who was best known for her comic performances in Mel Brooks’ films, died of ovarian cancer in New York on December 3, 1999. She was 57. Kahn was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on September 29, 1942. She made her film debut in 1965’s Kiss Me Kate. She was a regular on the 1970 television variety series Comedy Tonight. Kahn co-starred with Barbra Streisand and Ryan O’Neal in 1972’s What’s Up, Doc? The following year she was nominated for an Academy Award for best supporting actress for her role of Trixie Delight in Paper Moon. She was again nominated for an Oscar as saloon singer Lili Von Shtupp in Mel Brooks’

Madeline Kahn (with Gene Wilder from Young Frankenstein).

113 western spoof Blazing Saddles in 1974. She also starred opposite Gene Wilder in Brooks’ horror spoof Young Frankenstein (1974). Kahn’s other film credits include The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter Brother (1975), At Long Last Love (1975), Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976), High Anxiety (1977), The Cheap Detective (1978), The Muppet Movie (1979), Simon (1980), Happy Birthday, Gemini (1980), First Family (1980), Wholly Moses (1980), History of the World, Part 1 (1981), Slapstick (of Another Kind (1982), Scrambled Feet (1983), Group Madness (1983), Yellowbeard (1983), City Heat (1984), Clue (1985), Betsy’s Wedding (1990), Mixed Nuts (1994), Nixon (1995) as Martha Mitchell, and 1999’s Judy Berlin. She was a voice actor in the animated features My Little Pony: The Movie (1986), An American Tail (1986) and Disney’s A Bug’s Life (1998). Kahn starred in the short-lived 1983 television sit-com Oh Madeline and was Lois Gullickson in the 1987 comedy series Mr. President. She also starred as Nan Chase in the 1995 series New York News and, most recently, was Pauline, the neighbor, in the Cosby series from 1996. Kahn also received a Tony Award for her performance in The Sisters Rosensweig in 1993. She had previously been nominated for Tonys for her work in productions of In the Boom Boom Room (1973), On the 20th Century (1978) and Born Yesterday (1989). Los Angeles Times, Dec. 4, 1999, A22; New York Times, Dec. 4, 1999, A15; People, Dec. 20, 1999, 71; Time, Dec. 13, 1999, 33; Times (of London), Dec. 7, 1999, 23a; Variety, Dec. 6, 1999, 96.

1999 • Obituaries

in several episodes of Hawaii Five-O.

Kallen, Lucille Television comedy writer Lucille Kallen died of cancer at her Ardsley, New York, home on January 18, 1999. She was 76. Kallen was the only female on the writing staff of Sid Caesar’s classic comedy television series Your Show of Shows from 1950 through 1954. She worked on the show with such comedy legends as Imogene Coca, Mel Brooks, Neil Simon, Carl Reiner and Woody Allen. She also wrote for The Imogene Coca Show which ran from 1954 to 1955. Carl Reiner loosely based the character of Sally, played by Rose Marie on The Dick Van Dyke Show, on Ms. Kallen. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 23, 1999, A22; New York Times, Jan. 21, 1999, C29; Time, Feb. 1, 1999, 21; TV Guide, May 1, 1999, 8.

Kai, Lani Hawaiian entertainer Lani Kai died at a friend’s North Shore home on August 24, 1999. He was 63. Kai was born George Clarence Dennis James Von Rockleman Wood III on Oahu on August 15, 1936. He was a popular singer and songwriter on the islands from the late 1950s, known for such songs as “Shells,” “Beautiful Kauai” and “Tutu Kane.” He was cast as Kelly, one of the crewman aboard Gardner McKay’s schooner Tiki, in the television adventure series Adventures in Paradise from 1960 to 1962. Kai also played Carl Tanami in Elvis Presley’s 1961 film Blue Hawaii. In the late 1960s he also appeared

Lucille Kallen

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114

Kane, Sarah Playwright Sarah Kane was found hanged in an apparent suicide in her London apartment on February 20, 1999. She was 28. Kane was born in Brentwood, near London, England, on February 3, 1971. Her first play, 1995’s Blasted, was a violent drama with elements of cannibalism, graphic violence and sexual abuse. It was scorned by the critics, but Kane continued to produce

Sarah Kane

such controversial dramas as Phaedra’s Love (1995), Cleansed (1996) and Crave (1998). Los Angeles Times, Feb. 24, 199, A12; New York Times, Feb. 25, 1999, B12; Times (of London), Feb. 23, 1999, 21a; Variety, Mar. 1, 1999, 95.

Kanin, Garson Academy Award-winning director and screenwriter Garson Kanin died after a long illness at his home in Manhattan on March 13, 1999. He was 86. Kanin was born in Rochester, New York, on November 24, 1912. He began his career on stage as an actor in the early 1930s, and appeared in a George Abbott play in 1935. Abbott and playwright Thornton Wilder became influential mentors to the young Kanin. Kanin went to Hollywood in 1937, working for Samuel Goldwyn. The following year he went to RKO, where he directed A Man to Remember. Kanin also directed the films Next Time I Marry (1938), The Great Man Votes (1938), Bachelor Mother (1939), My Favorite Wife (1940), They Knew What They Wanted (1940) and Tom, Dick and Harry (1941). His Hollywood career was interrupted by service in the Army Signal Corps during World War II. Kanin also married actress and fellow playwright Ruth Gordon, who was 15 years his senior, in 1942. While still in the army Kanin co-directed The True Glory with Carol Reed, a film concerning the preparations for the Allied D-Day invasion. He was awarded an Oscar for the film in 1945. Kanin wrote the play Born Yesterday in 1946. It was adapted into a film in 1950, earning star Judy Holliday an Oscar for her performance. Kanin also scripted the 1946 film From This Day Forward and shared Oscar-nominations with his wife for scripting the films A Double Life (1948), Adam’s Rib (1949) and Pat and Mike (1952). He also scripted the films The Marrying Kind (1952), It Should Happen to You (1953), The Girl Can’t Help It (1956), The Rat Race (1960) and The Right Approach (1961). Kanin also continued to write and direct plays and scored a huge success on Broadway in 1964 with Funny Girl starring Barbra Streisand. He directed his own scripts with 1969’s Where It’s At and 1970’s Some Kind of Nut. He also collaborated with his wife for the 1980 tele-film Hardhat and Legs. Kanin also wrote several memoirs including Remembering Somerset

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feature in 1965, the juvenile film Grimace. He directed a handful of other films including Unruly Heyducks (1974), The Accent (1977), Peter and Paul (1978) and Heavenly Hosts (1988). From the 1980s Kardos worked primarily as a producer, becoming head of the Budapest Film Studio in 1992. He produced such films as Awakening (1994), Magic Hunter (1994), The Witman Boys (1997), Long Dusk (1997) and Passion (1998). His final directoral credits were 1989’s Truants and The Smallest Foundation in the World in 1996. Variety, Mar. 15, 1999, 58.

Karioka, Tahiya Garson Kanin (with Ruth Gordon).

Maugham (1966), Tracy and Hepburn (1971) and Hollywood (1974). He wrote the 1979 Hollywoodbased novel Moviola which was adapted into a television mini-series the following year. His other novels include Smash (1980) and Cordelia (1982). He remained married to Miss Gordon until her death in 1985. Kanin married actress Marian Seldes in 1990. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 14, 1999, B5; New York Times, Mar. 15, 1999, B7; People, Mar. 29, 1999, 102; Time, Mar. 22, 1999, 41; Times (of London), Mar. 16, 1999, 21a; Variety, Mar. 22, 1999, 52; Washington Post, Mar. 14, 1999, C8.

Egyptian actress and belly dancer Tahiya Karioka (Carioca) died of a heart attack in a Cairo hospital on September 20, 1999. She was 78. Karioka was born Badawiya Mohammed Karim in 1921. She began training as a belly dancer as a young girl and performed on the Egyptian stage in the 1930s. She made her film debut in Togo Mizrahi’s Doctor Farahat in 1935. Known as the “Queen of Oriental Dancing,” she performed in

Kaplan, Boris Producer Boris Kaplan died in Los Angeles on July 18, 1999. He was 84. Kaplan began his career working with the Omnibus series on television. He subsequently moved to Hollywood in the late 1950s, where he served as a producer for CBS. Kaplan produced the 1961 detective series The 87th Precinct. He was also producer for the 1960 feature film Let No Man Write My Epitaph.

Kardos, Ferenc Hungarian film director Ferenc Kardos died of a heart attack at his Budapest, Hungary, home on March 6, 1999. He was 62. Kardos was born in Galanta, Hungary, on December 4, 1937. He directed several shorts before co-directing his first

Tahiya Karioka

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nearly 300 Egyptian films and numerous television and stage productions during her career. She was best known internationally for her appearance in 1956’s Youth of a Woman, which received an award at the Cannes Film Festival. Ms. Karioka was married 14 times and her husbands included actor Rushdi Abaza and playwright Fayez Halawa. She continued to perform until her retirement in 1963. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 22, 1999, A18; New York Times, Sept. 22, 1999, B12.

Karlin, Marc British documentary filmmaker Marc Karlin died of a heart attack on January 19, 1999. He was 55. Karlin was born in France on March 7, 1943. He began his career in the 1960s, making two films about a Vietnam war deserter. He subsequently made several films concerning the plight of the working class. These include Dead Man’s Wheel (1968), The Night Cleaners and Seven Dreams of Myrtle. His later works include Utopias, Between Times, The Serpent and The Hair Cut.

Karp, David Screenwriter and novelist David Karp died of bladder cancer in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, on September 11, 1999. He was 77. Karp was born in New York City on May 5, 1922. He began his career writing for television in the 1950s. His science fiction novel, One, was adapted for television twice, on Kraft Television Theater in 1955, and Matinee Theater in 1957. Karp also wrote scripts for the 1950s television anthology series Studio One. Karp also scripted several films including The Crimebusters (1961), Cervantes (1966) and Sol Madrid (1968). He received a story credit for 1969’s Che!, based on the life of Marxist guerrilla leader Che Guevara. Karp also scripted the tele-films The Brotherhood of the Bell (1970), The Family Rico (1972), Hawkins on Murder (1973) and Winter Kill (1974). Other television credits include episodes of The Untouchables, The Defenders and Storefront Lawyers. He also served as producer for the series Hawkins and Archer in the mid–1970s. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 17, 1999, A22; New

Marc Karlin

York Times, Sept. 20, 1999, A15; Variety, Sept. 20, 1999, 100.

Keener, Eliott Actor Eliot Keener died of a heart attack in New Orleans on January 14, 1999. He was 49. Keener was born in Madison, Wisconsin, on January 1, 1950. He appeared in numerous films from the early 1980s including Back Roads (1981), Tightrope (1984), Down by Law (1986), The Big Easy (1987), Angel Heart (1987), Zandalee (1991), Undercover Blues (1993), Hard Target (1993), The Dangerous (1994), Born Wild (1995), Codename: Silencer (1996) and Ghosts of Mississippi (1996). Keener also appeared often on television and was featured in the tele-films The Savage Bees (1976), Hot Pursuit (1984), The Outside Woman (1989), Margaret Bourke-White (1989), False Witness (1989), This Gun for Hire (1991), Doublecrossed (1991), Jake Lassiter: Justice on the Bayou (1995) and Dark Angel (1996).

Kellard, Thomas Actor Thomas Kellard died of respiratory complications at his home in Lancaster, Califor-

117 nia, on March 16, 1999. He was 85. Kellard was a contract player for 20th Century Fox during the 1930s, appearing in several films including The Little Colonel (1935), Pigskin Parade (1936) and Life Begins in College (1937). Kellard abandoned his film career after World War II to work for Lockheed Aircraft. Variety, May 17, 1999, 76.

Kelley, DeForest Actor DeForest Kelley, who played the role of Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy in the popular science fiction series Star Trek for over 25 years on television and in films, died of stomach cancer at the Motion Picture and Television Country Home in Woodland Hills, California, on June 11, 1999. He was 79. Kelley was born in Atlanta, Georgia, on January 20, 1920. He began his career in films in the late 1940s, appearing in Fear in the Night (1947), Variety Girl (1947), Canon City (1948), Duke of Chicago (1949), Malaya (1949), The Men (1950), Taxi (1953), The View from Pompey’s Head (1955), Illegal (1955), Tension

1999 • Obituaries

at Table Rock (1956), The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit (1956), Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957) as Morgan Earp, Raintree County (1957), The Law and Jake Wade (1958), Warlock (1959), Gunfight at Comanche Creek (1964), Where Love Has Gone (1964), Town Tamer (1965), Black Spurs (1965), Marriage on the Rocks (1965), Apache Uprising (1966) and Johnny Reno (1966). He co-starred with William Shatner as Captain Kirk and Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock on the Star Trek series for two and a half seasons from 1966 to 1969. The series became a cult hit in syndication and spawned numerous films and spin-offs. Kelley reprised his role as Dr. McCoy in the 1973 animated series and in the first six feature films — Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979), Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982), Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984), Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986), Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989) and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991). He also made a cameo appearance in the pilot episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation series in 1987. Kelley appeared in numerous other television series from the 1950s including episodes of The Lone Ranger, The Lineup, The Millionaire, Gunsmoke, Science Fiction Theatre, 26 Men, Northwest Passage, You Are There, Zane Grey Theatre, The Silent Service, M Squad, Trackdown, Boots and Saddles, Lawman, The Donna Reed Show, Bat Masterson, The Rough Riders, Laramie, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Rawhide, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Black Saddle, Stagecoach West, Two Faces West, Bonanza, The Gallant Men, Tales of Wells Fargo, The Fugitive, The Virginian, Route 66, The Dakotas, 77 Sunset Strip, Slattery’s People, Death Valley Days, A Man Called Shenandoah, Laredo, Ironside, The Bold Ones: The New Doctors, Room 222, Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law, Police Story, The Cowboys, Strike Force and The Littlest Hobo. Los Angeles Times, June 12, 1999, B1; New York Times, June 12, 1999, A13; People, June 28, 1999, 121; Time, June 2, 1999, 23; Times (of London), June 14, 1999, 25a; TV Guide, July 17, 1999, 8; Variety, June 21, 1999, 91; Washington Post, June 12, 1999, B6.

Kemp-Welch, Joan DeForest Kelley (from Star Trek).

British actress and television director Joan Kemp-Welch died in England on July 5, 1999.

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Kennedy, John F., Jr.

Joan Kemp-Welch

She was 92. Kemp-Welch was born in Wimbledon, South London, England, on September 23, 1906. She began her career on stage in the late 1920s. She was featured in over a dozen films in the 1930s and 1940s including Once a Thief (1935), All In (1936), School for Husbands (1937), Girl in the Street (1937), The Girl in the Taxi (1937), The Avenging Hand (1937), The Citadel (1938), Sixty Glorious Years (1938) as Queen Victoria, Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939) with Robert Donat, Haunted Honeymoon (1940), Wings and the Woman (1941), Pimpernel Smith (1941), Jeannie (1941) and Hard Steel (1941). Kemp-Welch also began directing for the theater in the 1940s. She joined ITV television in the 1950s, directing the pop music program Cool for Cats. She also directed a television adaptation of Harold Pinter’s The Birthday Party and the 1963 drama The Lover. Her other credits include Electra, performed in Greek in 1962, Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1964) with Benny Hill as Bottom, The Bonegrinder (1968), Romeo and Juliet (1976), and episodes of Haunted, Menace and Doomwatch. She also produced the anthology series Armchair 30 for Thames television in 1973.

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Jr., the son of President John Kennedy and the publisher of George magazine, was killed on July 16, 1999, in the crash of his private plane off the coast of Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. His wife, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy, and sister-in-law, Lauren Bessette, also perished in the crash. He was 38. John, Jr. was born in Washington, D.C., on November 25, 1960, shortly after his father’s election to the presidency of the United States. The image of him as a three year old saluting the passing coffin of his father following the president’s assassination in November of 1963, was forever ingrained in America’s consciousness. He and his sister, Caroline, were raised by the mother, Jacqueline, away from the public limelight. As Kennedy grew older he entertained notions of becoming an actor, which were discouraged by his mother. He was seen often in the press, dating such well-known figures as Madonna and Daryl Hannah. Though he did not follow in the family business of politics, he did assist in campaigns for other family members, including his uncle, Senator Edward Kennedy. In 1988 John, Jr. gave a speech at the Democratic national convention, and was chosen by People magazine as “the sexiest man alive.” He founded George, a slick political magazine, in 1995, and appeared on an episode of television’s Murphy Brown show to promote the premiere issue. He relinquished his bachelor status by marrying Calvin Klein publicist Carolyn

John Kennedy, Jr.

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Bessette in 1996. He was piloting his plane to attend a cousin’s wedding at the time of the crash. Los Angeles Times, July 19, 1999, A1; New York Times, July 19, 1999, A14; People, Aug. 2, 1999, 50; Time, July 26, 1999, 20, Aug. 2, 1999, 30; Times (of London), July 19, 1999, 23a; TV Guide, July 31, 1999, 37.

Kenyon, Gwen Actress Gwen Kenyon died at her Montecito, California, home on October 18, 1999. She was 83. Kenyon appeared in over two dozen films in the 1930s and 1940s including True Confession (1937), Hold ’Em Navy (1937), Daughter of Shanghai (1937), You and Me (1938), Tropic Holiday (1938), Cocoanut Grove (1938), The Big Broadcast of 1938 (1938), Bluebeard’s Eighth Wife (1938), Artists and Models Abroad (1938), Cafe Society (1939), Under Age (1941), Sarong Girl (1941), Piano Mooner (1942), Meet the Mob (1942), Lawless Plainsmen (1942), Man from Headquarters (1942), The Corpse Vanishes (1942), College Belles (1942), Tornado (1943), Riding High (1943), A Maid Made Mad (1943), Quack Service (1943), He Was Only Feudin’ (1943), Charlie Chan in the Secret Service (1944), The Great Mike (1944) and The Cisco Kid in Old New Mexico (1945).

Hubie Kerns

Kerns, Hubie Veteran film and television stuntman Hubert J. “Hubie” Kerns died of cancer at his home in Van Nuys, California, on February 7, 1999. He was 78. Kerns was born in Los Angeles on August 10, 1920. He attended the University of Southern California, where he was a leading track star in the early 1940s. After serving in the army during World War II, Kerns entered films and had a small role in the 1949 film Take Me Out to the Ballgame. After an unsuccessful attempt at farming, Kerns returned to films, appearing in Jim Thorpe All American (1951). He was soon doing stunt work for such television series as Perry Mason, My Three Sons, Maverick, Gunsmoke, Star Trek, Bewitched, F Troop, Ironside and The Rockford Files. He was probably best known for his role as Adam West’s stunt double on the camp classic Batman series in the mid–1960s. Kerns also served as producer on the 1974 film Where the Red Fern Grows. His survivors include his son, stuntman Hubie Kerns, Jr. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 11, 1999, D2.

Kerridge, Mary

Gwen Kenyon

British character actress Mary Kerridge died in Windsor, Berkshire, England, on July 27, 1999. She was 85. Ms. Kerridge was born in London on April 3, 1914. She began her career on stage and, with her husband, John Counsell, ran the Theatre Royal, Windsor, from 1938. She was featured in the 1948 film version of Anna

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Mary Kerridge

Karenina with Vivien Leigh. She also appeared in the films The Blue Peter (1954), 1956’s Richard III, Law and Disorder (1958), The Duke Wore Jeans (1958), Curse of the Voodoo (1964) and No Longer Alone (1978). Ms. Kerridge was featured in an episode of The New Adventures of Charlie Chan in the 1950s and appeared on British television in Mr. Ponge (1965), Destiny of a Spy (1969) and A Murder Is Announced (1984). Kerridge was widowed in 1987. Times (of London), Aug. 20, 1999, 19a.

Kiley, Richard Stage, screen and television star Richard Kiley died in Warwick, New York, on March 5, 1999. He was 76. Kiley was born in Chicago, Illinois, on March 31, 1922. He studied drama and began his career on stage after serving in the Navy during World War II. He became a leading Broadway star in such productions as Kismet, No Strings, Advice and Consent and Absurd Person Singular. He was given a Tony Award for his performance as Don Quixote in Man of La Mancha in 1965. He received another Tony for Bob Fosse’s Victorian murder-mystery musical Redhead. Kiley

also appeared in several dozen films from the early 1950s including The Mob (1951), The Sniper (1952), Eight Iron Men (1952), Pickup on South Street (1953), The Phenix City Story (1955), Blackboard Jungle (1955), Spanish Affair (1958), Pendulum (1968), A.K.A. Cassius Clay (1970), The Little Prince (1974), Looking for Mr. Goodbar (1977), Jesus (1979), Endless Love (1981), Howard the Duck (1986), Chameleon Street (1991), Jurassic Park (1993) as the tour voice, Phenomenon (1996), Time to Say Goodbye (1997) and 1998’s Patch Adams (1998) with Robin Williams. A popular television performer, Kiley received an Emmy Award for his role as Paddy Cleary in the 1983 mini-series The Thorn Birds. He also received Emmys for the 1987 television series A Year in the Life and for his guest appearance in a 1994 episode of Picket Fences. Kiley starred as Timothy Macahan in the 1976 tele-film The Macahans and the 1978 series How the West Was Won. Kiley was also featured in the tele-films and mini-series Night Gallery (1969), Incident in San Francisco (1970), Murder Once Removed (1971), Jigsaw (1971), Columbo: A Friend in Deed (1974), Friendly Persuasion (1975), Angel on My Shoulder (1980), Isabel’s Choice (1981), Golden Gate (1981), Pray TV (1982), George Washington (1984), Do You Remember Love (1985), The Bad Seed (1985), Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1985), A.D. (1985), If Tomorrow Comes (1986), My First Love (1988), The Final Days (1989), Aladdin (1990), Gunsmoke: The Last Apache (1990), Separate but Equal (1991), Absolute Strangers (1991), The Obsessive Doctor (1992), Mastergate (1992), The Cosby Mysteries (1994), A Passion for Justice: The Hazel Brannon Smith Story (1994), Secrets (1995), Mary & Tim (1996) and The Rockford Files: Crime and Punishment (1996). Kiley also hosted the 1994 series Mysteries of the Bible and was narrator for the 30 Years of National Geographic special in 1995 and The Sonoran Desert: A Violent Eden in 1997. His other television credits include episodes of The Web, Suspense, Robert Montgomery Presents, Danger, Curtain Call, Kraft Theatre, Tales of Tomorrow, Philco Playhouse, Omnibus, Ford Theatre, Studio One, Elgin Hour, Climax, G.E. Theatre, Kaiser Aluminum Hour, Playhouse 90, You Are There, The U.S. Steel Hour, Goodyear Television Playhouse, The Alcoa Hour, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Defenders, Dr. Kildare, Cain’s Hundred, The Eleventh Hour, Great Adventure, Ben Casey, Nurses, Kraft Suspense Theatre, Slattery’s People,

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retired from acting in the mid–1960s to develop the Coral Sands Hotel resort in the Caribbean. Variety, Jan. 25, 1999, 87.

King, Mabel

Richard Kiley

The Long Hot Summer, The Danny Thomas Show, Coronet Blue, The F.B.I., Garrison’s Gorillas, The New People, Night Gallery, Name of the Game, The Mod Squad, Medical Center, Bonanza, Gunsmoke, Cannon, Jigsaw, Hawaii Five-O, 1986’s Twilight Zone, The Ray Bradbury Theatre, Christy, Tribeca and Ally McBeal. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 6, 1999, A16; New York Times, Mar. 6, 1999, A11; People, Mar. 29, 1999, 123; Variety, Mar. 15, 1999, 58.

Singer and actress Mabel King died of complications from diabetes at a Woodland Hills, California, hospital on November 9, 1999. She was 66. King was born in Charleston, South Carolina, on December 25, 1932. She began her career on stage, appearing in the 1975 Broadway production of the all-black musical version of The Wizard of Oz, The Wiz, as Evillen, the Wicked Witch of the West. She reprised the role in the 1978 film version. King also appeared as Mama Thomas on the television series What’s Happening!! from 1976 to 1979 and was Steve Martin’s mother in the 1979 film The Jerk. Her other film credits include Ganja and Hess (1972), The Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars and Motor Kings (1976), Scott Joplin (1977), The Gong Show Movie (1980), Getting Over (1980), The Jerk, Too (1984), Scrooged (1988) and Dead Men Don’t Die (1990). She was also seen on television in episodes of Barney Miller, Fantasy Island, Whiz Kids, The Master, The Jeffersons, Wiseguy, Tales from the Darkside and Steven Spielberg’s Amazing Stories.

King, Brett Actor Brett King died of leukemia in Palm Beach, Florida, on January 14, 1999. He was 79. King began his film career in the late 1940s after serving as a fighter pilot during World War II. He was featured in such films as Battleground (1949), State Penitentiary (1950), Side Street (1950), The Racket (1951), Purple Heart Diary (1951), Payment on Demand (1951), According to Mrs. Hoyle (1951) and Jesse James vs. the Daltons (1954). King also appeared in numerous television series in the 1950s and early 1960s including The Roy Rogers Show, Gunsmoke, Tombstone Territory, Yancy Derringer, Mackenzie’s Raiders, Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, Lawman, Johnny Ringo, Death Valley Days, Klondike, Zane Grey Theater, Men into Space, Laramie and Wagon Train. King

Mabel King

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New York Times, Nov. 18, 1999, B15; People, Dec. 6, 1999, 117.

Kline, Herbert Documentary filmmaker Herbert Kline died in Los Angeles on February 5, 1999. He was 89. Kline was born in Davenport, Iowa, on March 13, 1909. He went to Spain during the Spanish Civil War, where he worked for a radio station in Madrid. He made his first film, the documentary Heart of Spain, about the conflict in 1937. He made another film about the Spanish Civil War, Return to Life, the following year. In 1939 Kline made Crisis about the German annexation of Czechoslovakia. Later in the year he filmed Lights Out in Europe when Germany invaded Poland. He soon returned to the United States, where he collaborated with John Steinbeck for The Forgotten Village (1941), about peasant life in Mexico. He made A Boy, a Girl and a Dog in 1946 and the following year directed My Father’s House, a documentary of the Holocaust. Kline made The Fighter in 1952, but his leftist sympathies soon resulted in his being blacklisted during the McCarthy Era. He returned to making films in 1970 with Walls of Fire, about Mexican artists David Alfaro and Diego Rivera. Kline received an Academy Award nomination for his work. His final films were 1978’s The Challenge

Herbert Kline

of Modern Art and 1979’s Acting … Lee Strasberg. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 12, 1999, A26; New York Times, Feb. 17, 1999, C23; Times (of London), Feb. 16, 1999, 23a; Variety, Feb. 15, 1999, 74.

Klynn, Herbert Film and television animation pioneer Herbert Klynn died in a Tarzana, California, hospital on February 3, 1999. He was 81. Klynn worked with the United Productions of America Studios from 1944 to 1959 where he worked on such popular animated shorts as Mr. Magoo, Gerald McBoing-Boing and Madeline. He founded Format Productions in 1959, where he worked on such animated television series as The Alvin Show, The Lone Ranger and The Curiosity Shop. He also created the opening title graphics for the I Spy television series. Klynn retired as president of the company in 1982. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 6, 1999, B8; New York Times, Feb. 11, 1999, C22; Variety, Feb. 8, 1999, 91.

Knox, Buddy Wayne Rockabilly singer Buddy Wayne Knox died of cancer in Bremerton, Washington, on Febru-

Buddy Wayne Knox

123 ary 14, 1999. He was 65. Knox was born in Happy, Texas, on July 20, 1933. He was best known for writing and performing the 1950s hit song “Party Doll.” Knox’s other popular hits include “Hula Love,” “Rock Your Little Baby to Sleep” and “Somebody Touched Me.” He appeared as himself in the 1957 film Jamboree and was featured in the 1983 film Sweet Country Music. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 17, 1999, A12; People, Mar. 1, 1999, 89.

Koba, Alex Actor Alex Koba died of cancer in Citrus Heights, California, on November 13, 1999. He was 81. Koba was featured in the 1987 film adaptation of V.C. Andrews’ Flowers in the Attic. He also appeared in 1996’s The Secret Agent Club.

1999 • Obituaries

work in films as a script supervisor and writer after his acting career ended. Kowalski scripted 1970’s A Man Called Sledge, and wrote the screen story for Sam Peckinpah’s Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974). Variety, June 28, 1999, 83.

Kramer, Robert Film director Robert Kramer died of meningitis at a Normandy, France, hospital on November 10, 1999. He was 60. Kramer was born in New York on June 22, 1939. He directed, scripted and appeared in the 1967 film The Edge. Kramer became involved in the anti–Vietnam War movement in the 1960s and traveled to North Vietnam in 1969 to film the documentary People’s War. He also directed and wrote the 1969 science fiction film Ice. He and John Douglas filmed 1975’s Milestone, about the leftist movement of the 1970s. Kramer traveled throughout the world documenting dissident movements. He settled in France in 1980. Kramer’s other films include Guns (1980), Our Nazi (1984), Diesel (1985), Doc’s

Alex Koba

Kowalski, Frank Frank Kowalski died of Parkinson’s Disease in Panorama City, California, on June 3, 1999. He was 73. Kowalski was born on May 2, 1926. He began his career as a child actor, appearing in 1938’s Angels with Dirty Faces. He continued to

Robert Kramer

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Kingdom (1987), Route One USA (1989), Against Oblivion (1991), Starting Place (1994), The Coat (1996), Walk the Walk (1996) and The Ghosts of Electricity (1997). Kramer also scripted Wim Wenders’ 1982 German film The State of Things. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 15, 1999, A18; New York Times, Nov. 13, 1999, B11; Variety, Dec. 13, 1999, 121.

Kraus, Alfredo Spanish opera singer Alfredo Kraus died after a long illness at his Madrid, Spain, home on September 10, 1999. He was 71. He was born Alfredo Kraus Trujillo in the Canary Islands in 1927. He began his singing career in the mid– 1950s in Milan and made his opera debut in Rigoletto in Cairo in 1956. He was a leading lyric tenor, starring in numerous productions of La Traviate. He performed with the Chicago Lyric Opera in 1962 and made his debut with the Metropolitan Opera in 1964, appearing in productions of Rigoletto and Don Giovanni. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 11, 1999, A18; New York Times, Sept. 11, 1999, B7; Times (of London), Sept. 13, 1999, 21a.

Kress, Harold F. Oscar-winning film editor Harold F. Kress died in Palm Desert, California, on September 18, 1999. He was 86. Kress was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on July 26, 1913. He began editing films in the late 1930s. Kress received Academy Awards for editing the films How the West Was Won (1962) and The Towering Inferno (1974), sharing the latter award with his son, Carl Kress. He was also nominated for the Oscar for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941) with Spencer Tracy, Mrs. Miniver (1942), The Yearling (1946) and The Poseidon Adventure (1972). His other film credits include These Glamour Girls (1939), Remember? (1939), Broadway Serenade (1939), It’s a Wonderful World (1939), Comrade X (1940), New Moon (1940), Bitter Sweet (1940), H.M. Pulham, Esq. (1941), Rage in Heaven (1941), Unholy Partners (1941), Random Harvest (1942), Madame Curie (1943), Cabin in the Sky (1943), Dragon Seed (1944), Command Decision (1948), A Date with Judy (1948), The Great Sinner (1949), East Side, West Side (1949) and The Miniver Story (1950). Kress directed several films including Purity Squad (1945), No Questions Asked (1951), The Painted Hills (1951) starring Lassie the collie, and Apache War Smoke (1952). He continued to work as a film editor on such films as Saadia (1953), Ride, Vaquero! (1953), Green Fire (1954), Rose Marie (1954), Valley of the Kings (1954), I’ll Cry Tomorrow (1955), The Cobweb (1955), The Teahouse of the August Moon (1956), The Rack (1956), Until They Sail (1957), Silk Stockings (1957), Merry Andrew (1958), Imitation General (1958), Count Your Blessings (1959), The World, the Flesh and the Devil (1959), Home from the Hills (1960), King of Kings (1961), The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965), Alvarez Kelly (1966), Luv (1967), The Ambushers (1967), The Horsemen (1971), The Iceman Cometh (1973), 99 & 44/100% Dead (1974), Gator (1976), Viva Knievel! (1977), The Other Side of Midnight (1977) and Irwin Allen’s The Swarm (1978). Los Angeles Times, Sept. 28, 1999, A20.

Kubrick, Stanley Alfredo Kraus

Film director Stanley Kubrick, who created such masterpieces as Paths of Glory, Spartacus, Dr.

125 Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange and Full Metal Jacket, died suddenly of a heart attack at his Herfordshire, England, estate on March 7, 1999. He was 70. Kubrick was born in Manhattan on July 26, 1928. He took an interest in photography at an early age and was hired by Look magazine as a staff photographer at the age of 17. He worked for the magazine for four years. He graduated from still pictures to moving ones in 1951 when he made the documentary short Day of the Fight about boxer Walter Cartier. The following year he made Flying Padre, about a priest in New Mexico who attends to his sprawling parish with the use of a small plane. A third documentary short, The Seafarers, about the Seafarers’ International Union, followed in 1953. Kubrick also directed his first feature, Fear and Desire, an allegorical war story, in 1953. It received mixed reviews on the art house circuit and is now considered to be a lost film, rumored to have been destroyed by Kubrick himself. His next feature, Killer’s Kiss, with Kubrick again handling most of the production chores as well as co-scripting with Howard Sackler, was distributed by United Artists in 1955. The following year he formed Harris-Kubrick Productions with James B. Harris to make The Killing.

Stanley Kubrick

1999 • Obituaries

A crime drama starring Sterling Hayden and Coleen Gray, the film was praised for Kubrick’s technical expertise. He received even greater acclaim for 1957’s Paths of Glory starring Kirk Douglas. The film, set during World War I, is regarded as one of the finest anti-war films ever made. Kubrick again joined forces with Douglas in 1960, when the actor called on him to take over as director of Spartacus, a tale of a slave rebellion in ancient Rome. In 1962 Kubrick adapted Vladimir Nabokov’s controversial novel of an older man’s obsession with a young girl. Lolita starred James Mason, Peter Sellers and Sue Lyon as the nymphet. The following year Kubrick produced, directed and scripted the acclaimed black comedy of nuclear annihilation —Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. Peter Sellers starred in three roles including the title character, with George C. Scott as war-mongering Gen. Buck Turgidson and Sterling Hayden as the crazed Gen. Jack D. Ripper. In a satirical climax Slim Pickens, as Major “King” Kong, rides a nuclear warhead toward Armageddon like a bronco at the rodeo. The film earned Kubrick Academy Award nominations for his direction and script. It took Kubrick five years to make his next film, 2001: A Space Odyssey, again producing, directing and coscripting, this time with science-fiction master Arthur C. Clarke. The film included a mysterious monolith, a “star child” and an malevolent spaceship computer named HAL. Enhanced by a classical music score, 2001 ushered in a new era of special effects, and earned Kubrick an Oscar for his effects work. He was also nominated for his direction and script for the classic science fiction epic that both puzzled and fascinated critics and viewers. In 1971 Kubrick directed his most controversial film, A Clockwork Orange, based on the novel by Anthony Burgess. It is a dark satire of violence and free will set in a near future version of England. The film’s acts of graphic violence, including a vicious beating and rape choreographed to the strains of Gene Kelly’s “Singing in the Rain,” appalled numerous critics, though college audiences loved it and Oscar nominations for the film and Kubrick’s direction and script were handed down. Four years later Kubrick completed the historical costume drama Barry Lyndon starring Ryan O’Neal. Though again nominated for Academy Awards for best film, direction and script, Barry Lyndon was Kubrick’s

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only commercial failure. Another four years past before the release of Kubrick’s next project, The Shining (1980), based on Stephen King’s best-selling horror novel. Jack Nicholson starred as a struggling writer driven to madness in a snowshrouded inn. There was an even longer delay for the meticulous Kubrick before the completion of his next project — the Vietnam War epic Full Metal Jacket (1988), which gained him another Oscar nomination for his script. For the past several years Kubrick had been filming Eyes Wide Shut, a thriller starring Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman, that was released several months after Kubrick’s death. Kubrick had taken up a largely reclusive lifestyle in England for the past three decades. He was married three times — to Toba Metz, a high school classmate, and dancer Ruth Sobotka. He is survived by his current wife, actress Suzanne Christiane Harlan, and his three daughters, Katharine, Anya and Vivian. Considered a cinematic genius by many, his perfectionism on the set was legendary — sometimes requiring hundreds of takes to shoot a scene to his satisfaction. He exercised nearly complete control over his films, demanding, and receiving, a nearly unprecedented agreement for Warner Bros. in the early 1970s that gave him the right to a final cut. He was honored with the Directors Guild’s D.W. Griffith award in 1997 for his career achievements. Though he made a relatively small number of films over his nearly five decades as a director, he will likely be regarded as one of the most important auteurs of his time. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 8, 1999, A1; New York Times, Mar. 8, 1999, A1; People, Mar. 29, 1999, 118; Time, Mar. 22, 1999, 100; Times (of London), Mar. 8, 1999, 23a; Washington Post, Mar. 8, 1999, A1.

Kulik, Buzz Television director Buzz Kulik died of heart failure in Los Angeles on January 13, 1999. He was 76. Kulik began his career in television in the late 1940s and directed episodes of such anthology series as Lux Video Theater, Kraft Theater and Playhouse 90 during the 1950s. Kulik also directed episodes of Gunsmoke, Naked City, Pursuit, Have Gun —Will Travel, Rawhide and Twilight Zone. He received an Emmy nomination for an episode of Dr. Kildare in 1961. Kulik also directed the

films The Explosive Generation (1961), Yellow Canary (1963), Warning Shot (1967), Sergeant Ryker (1968), Villa Rides (1968), Riot (1969), To Find a Man (1972), Shamus (1973) starring Burt Reynolds, and Steve McQueen’s final film The Hunter (1980). He won an Emmy Award for the 1970 tele-film A Storm in Summer. He received further Emmy nominations for the highly popular telefilm Brian’s Song in 1972 and Babe in 1975. His other television credits include Owen Marshall, Counsellor at Law (1971), Vanished (1971), Incident on a Dark Street (1972), Pioneer Woman (1973), Remember When (1974), Bad Ronald (1974), Matt Helm (1975), Cage Without a Key (1975), The Lindbergh Kidnapping Case (1976), Kill Me If You Can (1977), Corey: For the People (1977), Never Con a Killer (1977), Ziegfeld: The Man and His Women (1978), the 1979 mini-series From Here to Eternity, Sidney Sheldon’s Rage of Angels (1983), the 1984 mini-series George Washington, the 1985 mini-series Kane & Abel, Women of Valor (1986), Her Secret Life (1987), Too Young the Hero (1988), the 1989 mini-series adaptation of Jules Verne’s Around the World in 80 Days, the 1990 mini-series Jackie Collins’ Lucky/Chances and Miles from Nowhere (1992). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 16, 1999, B5; New York Times, Jan. 25, 1999, 21; Variety, Jan. 25, 1999, 87.

Kumar, Rajendra Indian actor Rajendra Kumar died of cardiac arrest in Mumbai, India, on July 12, 1999. He was 71. Kumar was born in Hyderabad, India, on July 20, 1927. He began his film career in the early 1950s, appearing in Jogan (1950) and Awaz (1956). He starred in Mehboob Khan’s classic Mother India in 1957. He became a popular performer in Hindi cinema in such films as Blossom of Dust (1959), The Law (1960), Sangam (1964), Love in Kashmir (1965), Mera Naam Joker (1970), Tangewala (1972) and Aan Baan (1972).

Lafferty, Frances Radio actress Frances Lafferty died at her home in Brentwood, California, on September 15, 1999. She was 79. Lafferty was a popular

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Lane, Mildred Mildred Lane, who appeared in the popular Wendy’s “Where’s the Beef?” television commercials in the 1980s, died of injuries suffered in a fall in New Hope, Minnesota, on August 7, 1999. She was 96. Lane began appearing in commercials at the age of 80. She was one of two elderly women who complained about the hamburgers at other restaurants while Clara Peller shouted “Where’s the Beef?”

Lang, Doreen

Rajendra Kumar

performer on the radio in the 1940s. She was the announcer for the Ladies’ Home Journal live radio show and was featured in such series as Mr. District Attorney, The Green Hornet and Myrt and Marge. Her survivors include her husband, television producer Perry Lafferty. Variety, Oct. 4, 1999, 98.

Lander, Eric

Actress Doreen Lang died of cancer in Malibu, California, on April 21, 1999. She was 81. Lang was born in New Zealand in 1918. She began her career on stage after studying acting in London, appearing in productions of Blood Wedding and Blithe Spirit. Lang came to the United States in the 1940s where she appeared on Broadway in Faithfully Yours, I Know My Love and Season in the Sun. She also began performing on television in the 1950s and was featured in episodes of Kraft Television Theatre and Studio One. Alfred Hitchcock brought her to Hollywood where she made her film debut in his 1956 feature The Wrong Man. She appeared in several other Hitchcock films including North by Northwest (1959) and

British actor Eric Lander died in Cornwall, England, on October 28, 1999. He was 75. Lander was born in Rugby, England, on May 27, 1924. He was featured in a handful of British films in the 1950s including Track the Man Down (1954), Man in Demand (1955) and The Colditz Story (1955). He was best known for his work on British television, appearing in the 1957 production of Critical Point and in segments of Television Playhouse in 1958. Lander starred as Inspector Harry Baxter in the drama series No Hiding Place from 1959 to 1961, and again from 1963 to 1964. He also appeared as Inspector Cardish in the 1968 series Sexton Blake. His other television credits include the 1973 tele-film One Deadly Owner, and episodes of Out of the Unknown, The Avengers, The Champions and Department S. Doreen Lang

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The Birds (1963) and was featured in an episode of his television series. She also appeared in the films Wild in the Country (1961) with Elvis Presley, Cabinet of Caligari (1962) and The Group (1966), and the tele-films The Borgia Stick (1967), Gidget Grows Up (1969), The House That Would Not Die (1970), Brian’s Song (1971), Nightmare (1974) and Death Sentence (1974). Her other television credits include episodes of Perry Mason, Naked City, Ben Casey, The Young Lawyers, Mystery Show, Circle of Fear, Kung Fu and Highway to Heaven. She also worked on the television soap opera The Nurses, with her husband, actor Arthur Franz. In recent years she appeared in the 1990 film Almost an Angel with Paul Hogan, and was seen in episodes of Chicago Hope and Picket Fences. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 27, 1999, A22.

Lawrence, Joel Actor Joel Lawrence died in Los Angeles of complications from diabetes on May 23, 1999. He was 66. Lawrence began his career as part of the Lawrence Brothers comedy team. They entertained troops during the Korean War. He was soon working in television, where he appeared on such variety shows as The Red Skeleton Show, The Danny Kaye Show and The Carol Burnett Show, and on the sit-com Bewitched. He also played dra-

Joel Lawrence

matic roles in episodes of Perry Mason and Mission: Impossible. Lawrence also appeared in the tele-films The Face of Fear (1971), Jennifer: A Woman’s Story (1979) and Goldie and the Boxer Go to Hollywood (1981).

Layburn, Shirley Dinsdale Ventriloquist Shirley Dinsdale Layburn died of cancer at her Stony Brook, New York, home on May 9, 1999. She was 72. Ms. Layburn began her career as a ventriloquist on the radio in the early 1940s, hosting her own show Judy in Wonderland. She was also a frequent guest star on other radio programs during the 1940s. She and her puppet, Judy Splinters, debuted on television in 1947 at Los Angeles station KTLA. She was soon hosting the children’s show The Judy Splinters Show. She received an Emmy Award during the first Emmy presentations in 1949. She continued to host children’s shows in New York and Chicago before retiring in 1973. Los Angeles Times, May 12, 1999, A16; New York Times, May 12, 1999, A23; Variety, May 24, 1999, 85.

Le Breton, Auguste French writer Auguste Le Breton died of cancer on May 31, 1999. He was 86. Le Breton

Auguste Le Breton (center, signing copies of his books).

129 was born Auguste Monfort in Finistere, France, on February 18, 1913. He became involved with the Parisian underworld in his youth. During World War II Le Breton became a hero of the French Resistance. After the war he began to write. His crime novels, largely based on his own experiences, became extremely popular. Jean Gabin played Le Breton in three films adapted from his works, Rififi (1956), Razzia sur la Chnouf (1955) and The Sicilian Clan (1969). Le Breton authored nearly eight novels during his career, others of which were filmed starring Alain Delon and Jean-Paul Belmondo.

Lecoq, Jacques Leading French mime Jacques Lecoq died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Paris on January 19, 1999. He was 77. Lecoq was born in Paris on December 15, 1921. He was one of the foremost teachers of mime and the founder of the school Ecole Jacques Lecoq in Paris in 1956. Though he seldom performed in public, his influence was

1999 • Obituaries

felt through his students who include Academy Award winning actor Geoffrey Rush and members of the mime troupe Mummenschanz. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 29, 1999, A30; New York Times, Jan. 28, 1999, C22; Times (of London), Jan. 22, 1999, 23a.

Leduc, Jos Veteran professional wrestler Jos Leduc died in Atlanta, Georgia, on May 2, 1999. He was 53. Leduc, who was billed as a Canadian lumberjack, began wrestling in Montreal in the late 1960s. He was a popular performer in the Mid-South region in the 1970s, known for his maniacal demeanor and violent wrestling style. Leduc once sliced his own arm on a Memphis television show to promote an upcoming match. He continued to wrestle through the early 1990s. His son, Carl Leduc, is also a professional wrestler.

Jos Leduc

Lee, Dorothy Jacques Lecoq

Actress Dorothy Lee died of respiratory failure in San Diego, California, on June 24, 1999.

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Dorothy Lee (with Joe E. Brown from Local Boy Makes Good).

She was 88. Ms. Lee was born Marjorie Millsap in Los Angeles, California, on May 23, 1911. She began her career on vaudeville, singing with Fred Waring’s Pennsylvanians. She made her film debut in 1929’s Syncopation. During the 1930s she was a popular performer at RKO, often appearing with the comedy team of Bert Wheeler and Robert Woolsey. Her credits include Rio Rita (1929), The Cuckoos (1930), Dixiana (1930), Half Shot at Sunrise (1930), Hook, Line and Sinker (1930), Too Many Cooks (1931), Peach O’Reno (1931), Local Boy Makes Good (1931), Laugh and Get Rich (1931), Cracked Nuts (1931), Caught Plastered (1931), Girl Crazy (1932), Take a Chance (1933), Signing ’Em Up (1933), A Preferred List (1933), Plane Crazy (1933), Hips, Hips, Hooray (1934), Cockeyed Cavaliers (1934), School for Girls (1934), The Curtain Falls (1934), The Rainmakers (1935), The Old Homestead (1935), Silly Billies (1936), Penthouse Party (1936), S.O.S. Tidal Wave (1939), Twelve Crowded Hours (1939) with Lucille Ball, Too Many Blondes (1941), Roar of the Press (1941) and Repent at Leisure (1941). She subsequently retired from the screen. Ms. Lee was once married to newspaper columnist Jimmie Fidler. Los Angeles Times, July 3, 1999, A24.

way productions of Snafu, Goodbye, My Fancy, Years Ago and Inherit the Wind. She was an early performer on television from the late 1940s, appearing briefly as Cornelia Otis Skinner in the 1950 series The Girls. She was also featured in episodes of Playhouse 90, Lights Out, Out There, Tales of Tomorrow, Studio 57, Climax!, One Step Beyond, Philco Television Playhouse, Perry Mason, The Rifleman, Man and the Challenge, Dow Hour of Great Mysteries, Boris Karloff ’s Thriller, Gunsmoke, Maverick, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Bat Masterson, Wagon Train, Shotgun Slade, Stagecoach West, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Adventures in Paradise, Trackdown, The Texan, Frontier Circus, Man from Blackhawk, Death Valley Days, The Loner, Have Gun, Will Travel, The Investigators, Rawhide, Route 66, Empire, Naked City, Daniel Boone, The Fugitive, The Wild Wild West, The High Chaparral, The Virginian, Name of the Game and Kung Fu. She received an Emmy nomination for her role on The Richard Boone Show in 1963. Leslie also starred as Dr. Maggie Powers on the daytime soap opera The Doctors from 1965 to 1968. She also served as head writer for the soap opera The Secret Storm with partner Gerry Day. Her other television credits include the tele-films Dr. Cook’s Garden (1970), The Last Survivors (1975), Long Day’s Journey into Night (1987), Terror on Track 9 (1992), Kansas (1995), In Cold Blood (196) and Saint Maybe (1998). She was featured in a handful of films during her career including The Rabbit Trap (1959), Captain Newman, M.D. (1963), A Rage to Live (1965), The Molly Maguires (1970), Beyond Death’s Door (1979), Old Boyfriends (1979), Ironweed (1987) and 1999’s Message in a Bottle. She was also nominated for a Tony Award

Leslie, Bethel Stage, screen and television actress Bethel Leslie died of cancer in New York City on November 28, 1999. She was 70. Leslie was born in New York on August 3, 1929. She began her career on stage at the age of 15, appearing in Broad-

Bethel Leslie (from stage play The March on Madness).

131 for her work in 1986’s production of Long Day’s Journey into Night. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 9, 1999, A50; New York Times, Nov. 30, 1999, B13.

LeVien, John D. Documentary filmmaker John D. LeVien died in a London hospital on November 9, 1999. He was 81. LeVien was born in New York City in on July 18, 1918. He began his career as a journalist before turning to filmmaking in the late 1950s. He produced the 1963 documentary Black Fox about Adolf Hitler. The film was awarded the 1963 Academy Award for best documentary. LeVien was also nominated for Oscars for his documentaries The Finest Hours in 1965 and A King’s Story in 1968. He also produced the 1961 television documentary The Valiant Years for the BBC. New York Times, Nov. 22, 1999, A28.

Levinsky, Walt Clarinetist Walt Levinsky died in Sarasota, Florida, of brain cancer on December 14, 1999. He was 70. Levinsky played in Tommy Dorsey’s orchestra for two years before joining with Benny Goodman. He played with Goodman for nearly two decades. Levinsky also arranged songs for such performers as Frank Sinatra, Richard Harris and Liza Minnelli. He also composed theme songs for such network television programs as CBS Evening News with Dan Rather and ABC’s 20/20 and was musical director of the Daytime Emmy Awards. Levinsky also worked on such films as Just Tell Me What You Want (1980), Radio Days (1987), The Lemon Sisters (1990) and Alan & Naomi (1992).

Levitt, Gene Television director and writer Gene Levitt died of prostate cancer in Los Angeles on November 15, 1999. He was 79. Levitt was born in New York City on May 28, 1920. He began his career on radio, scripting episodes of Philip Marlowe. Levitt scripted several films in the 1950s in-

1999 • Obituaries

cluding Foreign Intrigue (1956), Beyond Mombasa (1956), The Night Runner (1957) and Underwater Warrior (1968). He soon moved to television, where he was a producer and writer for such series as Adventures in Paradise, Combat! and Hawaii Five-O. Levitt was the creator of the popular television series Fantasy Island in 1977. He directed such tele-films as Any Second Now (1969), Run a Crooked Mile (1969), The Forty-Eight Hour Mile (1970) and The Phantom of Hollywood (1974). His other television credits include episodes of The Young Lawyers, Night Gallery, Alias Smith and Jones, Cool Million, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, S.W.A.T., Tenafly, Barnaby Jones and Gibbsville. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 21, 1999, B5; New York Times, Nov. 24, 1999, B9; People, Dec. 20, 1999, 111; Time, Dec. 6, 1999, 41.

Lieffen, Karl German character actor Karl Lieffen died of bone cancer in Steinach, Germany, on January 13, 1999. He was 72. Lieffen was born Karel Frantisek Lifka in Ossek on May 17, 1926. He began his career on the German stage, but was best known for his performance as detective Nick Knatterton in the 1950s television series. Lieffen also appeared in Billy Wilder’s 1961 comedy film One, Two, Three as James Cagney’s assistant and driver. The tall, bald character actor also appeared in numerous European films including The Beggar Student (1956), Dorothea Angermann (1958), Aren’t We Wonderful? (1958), Resurrection (1958), The Man Who Walked Through the Wall (1959), Love Now — Pay Later (1959), Agatha, Stop That Murdering! (1960), The Phony American (1961), Piccadilly Zero Hour 12 (1963), Pirates of the Mississippi (1963), The Waltz King (1963), Adrian, the Tulip Thief (1965), The Defector (1966), When Night Falls on the Reeperbahn (1967), Jack of Diamonds (1967), Heidi (1968), Lolita ’79 (1969), Iron Hand (1979), It Can Only Get Worse (1979), The Wild Fifties (1983) and Rudy, the Racing Pig (1995). Lieffen also remained a familiar face on German television, starring as Karl Kempowski in the 1975 mini-series Tadelloser und Wolff. He was also seen on U.S. television in the mini-series War and Remembrance. One of his final roles was in the last episode of the long-running German series Derrick in 1998.

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Lilly, Lou Cartoon writer Lou Lilly died in Los Angeles on August 9, 1999. He was 90. Lilly was born in Henderson, Kentucky, in 1909. He began working in silent films as an extra in the late 1920s. He subsequently joined Charles Mintz’s cartoon company, where he worked as a an animator. Lilly worked with Warner Bros. from the 1930s, writing material for such animated characters as Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and Porky Pig. Lilly also scripted segments of the life-action Speaking of Animals series at Paramount in the 1940s. His segment, Who’s Who in Animal Land, was the recipient of the live-action short Academy Award in 1944. Lilly formed his own company in the early 1950s, where he produced numerous commercials until his retirement in 1970.

Limb, Bobby Australian actor Bobby Limb died of cancer in Sydney, Australia, on September 14, 1999. He was 74. Limb was born in Stepney, South Australia, in 1925. He began his show business career as a band leader in the early 1940s. He married singer and comedienne Dawn Lake in 1953 and the couple became leading entertainers throughout Australia and in the United Kingdom. From the late 1950s Limb was a popular face on Australian television, appearing in such shows as The Late Show, The Mobil-Limb Show and Bobby Limb’s Sound of Music. Limb also produced such television shows as The Don Lane Show and The Dave Allen Show, and the film Wake in Fright. He also appeared in the films Squeeze a Flower (1970) and Sunstruck (1972). Variety, Oct. 18, 1999, 55.

productions include Why Hanna’s Skirt Won’t Stay Down, Bouncers and Glamour, Glory and Gold starring Robert De Niro. Los Angeles Times, June 8, 1999, A16; New York Times, June 12, 1999, A13; Variety, June 21, 1999, 91.

Llewelyn, Desmond British character actor Desmond Llewelyn was killed in a car crash near Firle, East Sussex, England, on December 19, 1999. The actor, best known for his role as Q in the James Bond series, died in a head-on collision with another car while returning from a book signing. He was 85. Llewelyn was born in South Wales on September 12, 1914. He studied accounting before beginning his career as an actor. He attended the Royal Academy for the Dramatic Arts in the mid–1930s and made his film debut in 1939’s Ask a Policeman. His acting career was interrupted by World War II, with Llewelyn serving in the British army. He was captured by the German in France and spent five years as a prisoner of war. After the end of the war Llewelyn returned to acting, appearing in a television production of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. He appeared in a

Link, Ron Theatrical director Ron Link died during surgery at a Hollywood hospital of a pulmonary embolism on June 7, 1999. He was 54. Link was born in Ohio and went to New York in the early 1960s. He began working as a stage manager with Off-Broadway productions. He was best known for co-producing the hit prison spook Women Behind Bars with playwright Tom Eyen. His other

Desmond Llewelyn

133 handful of films over the next decade including They Were Not Divided (1950), Valley of Song (1953), Further Up the Creek (1958), A Night to Remember (1958), Sword of Sherwood Forest (1960), The Curse of the Werewolf (1961), Only Two Can Play (1962), The Pirates of Blood River (1962), Cleopatra (1963) and Silent Playground (1964). He was introduced in the second film of the James Bond series, From Russia with Love (1963), as Major Boothroyd, better known as Q. His character provided 007 with such fancy spy gadgets as deadly fountain pens and laser-equipped cigarette lighters. He appeared in all of the subsequent Bond films starring Sean Connery, including Goldfinger (1964), Thunderball (1965), You Only Live Twice (1967) and Diamond Are Forever (1971). He also supplied George Lazenby’s Bond with gadgetry in 1969’s On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. Llewelyn and Q were left out of the first film introducing Roger Moore as Bond, 1973’s Live and Let Die. He returned to the role in 1974’s The Man with the Golden Gun, and continued with the series in Moonraker (1979), For Your Eyes Only (1981), Octopussy (1983) and A View to a Kill (1985). Llewelyn’s Q had a major role in the two Timothy Dalton Bond films, The Living Daylights (1987) and License to Kill (1989). He continued to play the eccentric scientist opposite the newest Bond, Pierce Brosnan, in GoldenEye (1995) and Tomorrow Never Dies (1997). His appearance in the 1999 release, The World Is Not Enough (1999), was to have likely marked his final appearance as Q, with John Cleese being introduced as his successor. Llewelyn appeared in several other films during his career including Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968), Golden Lady (1979), Prisoner of Rio (1989), Merlin (aka October 32nd) (1992) and Taboo (1997). He was featured as the Colonel in the 1971 British television series Follyfoot and was Lord Dudley in the 1978 mini-series Lillie. His other television credits include episodes of such British series as The Invisible Man, Secret Agent, Virgin of the Secret Service, Doomwatch and Hazell. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 20, 1999, A30; Variety, Jan. 3, 2000, 93.

Locke, Josef Irish singer Josef Locke died in a hospital in Clane, County Kildare, Ireland, after a long ill-

1999 • Obituaries

Josef Locke

ness on October 15, 1999. He was 82. Locke was born Joseph McLaughlin in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, on March 23, 1917. He became one of Britain’s leading singers in the 1940s and 1950s, with his Irish ballads and songs often bringing tears to the eyes of his audiences. He appeared in several British films in the late 1940s including Holidays with Pay (1948), What a Carry On! (1949) and Somewhere in Politics (1949). Locke retired from performing in England when it was charged that he owed over $50,000 in back income tax. He returned to Ireland to avoid the tax bill. Another singer, Eric Ellison, began performing as Mr. X, impersonating Locke’s style and giving the impression that Locke had returned to singing under a false name. The incident was the basis for the 1992 film Hear My Song, starring Ned Beatty as Locke. Locke eventually settled his tax debt and sang several songs at the film’s premiere in London. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 17, 1999, B8; New York Times, Oct. 16, 1999, A17.

Long, Joan Australian screenwriter and producer Joan Long died in Sydney, Australia, on January 2, 1999. She was 73. Long was born in Victoria, Australia, in 1925. She began working in the Australian film industry in the late 1940s as a secretary. Long began scripting documentaries, receiving an Australian Film Institute award for her script of Paddington Lace. She scripted the 1976 Australian film Caddie. She also wrote and

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produced the documentary The Picture Show Man in 1977. She also served as producer on the films Puberty Blues (1981), Silver City (1984) and Emerald City (1991). Variety, Jan. 11, 1999, 124.

Lortel, Lucille Broadway producer Lucille Lortel died in New York on April 4, 1999. She was 98. She was born Louise Wadler on December 16, 1900. She was a stage actress in the 1920s, making her Broadway debut in a production of Caesar and Cleopatra in 1925. She continued to perform on stage until her marriage to businessman Louis Schweitzer in 1930. She subsequently appeared in several films and shorts including 1930’s Everything Happens to Me (1930). In the 1940s Lortel founded the White Barn Theater in Westport, Connecticut. She and her husband purchased the Theatre de Lys, now called the Lucille Lortel Theater, in Greenwich Village in 1955. She was involved in the production of nearly 500 plays during her career including the Tony-nominated A Walk in the Woods, Angels Fall, As Is, Blood Knot and Sarafina! Lortel was widowed in 1971. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 7, 1999, A17; New York Times, Apr. 1999, A21; Time, Apr. 19, 1999, 21; Times (of London), Apr. 7, 1999, 21a; Variety, Apr. 12, 1999, 75.

Lowe, Charles Charles Lowe, the husband and long-time manager of actress Carol Channing, died in Los Angeles on September 2, 1999. He was 87. Lowe was born in Steel City, Nebraska, in 1921. He began working in television in the 1950s, serving as an advertising executive on The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. He married Carol Channing in 1956, and subsequently managed her stage career. He also served as producer on five television specials featuring Ms. Channing, including An Evening with Carol Channing. In 1998 the couple separated after Ms. Channing accused him of mismanaging her career. She subsequently filed for divorce. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 5, 1999, B6; New York Times, Sept. 5, 1999, 35; People, Sept. 20, 1999, 226; Time, Sept. 13, 1999, 25; Variety, Sept. 27, 1999, 161.

Lowitz, Siegfried German character actor Siegfried Lowitz died in Munich, Germany, on June 27, 1999. He was 84. He was a popular performer in the German cinema from the 1950s, appearing in such features as The Sins of Rose Bernd (1956), King in Shadow (1957), The Legend of Robinson Crusoe (1957), Confess, Dr. Corda! (1958), It Happened in Broad Daylight (1958), Face of the Frog (1959), The Black Sheep (1960), The Forger of London (1961), The Invisible Dr. Mabuse (1961), The Brain (1962), The Mysterious Magician (1964) and The Sinister Monk (1965). Lowitz starred as Commissioner Erwin Koster on the popular German television series Der Alte from 1977 until 1985. He continued to perform on German television throughout the 1990s, appearing in the tele-film Mein Freund Harvey in 1997.

Ludwig, William

Lucille Lortel

Screenwriter William Ludwig died of complications from Parkinson’s Disease in Woodland Hills, California, on February 7, 1999. He was 86. Ludwig was born in New York City on May 26, 1912. He began scripting films in the late 1930s. His film credits include Love Finds Andy

135 Hardy (1938), Out West with the Hardys (1938), Stronger Than Desire (1939), Blackmail (1939), Love Crazy (1941), Journey for Margaret (1942), Girl Crazy (1943), Andy Hardy’s Blonde Trouble (1944), An American Romance (1944), Love Laughs at Andy Hardy (1946), Boys’ Ranch (1946), The Sun Comes Up (1948), Julia Misbehaves (1948), Hills of Home (1948), Challenge to Lassie (1949), Shadow on the Wall (1950), The Great Caruso (1951), It’s a Big Country (1951), The Merry Widow (1952), The Student Prince (1954), Athena (1954), Hit the Deck (1955), Oklahoma! (1955), Interrupted Melody (1955), Gun Glory (1957) and Ten Thousand Bedrooms (1957). Los Angeles Times, Feb. 14, 999, B5.

Luez, Laurette Actress Laurette Luez, the exotic brunette beauty best known for her roles as mysterious and sultry temptresses, spies and cavewomen, died in Milton, Florida, on September 12, 1999. She was 71. Luez was born in Honolulu, Hawaii, in 1928. She studied acting with Norma Jean Baker, and claimed to have been the one to suggest her screen name of Marilyn Monroe. Luez began her film career in the late 1940s, appearing in Unfaithfully Yours (1948), Kim (1950) with Errol Flynn, Killer Shark (1950), D.O.A. (1950) with Edmond O’Brien, Prehistoric Women (1950), Bomba and

Laurette Luez (left, from Prehistoric Women).

1999 • Obituaries

the African Treasure (1952), Siren of Bagdad (1953), Paris Model (1953), Jungle Gents (1954) with the Bowery Boys, Flower Drum Song (1961) and Ballad of a Gunfighter (1964). She also starred as Karamaneh in the 1956 television series The Adventures of Fu Manchu, and appeared in an episode of Stories of the Century. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 18, 1999, A17.

Lustig, Jo Producer and press agent Jo Lustig died of pancreatic cancer in Cambridge, England, on May 29, 1999. He was 74. Lustig was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1924. He began working as a press agent on Broadway for such stars as Louis Armstrong and Nat King Cole. Lustig relocated to London in 1960 where he became involved as an agent to many musical performers. During the 1980s Lustig handled publicity in Great Britain for several of John Cassavetes’ films. He also co-produced 84 Charing Cross Road. He was working on Arena, a BBC series on blonde actresses, at the time of his death. Times (of London), June 2, 1999, 21a; Variety, June 21, 1999, 91.

Macaulay, Charles Character actor Charles Macaulay died of metastatic cancer in Healdsburg, California, on August 13, 1999. He was 72. Macaulay was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on September 26, 1927. He began his career on stage in the 1950s after studying at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London. He received acclaim for performances in productions of The Winslow Boy and Family Portrait. Macaulay subsequently came to Hollywood, where he became a familiar face on television. He was featured as Dr. Elliot Kincaid on the Days of Our Lives soap opera in 1967, and appeared in episodes of such series as Destry, I Spy, Star Trek, It Takes a Thief, Wild Wild West, Mission: Impossible, Night Gallery, Gunsmoke, Barbary Coast, Wonder Woman, Baa Baa Black Sheep, Tales of the Gold Monkey and V. Macaulay appeared in The Monkees’ feature film Head in 1968 as Inspector Shrink, and was Count Dracula in the 1972 Blaxploitation film Blacula with William

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Charles Macaulay (with Vonetta McGee, from Blacula).

Marshall. He also had roles in Twilight People (1972), The Dirt Gang (1972), Brute Corps (1973), The House of Seven Corpses (1974), Come Live with Me (1974), The Hindenburg (1975), Airport ’77 (1977), Raise the Titanic! (1980), Samuel Fuller’s The Big Red One (1980), Splash (1984), Three O’Clock High (1987) and Whore (1991). Macaulay was featured in several Columbo tele-films and television productions of A Case of Rape (1974), The Return of the World’s Greatest Detective (1976), Tail Gunner Joe (1977), The Winds of Kitty Hawk (1978) and The Munsters’ Revenge (1981). Macaulay became a close friend of actor Raymond Burr, becoming a partner in the Raymond Burr Vineyards in Healdsburg in the early 1990s. His last roles were as the often-defeated prosecutor facing Burr’s Perry Mason in the tele-films The Case of the Poisoned Pen (1990), The Case of the Fatal Framing (1992), The Case of the Heartbroken Bride (1992), The Case of the Telltale Talk Show Host (1993), The Case of the Killer Kiss (1993) and The Case of the Wicked Wives (1993). Los Angeles Times, Aug. 19, 1999, A24.

McCann, Donal Irish actor Donal McCann died of pancreatic cancer in Dublin, Ireland, on July 17, 1999. He was 56. McCann was born in Dublin on May 7, 1943, the son of a playwright and former Lord Mayor of Dublin. The younger McCann began his career on stage, performing at the Abbey Theatre. He made his film debut in Disney’s 1966 The Fighting Prince of Donegal. McCann was also

featured in the films Sinful Davey (1969), Miss Julie (1972), The Mackintosh Man (1973), Poitin (1979) the first Irish-language feature film, Angel (1982), Summer Lightning (1984), Cal (1984), Out of Africa (1985), Mr. Love (1985), Clive Barker’s Rawhead Rex (1986), John Huston’s final film The Dead (1987), High Spirits (1988), December Bride (1990), The Miracle (1991), The Donner Party (1992), The Bishop’s Story (1995), Halcyon Days (1995), Stealing Beauty (1996), The Serpent’s Kiss (1997), Illuminata (1998) and The Nephew (1998). McCann was also a familiar face on British television, starring as Irish barrister Phineas Finn in the 1975 production of The Pallisers. He also appeared television productions of The Wood Demon (1974), The Hard Way (1979), Reflections (1984), Investigation: Inside a Terrorist Bombing (1990), Hedda Gabler (1993) and Into the Fire (1995). He also continued to perform on stage, recently completing a production of The Steward of Christendom at London’s Royal Court Theater. Los Angeles Times, July 19, 1999, A16; New York Times, July 19, 1999, A15; Times (of London), July 20, 1999, 19a; Variety, July 26, 1999, 45.

Donal McCann

McCarthy, Bob Special effects director Bob McCarthy died of respiratory failure at his Northridge, California, home on October 31, 1999. He was 66. McCarthy was born in New York City in 1933. During his career he designed effects for rock concerts, Broadway plays, films and television. He was also the lead special effects designer for Disney’s Epcot Center. McCarthy’s film credits

137 include The Philadelphia Experiment (1984), Doin’ Time (1985), Choke Canyon (1986), Frame Up (1991), Flashfire (1993), Possessed by the Night (1994), Inner Sanctum II (1994), Viper (1994) and Trance (1998). He also worked on such television shows as Saturday Night Live, Twin Peaks and Touched by an Angel.

MacDonald, Angus Scottish piper Angus MacDonald died on June 25, 1999. He was 60. MacDonald was born in Glasgow, Scotland, on October 20, 1938. He was trained on the bagpipes by his father at an early age. MacDonald enlisted in the Scots Guards at the age of 15 and became pipe major in 1957. MacDonald became the Queen’s household piper in 1965. He retired from the military in 1983. He continued to play and instruct in the pipes and helped compile the Scots Guards collection of tunes. Los Angeles Times, July 14, 1999, A15; New York Times, July 11, 1999, 31.

1999 • Obituaries

McDonald, Grace Actress Grace McDonald, who appeared in over 20 films in the 1940s, died of pneumonia in a Scottsdale, Arizona, hospital on October 30, 1999. She was 81. Ms. McDonald was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on June 15, 1918. She began her career on stage was tap dancing partner to her brother, actor Ray McDonald. She began her film career in the early 1940s, appearing in Dancing on a Dime (1940), What’s Cookin’? (1942), Strictly in the Groove (1942), Give Out, Sisters (1942), Behind the Eight Ball (1942), She’s for Me (1943), Mug Town (1943), It Ain’t Hay (1943), How’s About It (1943), Gung Ho! (1943), Get Going (1943), Gals, Incorporated (1943), Flesh and Fantasy (1943), Always a Bridesmaid (1943), My Gal Loves Music (1944), Destiny (1944), Murder in the Blue Room (1944), Hat Check Honey (1944), Follow the Boys (1944), See My Lawyer (1945) and Honeymoon Ahead (1945). She subsequently married and retired from show business. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 4, 1999, B7; Variety, Nov. 8, 1999, 52.

Angus MacDonald Grace McDonald (with David Bruce in She’s for Me).

Obituaries • 1999

138 vision. Macedo continued to appear in such films as The Seven Vampires (1986), The Scarlet Scorpion (1986), Fogo e Paixao (1988) and O Casamento dos Trapalhoes. She appeared with comedian Chico Anysio on his weekly television program until she was hospitalized in August of 1999.

McGowan, Stuart E.

Michael McDowell

McDowell, Michael Screenwriter Michael McDowell died of complications from AIDS in Boston, Massachusetts, on December 27, 1999. He was 49. McDowell was born in Enterprise, Alabama, in 1950. He scripted Tim Burton’s 1988 comedy horror film Beetlejuice and 1990’s Tales from the Darkside: The Movie. He also adapted Tim Burton’s 1993 animated film Nightmare Before Christmas and Stephen King’s Thinner (1996). McDowell also scripted and directed numerous episodes of television’s Tales from the Darkside in 1980s. McDowell was also the author of the Blackwater horror novel series in 1983. Sometimes writing as Axel Young, McDowell also wrote the novels Cold Moon Over Babylon (1980), Gilded Needles (1980), The Elementals (1981), Blood Rubies (1982), Katie (1982), Wicked Stepmother (1983), Clue (1985) and Toplin (1985).

Screenwriter Stuart E. McGowan died in North Hollywood, California, on September 18, 1999. He was 95. McGowan was born in Chicago in 1904. He began scripting films in the mid– 1930s, contributing to over 50 westerns during his career. Often working with his brother, Dorrell McGowan, his credits include The Singing Cowboy (1936), Sea Spoilers (1936), Red River Valley (1936), Ride, Ranger, Ride (1936), Guns and Guitars (1936), Comin’ Round the Mountain (1936), The Big Show (1936), King of the Pecos (1936), Yodelin’ Kid from Pine Ridge (1937), Hollywood Stadium Mystery (1937), A Man Betrayed (1937), Git Along, Little Dogies (1937), Sea Racketeers (1937), Bill Cracks Down (1937), Ladies in Distress (1938),

Macedo, Zeze Leading Brazilian comic actress Zeze Macedo died of complications from a stroke at a Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, hospital on October 8, 1999. She was 83. Macedo began her career in radio before being hired by the Atlantida movie studio in the 1950s. She became one of the country’s most popular comic actresses, appearing in over 100 films including De Vento em Popa (1957), O Homem do Sputnik (1959) and Esse Milhao E Meu (1959). She also became a familiar face on Brazilian tele-

Stuart McGowan

139 Under Western Stars (1938), Come On Leathernecks! (1938), Trouble in Sundown (1939), South of the Border (1939), In Old Monterey (1939), Smashing the Spy Ring (1939), Jeepers Creepers (1939), Rovin’ Tumbleweeds (1939), In Old Missouri (1940), Grand Ole Opry (1940), Barnyard Follies (1940), Friendly Neighbors (1940), Mountain Moonlight (1941), Down Mexico Way (1941), Arkansas Judge (1941), Country Fair (1941), Shepherd of the Ozarks (1942), The Old Homestead (1942), Mountain Rhythm (1942), Stardust on the Sage (1942), Hi, Neighbor (1942), O, My Darling Clementine (1943), Swing Your Partner (1943), Hoosier Holiday (1943), Sing, Neighbor, Sing (1944), San Fernando Valley (1944), The Big Bonanza (1944), Don’t Fence Me In (1945), Valley of the Zombies (1946), Night Train to Memphis (1946), The Inner Circle (1946), Twilight on the Rio Grande (1947), The Trespasser (1947), Saddle Pals (1947), Hellfire (1949) and Singing Guns (1950). McGowan directed and scripted several films including The Showdown (1950), Tokyo File 212 (1951) and The Bashful Elephant (1962). He also directed many episodes of the Sky King and Death Valley Days television series in the 1950s.

McGuire, Don Screenwriter, director and actor Don McGuire died in Los Angeles on April 13, 1999. He was 80. McGuire was born in Chicago, Illinois, on February 28, 1919. He began working in films as an actor in the mid–1940s, appearing in such features as San Antonio (1945), Pillow to Post (1945), God Is My Co-Pilot (1945), Pride of the Marines (1945), Too Young to Know (1945), Shadow of a Woman (1946), The Man I Love (1946), Humoresque (1946), Possessed (1947), Nora Prentiss (1947), That Way with Women (1947), My Wild Irish Rose (1947), Love and Learn (1947), Whiplash (1948), Wallflower (1948), The Fuller Brush Man (1948) with Red Skelton, I Surrender Dear (1948), the 1948 Columbia serial Congo Bill, Always Together (1948), The Threat (1949), Boston Blackie’s Chinese Venture (1949), Sideshow (1950), Armored Car Robbery (1950), Joe Palooka Meets Humphrey (1950), Three Guys Named Mike (1951) and Double Dynamite (1951). McGuire turned to screenwriting in the early 1950s. He was best known for adapting Howard Breslin’s novel for the screen as Bad Day at Black Rock (1955) star-

1999 • Obituaries

Don McGuire

ring Spencer Tracy. He also scripted and directed Johnny Concho (1956) with Frank Sinatra and The Delicate Delinquent (1957) with Jerry Lewis. McGuire directed 1957’s Hear Me Good and scripted the films Meet Danny Wilson (1952), Back at the Front (1952), Walking My Baby Home (1953), Three Ring Circus (1954), Artists and Models (1955) and Suppose They Gave a War and Nobody Came? (1970). McGuire served as producer, director and scripted for the 1960s television comedy series Hennessey. He also co-authored the original story for Dustin Hoffman’s 1982 film Tootsie. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 18, 1999, B5; New York Times, Apr. 26, 1999, A19.

McKimson, Charles E. “Chuck,” Jr. Animator and cartoonist Charles E. “Chuck” McKimson, Jr., died in Los Angeles on April 16, 1999. He was 84. The Colorado-born McKimson joined his brothers, Tom and Robert, at Warner Brothers in the late 1930s. There he worked on cartoons of characters created by brother Robert, including the Tasmanian Devil,

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Foghorn Leghorn and Speedy Gonzales. He also did sketches and cels for Bugs Bunny, Daff y Duck, Road Runner and Sylvester & Tweety cartoons. He joined brother Tom at Whitman Publishing in 1954 where he helped produce Dell Comics. McKimson formed his on animation studio in the early 1960s to produce title sequences and special effects for motion pictures. He remained active until his death, specializing in limited edition animated sports fine arts for the past five years. Los Angeles Times, May 6, 1999, A28.

McSweeney, John, Jr. Editor John McSweeney, Jr., died at his Redondo Beach, California, home on May 19, 1999. He was 83. Born in New York City, McSweeney went to Hollywood in the 1930s, where he began working with MGM as a payroll clerk. He subsequently began working with editor Harold Kress, assisting on such films as Mrs. Miniver and Random Harvest. McSweeney returned to MGM after military service during World War II. He made his debut as an editor on Mervyn LeRoy’s 1952 film Lovely to Look At. McSweeney also edited such features as Million Dollar Mermaid (1952), Latin Lovers (1953), Dangerous When Wet (1953), The King’s Thief (1955), Hit the Deck (1955), The Opposite Sex (1956), Gaby (1956), Diane (1956), House of Numbers (1957), Ten Thousand Bedrooms (1957), The Tunnel of Love (1958), Saddle the Wind (1958), Party Girl (1958), It Started with a Kiss (1959), Ask Any Girl (1959), The Mating Game (1959), Please Don’t Eat the Daisies (1960), All the Fine Young Cannibals (1960), Go Naked in the World (1961), Mutiny on the Bounty (1962) which earned him an Academy Award nomination, A Ticklish Affair (1963), Elvis Presley’s Viva Las Vegas (1964), The Rounders (1965), The Money Trap (1965), The Glass Bottom Boat (1966), Live a Little, Love a Little (1968), Sol Madrid (1968), Adam at 6 A.M. (1970), Evil Knievel (1971), Night of the Lepus (1972) and Christina (1974). He also edited several tele-films including The Dangerous Days of Kiowa Jones (1966), Dr. Cook’s Garden (1970), A Tattered Web (1971), Murder Once Removed (1971), Paper Man (1971) and Tom Sawyer (1973), and worked on such series as MacMillan and Wife, Trapper John, M.D. and Charlie’s Angels.

Maggio, Pupella Italian actress Pupella Maggio died of a brain hemorrhage in Rome on December 8, 1999. She was 89. Maggio was born in Naples, Italy, on April 24, 1910. She began performing on stage with her family at the age of three. She became a leading stage performer in the late 1940s, often appearing in plays written by Eduardo de Filippo. She appeared in over 20 films during her career including Bullet for Stefano (1947), Il Medico dei Pazzi (1954), Il Terribile Teodoro (1958), Mogli Pericolose (1958), Il Terrore dell’Oklahoma (1959), Sogno di Una Notte di Mezza Sbornia (1959), A Qualcuna Piace Calvo (1960), Mariti in Pericolo (1961), Two Women (1961), The Four Days of Naples (1962), The Bible (1966) as Noah’s Wife, The Family Doctor, The Valachi Papers (1972), Federico Fellini’s Amarcord (1974) as the Mother, Lacrime Napulitane (1982) and Cinema Paradiso (1988). Los Angeles Times, Dec. 13, 1999, A22; New York Times, Dec. 14, 1999, B12.

Mahlathini, Simon South African singer Simon Mahlathini Nkabinde died of complications from diabetes in Johannesburg, South Africa, on July 28, 1999. He was 61. Mahlathini began performing and recording with the Dark City Sisters in 1952. His guttural singing sound popularized mbaqanga music throughout the world during the 1960s and 1970s when he was lead vocalist for Mahlathini and the Mhaotella Queens. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 1, 1999, B5; New York Times, July 30, 1999, A17; Times (of London), Aug. 2, 1999, 19a.

Mahon, Barry Exploitation film producer and director Barry Mahon died in Las Vegas, Nevada, on December 4, 1999. He was 78. He was born Jackson Barrett Mahon in Santa Barbara, California, on Feb. 5, 1921. He learned to fly as a teenager and volunteered with the Royal Air Force in 1941. He was shot down in 1942 and held as a prisoner of war by the Germans. He made several

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Fanny Hill Meets Dr. Erotico (1967), The Warm Warm Bed (1968), Run Swinger Run! (1968), Forbidden Flesh: As Seen from a Hayloft in the Hills (1968) and Fanny Hill Meets the Red Baron (1969). Mahon subsequently turned to children films directing a handful of juvenile features including The Wonderful Land of Oz (1969), Thumbelina (1970), Musical Mutiny (1970), Jack and the Beanstalk (1970), Santa and the Three Bears (1970) and Santa and the Ice Cream Bunny (1972).

Simon Mahlathini

unsuccessful escape attempts before he was liberated in 1945. His wartime activities were recounted in the 1949 book The Great Escape, and Mahon served as technical advisor on the 1963 film starring Steve McQueen. Mahon began working in films in the 1950s, producing or directing nearly 40 films during his career. He was business manager for Errol Flynn late in the actor’s career, and helmed Flynn’s 1959 feature Cuban Rebel Girls. Mahon other credits, primarily low-budget sexploitation or horror films, include Violent Women (1959), Pagan Island (1960), Rocket Attack, U.S.A. (1961), The Dead One (1961), She Should Have Stayed In Bed (1963), 1000 Shapes of a Female (1963), Nudes, Inc. (1964), Nude Scrapbook (1964), Bunny Yeager’s Nude Las Vegas (1964), Bunny Yeager’s Nude Camera (1964), The Adventures of Busty Brown (1964), Nudes on Tiger Reef (1965), Naughty Nudes (1965), International Smorgas-Broad (1965), Hot Skin, Cold Cash (1965), Confessions of a Bad Girl (1965), Censored (1965), The Beast That Killed Women (1965), Sin in the City (1966), P.P.S.— Prostitute Protective Society (1966), The Sex Killer (1967), Sex Club International (1967), Good Times with a Bad Girl (1967), Fanny Hill Meets Lady Chatterley (1967),

Barry Mahon

Manco, Baris Turkish folk singer Baris Manco died of a heart attack in Istanbul, Turkey, on February 1, 1999. He was 56. Manco was born in Istanbul on January 2, 1943. He began his career in a rock band in the 1960s. Manco wrote and recorded over 200 popular songs, including such children’s tunes as “My Friend the Donkey.” Known for his flowing long hair and eccentric dress, Manco became a cult figure in Turkey, hosting his own weekly television program for nearly a decade. New York Times, Feb. 7, 1999, 51.

March, Elspeth British actress Elspeth March died in London on April 5, 1999. She was 88. She was born Elspeth Mackenzie on March 5, 1911. Ms. March began her career on stage in the early 1930s. She received acclaim for her performance in the title role in Bernard Shaw’s The Millionairess in 1937. Ms. March also appeared in a handful of films

Obituaries • 1999

142 voice of the cat, Thomasina, Psyche ’59 (1964), Don’t Lose Your Head (1967), Woman Times Seven (1967), Carry On Again, Doctor (1969), the 1969 version of Goodbye, Mr. Chips with Peter O’Toole, The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer (1970), Promise at Dawn (1970) and The Magician of Lublin (1979). She was also active on British television, appearing in productions of Rebecca (1978), Charlie Muffin (1979) and The Eligible Bachelor (1992). Her other television credits include episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, One Step Beyond, The Saint and Roald Dahl’s Tales of the Unexpected. Ms. March was married to actor Stewart Granger from 1938 until 1948. Times (of London), May 31, 1999, 23A.

Margulies, Edward

Baris Manco

during her career including Mr. Emmanuel (1944), Quo Vadis? (1951), His Excellency (1952), The Miracle (1959), Midnight Lace (1960), The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (1961), Dr. Crippen (1962), The Three Lives of Thomasina (1963) as the

Film columnist Ed Margulies died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on November 16, 1999. He was 48. Margulies worked as a publicist for United Artists and other companies before becoming co-editor of Movieline magazine. He also headed up the Movieline web site and was a columnist for the Mr. Showbiz web site. Margulies authored the book Bad Movies We Love with Steve Rebello, and co-hosted a cable television program based on the book. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 18, 1999, A45; Variety, Nov. 29, 1999, 68.

Marion, Richard

Elspeth March (kneeling by Joss Ackland, with Jane Merron looking on, from Arms and the Man).

Actor Richard Marion died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on July 19, 1999. He was 50. Marion began his career on stage before appearing in the television series Operation Petticoat as Pharmacist’s Mate Williams in 1977. Marion was also seen in several films including Roadie (1980), Choose Me (1984), Jagged Edge (1985) and Child’s Play 3 (1991), and the tele-films Mistress (1987), My Brother’s Wife (1989), The Dreamer of Oz (1990), Armed and Innocent (1994), Family Album (1994) and Killing Mr. Griffin (1997). Marion’s other television credits include episodes of The Dukes of Hazzard, Hill Street Blues, Anything but Love, Designing Women and Seinfeld. He later

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was 93. He began working in television with his son Garry, producing such 1970s sitcoms as The Odd Couple, Happy Days, Mork and Mindy and Laverne and Shirley. The latter starred his daughter Penny Marshall and Cindy Williams as the title characters. Marshall retired in the early 1980s. Los Angeles Times, July 22, 1999, A22; New York Times, July 20, 1999, B9.

Martin, Malachi

Richard Marion

turned to directing, helming episodes of Anything but Love and Everybody Loves Raymond. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 5, 1999, A18.

Author and former Jesuit priest Malachi Martin died at a Manhattan hospital of injuries suffered from a fall on July 28, 1999. He was 78. Martin was born in Kerry, Ireland, on July 23, 1921. He joined the Jesuit order in 1939. He became a leading scholar and a close advisor to Pope John XXIII, before being released from his vows as a priest in 1964 in opposition to the liberal reforms of the Catholic Church. Martin subsequently began writing and had a best seller in 1976 with his book Hostage to the Devil. Released shortly after the film The Exorcist, Martin’s book

Markes, Larry Film and television writer Larry Markes died in a Los Angeles hospital on May 19, 1999, of injuries he received in a fall at his home. He was 77. Markes began working at NBC in 1945 as a page before becoming a joke writer for such comedians as Bob Hope and Fred Allen. Markes also worked with Ernie Kovacs, Steve Allen, Jackie Gleason and Jack Paar. He moved to Hollywood in 1960 where he scripted several films including For Love or Money (1963) and Wild and Wonderful (1964). Markes also scripted episodes of such television series as Bonanza, McHale’s Navy, My Three Sons, The Flintstones, I Dream of Jeannie and Love, American Style, and wrote a 1967 television adaptation of Jack and the Beanstalk. Variety, May 31, 1999, 47.

Marshall, Tony Television producer Anthony W. “Tony” Marshall died in Los Angeles on July 12, 1999. He

Malachi Martin

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reportedly detailed several true exorcisms in the United States. Martin also wrote the books The Pilgrim (1964), under the pseudonym Michael Serafian, and The Final Conclave (1978). Los Angeles Times, July 31, 1999, A20; New York Times, July 30, 1999, A17; Times (of London), Aug. 28, 1999, 22c.

Mason, Christine Hairstylist Christine Mason died of cervical cancer in Baltimore, Maryland, on October 17, 1999. She was 49. Mason was best known for designing outrageous hairstyles for such performers as Divine, Ricki Lake and Patricia Hearst for films by director John Waters. She worked on such Waters films as Female Trouble (1975), Desperate Living (1977), Polyester (1981), Hairspray (1988) and Cry Baby (1990).

opera The Young and the Restless in the 1980s and 1990s. She also appeared in the soap opera’s General Hospital, Return to Peyton Place as Selena Cross and Days of Our Lives. Her other television credits include episodes of Playhouse 90, Wagon Train, Wild Wild West, Ironside and Adam 12. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 31, 1999, A18; Variety, Apr. 5, 1999, 158.

Matsuda, Hiro Yasuhiro Kojima, who wrestled professionally as Hiro Matsuda, died of colon and liver cancer at his home in Tampa, Florida, on November 27, 1999. He was 62. Matsuda began wrestling in the early 1960s, and was a popular performer in Texas, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Florida. He also headed a wrestling school, training such future stars as Hulk Hogan, Lex Lugar and Paul Orndorff.

Mason, Margaret Actress Margaret Mason died of a heart attack in Silverdale, Washington, on March 26, 1998. She was 58. Ms. Mason was born in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, in 1939. She was best known for her role as Eve Howard, millionaire Victor Newman’s mistress, in the television soap

Hiro Matsuda

Mature, Victor

Margaret Mason

Victor Mature, the muscular leading man who starred in such films as Samson and Delilah, One Million B.C. and My Darling Clementine, died after a long bout with cancer in Rancho Santa Fe, California, on August 4, 1999. Mature was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on January 29, 1915. He began his career in Hollywood on stage at the Pasadena Playhouse before making his film debut in The Housekeeper’s Daughter in 1939. The

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several subsequent films including Head (1968) with the Monkees, Every Little Crook and Nanny (1972), Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976) and Firepower (1979). He portrayed Samson’s father in the 1984 tele-film version of Samson and Delilah. Mature lived comfortably in retirement from investments in real estate and could often be found on the golf course. He was diagnosed with cancer three years ago. His survivors include his fifth wife, Lorey, and their daughter, Victoria. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 10, 1999, A3; New York Times, Aug. 10, 1999, C21; People, Aug. 23, 1999, 137; Times (of London), Aug. 11, 1999, 23a; Variety, Aug. 16, 1999, 40. Victor Mature (with Carole Landis from One Million B.C.).

following year Mature starred as the caveman Tumak in the prehistoric drama One Million B.C. Often cast in action roles because of his physique and toothy grin, Mature was featured in such films as No, No, Nanette (1940), Captain Caution (1940), The Shanghai Gesture (1941), I Wake Up Screaming (1941) with Betty Grable and Laird Cregar, Seven Days’ Leave (1942), Footlight Serenade (1942), Song of the Islands (1942), My Gal Sal (1942) with Rita Hayworth, John Ford’s My Darling Clementine (1946) as Doc Holliday, Moss Rose (1947), Kiss of Death (1947), Fury at Furnace Creek (1948), Cry of the City (1948), Red, Hot and Blue (1949), Easy Living (1949), Samson and Delilah (1949) with Hedy Lamarr, Wabash Avenue (1950), Stella (1950), I’ll Get By (1950), Gambling House (1951), Something for the Birds (1952), Million Dollar Mermaid (1952), The Las Vegas Story (1952), The Glory Brigade (1953), Affair with the Stranger (1953), Androcles and the Lion (1953), The Robe (1953) and its sequel Demetrius and the Gladiators (1954) as Demetrius, Betrayed (1954), Dangerous Mission (1954), The Egyptian (1954), Violent Saturday (1955), Chief Crazy Horse (1955), Zarak (1956), The Sharkfighters (1956), The Last Frontier (1956), Safari (1956), The Long Haul (1957), Pickup Alley (1957), China Doll (1958), Tank Force (1958), Escort West (1958), The Big Circus (1959), Timbuktu (1959), The Bandit of Zhobe (1959), Hannibal (1960) and The Tartars (1961). Mature largely retired from films in the early 1960s. He returned to the screen in Vittorio De Sica’s After the Fox (1966), parodying his own on screen image. Mature had small roles in

Maxwell, Eddie Comedy writer Eddie Maxwell died in Studio City, California, on November 21, 1999. He was 87. Maxwell was born Eddie Cherkose in Detroit in 1912. He came to Hollywood in the 1930s, where he wrote scripts for radio series. He also wrote the lyrics to songs for such films as Rose of the Rio Grande, Billy the Kid Returns, Come on Rangers, Gold Mine in the Sky, Man from Music Mountain, Lady from Louisiana, Rawhide, Shine

Eddie Maxwell

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146

On Harvest Moon, Down Mexico Way, Pals of the Pecos, South of Monterey, Gay Cavalier, Golden Stallion, Under Mexicali Stars, Hi Ya Chum, Beauty and the Bandit, Melody Ranch and Zorro’s Fighting Legion. He also appeared in small roles in handful of films and serials including Gold Mine in the Sky (1938), Dick Tracy Returns (1938), Dick Tracy’s G-Men (1939), Daredevils of the Red Circle (1939), Zorro’s Fighting Legion (1939), Sierra Sue (1941) and Bowery Champs (1944). Maxwell was also lyricist for several popular novelty songs including “Yodeling up the Canyon of Love” and “Pico and Sepulveda.” He also wrote comedy bits for such stars as Abbott & Costello, the Ritz Brothers and Spike Jones. Times (of London), Nov. 21, 1999, 121.

Mayer, Helen Aberson Helen Aberson Mayer, who wrote the original story that was adapted into to the classic Disney animated film Dumbo, died at her home in Manhattan on April 3, 1999. She was 91. Mayer

Helen Mayer

was born in Syracuse, New York, in 1907. Her book, Dumbo, the Flying Elephant, was published in 1939 with illustrations by Harold Pearl. The Disney film version was released two years later. New York Times, Apr. 10, 1999, A13; People, Apr. 26, 1999, 89; Time, Apr. 19, 1999, 21.

Mayfield, Curtis Songwriter and soul singer Curtis Mayfield died in a Roswell, Georgia, hospital on December 26, 1999. He had suffered from poor health since 1990, when he was paralyzed from the neck down after a lighting scaffold fell and crushed him while performing at a Brooklyn concert. He was 57. Mayfield was born in Chicago, Illinois, on June 3, 1942. He began singing gospel and soul at an early age and was leading the group, the Alphatones, in the early 1950s. He subsequently joined Jerry Butler’s soul group, the Roosters, who soon became known as the Impressions and had the pop hit “For Your Precious Love.” Mayfield became leader of the Impressions on such hits as “Gypsy Woman,” “It’s All Right” and “Keep on Pushing.” Mayfield wrote the hit theme song for the 1972 blaxploitation film Superfly. He also wrote music for the films

Curtis Mayfield

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Superfly T.N.T. (1973), Claudine (1974), Let’s Do It Again (1975), Sparkle (1976), Short Eyes (1977) and A Piece of the Action. Mayfield wrote and recorded as a solo act in the 1970s, producing such songs as “People Get Ready” and “Mighty Mighty.” He continued to compose and play despite his crippling accident in 1990. Mayfield was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of the Impressions in 1991, and again as a solo artist in 1999. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 27, 1999, A23; People, Jan. 1, 2000, 118; Time, Jan. 1, 2000, 41; Times (of London), Jan. 3, 2000, 19a; Variety, Jan. 3, 2000, 90.

Menken, Shepard Actor Shepard Menken died at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on January 2, 1999. He was 77. Menken was born in New York City in 1921. He began his career on radio at the age of 11. After attending Columbia University and the Juilliard School of Music, Menken went to Hollywood. He made his film debut in 1949’s The Red Menace. He was also featured in The Great Caruso (1951), Harem Girl (1952), April in Paris (1952), The Merry Widow (1952), Tangier Incident (1953), Man in the Dark (1953), Captain John Smith and Pocahontas (1953), Bengal Brigade (1954), Killers from Space (1954) and The Benny Goodman Story (1955). Menken was also featured on television in several episodes of the 1950s comedy series I Love Lucy. He also appeared in episodes of The Big Valley and Mission: Impossible. Menken was a popular voice actor from the 1960s. He was heard as Clyde Crashcup in The Alvin Show, and was heard in the animated films The Man from Button Willow (1965), The Phantom Tollbooth (1969) and Bugs Bunny’s Third Movie: 1001 Rabbit Tales (1982). He was also heard on commercials for Mattel Toys, Starkist Tuna, Friskies and Western Airlines. Variety, Feb. 1, 1999, 74.

Menuhin, Yehudi Leading concert violinist Yehudi Menuhin died in a Berlin hospital on March 12, 1999. He

Yehudi Menuhin

was 82. He was born in New York on April 22, 1916, and began playing the violin at the age of 3. A child prodigy, Menuhin toured Europe in the 1928s, playing in Berlin in 1928 and London in 1929. He recorded the Elgar Violin Concerto in 1932 to great acclaim. Despite several setbacks of confidence, Menuhin remained one of the leading violinists of the 20th Century. Bartok’s Solo Sonata and Walton’s Sonata for Violin and Piano where written for him. Menuhin became a British citizen in 1985 and became Lord Menuhin of Stoke D’Abernon in 1993. He was the author of several books including his memoirs, Theme and Variations (1972) and Unfinished Journey (1977). Los Angeles Times, Mar. 13, 1999, A1: New York Times, Mar. 13, 1999, A12; People, Mar. 29, 1999, 102; Time, Mar. 22, 1999, 43; Times (of London), Mar. 13, 1999, 21a; Variety, Mar. 22, 1999, 52; Washington Post, Mar. 13, 1999, B6.

Merryfield, Buster British character actor Buster Merryfield died of a brain tumor at a Poole, England, hospital on June 23, 1999. He was 78. Merryfield was born in Battersea, South London, England, on November 27, 1920. Merryfield worked as a

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148

Paul J. Micale Buster Merryfield

banker before deciding to become and actor in his late 50s. He began appearing on television in the late 1970s in productions of Hannah, Love Story with Patsy Kensit, and P.D. James’ Shroud for a Nightingale (1984). He also appeared in the British film Pick of the Cherries. Merryfield was best known for his role as the bearded Uncle Albert in the BBC series Only Fools and Horses from 1984 through 1991. Times (of London), June 24, 1999, 25a.

Meyer, Stanley Stanley Meyer, the executive producer of the Dragnet television series, died of heart failure at his home in Santa Monica, California, on December 18, 1999. He was 85. Meyer headed the Mark VII television production company and was producer and co-owner of Jack Webb’s popular television police series Dragnet from the 1950s. Meyer also produced the 1954 film version of the series. Meyer was also chairman of Filmaster Ltd., which helped produced such other series as Gunsmoke, Pete Kelly’s Blues and Have Gun Will Travel. Meyer also produced the U.S. release of the 1960 Japanese horror film The Human Vapor. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 21, 1999, A47; Variety, Jan. 3, 2000, 94.

Micale, Paul J. Veteran character actor Paul J. Micale died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease at the Motion Picture and Television Home in Woodland Hills, California, on January 16, 1999. He was 83. Micale was born in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1915. He began his career on the local stage and radio. He moved to Los Angeles in 1959, where he appeared often on television and in films. Micale was best known as Father Carmine in three of the Rocky films with Sylvester Stallone. He was also featured in the films Pocket Full of Miracles (1961), Dreams of Glass (1969), Marlowe (1969), Brute Corps (1972), Lady Sings the Blues (1972) and Herbie Rides Again (1972). He also appeared in the tele-films Something Evil (1972) and Miracle on Ice (1981). Micale’s other television credits include episodes of The Untouchables, Gunsmoke, Mission: Impossible, It Takes a Thief, Laredo, The Streets of San Francisco, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Alias Smith and Jones, Night Gallery, Trapper John, M.D., Laverne and Shirley, Barnaby Jones, Kojak, Columbo, Emergency! and The Rockford Files. Variety, Feb. 22, 1999, 166.

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Michaels, Mickey S. Film and television set decorator Mickey S. Michaels died in Los Angeles on March 20, 1999. He was 67. Michaels began his career in the 1950s and was a founding members of the Set Decorators Society of America in 1968. He worked on such films as Airport (1970), Airport 1975 (1974), Airport ’77 (1977), House Calls (1978), The Concorde: Airport ’79 (1979), The Pursuit of D.B. Cooper (1981), Warning Sign (1985), Psycho III (1986), The Hunt for Red October (1990), The Naked Gun 2∂: The Smell of Fear (1991), Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991), Clear and Present Danger (1994), Crimson Tide (1995) and Down Periscope (1996). Michaels received an Emmy nomination for his work on the science fiction television series Battlestar Galactica in 1979. He also worked on the 1993 pilot for Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. His other television credits include the tele-films Police Story: The Freeway Killings (1987), The Taking of Flight 847: The Uli Derickson Story (1988) and Police Story: The Watch Commander (1988) Variety, Apr. 19, 1999, 57.

Miki, Norihei Japanese actor Norihei Miki died in Tokyo on January 25, 1999. Miki appeared in over a dozen Japanese films from the late 1950s. His film credits include Monkey Magic (1959), The Birth of Japan (1959), 47 Samurai (1962), My Hobo (1963), Tora-san 19 (1977), Demon Pond (1979), Ballad of Narayama (1982), Fire Festival (1985), Tokyo Blackout (1987), Black Rain (1989) and Sada (1998).

1999 • Obituaries

era (1951), There’s No Business Like Show Business (1954), Anything Goes (1956), The Pajama Game (1957) and The Bells Are Ringing (1960), where he danced the cha-cha with Judy Holliday. Variety, Mar. 15, 1999, 58.

Miller, Harvey Screenwriter Harvey Miller died of heart failure at his Los Angeles home on January 8, 1999. He was 63. Miller began his career in the 1960s as a comedy writer for such comedians as Alan King, Shecky Greene and Dick Gregory. He made his television debut writing for the sit-com Hey Landlord! in 1967. He was nominated for an Emmy Award while serving as executive producer of The Odd Couple in 1974. He also wrote and directed episodes of Taxi, The Tracey Ullman Show and A League of Their Own. Miller was nominated for an Academy Award for his screenplay for the 1980 Goldie Hawn comedy Private Benjamin. He also scripted the films Jekyll & Hyde … Together Again (1982), Protocol (1984) and Cannonball Run II (1984). Miller wrote and directed the features Bad Medicine (1985) and Getting Away with Murder (1996). Miller also appeared as a supporting actor in the films The Hollywood Knights (1980), License to Drive (1988), Beaches (1988), Big (1988), New Year’s Day (1989), Awakenings (1990), Frankie and Johnny (1991), This Is My Life (1992) and The Definite Maybe (1997), and the tele-films The Glitter Dome (1984) and The Odd Couple: Together Again (1993). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 13, 1999, A12; New York Times, Jan. 28, 1999, B7; TV Guide, Apr. 10, 1999, 4; Variety, Jan. 18, 1999, 147.

Miller, Herman Miller, Buzz Dancer Buzz Miller died of complications from emphysema on February 23, 1999. He was 75. Miller was born Vernal Miller in Snowflake, Arizona, on December 23, 1923. He went to New York in the 1940s, where he trained with choreographers John Butler and Jack Cole. He made his Broadway debut in 1948 in a production of Magdalena. Miller appeared as a dancer in numerous films in the 1950s including On the Rivi-

Television writer Herman Miller died in a Los Angeles hospital after a long illness on April 18, 1999. He was 79. Miller scripted the pilot for the Kung Fu television series and wrote several later episodes. He also scripted the film Coogan’s Bluff and subsequently developed the story idea into the McCloud television series. Miller’s other credits include episodes of Death Valley Days, The Beverly Hillbillies, The New Mike Hammer and MacGyver. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 29, 1999, A22.

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150

Miller, Tony

Millowitsch, Willie

Actor Tony Miller died of cancer at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on September 12, 1999. He was 72. Miller was born on March 29, 1927. He began his career on stage in 1941, appearing in the Broadway production of Life with Father. He was also featured on Broadway in I Remember Mama, and appeared in early television productions on Playhouse 90. Miller came to Hollywood in 1955, where he appeared in such films as Roger Corman’s Attack of the Crab Monsters (1957), T-Bird Gang (1959) which he also scripted, North to Alaska (1960), Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961), Return to Peyton Place (1961). Miller also appeared on television in the daytime soap operas General Hospital and Days of Our Lives, and episodes of such series as Perry Mason, The Twilight Zone, CHiPs, Three’s Company, Cagney and Lacey and Dallas. In the 1980s Miller was featured in the films S.O.B. (1981) and Lies (1983), and the tele-films Second Sight: A Love Story (1984), Obsessive Love (1984), Mirrors (1985) and Obsessed with a Married Woman (1985). Los Angeles Times, Oct. 5, 1999, A22.

German comic actor Willie Millowitsch died of heart failure in Cologne, Germany, on September 20, 1999. He was 90. Millowitsch was born in Cologne on January 8, 1909. He began his career on stage at the age of 5 and was a popular comic in touring companies during World War II. Millowitsch became a major film star in Germany during the 1950s, appearing in over 50 films including Two Hearts in May (1958), Lady Country Doctor (1958), Everyday’s Not Sunday (1959), Robert and Bertram (1961), Princess Tzigane (1962), Confessions of a Bigamist (1969), Whispering in the Hayloft (1969) and The Wild Fifties (1983). He was also featured in the U.S. comedy film National Lampoon’s European Vacation in 1985. Millowitsch was also a popular German television performer, starring in the Klefisch series through the mid–1990s. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 21, 1999, A20.

Tony Miller

Mills, Donald Donald Mills, the last survivor of the Mills Brothers singing group, died at a Los Angeles hospital of pneumonia on November 13, 1999. He was 84. Mills was born in Piqua, Ohio, on April 29, 1915, the youngest of four brothers. He and his brothers Herbert, Harry and John began performing in vaudeville as Four Boys and a Kazoo. The were soon being heard on radio and signed a recording contract in 1931. They had a hit with their first record, “Tiger Rag.” The Mills Brothers recorded with such artists as Bing Crosby, Ella Fitzgerald, Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong. They also appeared in several films and shorts including I Ain’t Got Nobody (1932), Dinah (1933), When Yuba Plays the Rumba on the Tuba (1933), Strictly Dynamite (1934), Broadway Gondolier and Lawless Valley (1939). Brother John died in 1936 and was replaced by their father, John Sr. The continued to perform and record, with major hits including “Paper Doll,” “You Always Hurt the One You Love,” “I’ll Be Around” and “Glow Worm.” They were seen in a few more films in the 1940s and 1940s including Rhythm Parade (1943), Chatterbox (1943) and The Big Beat (1958). John Sr. retired from the group in the mid–1950s. Harry

151

Donald Mills (center, with Herbert and Harry).

Mills died in 1982, and Donald and Herbert continued to perform as a duo until Herbert’s death in 1989. Donald remained active, recording “Still, There’s You” with his son John in 1994, until poor health forced his retirement earlier in 1999. He was a recipient of a Grammy Award for lifetime achievement in 1998. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 15, 1999, B1; People, Nov. 19, 1999, 149; Times (of London), Nov. 16, 1999, 27a; Variety, Nov. 22, 1999, 95.

Mitchell, Guy Guy Mitchell, a leading singing star from the 1950s, died in a Las Vegas hospital following

Guy Mitchell

1999 • Obituaries

surgery on July 1, 1999. He was 71. Mitchell was born in Detroit, Michigan, on February 22, 1925. His career received a large boost in 1949 after winning the Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts competition. The following year he recorded “My Heart Cries For You” and “The Roving Kind,” which established him as a major recording star. He also recorded such hits as “My Truly Truly Fair,” “Singing the Blues” and “Heartaches by the Number.” Mitchell had 16 million-selling records during the 1950s and hosted the television variety series The Guy Mitchell Show in 1957. Mitchell also appeared in several films including Those Redheads from Seattle (1953), Red Garters (1954) and The Wild Westerners (1962), and starred as Detective George Romack in the television western series Whispering Smith in 1961. Mitchell also appeared on numerous variety series and in episodes of Perry Mason and Overland Trail. Los Angeles Times, July 3, 1999, A23; New York Times, July 5, 1999, B7; People, July 19, 1999, 79; Times (of London), July 13, 1999, 23a.

Mitchison, Naomi Author Naomi Mitchison died at her home on the Mull of Kintyre, Scotland, on January 11,

Naomi Mitchison

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1999. She was 101. She was born Naomi Margaret Haldane in Edinburgh on November 1, 1897, the daughter of physiologist and philosopher J.S. Haldane and sister of geneticist J.B.S. Haldane. She married Labor politician Dick Mitchison in 1916. Naomi Mitchison wrote her first book in 1923, which was well received by the critics despite its depiction of lesbianism, rape and abortion. She continued to write and achieved acclaim for her 1931 historical fantasy The Corn King and the Spring Queen. She was also politically active, appearing in the Socialist Film Council’s 1933 film The Road to Hell. She was an unsuccessful candidate for Parliament in 1935. Mitchison was the author of over 70 books during her long career, including the 1985 memoir Among You Taking Notes. She was widowed in 1970. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 13, 1999, A12; New York Times, Jan. 16, 1999, C17; Times (of London), Jan. 13, 1999, 21a.

Miyagawa, Kazuo Japanese cinematographer Kazuo Miyagawa died of kidney failure in Tokyo on August 7, 1999. He was 91. Miyagawa was born in Kyoto, Japan, on February 25, 1908. He began working in films at the Nikkatsu Studio in the mid–1920s. Miyagawa is best known for his work with legendary director Akira Kurosawa on such films as Rashomon (1950). His film credits also include The Great World Power Rising (1938), The Last Abdication (1945), Miss Oyu (1951), Kenji Mizoguchi’s Ugetsu (1953), A Geisha (1953), The Bailiff (1954), The Crucified Woman (1954), The Crucified Lovers (1954), Legend of the Taira Clan (1955), Street of Shame (1956), Conflagration (1958), Drifting Weeds (1959), The Key (1959), Yojimbo (1961), The Money Dance (1963), Zatoichi and the Chest of Gold (1964), Tokyo Olympiad (1965), Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman and the Fugitives (1968), The Magoichi Saga (1970), Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo (1971), Lone Wolf and Cub: In Peril (1972), Kagemusha the Shadow Warrior (1980), Akuryo Island (1981), MacArthur’s Children (1984) and Gonza the Spearman (1986). His final film credit was for Masahiro Shinoda’s Maihime in 1989. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 9, 1999, A18; New York Times, Aug. 10, 1999, C20; Variety, Aug. 16, 1999, 40.

Mizushima, Michitaro Michitaro Mizushima, a leading Japanese action film star from the 1940s, died in a Tokyo hospital on March 23, 1999. He was 87. Mizushima became a major action star following his performance in Shinsetsu (Fresh Snow) in 1942. He appeared in numerous films in post-World War II Japan, including 1948’s Jonetsu no Ningyo. He began playing supporting and character roles in the mid–1960s. One of his later films was 1988’s Okashina Futan (The Strange Pair).

Molloy, John Irish actor John Molloy died after a long illness in Oakland, California, on September 2, 1999. He was 70. Molloy was born in Dublin in 1929. He began his career on stage, where he became known for his performances in the works of Samuel Beckett. Molloy was also featured in many films including The Concrete Jungle (1962), Stork Talk (1962), Ulysses (1967), Paddy (1969), Country Dance (1970), Flight of the Doves (1971), On the Game (1973) and The Purple Taxi (1977). He also wrote numerous revues, radio and television plays, including the popular one-man show Molloy in the early 1980s. He also wrote the best-selling novel Alive, Alive-O. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 13, 1999, A21.

Monsoon, Gorilla Gorilla Monsoon, a leading professional wrestler in the 1960s and 1970s, who later severed as television commentator for the WWF wrestling promotion, died of complications from diabetes and heart ailments at his home in Willingboro, New Jersey, on October 6, 1999. He was 62. Monsoon was born Robert “Gino” Marella in New York on June 4, 1937. The 6'6", 400 pound athlete began his wrestling career in the early 1960s as a vicious villain, often competing against world champion Bruno Sammartino. Teaming with such ring stars as Killer Kowalski, El Mongo and Bill Watts, he held numerous tag team championships in the WWWF. Monsoon became a fan favorite in the 1970s before retiring from the ring the following decade. He

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Gorilla Monsoon

subsequently served as a commentator World Wrestling Federation’s television programs, often co-hosting with Jesse “the Body” Ventura (the current Governor of Minnesota) and Bobby “the Brain” Heenan. Monsoon also briefly served as interim president of the WWF in the mid–1990s. Poor health forced Monsoon to limit his activities in recent years. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 8, 1999, A26; New York Times, Oct. 8, 1999, C21; People, Oct. 25, 1999, 115.

Montagu, Ashley Author and anthropologist Ashley Montagu died of cardiovascular disease in Princeton, New Jersey, on November 26, 1999. He was 94. He was born Israel Ehrenberg in the East End of London on June 28, 1905. An ambitious scholar, he was educated at the University of London and Columbia University, where he studied physical anthropology. He achieved prominence in the 1940s for his statements that race was a product of perception rather than a biological fact. He authored over 60 books, including 1953’s The Natural Superiority of Women. His book on John Merrick, the Victorian era Elephant Man, was the basis of David Lynch’s 1980 film, The Elephant Man, starring John Hurt as Merrick and Anthony Hopkins as Dr. Frederick Treves. Other topics he wrote on included the history of swearing, human anatomy and intelligence, and the primitive Neanderthals. He was a popular figure on American television, appearing often on such

Ashley Montagu

programs as The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. He was working on a revision of his book on women at the time of his death. New York Times, Nov. 28, 1999, 55; People, Dec. 13, 1999, 139.

Monty, Harry Harry Monty, who was seen as both a Munchkin and a Flying Monkey in the fantasy classic The Wizard of Oz (1939), died in Beverly Hills, California, on December 28, 1999. He was 95. Monty was born Hymie Lichenstein in Dallas, Texas, of Polish immigrant parents. He became one of the leading “Little People” of stage and screen. Monty was also top stunt performer when a person of his size was needed for stunt work. He began his career in vaudeville and made his film debut in the late 1930s. He was seen on the screen in such films as Hellzapoppin’ (1941), Tarzan’s New York Adventure (1942), Ride ’Em Cowboy (1942), See My Lawyer (1945), George

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154

Harry Monty (as a Flying Monkey from The Wizard of Oz).

White’s Scandals (1945), Crack-Up (1946), Invaders from Mars (1953) as a mutant, River of No Return (1954), The Court Jester (1956), How the West Was Won (1962), Our Man Flint (1965), Planet of the Apes (1968) as a child ape, Hello, Dolly! (1969), Papillon (1973), Ralph Bakshi’s 1978 adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkein’s Lord of the Rings and Hometown U.S.A. (1979). Monty was also seen on television in episodes of Bewitched, Lost in Space, where he played various aliens, Bonanza, where he is mistaken for a leprechaun by Hoss, It’s About Time, H.R. Pufnstuf and Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 31, 1999, A24.

Moore, Brian Irish-born author Brian Moore died of heart disease at his Malibu, California, home on January 10, 1999. He was 77. Moore was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, on August 25, 1921. He served in the British army during World War II and emigrated to Canada after the war. He began working for a newspaper before starting

Brian Moore

his career as a fiction writer. He subsequently moved to New York and his first novel, The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne was published in the U.S. in 1956. Moore adapted his novel The Luck of Ginger Coffey into a screenplay for the 1964 film. He relocated to Los Angeles, where he scripted Alfred Hitchcock’s 1966 film Torn Curtain. Moore also adapted his novel Catholics into an acclaimed tele-film in 1973. Moore scripted the 1984 tele-film The Blood of Others and adapted in 1985 novel Black Robe for director Bruce Beresford’s 1991 film. Moore’s first novel, The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne, was adapted for the screen in 1987 and Cold Heaven was filmed in 1992. Moore’s later works include the novels No Other Life (1993), The Statement (1996) and The Magician’s Wife (1998). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 12, 1999, B1; Time, Jan. 25, 1999, 23; Times (of London), Jan. 13, 1999, 21a.

Moore, Clayton Clayton Moore, who starred as the legendary Western hero, the Lone Ranger, on tele-

155

Clayton Moore (as the Lone Ranger).

vision in the 1950s, died of a heart attack at a Los Angeles hospital on December 28, 1999. He was 85. He was born Jack Moore in Chicago, Illinois, on September 14, 1914. Moore worked as a trapeze artist with a circus before going to Hollywood in the late 1930s. Moore worked steadily in such films and serials as Thunder Trail (1937), The Texans (1938), Go Chase Yourself (1938), Crime School (1938), When Were You Born (1938), The Cowboy from Brooklyn (1938), Secrets of an Actress (1938), Sergeant Madden (1939), Zorro’s Fighting Legion (1939), The Son of Monte Cristo (1940), Kit Carson (1940), Tuxedo Junction (1941), International Lady (1941), Perils of Nyoka (1942), Outlaws of Pine Ridge (1942), Black Dragons (1942), Heldorado (1946), The Crimson Ghost (1946), The Bachelor’s Daughters (1946), Jesse James Rides Again (1947), Along the Oregon Trail (1947), Marshal of Amarillo (1948), G-Men Never Forget (1948), Adventures of Frank and Jesse James (1948) as Jesse James, The Plunderers (1948), South of Death Valley (1949), Sons of New Mexico (1949), Riders of the Whistling Pines (1949), Masked Raiders (1949), Ghost of Zorro (1949), The Gay Amigo (1949), Frontier Investigator (1949), The Far Frontier (1949), The Cowboys and the Indians (1949), Sheriff of Wichita (1949), Bride of Vengeance (1949) and Bandits of El Dorado (1949). Moore took on

1999 • Obituaries

the role of radio hero The Lone Ranger in 1949, who with his faithful Indian companion, Tonto, played by Jay Silverheels, battled badmen throughout the west for most of the 1950s. Moore was briefly replaced in the title role by John Hart over a contract dispute in the early 1950s, but soon returned to the role. He also starred in the features adapted from the series, The Lone Ranger (1956) and The Lone Ranger and the Lost City of Gold (1958). Though the series quit production later in the decade, “The William Tell Overture” theme would announce that the masked Ranger, astride his horse Silver, would continue to protect the innocent in reruns for decades to come. During the 1950s Moore also continued to appear in films and serials. He was seen in Flying Disc Man from Mars (1951), Cyclone Fury (1951), Son of Geronimo (1952), Night Stage to Galveston (1952), The Hawk of Wild River (1952), Desert Passage (1952), Captive of Billy the Kid (1952), Buffalo Bill in Tomahawk Territory (1952), Barbed-Wire (1952), Radar Men from the Moon (1952), Mutiny (1952), Montana Territory (1952), Kansas Pacific (1953), Jungle Drums of Africa (1953), Down Laredo Way (1953), The Bandits of Corsica (1953), Gunfighters of the Northwest (1954), The Black Dakotas (1954) and The Titled Tenderfoot (1955). He also made occasional appearances on television in other Western series including The Range Rider, Wild Bill Hickok and The Gene Autry Show, and reprised the voice of the Lone Ranger in the 1960s animated series. Moore also continued his role of the Ranger in personal appearances throughout the country until producers of a new big-budget film about the character forced him to stop appearing as the Lone Ranger with a court order in 1979. Moore subsequently removed the mask and donned a pair of wrap-around dark glasses for his appearances. The new film, The Legend of the Lone Ranger with Klinton Spilsbury premiered two years later and was a major bomb. The court order was lifted in 1984. People, Jan. 1, 2000, 105; Time, Jan. 1, 2000, 41; Times (of London), Dec. 31, 1999, 23a; Variety, Jan. 3, 2000, 93.

Moreno, Zully Argentine actress Zully Moreno died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Buenos

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Aires on December 25, 1999. She was 79. She was born Zulema Esther Gonzalez in 1920. She became a leading star on the Argentine screen in the 1940s, appearing in such films as Cristina (1946), La Gata (1947), God Reward You (1948), Love Never Dies (1955), Madrugada (1957), La Noche y el Alba (1958), Una Gran Senora (1959) and Un Trono Para Cristy (1960). She was the widow of Argentine film director Luis Cesar Amadori.

such television series as Gunsmoke and The Restless Gun. Morgan was badly injured on the set of How the West Was Won in April of 1962. He lost his left leg while doubling George Peppard in a scene aboard a train carrying a load of logs. When the logs dislodged he was knocked from the train, and several cars ran over him. He was hospitalized for over a year. Morgan was married to actress Yvonne De Carlo from 1955 through the mid–1970s.

Morgan, Bob

Morris, Willie

Stuntman Bob Morgan died at the Motion Picture Hospital on February 22, 1999. He was 62. He was born in Mt. Carmel, Illinois, in 1916. He began working in films in the late 1940s, working as a stuntman for Dark Passage (1947). Morgan worked on such films as The Wild Blue Yonder (1951), Gun Fury (1953), The War of the Worlds (1953), You’re Never Too Young (1955), Shotgun (1955), The Boss (1956), The Big Country (1958), The Alamo (1960) and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962). He also worked on

Author Willie Morris died of a heart attack in a Jackson, Mississippi, hospital on August 2, 1999. He was 64. Morris was born in Jackson on November 29, 1934. He went to work at Harper’s magazine in 1963, becoming editor in 1967. He left the magazine in 1971 and returned to Mississippi in 1980. Morris became one of the South’s leading authors, whose books include North Toward Home (1967), The Courting of Marcus Dupree (1983), After All, It’s Only a Game (1992) and New York Days (1993). His most recent work was The Ghosts of Medgar Evers (1998), detailing the production of the 1995 films about Evers’ assassination and the subsequent trial of his killer, Ghosts of Mississippi. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 3, 1999, A14; New York Times, Aug. 3, 1999, A13; People, Aug. 23, 1999, 109; Time, Aug. 16, 1999, 21.

Willie Morris

Bob Morgan

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Morse, Ella Mae Singer Ella Mae Morse died at a Bullhead City, Arizona, hospital of respiratory failure on October 16, 1999. She was 75. Morse was born in Mansfield, Texas, on September 12, 1924. She began singing in the late 1930s as a vocalist with the Jimmy Dorsey Band, but was replaced when it was learned she had lied about her age to get the job. She subsequently moved to San Diego where she sang with Freddie Slack in the early 1950s. She was best known for the hit songs “Cow Cow Boogie,” “Pigfoot Pete” and “The House of Blue Lights.” Morse appeared in several films including Reveille with Beverly (1943), South of Dixie (1944), Ghost Catchers (1944) and How Do You Dooo? (1946). Morse stopped recording in 1957, but continued to perform until her retirement in 1987. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 18, 1999, A18; New York Times, Oct. 18, 1999, A20; Time, Nov. 1, 1999, 39.

Penelope Mortimer

Mortimer, Penelope

Ella Mae Morse

British novelist Penelope Mortimer died of cancer in Willesden, England, on October 19, 1999. She was 81. Mortimer was born Penelope Ruth Fletcher in Oxfordshire, England, on September 19, 1918. She was best known as the author of the 1962 novel The Pumpkin Eater, which was filmed two years later starring James Mason and Anne Bancroft. She wrote her first novel, Johanna, in 1947 under the name Penelope Dimont. During the 1950s she also wrote the novels A Villa in Summer, The Bright Prison and Daddy’s Gone A-Hunting. She scripted the 1965 thriller Bunny Lake Is Missing and 1988’s A Summer Story. She also adapted Portrait of a Marriage, the biography of Vita Sackville-West, for British television in 1990. It was aired in the United States as three segments of Masterpiece Theater in 1992. Mortimer’s other works include the novels My Friend Says It’s Bulletproof (1968), Long Distance (1974) and The Handyman (1985),

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and the 1986 biography Queen Elizabeth: A Life of the Queen Mother. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 23, 1999, A18; New York Times, Oct. 23, 1999, A14.

Morton, Gary Television producer Gary Morton died of lung cancer at a Palm Springs, California, hospital on March 30, 1999. Morton was the widower of legendary comedienne Lucille Ball. He was 74. He was born Morton Goldaper in New York City in 1921. He was a popular nightclub comedian in New York, Las Vegas and the Borscht Belt when he married Lucille Ball in 1960, soon after her divorce from Desi Arnaz. He soon began working as an executive producer on his wife’s television programs including The Lucy Show, Here’s Lucy and Life with Lucy. He also served as vice president of Lucille Ball Productions from 1967 and produced several of Lucy’s television specials. Morton also produced the 1983 Tom Cruise film All the Right Moves and the tele-films Bungle Abbey (1981) and Sentimental Journey (1984). He also appeared as an actor in the films Lenny (1974) and Postcards from the Edge (1990). He and Miss Ball remained married until her death in 1989. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 1, 1999, A26; New York Times, Apr. 1, 1999, B11; People, Apr. 19, 1999, 113; Time, Apr. 12, 1999, 35; Variety, Apr. 5, 1999, 158.

Bryan Mosley

Mosley, Bryan British actor Bryan Mosley died of a heart attack in Shipley, Yorkshire, England, on February 9, 1999. He was 67. Mosley was born in Leeds, Yorkshire, on August 25, 1931. He was best known for his performance as Alf Roberts on the popular British soap opera Coronation Street. He played the role from 1967 until his character’s death from a heart attack in December of 1998. Mosley began his career on stage and was a popular television performer from the 1950s. He was featured in episodes of Armchair Theatre, Play of the Week, Z Cars, The Avengers, Doctor Who, The Saint, Redcap and Out of the Unknown. Mosley also appeared in a handful of films including A Kind of Loving (1962), Far from the Madding Crowd (1967), Charlie Bubbles (1968) and Get Carter (1971). Times (of London), Feb. 11, 1999, 23a.

Mountain Chief, Leonard

Gary Morton (with Lucille Ball).

Leonard Mountain Chief, a Tribal Elder for the Blackfeet Indian Nation, died of a heart attack in Heart Butte, Montana, on March 29, 1999. He was 59. Mountain Chief, a champion fiddler, appeared in numerous documentaries over the past four decades. He was also featured in several feature films including All the Young Men (1960) and War Party (1989). Most recently, he appeared as Steven Seagal’s father-in-law in the 1998 film The Patriot. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 1, 1999, A26.

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Munro, David

Declan Mulholland

British documentary filmmaker David Munro died in England after a long illness on August 5, 1999. He was 55. Munro was born on July 1, 1944, the son of television director Hugh Munro. He became involved in film and television production in the 1970s, directing a dramatization of R.D. Laing’s Knots. He subsequently began working with John Pilger’s documentary film company, directing Do You Remember Vietnam in 1978. He created four documentaries on Cambodia beginning with Year Zero in 1979 which documented the horrors of the Pol Pot regime. He completed his anti-war trilogy The Four Horsemen in 1985. Munro also brought to the world’s attention the injustices in East Timor with Death of a Nation (1994) and The Timor Conspiracy (1998). He was working on a screenplay based on an Isabel Allende short story at the time of his death.

Mulholland, Declan Irish actor Declan Mulholland died of a heart attack in Great Britain on June 29, 1999. He was 67. Mulholland was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, in December of 1932. He began his career on stage in the late 1950s. He made his film debut several years later in 1962’s Damn the Defiant! His other film credits include Mystery Submarine (1963), Guns in the Heather (1968), Great Catherine (1968), The Charge of the Light Brigade (1968), Naughty! (1971), The Ruling Class (1972), Theatre of Blood (1973), The Land That Time Forgot (1975), The Quatermass Conclusion (1979), Hawk the Slayer (1980), Time Bandits (1981), The Tall Guy (1989), War of the Buttons (1994) and The Run of the Country (1995). Mulholland was slated to be the stand-in for Jabba the Hutt in George Lucas’ 1977 science fiction classic, Star Wars, but budget restraints forced Lucas to abandon the scene. Mulholland was also a popular performer on British television, featuring in productions of Rogue Male (1976), Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing (1984), Return to Treasure Island (1985) and Work! (1990), and in episodes of The Avengers, Doctor Who and Lovejoy.

David Munro

Murdoch, Iris British writer Iris Murdoch died of complications from Alzheimer’s Disease in Oxford,

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160 September 15, 1906. She met Arthur Murray at the age of 17 while in the studio audience of his radio program. They married four months later. The Murrays created a chain of dance studios throughout the United States in the 1940s, popularizing ballroom dancing. The couple were married for 65 years before Arthur’s death in 1991. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 9, 1999, A18; New York Times, Aug. 8, 1999, 39; People, Aug. 23, 1999, 109; Times (of London), Aug. 16, 1999, 19a; Variety, Aug. 30, 1999, 166.

Iris Murdoch Kathryn Murray

England, on February 8, 1999. She was 79. Ms. Murdoch was born in Dublin, Ireland, on July 15, 1919. Her first novel, Under the Net, was published in 1954. She was best known for authoring A Severed Head in 1961, which was filmed in 1971. Her other works include the novels Flight from the Enchanter (1956), The Black Prince (1973), The Sacred and Profane Love Machine (1974), The Sea, the Sea (1978), The Message to the Planet (1989) and The Green Knight (1994). Los Angeles Times, Feb. 9, 1999, B4; New York Times, Feb. 9, 1999, A1; People, Feb. 22, 1999, 120; Time, Feb. 22, 1999, 31; Times (of London), Feb. 9, 1999, 19a; Washington Post, Feb. 9, 1999, B6.

Murray, Kathryn Kathryn Murray, who co-hosted The Arthur Murray Party variety show with her husband from 1950 until 1960, died at her Honolulu home on August 6, 1999. She was 92. She was born Kathryn Kohnfelder in Jersey City, New Jersey, on

Myhrum, Robert Television director Robert Myhrum died of a heart attack aboard his boat while vacationing in Boca Grande, Florida, on April 2, 1999. He was 72. Myhrum was born in Chicago in 1926. He began working at CBS after graduating for college. He soon began directing the children’s show Captain Kangaroo and such daytime soap operas as As the World Turns, Secret Storm, Ryan’s Hope, Love of Life and Days of Our Lives. Myhrum began directing the PBS children’s series Sesame Street in the early 1970s. He remained with the program for 13 years and was nominated for an Emmy Award in 1973. New York Times, Apr. 1999, 21.

Myrow, Fredric Composer Fredric Myrow died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on January 14, 1999. He

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was 59. He was the son of songwriter Josef Myrow. The younger Myrow began composing in the late 1950s. He worked on numerous films including the cult horror Phantasm series —Phantasm (1979), Phantasm II (1988), Phantasm III: Lord of the Dead (1994) and Phantasm: Oblivion (1998). His other film credits include Stop (1970), Leo the Last (1970), Loly-Madonna XXX (1973), A Reflection of Fear (1973), Scarecrow (1973), Soylent Green (1973), Kenny and Company (1986), On the Nickel (1980), Hour of the Assassin (1987), Journey to Spirit Island (1988), Survival Quest (1989) and Rubin and Ed (1991). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 17, 1999, B5. Robin Nedwell

Neal, Billie Character actress Billie Neal died of cancer in Los Angeles on December 27, 1999. She was 44. Neal was born Gwendolyn Williams in Little Rock, Arkansas, in 1955. She began her career on stage and appeared in many films from the mid–1980s. Her film credits include Down by Law (1986), January Man (1989), Born on the Fourth of July (1989), Jacob’s Ladder (1990), Internal Affairs (1990), Mortal Thoughts (1991), A Kiss Before Dying (1991), Consenting Adults (1992), The Gun in Betty Lou’s Handbag (1992), Girl 6 (1996), Sweet Nothing (1996), Red Meat (1997), Gridlock’d (1997) and Eve’s Bayou (1997). Neal was also featured in the BBC television mini-series Signs and Wonders in 1995. Her other television credits include episodes of Law and Order and The Practice.

Nedwell, Robin British actor Robin Nedwell died of a heart attack in Southampton, Hampshire, England, on February 2, 1999. He was 52. Nedwell was born on September 27, 1946. He was best known for his role as Dr. Duncan Waring in several British television series including Doctor in the House (1969), Doctor at Sea (1974), Doctor on the Go (1975), The Doctors Down Under (1979) and Doctor at the Top (1991). He was also seen in the television series The Upchat Connection, The Shillingbury Tales, West End Tales and The Climber. Nedwell also appeared in a handful of films in-

cluding the 1973 horror anthology The Vault of Horror, Stand Up, Virgin Soldiers (1977) and A Slice of Life (1983). Times (of London), Feb. 3, 1999, 19a.

Newley, Anthony British actor and entertainer Anthony Newley died of cancer at his home in Jensen Beach, Florida, on April 14, 1999. He was 67. Newley was born in London on September 24, 1931. He began his film career in the 1940s, starring in The Adventures of Dusty Bates. He also played the Artful Dodger in David Lean’s 1948 production of Oliver Twist. Newley was also seen in the films Vice Versa (1948), The Guinea Pig (1948), Vote for Huggett (1949), Don’t Ever Leave Me (1949), A Boy, a Girl and a Bike (1949), Highly Dangerous (1950), The Little Ballerina (1951), Those People Next Door (1952), Top of the Form (1953), Dusty Bates (1953), Up to His Neck (1954), The Blue Peter (1954), Above Us the Waves (1955), X the Unknown (1956), High Flight (1956), The Battle of the River Plate (1956), The Cockleshell Heroes (1956), Port Afrique (1956), The Good Companions (1957), How to Murder a Rich Uncle (1957), Fire Down Below (1957), The Small World of Sammy Lee (1958), The Man Inside (1958), Tank Force (1958), The Lady Is a Square (1959), Idle on Parade (1959), The Heart of a Man (1959), The Bandit of Zhobe (1959), Killers of Kilimanjaro (1959), Jazz Boat (1960) and In the Nick (1960). Newley also became a popular singer and recording star in the early 1960s. Working with Leslie

Obituaries • 1999

162 in the Fountain (1990), Polly Comin’ Home! (1990) and Boris and Natasha (1992). He was also seen in episodes of Fame, Magnum P.I., Murder, She Wrote, Alfred Hitchcock Presents and The Upper Hand, and was Vince Walton in the British television series EastEnders in 1998. Newley was married three times including to actress Joan Collins from 1963 until 1971. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 15, 1999, A26; New York Times, Apr. 16, 1999, A23; People, May 3, 1999, 107; Time, Apr. 26, 1999, 23; Times (of London), Apr. 16, 1999, 25a; Variety, Apr. 19, 1999, 57; Washington Post, Apr. 16, 1999, B7.

Newman, Paul S.

Anthony Newley (from Doctor Doolittle).

Bricusse, he put together his own theatrical show, Stop the World, I Want to Get Off, in 1961. The popular show, which included the hit song “What Kind of Fool Am I?” moved to Broadway the following year. Newley was the lyricist for the title song for the 1964 James Bond film Goldfinger, which was a popular hit sung by Shirley Bassey. Newley and Bricusse also produced the 1965 show The Roar of the Greasepaint, the Smell of the Crowd, which included such songs as “Who Can I Turn To?” and “A Wonderful Day Like Today.” Though the show failed in England, it became a popular success on Broadway. Newley co-starred with Rex Harrison in the 1967 musical fantasy film Doctor Dolittle. He continued to appear in such films as Sweet November (1968), Can Hieronymus Merkin Ever Forget Mercy Humppe and Find True Happiness? (1969) which he also directed and scripted, The Old Curiosity Shop (1975) and It Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time (1975). Newley and Bricusse also wrote the score for the 1971 film Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, which included the hit song “The Candy Man.” He starred in the off beat 1987 film The Garbage Pail Kids Movie. From the 1980s Newley appeared often on television. He was featured in such telefilms as Malibu (1983), Blade in Hong Kong (1985), Alice in Wonderland (1985) as the Mad Hatter, Outrage! (1986), Stagecoach (1986), Coins

Comic writer Paul S. Newman died of a heart attack in Columbia, Maryland, on May 30, 1999. He was 75. Newman began writing for comic books in the late 1940s. During his career he wrote over 4000 stories, which earned him a listing in the Guinness Book of World Records as the most prolific writer in the field. Newman, who worked on over 300 different titles, wrote stories for such popular characters as Superman and Mighty Mouse. He also adapted into comics such television series as Twilight Zone, Star Trek, Leave It to Beaver and I Love Lucy. Newman also scripted several newspaper comic strips including The Lone Ranger, Smokey the Bear, Space Cadets, Robin Malone and Laugh In. New York Times, June 7, 1999, B9; Washington Post, June 8, 1999, B6.

Paul S. Newman

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Norvo, Red

Derek Nimmo

Nimmo, Derek British comic actor Derek Nimmo died of pneumonia in London on February 25, 1999. He was 68. Nimmo was born in Liverpool on September 19, 1930. He was a popular performer in British films and television shows. Nimmo was best known for his roles as comic clergymen, starring as the Curate in the series All Gas and Gaiters in 1966 and as a monk in Oh Brother! in 1968. Nimmo was also featured in the films The Millionairess (1960), Go to Blazes! (1962), The Amorous Mr. Prawn (1962), It’s Trad, Dad! (1962), Tamahine (1963), Hot Enough for June (1963), The Small World of Sammy Lee (1963), Heavens Above! (1963), Murder Ahoy! (1964), Coast of Skeletons (1964), The Bargee (1964), Murder Ahoy! (1964), The System (1964), The Beatles’ 1964 film A Hard Day’s Night, Agent 8∫ (1964), The Liquidator (1965), Joey Boy (1965), Mister Ten Per Cent (1966), The Yellow Hat (1966), the 1967 James Bond spoof Casino Royale, A Talent for Loving (1969), Sunstruck (1975) and One of Our Dinosaurs Is Missing (1976). Nimmo’s other television credits include the British series Undermind (1965), The Bed-Sit Girl (1965), Sorry I’m Single (1967), Blanding’s Castle (1967), Of Father (1973), Life Begins at Forty (1978), Third Time Lucky (1982) and Hell’s Bells (1986). Times (of London), Feb. 25, 1999, 27a.

Jazz musician Red Norvo died in Santa Monica, California, on April 6, 1999. He was 91. Norvo was born in Beardstown, Illinois, on March 31, 1908. He began performing in the late 1920s, playing the vibraphone with Paul Whiteman’s orchestra. Norvo joined Benny Goodman’s band in the 1940s. Norvo formed a group with guitarist Tal Farlow and bassist Charles Mingus in the late 1940s. Norvo continued to record and perform until a stroke forced his retirement in the 1990s. He was seen in several films in the 1950s including Disc Jockey (1951), Screaming Mimi (1958), Kings Go Forth (1958) and Ocean’s Eleven (1960). Los Angeles Times, Apr. 8, 1999, A20; New York Times, Apr. 8, 1999, 9; Time, Apr. 19, 1999, 21; Times (of London), Apr. 8, 1999, 25a; Variety, Apr. 19, 1999, 57; Washington Post, Apr. 8, 1999, B6.

Red Norvo

Novak, Paul Paul Novak, the long-time companion of actress Mae West, died of prostate cancer at a Santa Monica hospital on July 14, 1999. He was 76. Novak was born Chester Rybinsky in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1923. A body-builder who wrestled professionally under the name Charles Krauser, Novak was a member of West’s musclemen chorus line from the 1950s. He toured with West at nightclubs throughout the country. He and West soon became romantically involved. He remained with her as lover, companion and bodyguard until the actress’s death in 1980. Los Angeles Times, July 15, 1999, A22.

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164 lies. He was best known collaborating with his wife, choreographer Susan Stroman, for the 1992 Tony Award winning Broadway play Crazy for You. He had previously directed the hit Broadway musical Me and My Girl in 1986. Ockrent had recently helmed the Broadway production of the film Big, which was unsuccessful. He also directed two tele-films for the BBC, 1990’s Dancin’ Thru the Dark and Money for Nothing in 1993. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 4, 1999, A22; New York Times, Dec. 3, 1999, C23; Time, Dec. 13, 1999, 33; Times (of London), Dec. 4, 1999, 24a; Variety, Dec. 6, 1999, 96.

Paul Novak (with Mae West).

O’Brien, Dean Film and television producer Dean O’Brien died of complications from a lung transplant at a Los Angeles hospital on October 2, 1999. He was 67. O’Brien was born in Los Angeles in 1932. He began his career producing television commercials. He served as unit production manager or co-producer on such feature films as Things Are Tough All Over (1982), Vice Versa (1988), Steel Magnolias (1989), Thelma and Louise (1991), The Cutting Edge (1992), Blown Away (1994) and Buddy (1997). He also produced the V science fiction television series and the tele-films A Smoky Mountain Christmas, Out on a Limb and Mystic Warrior. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 7, 1999, A28.

Mike Ockrent

O’Farrell, Bernadette Ockrent, Mike Theatrical director Mike Ockrent died of acute leukemia at a New York hospital on December 2, 1999. He was 53. Ockrent was born in London on June 18, 1946. He began directing in England, helming productions of Educating Rita, Watch on the Rhine and Stephen Sondheim’s Fol-

Irish-born actress Bernadette O’Farrell, who was best known for portraying Maid Marian in the 1950s Robin Hood television series, died in Monaco on September 26, 1999. She was 75. Ms. O’Farrell was born in Birr, Ireland, on January 30, 1924. She began her film career in 1947’s Captain Boycott, starring Stewart Granger. The film

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Okita, Hiroyuki Japanese actor Hiroyuki Okita hanged himself in Japan on March 27, 1999. He was 36. He was a popular performer on Japanese television and starred in the bizarre cult series Rapeman on video.

Bernadette O’Farrell

was scripted by Frank Launder, who married Ms. O’Farrell three years later. She often appeared in films scripted by her husband. Her film credits also include The Happiest Days of Your Life (1950), Life in Her Hands (1951), Lady Godiva Rides Again (1951), Scotland Yard Inspector (1952), The Genie (1952), The Square Ring (1953) and The Story of Gilbert and Sullivan (1955). She was cast as Maid Marian in The Adventures of Robin Hood in 1955, which also starred Richard Greene in the title roll. She left the series, despite its continued popularity in both Great Britain and the United States, after two years for fear of being typecast. She next appeared in her husband’s film The Bridal Path in 1959. O’Farrell largely retired from acting the following year, though she continued to remain active on stage. She and her husband moved to Monaco, where they remained together until Launder’s death in 1997. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 2, 1999, A20; New York Times, Oct. 1, 1999, C19.

Hiroyuki Okita

Oses, Fernando Actor and screenwriter Fernando Oses died of a heart attack on May 11, 1999. He was 77. The Spanish-born Oses came to Mexico in the 1950s where he became a popular professional wrestler. He began working full-time on Mexican films after a ring injury ended his wrestling career. He appeared in numerous lucha libre (wrestling hero) films from the late 1950s, which often pitted masked wrestlers against monsters and villains. His films include Brain of Evil (1958), Invasion of the Zombies (1961), Santo vs. the King of Crime (1961), Santo in the Hotel of Death (1961), Santo

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166

vs. the Diabolical Brain (1961), Santo vs. the Vampire Women (1962), Santo in the Wax Museum (1963), The Witches Attack (1964), The Diabolical Hatchet (1964), The Dealers in Death (1965), Santo vs. Baron Brakola (1965), Hellish Spiders (1966), Shadow of the Bat (1966), The Empire of Dracula (1966), The Scoundrels (1969), Santo Faces Death (1969), The Vengeance of the Vampire Women (1970), Santo vs. the Vice Mafia (1970), Suicide Mission (1971), The Royal Eagle (1971), Santo vs. the Kidnappers (1972), Santo Against the Black Magic (1972), The Beasts of Terror (1972) and Santo in the Mystery of the Black Pearl (1974). Oses also scripted many films in the lucha libre genre. During the 1970s he also produced and directed several films.

Owen, Bill British actor Bill Owen died in England on July 12, 1999. He was 85. Owen was born William John Owen Rowbotham in Acton, West London, on March 14, 1914. He began his career on stage in the 1930s under the name Bill Rowbotham, which he was also credited as in several of his early films. Owen appeared in numerous films from the 1940s including The Way to the Stars (1945), When the Bough Breaks (1947), Daybreak (1947), Dancing with Crime (1947), The Weaker Sex (1948), Trouble in the Air (1948), Once a Jolly Swagman (1948), Easy Money (1948), My Brother’s Keeper (1948), Diamond City (1949), Trottie True (1949), The Girl Who Couldn’t Quite (1950), Hotel Sahara (1951), The Story of Robin Hood and His Merrie Men (1952), There Was a Young Lady (1953), The Square Ring (1953), A Day to Remember (1953), The Rainbow Jacket (1954), The Ship That Died of Shame (1955), Not So Dusty (1956), Davy (1957), Carve Her Name with Pride (1958), The Shakedown (1959) and The Hellfire Club (1960). Owen also appeared in several films in the popular British Carry On comedy series including Carry On Sergeant (1958), Carry On Nurse (1958), Carry On Regardless (1961) and Carry On Cabby (1963). He continued to appear in such features as The Secret of Blood Island (1965), The Fighting Prince of Donegal (1966), Georgy Girl (1966), Kadoyng (1972), Lindsay Anderson’s O Lucky Man! (1973), In Celebration (1975), The Comeback (1978) and Laughterhouse (1984). Owen was also a popular performer on

Bill Owen

British television, starring as Compo in the BBC comedy series Last of the Summer Wine from 1973. He also starred as Sergeant Sam Short in the short-lived police comedy series Coppers on ITV in 1971. He also appeared in the 1982 mini-series Brideshead Revisited and in the tele-films Getting Sam Home (1983), Uncle of the Bride (1985) and Big Day at Dream Acres (1987). He was also seen in episodes of Man in a Suitcase, Roald Dahl’s Tales of the Unexpected and Coronation Street. Times (of London), July 13, 1999, 23a.

Pagan, Peter Actor Peter Pagan died in New York on June 2, 1999. He was 77. Pagan was born in Sydney, Australia, in 1922. He starred in several Australian films in the 1940s including The Overlanders (1946). He subsequently came to the United States, where he performed on Broadway in supporting roles. He also appeared in the daytime soap opera As the World Turns and the 1986 films 9∂ Weeks. Variety, July 26, 1999, 45.

Palmer, Edward L. Edward L. Palmer, who was instrumental in the success of the children’s television series

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Sesame Street, died of prostate cancer in Albany, New York, on August 1, 1999. He was 66. Palmer worked for the Children’s Television Workshop from 1968, where he served as senior researcher. He was instrumental in advising the show on what characters and situations would be of most interest to children. Palmer was also involved in the development of such other children’s shows as Electric Company, 3-2-1- Contact and Ghostwriter. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 10, 1999, A24; Variety, Aug. 23, 1999, 120.

Palmieri, Hank Hank Palmieri died of metastatic melanoma in Malibu, California, on September 18, 1999. He was 43. Palmieri headed the National Geographic Society’s film division. He helmed the 1997 telefilm Forbidden Territory about the meeting of Stanley and Livingston. He also produced upcoming films about the Lewis and Clark expedition and Sir Ernest Shackleton’s Antarctic explorations. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 25, 1999, A20.

Paris, Jonni Actress Jonni Paris died of cancer at the Motion Picture and Television Fund hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on January 26, 1999. She was 66. She was born Janet Buse Savenick in 1932. She began her career appearing in Our Gang comedies as a child. She appeared in several films in the 1950s including Seminole Uprising (1955) and The Proud Ones (1956). Ms. Paris was featured on television in the 1970s and 1980s in episodes of Falcon Crest, Highway to Heaven and Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman. Variety, Feb. 22, 1999, 166.

Parker, Lloyd “Sunshine” Character actor Lloyd Olen “Sunshine” Parker died of pneumonia at a Burbank, California, hospital on February 17, 1999. He was 71. Parker was born in Lawn, Texas, in 1927. He began his acting career in the early 1960s, when

Lloyd “Sunshine” Parker

he was persuaded by former classmate Dan Blocker to appear in episodes of Bonanza. Parker also appeared in such films as Hometown, U.S.A. (1979), Any Which Way You Can (1980) with Clint Eastwood, Heart Beat (1980), Cannery Row (1982), The Sure Thing (1985), Pee-wee’s Big Adventure (1985), Road House (1989), Love at Large (1990), Tremors (1990), Sundown: The Vampire in Retreat (1990) and Double Revenge (1990). Parker was also a popular character performer on television, appearing the 1979 tele-film Mr. Horn and in episodes of Little House on the Prairie, After M*A*S*H, 1986’s Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Fall Guy, Werewolf and The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 25, 1999, A20.

Paterson, Jennifer Jennifer Paterson, the co-host of the television cooking show Two Fat Ladies, died of lung cancer at a London hospital on August 10, 1999. She was 71. Paterson was born in London on April 3, 1928. She became a professional chef and, later, the food columnist for The Spectator newspaper. She was matched with fellow cooking columnist Clarissa Dickson Wright by the BBC to host the quirky cooking show in 1996. The program was picked up in the United States by

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168

Jenifer Paterson (left, with Clarissa Dickson Wright).

the Food Network in 1997, and rapidly became a cult hit. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 11, 1999, A16; New York Times, Aug. 11, 1999, C23; People, Aug. 23, 1999, 109; Time, Aug. 23, 1999, 23; Times (of London), Aug. 11, 1999, 23a; TV Guide, Sept. 25, 1999, 7; Variety, Aug. 16, 1999, 40.

Patkin, Max Max Patkin, who was known as the Clown Prince of Baseball, died of an aortic aneurysm at a Paoli, Pennsylvania, hospital on October 30, 1999. He was 79. Patkin was born in Philadelphia in 1920. He began his career in baseball as a pitcher in the minor leagues. While serving in the Navy during World War II, Patkin began his comedy act during a baseball game against the Air Force. He followed and mimicked Air Force player Joe DiMaggio as he ran around the bases. He continued to perform his baseball antics at games for the next half a century. He would contort his face and perform pitching routines, that would usually result in being tossed out of the ballpark as part of the act. Patkin appeared as himself in several movies including Bull Durham (1988) and Looking for Oscar (1999). He also authored the 1994 autobiography The Clown Prince of Baseball. New York Times, Nov. 1, 1999, B8.

Max Patkin

Patterson, Dick Stage, film and television actor Dick Patterson died in Los Angeles after a long illness on September 20, 1999. He was 70. Patterson was born in Clear Lake, Iowa, in 1929. He began his career on stage and was featured in such Broadway musicals as Vintage ’60, The Billy Barnes People, Bye Bye Birdie and Fade-Out, Fade-In. He was a frequent performer on television from the 1960s, appearing in episodes of such series as The Dick Van Dyke Show, Petticoat Junction, Get Smart, Here’s Lucy, The Carol Burnett Show, Family Affair, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Room 222, Here’s Lucy, CHiPs, Happy Days, Laverne and Shirley, The Fall Guy and Small Wonder. His other television credits include the tele-films Sunset Limousine (1983), Lots of Luck (1985) and Columbo: Death Hits the Jackpot (1991). Patterson also appeared in a handful of films during his career including Dondi (1961), Pretty Polly (1967), The Strongest Man in the World (1975), Grease (1978), Can’t Stop the Music (1980) and Grease 2 (1982).

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Dick Patterson

Los Angeles Times, Oct. 1, 1999, A34; Variety, Oct. 4, 1999, 98.

Payne, Sally Actress Sally Payne, who appeared as Roy Rogers’ leading lady in a series of Republic westerns in the 1940s, died in Los Angeles on May 8, 1999. She was 85. Ms. Payne was an artists’ model known as the “Sunshine Girl” before making her debut in films with Hollywood Hobbies (1935). She continued to appear in such films as The Big Show (1936), Exiled to Shanghai (1937), The Higgins Family (1938), Man from Music Mountain (1938) with Gene Autry, Fisticuffs (1938), My Wife’s Relatives (1939), Culinary Carving (1939), When Tomorrow Comes (1939), No, No, Nanette (1940), I Love You Again (1940) and La Conga Nights (1940). In the early 1940s she starred with Roy Rogers in ten films including Young Bill Hickok (1940), Sheriff of Tombstone (1941), Robin Hood of the Pecos (1941), Red River Valley (1941), Nevada City (1941), Jesse James at Bay (1941), In Old Cheyenne (1941), Bad Man of Deadwood (1941), Romance on the Range (1942) and Man from Cheyenne (1942). Her other films and shorts include Tuxedo Junction (1941), A Quiet Fourth (1941), Playmates (1941), Lady from Cheyenne (1941), Westward Ho-Hum (1941), I’ll Fix It (1941)

Sally Payne

and Cooks and Crooks (1942). Ms. Payne retired from films in 1942 following her marriage to Western Airlines executive Arthur F. Kelly. She subsequently began oil painting and was illustrator for a series of Small Star children’s books. Los Angeles Times, May 13, 1999, A24.

Peabody, Dick Actor Dick Peabody died of prostate cancer in Camino, California, on December 27, 1999. He was 74. The 6'6" Peabody was best known for his role as Littlejohn, the large farm boy, in the Combat television series from 1963 to 1967. Peabody also appeared in a handful of films in the 1960s including Mackenna’s Gold (1969), Support Your Local Sheriff (1969), The Good Guys and the Bad Guys (1969) and The Moonshine War (1970). He was also seen in the tele-films Your Money or Your Wife (1972), Sidekicks (1974) and Cop on the Beat. His television credits also include episodes of Gunsmoke, Bonanza, The Big Valley, Daniel

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170 (1975), Macbeth (1979), The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby (1981) and The Disputation (1986). He was acclaimed for his performance in the 1986 British mini-series Edge of Darkness, starring as Ron Craven in the nuclear thriller. He continued to star in such British tele-films and mini-series as After Pilkington (1987), A TV Dante: The Inferno Cantos I–VIII (1989) as Dante, One Way Out (1989), Children Crossing (1990), The Investigation Inside a Terrorist Bombing (1990), The War That Never Ends (1991), An Ungentlemanly Act (1992), Natural Lies (1992), The Black Velvet Gown (1993), Hard Times (1994), Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice (1996), Deadly Summer (1997), Hospital! (1997) and The Scold’s Bridle (1998). His other television credits include episodes of Rising Damp, The Clairvoyant, The Storyteller and The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles. Peck was also featured in such films as Royal Flash (1975), Bird of Prey 2 (1984), On the Black Hill (1987), The Kitchen Toto (1987), Ladder of Swords (1988), Slipstream (1989), the 1990 remake of Lord of the Flies, Surviving Picasso (1996), Seasick (1996), The Opium War (1997), FairyTale: A True Story (1997) and Smilla’s Sense of Snow (1997). Peck had suffered from cancer for the past several years. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 10, 1999, A10; New York Times, Apr. 10, 1999, A13; Times (of London), Apr. 8, 1999, 25a; Variety, June 7, 1999, 52.

Dick Peabody (from Combat).

Boone, Here Come the Brides, Cade’s County, Cannon and Lancer. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 30, 1999, A24.

Peck, Bob British actor Bob Peck did of cancer in London on April 4, 1999. He was 53. Peck was born in Leeds, England, on August 23, 1945. Peck was best known in the United States for his performance as ill-fated game warden Robert Muldoon in Steven Spielberg’s 1993 blockbuster Jurassic Park. He began his career on the stage, performing with the Royal Shakespeare Company and the National Theater. He became a well known face on British television in the mid–1970s, appearing in productions of Sunset Across the Bay

Bob Peck (from The Kitchen Toto).

Perkins, Gil Veteran stuntman and actor Gil Perkins died of natural causes at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on March 28, 1999. He was 91. Perkins was born

171

Gil Perkins

in Australia in 1907. He came to Hollywood and began his career in films in 1929 was Rod La Rocque’s double in Delightful Rogue. Perkins soon began doing stuntwork, working on hundreds of films and television productions over the next fifty years. He had a small part as a sailor and was Bruce Cabot’s stunt double in the 1933 classic fantasy King Kong. He also doubled Spencer Tracy as Mr. Hyde in 1941’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and took over for Bela Lugosi as the Frankenstein Monster when the monsters clashed in 1943’s Frankenstein Meets the Wolfman. His numerous other film and serial credits include A Feather in Her Hat (1935), Captains Courageous (1937), God’s Country and the Woman (1937), The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), Blackmail (1939), Riders of the Valley (1941), Hellzapoppin’ (1941), Mrs. Miniver (1942), Spy Smasher (1942), G-Men vs. the Black Dragon (1943), They Got Me Covered (1943), Captain America (1944), The Fatal Witness (1945), Cloak and Dagger (1946), The Black Widow (1947), Jesse James Rides Again (1947), Son of Zorro (1947), Twilight on the Rio Grande (1947), G-Men Never Forget (1948), The Three Musketeers (1948), The Lost Tribe (1949), Father of the Bride (1950), Double Dynamite (1951), Hans Christian Andersen (1952), The Clown (1952), Brave Warrior (1952), City of Badmen (1953), Abbott and Costello Meet Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1953), Private Eyes (1953), Demetrius and the Gladiators (1954), Big Chase

1999 • Obituaries

(1954), The Sea Chase (1955), Teenage Monster (aka Meteor Monster) (1957), Shoot-Out at Medicine Bend (1957), Calypso Heat Wave (1957), The Alamo (1960), Valley of the Dragons (1961), Experiment in Terror (1962), How the West Was Won (1962), the 1966 Batman feature, Bonnie and Clyde (1967) and Walking Tall (1973). Perkins also appeared often on television in episodes of such series as Boris Karloff ’s Thriller, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok, Richard Diamond, Private Eye, The Californians, Colt .45, Wagon Train, Bonanza, Perry Mason, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Batman, The Virginian, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Laredo, Cimarron Strip, Here’s Lucy, Star Trek and Mission: Impossible. He was a board member of the Screen Actors Guild from the 1950s through 1970s and was a founding member of the Stuntmen’s Association of Motion Pictures. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 5, 1999, A18; Variety, Apr. 12, 1999, 75.

Petrucciani, Michel Jazz pianist Michel Petrucciani died in a New York City hospital of complications from a lung infection on January 6, 1999. He was 36. Petrucciani was born in Orange, France, on December 28, 1962. He suffered from a crippling genetic disorder known as “glass bone disease,” which stunted his growth and left his bones brittle. He was a child prodigy in music and made his professional debut at the age of 13. He released his first album, Flash, three years later. He recorded over a dozen jazz albums during his career. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 7, 1999, A18; New York Times, Jan. 7, 1999, B11; Times (of London), Jan. 8, 1999, 25a; Variety, Feb. 22, 1999, 166.

Philips, Lee Television director Lee Philips died of complications from Parkinson’s Disease at his home in Brentwood, California, on March 3, 1999. He was 72. Philips was born in New York City on January 10, 1927. He began his career as an actor, appearing in the Philco Television Playhouse production of Marty in 1953. He also was featured

Obituaries • 1999

172 Michener’s Dynasty (1976), The War Between the Tates (1977), The Spell (1977), Special Olympics (1978), The Comedy Company (1978), Valentine (1979), Hardhat and Legs (1980), Crazy Times (1981), Mae West (1982), Games Mother Never Taught You (1982), A Wedding on Waltons Mountain (1982), Samson and Delilah (1984), Happy (1984), James Michener’s Space (1985), The Blue Lightning (1986), Barnum (1986), American Geisha (1986), Sidney Sheldon’s Windmills of the Gods (1988), King of the Olympics: The Lives and Loves of Avery Brundage (1988), Money, Power, Murder (1989), Blind Vengeance (1990) and Silent Motive (1991). Los Angeles Times, Mar. 11, 1999, A22; Variety, May 10, 1999, 150.

Pierce, Charles Leading female impersonator Charles Pierce died of cancer at his home in Toluca Lake, California, on May 31, 1999. He was 72. Born in Watertown, New York, on July 14, 1926, Pierce Michel Petrucciani

in several films including Peyton Place (1957), The Hunters (1958), Tess of the Storm Country (1960) and Psychomania (1962). Philips starred as the master detective in the 1959 television series The Further Adventures of Ellery Queen. He was also featured in episodes of Goodyear Television Playhouse, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Untouchables, Death Valley Days, One Step Beyond, Twilight Zone, The Outer Limits, The Loner, Combat!, Perry Mason, Wagon Train, I Spy and The Waltons. Philips also began directing in the late 1950s, helming an episode of The Donna Reed Show. He was prolific television director over the next four decades, directing episodes of The Andy Griffith Show, The Dick Van Dyke Show, The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, The Partridge Family, Longstreet, Cade’s County, The Rookies, The Waltons, M*A*S*H, Kung Fu, The Practice, Salvage-1 and, most recently, Diagnosis Murder. He also directed numerous tele-films and mini-series including Getting Away from It All (1971), The Girl Most Likely To… (1973), The Stranger Within (1974), The Red Badge of Courage (1974), Sweet Hostage (1975), Wanted: The Sundance Woman (1976), Louis Armstrong — Chicago Style (1976), James A.

Charles Pierce

173

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began performing on stage in the mid–1950s. He gained fame as a mimic of such leading ladies as Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Mae West, Barbra Streisand, Gloria Swanson and Tallulah Bankhead. Pierce was also seen on television in episodes of such series as Love, American Style, Laverne and Shirley, Wonder Woman, Fame and Designing Women, and appeared in the 1988 film Torch Song Trilogy. Los Angeles Times, June 2, 1999, A16; New York Times, June 3, 1999, B11; People, June 28, 1999, 83; Time, June 14, 1999, 41; Variety, June 7, 1999, 52.

Piseth Pelika Leading Cambodian actress Piseth Pelika died on July 13, 1999, at a Phnom Penh hospital a week after being shot three times by an assailant a week earlier. She was 34. Piseth Pelika was also a classical dancer and teacher at the Cambodian School of Fine Arts. She appeared in numerous films including several produced by Cambodian King Norodom Sihanouk. She is best known for her performance in Sihanouk’s film Shadow of Darkness.

Piseth Pelika

Pitlik, Noam Actor and director Noam Pitlik died of lung cancer at a Los Angeles hospital on February 18, 1999. He was 66. Pitlik was born on November 4, 1932. He began acting in Philadelphia and New York before settling in Hollywood in the

Noam Pitlik

1960s. Pitlik was featured in nearly twenty films, including A Child Is Waiting (1963), The Hallelujah Trail (1965), The Fortune Cookie (1966), The Graduate (1967), Fitzwilly (1967), Fade-In (1968), The Big Bounce (1969), The Thousand Plane Raid (1969) and The Front Page (1974). He was also a popular television performer, appearing in the tele-films The Bait (1973) and Houston, We’ve Got a Problem (1974), and in episodes of Combat, The Rifleman, The Virginian, The Fugitive, Ben Casey, Gunsmoke, The Mod Squad, Hogan’s Heroes, The F.B.I., The Munsters, The Monkees, Iron Horse, The Guns of Will Sonnett, Here Come the Brides, I Dream of Jeannie, Bewitched, Night Gallery, Nichols, The Partridge Family, Sanford and Son, The Bob Newhart Show and Barney Miller. Pitlik also began directing in the 1970s, helming over 100 episodes of the Barney Miller series, earning an Emmy Award for his work. He also directed episodes of Taxi, Mr. Belvedere, Holmes and Yo Yo, The Practice, One Day at a Time and Wings. Pitlik returned to acting in the past year in the recurring role of Mr. Schmalen in the Becker television series with Ted Danson. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 24, 1999, A12; Variety, Mar. 1, 1999, 95.

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174 Los Angeles Times, May 10, 1999, A20; New York Times, May 10, 1999, A21; People, May 24, 1999, 116; Time, May 24, 1999, 35; Variety, May 17, 1999, 76.

Polaire, Hal

Dana Plato

Plato, Dana Actress Dana Plato, best known for her role as Kimberly Drummond on the television sitcom Diff ’rent Strokes, died of an accidental drug overdose while visiting at the home of her fiance’s parents in Moore, Oklahoma, on May 8, 1999. She was 34. Ms. Plato was born in Maywood, California, on November 7, 1964. She began her film career as a child actress in the tele-film Beyond the Bermuda Triangle (1975). She was also featured in the films Exorcist II: The Heretic, Return to Boggy Creek (1978) and California Suite (1978). She appeared on Diff ’rent Strokes as the sister to adopted brothers Gary Coleman and Todd Bridges from 1978 through 1984. She was also featured on television in episodes of CHiPs and Growing Pains, and the tele-films Schoolboy Father (1980) and High School U.S.A. (1983). She, like her two young co-stars, had several run-ins with the law after the series went off the air. She was arrested for robbing a video store in Las Vegas in 1991 and was sentenced to five years probation for forging a prescription the following year. In recent years Ms. Plato appeared in such low budget films as Prime Suspect (1989), The Sounds of Silence (1992), The Sex Puppets (aka Bikini Beach Race) (1992), Compelling Evidence (1995) and Different Strokes: A Story of Jack and Jill … and Jill. She was also featured in the 1992 video game Night Trap.

Film executive Hal Polaire died of heart failure in Honduras on July 11, 1999. He was 81. Polaire began his career working in radio and live television in New York. He moved to California in the mid–1950s, where he was an assistant director on such films as The Lost Missile (1958), The Apartment (1960), Ride the High Country (1962), All Fall Down (1962), Irma la Douce (1963), Seven Days in May (1964) and Games (1967). He was also an assistant director for the popular television sit-com Bewitched in the 1960s. Polaire also served as an assistant to the producer for Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton’s classic film Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), and was production manager on the films Gambit (1966), The Ballad of Josie (1967), Tell Them Willie Boy Is Here (1969) and The Gambler (1974). In the 1970s and 1980s Polaire was president of production at Chartoff-Winkler Productions, serving as a producer on such films as Raging Bull (1980), Betrayed (1988), Music Box (1990) and Scissors (1991). Los Angeles Times, July 14, 1999, A15; Variety, July 26, 1999, 45.

Polonsky, Abraham Film director and screenwriter Abraham Polonsky was found dead of a heart attack at his Beverly Hills home on October 26, 1999. He was 88. Polonsky was born in New York City on December 10, 1910. He was trained as a lawyer and wrote novels and radio plays for Orson Welles. He served in the OSS during World War II and began scripting films with Golden Earrings (1947) and Body and Soul (1947), the latter of which earned him an Oscar nomination. The following year he scripted and directed the classic film Force of Evil. He also scripted 1951’s I Can Get It for You Wholesale. Polonsky’s film career was cut short in the early 1950s when he was blacklisted after refusing to testify about his political affiliations

175

Abraham Polonsky

during the McCarthy Era. He continued working, using other writers as fronts for his scripts for such television series as You Are There. He also scripted the 1959 crime film Odds Against Tomorrow, using the alias John O. Killens. His writing credit was restored by the Writers Guild of America in 1996. He resumed his career in the late 1960s scripting Madigan (1968) and writing and directing Tell Them Willie Boy Is Here (1969) starring Robert Redford. Polonsky subsequently directed Romance of a Horse Thief (1971) and scripted the films Avalanche Express (1978) and Monsignor (1982). Los Angeles Times, Oct. 28, 1999, B1; New York Times, Oct. 29, 1999, B15; Variety, Nov. 1, 1999, 105; Washington Post, Oct. 29, 1999, B5.

1999 • Obituaries

City in 1926. He began his career on the Broadway stage as a dancer while still in his teens. He began appearing in films in the early 1950s and was featured in The Joe Louis Story (1953), The Harder They Fall (1956), Journey to Shiloh (1968), Coogan’s Bluff (1968), Lot Flight (1969), Glass Houses (1970), The Peace Killers (1971) and Dirty Harry (1971) where he was the recipient of Clint Eastwood’s famous line, “Being that this is a .44 magnum, the most powerful handgun in the world … you’ve got to ask yourself one question. ‘Do I feel lucky?’ Well, do ya, punk?” Popwell also appeared with Eastwood in the sequels Magnum Force (1973), The Enforcer (1976) and Sudden Impact (1983). His other film credits include Fuzz (1972), Cleopatra Jones (1973), Charley Varrick (1973), Bloody Friday (1973), The Single Girls (1974), Lost in the Stars (1974), Cleopatra Jones and the Casino of Gold (1975), The Buddy Holly Story (1978), Who’s That Girl? (1987), The Siege of Firebase Gloria (1989), David Lynch’s Wild at Heart (1990) and Scissors (1991). Popwell was also a prolific television actor, appearing in the telefilms McCloud: Who Killed Miss U.S.A.? (1970), Probe (1972), Columbo: A Friend in Need (1974), Billy: Portrait of a Street Kid (1977), Steel Cowboy (1978) and Sister, Sister (1982). He also appeared regularly as Griffith in the short-lived 1972 adventure series Search. His other television credits include episodes of Cowboy in Africa, Tarzan,

Albert Popwell

Popwell, Albert Veteran black character actor Albert “Poppy” Popwell died in a Los Angeles hospital of complications from open-heart surgery on April 9, 1999. He was 72. Popwell was born in New York

Night Gallery, The Streets of San Francisco, The Girl with Something Extra, Emergency!, The Hardy Boys Mysteries, Wonder Woman, The A-Team, The Incredible Hulk and Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 18, 1999, B5; New

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176

York Times, Apr. 26, 1999, A19; Variety, May 24, 1999, 85

Pratt, Hawley B. Animator Hawley B. Pratt died at a retirement home in Thousand Oaks, California, on March 4, 1999. He was 87. Pratt was born in Seattle, Washington, on June 9, 1911. He was raised in New York before moving to Los Angeles in 1933 to work for Walt Disney as an animator. He remained at Disney until 1941, when he joined Fritz Freling at Warner Bros. He worked on Freling’s Sylvester and Tweety and Roadrunner cartoons and, with Freling and Arthur Leonardi, created the animated title for the 1964 Pink Panther film. Pratt also worked on the subsequent Pink Panther cartoon series. He also worked as a production designer and animation director on Don Knotts’ 1964 comedy The Incredible Mr. Limpet. During his later career he worked with Hanna-Barbera animation studio before retiring in the 1970s. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 7, 1999, B10.

Pringle, Val Mario Puzo

Black actor and entertainer Val Pringle was stabbed to death while confronting burglars at his home outside of Maseru, Lesotho, on December 13, 1999. He was 63. Two men were arrested for the slaying. The American-born actor appeared in a handful of films in the 1970s and early 1980s including Shot It Black, Shoot It Blue (1974), The Strange Case of the End of Civilization as We Know It (1977), The Last Remake of Beau Geste (1977), Ragtime (1981) and Britannia Hospital (1982). He was also featured as Lead in British sci-fi television series Sapphire and Steel in 1979. Pringle was also a songwriter and singer, recording four albums and writing such songs as “Louise,” made popular by Harry Belafonte. He moved to Lesotho in the 1980s where he operated a nightclub and hotel.

Puzo, Mario Mario Puzo, who authored the best-selling novel The Godfather and received two Academy

Awards for its film adaptations, died of heart failure at his home on Long Island, New York, on July 2, 1999. He was 78. Puzo was born in New York City on October 15, 1920. Puzo’s The Godfather was published in 1969 and he and director Francis Ford Coppola wrote the screenplay for the popular film about the Corleone family in 1972. Puzo and Coppola also scripted the sequels, The Godfather, Part II (1974) and The Godfather, Part III (1990). Puzo also scripted the 1974 disaster film Earthquake, and supplied the story for such films as Superman (1978), Superman II (1980), A Time to Die (1983) and The Cotton Club (1984). Another novel, The Sicilian, was adapted into a film in 1987 and his The Fortunate Pilgrim became a television mini-series in 1988. Puzo also wrote the story for the 1992 film Christopher Columbus: The Discovery. His novel The Last Don was adapted into a mini-series in 1997. Los Angeles Times, July 3, 1999, A1; New York Times, July 3, 1999, B7; Time, July 12, 1999, 21; Times (of London), July 5, 1999, 23a; TV Guide,

177 Aug. 28, 1999, 9; Washington Post, July 3, 1999, B5.

Quarry, Jerry Boxer Jerry Quarry died on January 3, 1999, of complication from pneumonia after being taken off life-support at a Templeton, California, hospital. Quarry was born in Los Angeles on May 14, 1945. He was a leading heavyweight boxing contender in the 1960s and 1970s, competing against such boxing greats as Floyd Patterson and Muhammad Ali. He was the first opponent Ali fought upon returning the ring in 1970 after having been stripped of his title several years earlier for refusing induction into the army as a conscientious objector. Quarry appeared in episodes of several television series in the 1970s and 1980s including I Dream of Jeannie, Land of the Giants, The Magician, Turnabout and Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. Quarry’s health deteriorated in the early 1980s, when he as diagnosed with severe neurological disorders as a result of the beatings he took in the ring. He suffered from dementia pugilistica during his later years. Quarry attempted an ill-fated comeback

1999 • Obituaries

in the ring in 1992, when he was beaten in six rounds. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 4, 1999, D1; New York Times, Jan. 5, 1999, A15; People, Jan. 18, 1999, 71; Time, Jan. 18, 1999, 25; Times (of London), Jan. 7, 1999, 25a.

Quinn, Robert J. Television director Robert J. Quinn died of cancer in Malibu, California, on October 21, 1999. He was 72. Quinn was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1927. He began working at NBC as a mail clerk in the 1940s. He remained with the network, rising to become a director. Quinn directed the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson from 1968 until Carson’s retirement in 1992. Quinn was nominated for an Emmy Award for his work in 1992. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 27, 1999, A18; New York Times, Oct. 25, 1999, A29; Variety, Nov. 15, 1999, 102.

Quintero, Jose Theatrical director Jose Quintero died of cancer in New York on February 26, 1999. He was 74. Quintero was born on October 15, 1924. He was best known for his director of plays by Eugene O’Neill. He received Tony Awards for his productions of Long Day’s Journey into Night and Moon for the Misbegotten. Quintero was a founder of the Greenwich Village theater Circle in the Square. He also direct Broadway revivals of O’Neill’s work including Hughie (1964), A Moon for the Misbegotten (1973) and A Touch of the Poet (1977). Quintero’s only film credit was the 1961 adaptation of Tennessee Williams’ The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone starring Vivien Leigh and Warren Beatty. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 27, 1999, A22; New York Times, Feb. 27, 1999, A12; Time, Mar. 8, 1999, 27; Variety, Mar. 8, 1999, 75.

Radziwill, Anthony Jerry Quarry

Television producer Anthony Radziwill died of cancer in a New York hospital on August 10,

Obituaries • 1999

178 was 101. Rapper was born in London in 1898. He came to the United States as a young boy and began his career directing stage plays at New York University. Rapper worked on Broadway as an actor and director before going to Hollywood in the mid–1930s. He worked as an assistant director at Warner on such films as The Story of Louis Pasteur (1935), The Life of Emile Zola (1937), Four Daughters (1938), Juarez (1939) and Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet (1940). He made his directoral debut in 1941, helming the features Shining Victor (1941) and One Foot in Heaven (1941) with Fredric March. Rapper was best known for directing the classic Bette Davis film Now, Voyager in 1942. He directed Davis in three other films —The Corn Is Green (1945), Deception (1946) and Another Man’s Poison (1952). He also directed The Gay Sisters (1942), The Adventures of Mark Twain (1944), Rhapsody in Blue (1945) and The Voice of the Turtle (1947) with Ronald Reagan. Rapper subsequently left Warner. He continued to direct such films as Anna Lucasta (1949), The Glass Menagerie

Jose Quintero

1999. He was 40. Radziwill was the son of Jacqueline Kennedy’s younger sister, Lee Bouvier Radziwill. He was first cousin and a close friend to John Kennedy, Jr. He began his career in television as an associate producer with NBC Sports and received an Emmy Award for his work during the Summer Olympics in Seoul in 1988. He subsequently served as producer at ABC News for PrimeTime Live in 1989, where he won an Emmy Award for his work on the Menendez murder case. He moved to HBO in 1997, where he was involved in production of documentaries. He served as supervising producer for 1999’s Lenny Bruce: Swear to Tell the Truth. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 12, 1999, A22; New York Times, Aug. 12, 1999, C21; People, Aug. 30, 1999, 129; Time, Aug. 23, 1999, 23; Variety, Sept. 27, 1999, 161.

Rapper, Irving Film director Irving Rapper died at the Motion Picture and Television Fund home in Woodland Hills, California, on December 20, 1999. He

Irving Rapper

179 (1950), Bad for Each Other (1954), Forever Female (1954), Strange Intruder (1956), The Brave One (1956), Marjorie Morningstar (1958) with Natalie Wood and Gene Kelly, The Miracle (1959), The Story of Joseph and His Brothers (1960), Pontius Pilate (1962), The Christine Jorgensen Story (1970) and Born Again (1978). Variety, Jan. 3, 1999, 2000, 94.

Rayburn, Gene Television game show host Gene Rayburn died of congestive heart failure at his daughter’s Gloucester, Massachusetts, home on November 29, 1999. He was 81. Rayburn was born in Christopher, Illinois, on December 22, 1917. He began his career in show business as a radio disc jockey in New York City. Rayburn soon moved to television, appearing as a panelist on the 1953 quiz show The Name’s the Same. Rayburn worked with Steve Allen from the mid–1950s as an announcer for the Tonight show and a regular on the prime-

1999 • Obituaries

time variety series The Steve Allen Show. Rayburn also appeared in episodes of several drama series including Kraft Theatre and Robert Montgomery Presents. He was best known as the host of the popular game show The Match Game from 1962. He continued to host the series in several incarnations through the 1980s. Rayburn also hosted such quiz shows as Make the Connection, Musical Chairs, Choose Up Sides, Play Your Hunch, Dough Re Mi, Snap Judgment and Break the Bank, and was seen on several episodes of television’s The Love Boat. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 3, 1999, A36; New York Times, Dec. 4, 1999, A15; People, Dec. 20, 1999, 140; Time, Dec. 13, 1999, 33; Variety, Dec. 6, 1999, 96.

Rea, Betty Stage actress and television casting director Betty Rea died of respiratory failure in Los Angeles on December 23, 1999. She was 82. She was born Elizabeth Wilson in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, in 1917. She began her career on stage in Canada before moving to New York. She appeared on Broadway in a production of Medea. Rea abandoned her acting career to become casting director for daytime television. She worked with the Guiding Light from 1970 to 1996, and also for As the World Turns from 1979 to 1983. She was inducted into the Soap Opera Hall of Fame in 1997. She continued to serve as a casting consultant for the shows and also for Another World in the late 1990s.

Reed, Oliver

Gene Rayburn

Burly British actor Oliver Reed died in route to a hospital in Valetta, Malta, after becoming ill while drinking with friends in a bar. He was 61. Reed was born in Wimbledon, London, England, on February 13, 1938. He was the nephew of famed British film director Sir Carol Reed. He dropped out of school and left home at the age of 17, spending several years supporting himself as a nightclub bouncer, cab driver and other odd jobs. He began appearing in small roles in films in the late 1950s and was featured in Hello London (1958), The League of Gentlemen (1959), The

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180

Sword of Sherwood Forest (1960), The Bulldog Breed (1960), The Angry Silence (1960), Beat Girl (1960), The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll (1960), The Rebel (1961), No Love for Johnnie (1961) and His and Hers (1961). He was then cast in the title role in the 1961 Hammer horror film The Curse of the Werewolf. He became a familiar face on the British screen, often playing heavies in such films as Night Creatures (aka Captain Clegg) (1962), The Pirates of Blood River (1962), The Crimson Blade (1963), Paranoiac (1963), These Are the Damned (1963), The Brigand of Kandahar (1965), The Trap (1966), The Party’s Over (1966), The Jokers (1966) with Michael Crawford, The Girl-Getters (1966), the 1967 film version of H.P. Lovecraft’s The Shuttered Room, and I’ll Never Forget What’s ’Is Name (1967). He starred as Bill Sikes in the 1968 musical Oliver! and had leading roles in three of director Ken Russell’s films —Women in Love (1969), The Devils (1971) and the rock opera Tommy (1975). He also appeared in The Assassination Bureau (1969) with Diana Rigg, Hanibal Brooks (1969), Take a Girl Like You (1970), The Lady in the Car with Glasses and a Gun (1970), The Hunting Party (1971), Z.P.G. (1972), Dirty Weekend (1972), Sitting Target (1972), Triple Echo (1973), Revolver (1973), Blue Blood (1973), Days of Fury (1973) and Mahler (1974). He starred with Michael York and Richard Chamberlain in Richard Lester’s 1973 version of The Three Musketeers and the 1974 sequel The Four Musketeers. He reprised the role in 1989’s The Return of the Musketeers. He also appeared as Otto von Bismarck in 1975’s Royal Flash with Malcolm McDowell and was featured in Burnt Offerings (1976), The Sell-Out (1976), Great Scout and Cathouse Thursday (1976), Ransom (aka Maniac) (1977), Crossed Swords (1978), The Class of Miss MacMichael (1978), Tomorrow Never Comes (1978), The Big Sleep (1978), A Touch of the Sun (1979), David Cronenberg’s The Brood (1979), Omar Mukhtar: Lion of the Desert (1980), the 1980 horror-comedy Dr. Heckyl and Mr. Hype, Disney’s Condorman (1981), Venom (1982), Two of a Kind (1983), The Sting II (1983), Fanny Hill (1983), Spasms (aka Death Bite) (1983), Captive (1986), Skeleton Coast (1987), Rage to Kill (1987), The Misfit Brigade (1987), Master of Dragonard Hill (1987), Castaway (1987), 1988’s The House of Usher, Gor (1988), Captive Rage (1988), Blind Justice (1988), The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988), The Revenger (1989), The Pit and the Pen-

Oliver Reed

dulum (1990), Panama Sugar (1990), Hired to Kill (1991), Severed Ties (1992), Funny Bones (1995), The Bruce (1996), Parting Shots (1998) and Marco Polo (1998). He was filming Gladiator at the time of his death. Reed was also featured in television productions of Christopher Columbus (1985), Black Arrow (1985), The Lady and the Highwayman (1989), Treasure Island (1990), A Ghost in Monte Carlo (1990), Prisoner of Honor (1991) and Jeremiah (1998), and appeared as Gregor Dunnigan in the 1993 mini-series Return to Lonesome Dove. His other television credits include several episodes of the British spy series The Saint in the mid–1960s. Reed was nearly as well known for his off-screen drinking bouts and barroom brawls. He was married to Irish model Kathleen Byrne from 1960 until 1970. He is survived by his second wife, Josephine Burge, who he married in 1985. Los Angeles Times, May 3, 1999, A22; New York Times, May 3, 1999, A27; People, May 17, 1999, 170; Time, May 17, 1999, 25; Times (of London), May 3, 1999, 23a; Variety, May 10, 1999, 150; Washington Post, May 3, 1999, B6.

Reisman, Philip H., Jr. Screenwriter Philip H. Reisman, Jr., died in a New Rochelle, New York, hospital on June 1,

181 1999. He was 82. Reisman was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, on November 12, 1916. He began his career in films in the 1930s writing newsreel narration for RKO-Pathé. In 1941 he scripted the documentary film Jungle Cavalcade starring explorer Frank Buck. Reisman began writing for television in the late 1940s and scripted the Man Against Crime series starring Ralph Bellamy. He also worked on such television documentary series as Project 20, Twentieth Century and You Are There. Reisman also scripted the documentary films The Real West (1961) and The End of the Trail (1965). He wrote the feature films All the Way Home (1963) and P.J. (1968) and scripted several tele-films including A Very Missing Person (1972), Short Walk to Daylight (1972), and adapted Mark Twain’s Life on the Mississippi (1980) and Pudd’nhead Wilson (1984). New York Times, June 6, 1999, 50.

Remsen, Bert Veteran character actor Bert Remsen died at his home in California’s San Fernando Valley on April 22, 1999. He was 74. Remsen was born in Glen Cove, New York, on February 25, 1925. He began his career on stage, studying under Sanford Meisner. Remsen appeared on Broadway in productions of The Rainmaker and Diamond Lil. He went to Hollywood in the late 1950s where he was featured in the films Pork Chop Hill (1959), Tess of the Storm Country (1960), Moon Pilot (1962), Kid Galahad (1962) and Dead Ringer (1964). He was also a familiar face on television in episodes of Maverick, Yancy Derringer, Rawhide, Wanted Dead or Alive, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Jefferson Drum, Perry Mason, Man and the Challenge, Leave It to Beaver, The Fugitive, The Outer Limits, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea and The Dick Van Dyke Show. His career was interrupted in 1964 when he was seriously injured when struck by a falling crane during the filming of an episode of No Time for Sergeants. He suffered a broken back and numerous fractures of his leg and underwent repeated surgical procedures. Following his recovery, Remsen remained involved in films, working as a casting director. He was persuaded to return to the screen by director Robert Altman, who cast him in a supporting role in 1971’s McCabe and Mrs. Miller. Remsen resumed his acting career, appearing in

1999 • Obituaries

many of Altman’s subsequent films. His film credits include The Strawberry Statement (1970), Brewster McCloud (1970), Fuzz (1972), California Split (1974), Thieves Like Us (1974), Nashville (1975), Harry and Walter Go to New York (1976), Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull’s History Lesson (1976), Baby Blue Marine (1976), Uncle Joe Shannon (1978), A Wedding (1978), Fast Break (1979), Joni (1980), Inside Moves (1980), Carny (1980), Borderline (1980), Second-Hand Hearts (aka The Hamster of Happiness) (1981), P.K. and the Kid (1982), Lookin’ to Get Out (1982), Lies (1983), The Sting II (1983), Independence Day (1983), Places in the Heart (1984), Stand Alone (1985), Code of Silence (1985), TerrorVision (1986), Tai-Pan (1986), Eye of the Tiger (1986), Three for the Road (1987), South of Reno (1988), Sundown: The Vampire in Retreat (1989), Miss Firecracker (1989), Curfew (1989), Vietnam, Texas (1990), Peacemaker (1990), Payback (1990), Jezebel’s Kiss (1990), Evil Spirits (1990), Daddy’s Dyin’… Who’s Got the Will? (1990), Dick Tracy (1990), The Walter Ego (1991), Only the Lonely (1991), The Player (1992), The Bodyguard (1993), Loving Lulu (1993), Jack the Bear (1993), Army of One (1993), Bloodfist VI: Ground Zero (1994), Maverick (1994), Dillinger and Capone (1995), White Man’s Burden (1995), Conspiracy Theory (1997), Hugo Pool (1997), The Sky Is Falling (1999) and Forces of Nature (1999). He also appeared in numerous telefilms including If Tomorrow Comes (1971), The Death Squad (1974), Sweet Hostage (1975), Columbo: Fade in to Murder (1976), Brinks: The Great Robbery (1976), Tarantulas: The Deadly Cargo (1977), Love for Rent (1979), Crazy Times (1981), Victims (1982), Policewoman Centerfold (1983), Memorial Day (1983), M.A.D.D.: Mothers Against Drunk Driving (1983), Hobson’s Choice (1983), I Married a Centerfold (1984), Burning Rage (1984), Generation (1985), James Michener’s Space (1985), Who Is Julia? (1986), Convicted (1986), Night Walk (1989), Maid for Each Other (1992), Ladykiller (1992), Wild Card (1992), There Was a Little Boy (1993), In the Shadows, Someone’s Watching (1993), Secret Sins of the Father (1994), Rise and Walk: The Dennis Byrd Story (1994), Mike Hammer: Come Die with Me (1994), Humanoids from the Deep (1996), Crime of the Century (1996) and Lansky (1999). Remsen also appeared as Isaac Barker in the 1978 mini-series The Awakening Land and was Harrison “Dandy” Dandridge in Dallas in 1987. He also starred as

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182

Bert Remsen (from Inside Moves).

Pell, the city editor, in the short-lived 1976 drama series Gibbsville and as Mario in the 1980 sit-com It’s a Living. His television credits also include episodes of S.W.A.T., Charlie’s Angels, Starsky and Hutch, Wonder Woman, The Phoenix, CHiPs, Tucker’s Witch, The Yellow Rose, The Adventures of Brisco County Jr., Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Melrose Place as Sonny Skyler. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 27, 1999, A22; New York Times, May 3, 1999, A26; People, May 17, 1999, 127; Variety, May 3, 1999, 100.

Renegade Richard Wilson, who wrestled as the Renegade in the WCW promotion from 1995, died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head at his home in Marietta, Georgia, on February 23, 1999. He was 33. Wilson was reportedly upset over having lost his job with the wrestling promotion several months earlier. Wilson was born on October 16, 1965. He also wrestled under the name Reo, Lord of the Jungle. He was brought into the WCW as the Renegade and appeared often on the Nitro television program, teaming with Hulk Hogan and Randy Savage. He used a similar ring style to the Ultimate Warrior and held the television title several months in 1995.

Renegade

Rerberg, Gyrogy Russian cinematographer Gyrogy Rerberg died in Moscow on July 28, 1999. He was 62. Rerberg attended the Moscow State Film Institute and photographed his first film in 1965 with Andrei Konchalovsky’s First Teacher. He again worked with Konchalovsky on The Story of Asya Klyachina (1966) and Uncle Vanya (1970). Rerberg was acknowledged as one of the leading Russian cinematographers of his day, also filming such features as A Nest of Gentlefolk (1969), A Dog, Sour Cream and Pipe (1970), Andrei Tarkovsky’s The Mirror (1975), Twelve Chairs (1977), Little Goldfish (1981), Rest Time from Saturday until Monday (1984), The Dangerous Game (1986) and The Arrival of a Train (1995). Variety, Sept. 6, 1999, 76.

183

Fanely Revoil

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so convincingly that many people assumed he was from England. He appeared frequently on live television drama series such as Playhouse 90 and Studio One in the 1950s. Richardson was nominated for a Tony Award for his performance in Vivat! Vivat Regina! on Broadway in 1973. He also appeared in numerous films during his career including Middle of the Night (1959), Network (1976), Brubaker (1980), Prince of the City (1981), I Am the Cheese (1983), Daniel (1983), John Huston’s Prizzi’s Honor (1985), Sweet Lorraine (1987), The Believers (1987), Amazing Grace and Chuck (1987), Tiger Warsaw (1988), The Fly II (1989), The Exorcist III (1990), Q & A (1990) and A Stranger Among Us (1992). On television he appeared in episodes of Way Out and Law & Order, and the tele-films Country Gold (1982), Stingray (1985), Doubletake (1985), Laura Lansing Slept Here (1988), Internal Affairs (1988), Capital News (1990), With Murder in Mind (1992), Skylark (1993) and 1995’s Truman as Franklin D. Roosevelt. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 11, 1999, A20; New York Times, Oct. 10, 1999, 53; Variety, Oct. 18, 1999, 55.

Revoil, Fanely French singer Fanely Revoil died in France on January 31, 1999. She was 92. She was born in Marseilles, France, on September 25, 1906. She studied singing in the 1920s and was performing in provincial operas in the 1930s. Often performing with baritone Andre Bauge, she starred in productions of Johann Strauss’ Valses De Vienne, The Marriage of Figaro, Carmen, Mignon and La Boheme. In post-war France she continued to perform in musicals and operettas. She began teaching in the late 1950s, forming an operetta class at the Paris Conservatoire in the early 1960s.

Richardson, Lee Actor Lee Richardson died in New York of complications from a perforated ulcer on October 2, 1999. He was 73. Richardson was born in Chicago on September 11, 1926. He began his career on stage where he affected a British accent

Lee Richardson

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184

Roberts, Don Television production designer Don Roberts died of a brain tumor at the Motion Picture & Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on January 10, 1999. He was 64. Roberts began his career as a stage designer in Pasadena and Los Angeles. He soon began working in television and designed the sets for the classic 1970s series All in the Family. He worked on numerous other series including The Jeffersons, Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman, Three’s Company, Spenser for Hire, One Day at a Time, Sanford and Son, Who’s the Boss? and Married with Children. Roberts also designed sets for several game shows including The Price Is Right and The Joker’s Wild. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 18, 1999, A24; People, Feb. 1, 1999, 69; Variety, Jan. 18, 1999, 147. Stephen Roberts

Roberts, Ivor British character actor Ivor Roberts died in England on September 5, 1999. He was 74. Roberts was an announcer for ITV before he began his acting career. He was featured on British television in productions of Rogue Male (1976), Alternative 3 (1977), Agatha Christie’s Murder Is Easy (1982), Hitler’s S.S.: Portrait in Evil (1985) and the 1996 series Oh, Doctor Beeching! as Arnold. He also appeared in episodes of Doctor Who, Adam Adamant Lives!, George and Mildred, Agony, The Lenny Henry Show, Boon and Peak Practice. Roberts was seen in a handful of films during his career including The Sailor’s Return (1978), Sweet William (1980), Hopscotch (1980), Another Country (1984), Without a Clue (1988) and We Think the World of You (1988).

Roberts, Stephen Actor Stephen Roberts died of cancer at the Motion Picture & Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on October 26, 1999. He was 82. Roberts began his career on stage, playing in numerous productions at the Mercury Theater. He came to Hollywood in the early 1940s where his film credits include Spy Train (1943), The Song of Bernadette (1943), Miracle on 34th Street (1947), Kiss of Death (1947), Joan of

Arc (1948), Tension (1949), The File on Thelma Jordon (1949), Criss Cross (1949), A Miss in a Mess (1949), Samson and Delilah (1949), Wha’ Happen? (1949), Where the Sidewalk Ends (1950), Rogue River (1950), At War with the Army (1950), The Racket (1951), On Dangerous Ground (1951), Harlem Globetrotters (1951), The Prisoner of Zenda (1952), The Twonky (1953), Julius Caesar (1953), Gog (1954), The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell (1955), The Brothers Karamazov (1958), The Wild and the Innocent (1959), Portrait of a Mobster (1961), Terrified (1962), Diary of a Madman (1963), The Quick Gun (1964), Brainstorm (1965), First to Fight (1967) and Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971). Roberts appeared on television as Stan Peeples in the Mr. Novak series in the mid– 1960s and was President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1979 mini-series Ike: The War Years. His other television credits include episodes of The Lone Ranger, Gunsmoke, Black Saddle, One Step Beyond, The Californians, Have Gun, Will Travel, Black Saddle, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Cheyenne, Perry Mason, Bonanza, Hotel de Paree, The Deputy, Death Valley Days, The Loner, The Fugitive, The Virginian, Lancer, Green Acres, Mission: Impossible and I Dream of Jeannie. Variety, Nov. 8, 1999, 52.

185

Roche, Betty Singer Betty Roche died in Pleasantville, New Jersey, on February 16, 1999. She was 81. She began her professional career singing with the Savoy Sultans in the early 1940s. She joined Duke Ellington’s band in 1943 and performed with Ellington over the next two decades. She was best known for signing Ellington’s composition “Black, Brown and Beige.” She also performed the song “Take the A Train” in the 1943 film Reveille with Beverly. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 3, 1999, A15; New York Times, Mar. 1, 1999, A19.

Rodrigues, Amalia Portuguese singer Amalia Rodrigues was found dead of a heart attack at her Lisbon, Portugal, home on October 6, 1999. She was 79. She was born Amalia Rebordao da Piedade Rodrigues in Lisbon on June 23, 1920. She began singing professionally in 1939 at Lisbon nightclubs and soon became a leading star. Rodrigues popularized the Portuguese “fado” music, which was described as a cross between blues, folk and opera, with the international hit “Coimbra” in 1955. The song became known as “April in Portugal” in English. Rodrigues had numerous other hit songs and starred in over a dozen Portuguese films including Capas Negras (1947), Fado, Historia d’uma Cantadeira (1948), Vandeval Maravilhoso (1949), Sol e Toiros (1949), April in Portugal (1954), The Lovers of Lisbon (1955), Musica de Siempre (1956), Les Canciones Unidas (1959),

Amalia Rodrigues

1999 • Obituaries

Fado Corrido (1964), As Ilhas Encantadas (1965) and Via Macau (1966). She retired after a world tour in 1990. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 7, 1999, A28; New York Times, Oct. 7, 1999, C23.

Rogers, Charles “Buddy” Charles “Buddy” Rogers, actor and husband of the late silent screen star Mary Pickford, died at his home in Rancho Mirage, California, on April 21, 1999. He was 94. Rogers was born in Olathe, Kansas, on August 13, 1904. He went to Hollywood in the mid–1920s after sending his photograph to Paramount during a talent hunt. He made his screen debut in the 1926 silent film Fascinating Youth. The following he starred in Wings, the first film to receive and Academy Award for best picture. Rogers’ other screen credits in the 1920s include So’s Your Old Man (1926), More Pay — Less Work (1926), My Best Girl (1927), Get Your Man (1927), Varsity (1928), Someone to Love (1928), Red Lips (1928), Abie’s Irish Rose (1929), Close Harmony (1929), River of Romance (1929), Perfect Day (1929), Illusion (1929) and Half way to Heaven (1929). Rogers made the transition to talkies and continued to perform in such films as Outside the Law (1930), Heads Up (1930), Young Eagles (1930), Paramount on Parade (1930), Safety in Numbers (1930), Along Came Youth

Charles “Buddy” Rogers

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186

(1930), Follow Thru (1930), Working Girls (1931), The Slippery Pearls (1931), The Road to Reno (1931), The Lawyer’s Secret (1931), This Reckless Age (1932), Take a Chance (1933), Best of Enemies (1933), Maid in Hollywood (1934), I’ll Be Suing You (1934), Weekend Millionaire (1935), Dance Band (1935), Old Man Rhythm (1935), Once in a Million (1936), This Way Please (1937), Let’s Make a Night of It (1937), Mexican Spitfire’s Baby (1941), Golden Hoofs (1941), Double Trouble (1941), They Raid by Night (1942), Sing for Your Supper (1942), Mexican Spitfire Sees a Ghost (1942), Mexican Spitfire at Sea (1942), House of Errors (1942), That Nazty Nuisance (1943) and An Innocent Affair (1948). Rogers had married Mary Pickford, the silent screen star known as “America’s Sweetheart,” in 1936 following the collapse of her previous marriage to Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. Miss Pickford had largely abandoned her film career after the advent of talkies. Rogers was host of the musical series The Cavalcade of Bands in 1951. He made several appearances on television in the 1960s including episodes of The Lucy Show and Petticoat Junction. He remained married to Miss Pickford until her death in May of 1979. The following year he married Beverly Ricono, who survives him. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 22, 1999, A3; New York Times, Apr. 23, 1999, A23; People, May 10, 1999, 213; Times (of London), Apr. 23, 1999, 27a; Variety, Apr. 26, 1999, 59.

Terri Rogers (with her dummy, Shorty Harris).

Roman, Ruth Actress Ruth Roman died in her sleep at her Laguna Beach, California, home on September 9, 1999. She was 75. She was born Norma Roman in Lynn, Massachusetts, on December 22, 1924. She began her career in films in 1943, appearing in small parts in Stage Door Canteen (1943), Storm Over Lisbon (1944), Ladies Courageous (1944), Since You Went Away (1944), She Gets Her Man (1945), See My Lawyer (1945), Incendiary Blonde (1945), The Affairs of Susan (1945), You Came

Rogers, Terri British ventriloquist Terri Rogers died in England of a stroke on May 30, 1999. She was 62. She was born Ivan Southgate, in Ipswich, England, on May 4, 1937. She began her career as a magician and ventriloquist in touring shows in the 1950s. She underwent a sex-change operation in the early 1960s, which gained her some notoriety. She and her dummy, Shorty Harris, became leading performers at British variety clubs. She was also a regular guest star on the ITV television series Wheeltappers and Shunters from 1971. Rogers also appeared often in the United States, performing in Los Angeles and Las Vegas, and guesting on television talk shows. Times (of London), June 4, 1999, 25a. Ruth Roman

187 Along (1945), Gilda (1946), A Night in Casablanca (1946), Without Reservation (1946), Harmony Trail (1947), The Night Has a Thousand Eyes (1948) and The Big Clock (1948). She starred as Lothel in the 1945 serial Jungle Queen and was Rose of Cimarron in 1948’s Belle Starr’s Daughter. She continued to appear in such films as Good Sam (1948), The Window (1949), Always Leave Them Laughing (1949), Stanley Kramer’s Champion (1949), Beyond the Forest (1949) with Bette Davis, Three Secrets (1950), Dallas (1950), Colt .45 (1950), Barricade (1950), Tomorrow Is Another Day (1951), Starlift (1951), Lightning Strikes Twice (1951), Alfred Hitchcock’s Strangers on a Train (1951), Invitation (1952), Mara Maru (1952) with Errol Flynn, Young Man with Ideas (1952), Blowing Wild (1953), Tanganyika (1954), The Shanghai Story (1954), Down Three Dark Streets (1954), Desert Desperados (1955), Man on a Bus (1955), Joe MacBeth (1955), The Far Country (1955), Jungle Safari (1956), Great Day in the Morning (1956), The Bottom of the Bottle (1956), Rebel in Town (1956), Bitter Victory (1957), 5 Steps to Danger (1957), Look in Any Window (1961) and Love Has Many Faces (1965). Ms. Roman starred as Minnie Littlejohn on the television drama series The Long, Hot Summer in the 1965 season. Her subsequent work was mainly seen on television, though she did appear in a handful of films, primarily low-budget horrors, including The Killing Kind (1973), The Baby (1973), A Knife for the Ladies (1974), Impulse (1974), Dead of Night (1974), Day of the Animals (1977) and Echoes (1983). She was featured in such tele-films as Incident in San Francisco (1970), The Old Man Who Cried Wolf (1970), Go Ask Alice (1972), Punch and Jody (1974), The Sacketts (1979) and Willow B: Women in Prison (1980). She starred as Sylvia Lean in the evening soap opera Knots Landing in 1986. Her other television credits include episodes of Lux Video Theatre, Ford Theatre, Producers’ Showcase, G.E. Theatre, Climax!, The Jane Wyman Show, Bonanza, Naked City, The Defenders, The Untouchables, Bus Stop, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Sam Benedict, The Eleventh Hour, Route 66, The Greatest Show on Earth, Burke’s Law, Dr. Kildare, The Outcasts, The Breaking Point, Bob Hope Chrysler Theatre, The Outer Limits, The Bing Crosby Show, The Girl from U.N.C.L.E., Tarzan, The F.B.I., Mission: Impossible, I Spy, Gunsmoke, The Name of the Game, The Outsider, Crisis, The Sixth Sense, Mannix,

1999 • Obituaries

Marcus Welby, M.D., The Men from Shiloh, Kung Fu, Fantasy Island, Ironside, The Mod Squad, Faraday and Company, Hec Ramsey, Police Woman, Cannon, and, most recently, several episodes of Murder, She Wrote in the late 1980s. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 11, 1999, A18; New York Times, Sept. 11, 1999, B7; People, Sept. 27, 1999, 131; Time, Sept. 20, 1999, 23; Times (of London), Sept. 14, 1999, 21a.

Rossington, Norman British comic actor Norman Rossington died of cancer in a Manchester, England, hospital on May 21, 1999. He was 70. Rossington was born in Liverpool, England, on December 24, 1928. He was a popular stage, film and television performer in Great Britain. He began his film career in the mid 1950s appearing in such features as Three Men in a Boat (1956), Keep It Clean (1956), Stranger’s Meeting (1957), I Only Arsked! (1958), Carry on Sergeant (1958), Carry on Nurse (1958), A Night to Remember (1958), Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960), Carry on Regardless (1961), the World War II drama The Longest Day (1962), David Lean’s epic Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Go to Blazes (1962), Crooks Anonymous (1962), Nurse on Wheels (1963), The Comedy Man (1963), Daylight Robbery (1964), the Beatles’ first film A Hard Day’s Night (1964) as the band’s manager, Joey Boy (1965), Cup Fever (1965), Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines (1965), The Wrong Box (1966), Tobruk (1967), Double Truble (1967), Negatives (1968), The Charge of the Light Brigade (1968), Two Gentlemen Sharing (1969), Simon Simon (1970), The Adventures of Gerard (1970), Man in the Wilderness (1971), Go for a Take (1972), Double Take (1972), Raw Meat (aka Deathline) (1972), Young Winston (1972), Digby, the Biggest Dog in the World (1973), The Prisoner of Zenda (1979), Rhubard Rhubard (1980), House of the Long Shadows (1983), The Krays (1990) and Let Him Have It (1991). He also appeared on television productions of Casanova (1971), Carry on Christmas: Carry on Stuffing (1972), I, Claudius (1976), S.O.S. Titanic (1979) and Sharpe’s Regiment (1996). His other television credits include such British series as The Army Game, The Big Noise, Curry and Chips, Spooner’s Patch, Target, Hunter’s Walk, Big Jim and the Figaro Club and And the

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188

Rountree, Martha Martha Rountree, the co-creator of NBC’s Meet the Press, died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in a Washington, D.C., hospital on August 23, 1999. She was 87. Rountree was born in Gainesville, Florida, in 1911. She moved to New York in the late 1940s where she worked as a journalist. She joined NBC shortly after World War II. She and Lawrence Spivak created Meet the Press as a radio show in 1945. The program moved to television two years later, with Rountree serving as moderator. She remained with the show until 1953, when she sold Spivak her share following a coin toss. Rountree also produced and moderated such other 1950s public affairs programs as Keep Posted, The Big Issue and Press Conference. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 25, 1999, A16; New York Times, Aug. 25, 1999, B7; People, Sept. 13, 1999, 103; Time, Sept. 6, 1999, 25; Variety, Sept. 6, 1999, 76; Washington Post, Au. 25, 1999, B5.

Norman Rossington

Beat Goes On. Rossington was performing on stage in a production of Beauty and the Beast until November of 1998, when poor health forced his retirement. Los Angeles Times, May 22, 1999, A26; Times (of London), May 24, 1999, 25A; New York Times, May 25, 1999, B10.

Rouiched Algerian playwright and actor Rouiched died in Algeria on January 28, 1999. He was 78. He was born Mohamed Ayad on April 20, 1941. He began his career on stage as an actor in the late 1930s. He was an outspoken advocate of Algeria’s independence from France, and his career was interrupted during rebellion from 1954 to 1962, when he was often imprisoned by the colonial authorities. He resumed his career after independence. He wrote the play Hassan, Terrorist, and starred in the production and the 1967 film. He was also seen in Ahmed Rached’s film The Opium and the Stick. Rouiched also wrote the popular plays The Monster and The Honest Man in the 1980s.

Martha Rountree

189

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Lady Rowlands

Rowlands, Lady Actress Mary Allen “Lady” Rowlands died of heart failure at the Motion Picture County Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on May 28, 1999. She was 94. Rowlands was the mother of actress Gena Rowlands and appeared with her daughter in several films directed by her late sonin-law John Cassavetes including Minnie and Moskowitz (1971), A Woman Under the Influence (1974) and Opening Night (1978). She also had a role in the 1978 tele-film Dr. Strange, and appeared with Lily Tomlin on television. Her most recent film credit was 1991’s Ted and Venus. Los Angeles Times, June 1, 1999, A22; Variety, June 7, 1999, 52.

Rude, Rick Ravishing Rick Rude, one of the top professional wrestlers of the 1980s, died of a heart attack on April 20, 1999. He was found unconscious at his Alpharetta, Georgia, home and died after being taken to the hospital. He was 41. He was born Richard Rood in Robbinsdale, Minnesota, on December 7, 1957. He began wrestling professionally in the early 1980s, becoming a leading ring villain in the Mid-South area. Rude en-

Rick Rude

tered the WWF in 1987, where he feuded the Jack “the Snake” Roberts and the Ultimate Warrior and held the Intercontinental Title for several months in 1989. He went to the WCW in 1991 and held the world title in 1993 and 1994 until an injury largely ended his in-ring career. In recent years Rude had been seen on television as a commentator and manager in the WWF, WCW and ECW arena. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 30, 1999, A32; People, May 17, 1999, 127.

Rumble, Tony Wrestler and promoter Tony Rumble died of a heart attack in Melrose, Massachusetts, on November 13, 1999. He was 43. He was born Anthony D. Magliaro in 1956. He began wrestling

Obituaries • 1999

190 and The Crooked Hearts (1972). In the 1980s Russell wrote for the daytime television soap opera General Hospital, earning another Emmy nomination in 1983. Variety, Dec. 20, 1999, 72.

Russell, Ray

Tony Rumble

professionally in the mid–1980s with International Championship Wrestling. He became known as “the Boston Bad Boy.” Rumble was also a leading promoter with Century Wrestling Alliance and was the founder of NWA New England Pro Wrestling. Rumble also worked with ECW, where he was instrumental in promoting the careers of Taz, Tommy Dreamer and the Public Enemy.

Russell, A.J. Television writer Andrew J. Russell died in a Los Angeles hospital on November 18, 1999. He was 84. Russell wrote for such popular 1950s television series as The Ed Sullivan Show, The Honeymooners, The Jackie Gleason Show and The Phil Silvers Show. The latter earned him an Emmy Award in 1957. Russell also scripted the television special Art Carney Meets Peter and the Wolf in 1958. He also wrote the screenplay for the 1969 film Stiletto, and scripted several tele-films including The Borgia Stick (1967), A Clear and Present Danger (1970), The Death of Me Yet (1971)

Veteran horror and fantasy writer Ray Russell died of complications from a stroke in Los Angeles on March 15, 1999. He was 74. Russell was born on September 4, 1924. He began writing in the early 1950s. Much of his work was published in Playboy magazine, where he worked as an editor from 1954 through the early 1970s. He was best known for his short novel Sardonicus, about a man who digs up his father’s grave to retrieve a winning lottery ticket, only to have his face frozen in a hideous sardonic smile. The story was filmed by William Castle as Mr. Sardonicus in 1961, with Russell writing the script. Russell also scripted the 1962 fantasy Zotz!, based on a novel by Walter Karig, and, with Charles Beaumont, co-scripted Roger Corman’s 1962 adaptation of Premature Burial. He again worked with Corman on 1963’s X — The Man with X-Ray Eyes. Russell also scripted the 1963 British horror comedy Horror of It All, which starred Pat Boone. His tale Chamber of Horrors was adapted into a 1966 film and Incubus was filmed in 1980. Russell also wrote the horror novel The Case Against Satan (1962), and the short novels Sanguinarius and Sagittarius. His numerous short stories include The Actor, The Sword of Laertes, I Am Returning, Incommunicado and London Calling. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 19, 1999, A29; New York Times, Mar. 22, 1999, A19.

Ruvinskis, Wolf Mexican wrestler turned actor Wolf Ruvinskis died of heart failure on November 9, 1999. He was 78. Ruvinskis was born in Latvia and raised in Argentina. He went to Mexico in the 1940s as a professional wrestler. He began acting in the late 1940s and appeared in over 150 films during his career. His credits include Bambucos y Corazones (1945), La Oveja Negra (1949), The Man Without a Face (1950), The Beautiful

191

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Wolf Ruvinskis (as Neutron).

Dreamer (1952), La Bestia Magnifica (1953), Pepe El Toro (1953), Reportaje (1953), La Vida no Vale Nada (1955), The Body Snatchers (1956), Chiquito Pero Picosa (1957) and The Empty Star (1958). He appeared in a series of Mexican films in the 1960s, portraying the black masked super-hero wrestler Neutron in such movies as Neutron vs. the Maniacs (1961), Neutron Against the Death Robots (1961), Neutron and the Black Mask (1961), Neutron Battles the Karate Assassins (1962) and Neutron vs. the Amazing Dr. Caronte (1963). He was also featured with Mexican wrestling film legend Santo in Santo vs. the Martian Invasion (1966) and Santo vs. the Villains of the Ring (1966). Ruvinskis was also president of the Mexican Wrestler’s Association.

Ryan, Marion British pop singer Marion Ryan died in Florida of a heart attack and complications from pneumonia on January 15, 1999. She was 67. She was born Marion Sapherson in Leeds, England, in 1931. She began her career performing with the Ray Ellington Quartet on BBC radio and the television show Swing Along. During the 1950s and 1960s she recorded such popular songs “Hot Diggity,” “Mr. Wonderful,” “Who Do Fools Fall in Love,” “Love Me Forever” and “It’s You That I Love.” She was also featured in the 1963 British musical film It’s All Happening. She largely retired from show business in the mid–1960s. Times (of London), Jan. 19, 1999, 25a.

Marion Ryan

Sahm, Doug Singer Doug Sahm was found dead of a heart attack in a Taos, New Mexico, hotel room on November 18, 1999. He was 58. Sahm was born in San Antonio, Texas, on November 6, 1941. He began his career in the mid–1950s with a single entitled “A Real American Joe.” He achieved fame in the 1960s while playing with the Sir Douglas Quintet. They recorded the hit singles “She’s About a Mover,” “Rains Came” and “Mendocino.” Sahm was also featured in Kris Kristofferson’s 1972 film Cisco Pike. He recorded several solo albums including Doug Sahm and Band (1973) and Hell of a Spell (1979). He was also seen in the 1979 film More American Graffiti. In the late 1980s Sahm teamed with Freddie Fender and the Texas Tornados on such songs as “A Little Bit Is Better Than Nada” and “Who Were You Thinking Of.” New York Times, Nov. 22, 1999, A28.

Obituaries • 1999

192 uary 29, 1999. She was 80. Ms. St. Cyr was born Willis Marie Van Schaack in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on June 3, 1918. She worked as a chorus girl before beginning her career as a striptease artist in vaudeville in the late 1930s. Known for her onstage bubble-baths, St. Cyr became one of the best known ecdysiasts of the 1940s and 1950s, ranking with Gypsy Rose Lee, Blaze Starr and Tempest Storm. She also appeared in a handful of films in the 1950s including The Miami Story (1954), Son of Sinbad (1955), the 1958 adaptation of Norman Mailer’s The Naked and the Dead and I, Mobster. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 4, 1999, A20; New York Times, Feb. 6, 1999, C16; People, Feb. 22, 1999, 85; Time, Feb. 15, 1999, 21.

Sandman, Mark Doug Sahm

St. Cyr, Lili

Mark Sandman, the lead singer of the rock band Morphine, died of a heart attack on July 4, 1999, after collapsing at a rock concert near Rome, Italy. He was 46. Sandman was born in

Legendary striptease artist Lili St. Cyr died of natural causes at her Los Angeles home on Jan-

Lili St. Cyr

Mark Sandman

193 Boston, Massachusetts, on September 24, 1952. He began performing with the band Treat Her Right in Boston before forming Morphine in the early 1990s. The band recorded such albums as Good (1992), Cure for Pain (1993), Yes (1995) and Like Swimming (1997), and their songs were heard in such films as Get Shorty and Beautiful Girls. Morphine had recently completed recording a live album. Los Angeles Times, July 6, 1999, F2; New York Times, July 6, A15; Times, July 24, 1999, 24a.

Santacroce, Mary Nell Character actress Mary Nell Santacroce died of leukemia and bone cancer in Atlanta on February 17, 1999. She was 81. She was born Mary Nell McKoin in Atlanta in approximately 1917. She was a speech and drama teacher at the Georgia Institute of Technology from 1948 until 1965. She was featured as the landlady in John Huston’s 1979 film Wise Blood. Her other film cred-

Mary Nell Santacroce

1999 • Obituaries

its include The Private Eyes (1980), Mutant (1984), Impure Thoughts (1985), Not Without My Daughter (1991), Silent Cries (1993), The War (1994), A Simple Twist of Fate (1994) and Something to Talk About (1995). She was also featured in numerous tele-films and mini-series including The Ordeal of Dr. Mudd (1980), Cold Sassy Tree (1989), Caroline? (1990), Rising Son (1990), Rising Son (1990), Perfect Harmony (1991), Night of the Hunter (1991), Carolina Skeletons (1991), Wife Mother, Murderer: The Marie Hilley Story (1991), Queen (1993), Stolen Babies (1993), Class of ’61 (1993), A Passion for Justice: The Hazel Brannon Smith Story (1994), The Yearling (1994) and Scarlett (1994). She also appeared in episodes of I’ll Fly Away and was Millie Lester in the series Savannah in 1996.

Santon, Penny Character actress Penny Santon died in Burbank, California, on May 12, 1999. She was 82. Ms. Santon was born in New York City on September 2, 1916. She began her career in films in the mid–1950s, appearing in Full of Life (1956), The Wrong Man (1956), Dino (1957), Cry Tough (1959), West Side Story (1961), Love with the Proper Stranger (1963), California (1963), Captain Newman, M.D. (1963), Don’t Just Stand There! (1968), Funny Girl (1968), Kotch (1971), Rhinestone (1984), Fletch (1985), Short Circuit (1986) and One Good Cop (1991). She was a familiar face on television appearing as Madame Fatima in the short-lived sit-com Don’t Call Me Charlie in 1962 and was Madame Delacort in 1973’s Roll Out. She also appeared as Mrs. Bernardi in the 1980 series B.A.D. Cats and was Mama Novelli on Matt Houston from 1982 until 1983. She was also featured as Consuelo Guadalupe Lopez on the 1969 Marcus Welby, M.D. pilot film. Her other telefilm credits include A Storm in Summer (1970), The Impatient Heart (1971), The Last Angry Man (1974), And Your Name Is Jonah (1979), There Was a Little Boy (1993) and Columbo: Undercover (1994). She was also featured in episodes of The Adventures of Jim Bowie, Zorro, Wyatt Earp, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, One Step Beyond, The Untouchables, Rawhide, Temple Houston, Bonanza, My Favorite Martian, The Girl from U.N.C.L.E., The High Chaparral, Bewitched, Streets of San Francisco, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, St. Elsewhere,

Obituaries • 1999

194

Penny Santon Nathalie Sarraute

The Fall Guy, Hill Street Blues, Airwolf, Hunter, Starman, Quantum Leap, Burke’s Law and Friends. New York Times, Feb. 21, 1999, 47.

Sarraute, Nathalie French novelist Nathalie Sarraute died at her Paris home on October 19, 1999. She was 99. She was born Natasha Tcherniak in Ivanovo, Russia, on July 18, 1900. She moved to Paris at an early age, and studied literature at law at the Sorbonne and Oxford. She practiced law from 1925 and began writing her book of short sketches, Tropisms, in 1932. The book was published in 1939. She spent much of the German occupation of France during World War II in hiding. She continued writing after the war, authoring her first novel, Portrait of a Man Unknown, in 1948. He second novel, Martereau, followed in 1953. Her other works include The Planetarium (1959), The Golden Fruits (1963), Between Life and Death (1968) and Do You Hear Them? (1972). Several of her works, including Childhood, The Lie and Silence, were adapted for the stage. Sarraute continued to write well into her 90s, producing You Don’t Love Yourself (1990), Here (1995) and, her final work, Open in 1997. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 21, 1999, A24; New York Times, Oct. 20, 1999, C25; Time, Nov. 1, 1999, 39.

Sato, Masaru Japanese film composer Masaru Sato died in a Tokyo hospital on December 5, 1999, after becoming ill a party in his honor. He was 71. Sato was born on May 29, 1928. He was trained by leading film composer Fumio Hayasaka and began writing film scores in the early 1950s. Sato completed the scoring for Akira Kurosawa’s Ikimono no Kiroku in 1955 following Hayasaka’s death. Sato continued to work with Kurosawa over the next decade through 1965’s Akahige. Sato also composed scores for several Toho monster films including the first sequel to Godzilla, Gigantis, the Fire Monster (1955), Half-Human (1955), The H-Man (1958), Godzilla vs. the Sea Monster (1966), Son of Godzilla (1967) and Godzilla vs. the Cosmic Monster (1974). During his career he composed over 300 film scores. His other credits include Legend of the Taira Clan (1955), I Live in Fear (1955), Vampire Moth (1956), Throne of Blood (1957), The Lower Depths (1957), The Hidden Fortress (1958), Westward Desperado (1960), The Bad Sleep Well (1960), Challenge to Live (1961), Yojimbo (1961), Sanjuro (1962), The Crimson Sky (1962), Warring Clans (1963), Heaven and Hell (1963), The Lost World of Sinbad (1963), Fort Graveyard (1964), Red Beard (1965), Ironfinger (1965), Three Sisters (1966), Sword of Doom (1966), The Age of Assassins (1967),

195 The Emperor and a General (1967), The Day the Sun Rose (1967), Portrait of Chieko (1967), Kill! (1968), Admiral Yamamoto (1968), Official Gold (1969), Samurai Banners (1969), Red Lion (1969), East Capital (1970), The Song from My Heart (1970), The Magoichi Saga (1970), Band of Assassins (1970), Outlaws (1970), Kazoku (1971), The Battle of Okinawa (1971), The Wolves (1972), Tidal Wave (1973), A Portrait of Shunkin (1977), The Yellow Handkerchief (1977), The Alaska Story (1978), Blood Type: Blue (1978), Hunter in Darkness (1979), The Glacier Fox (1979), Nomugi Pass (1979), Toward the Terra (1980), A Distant Cry from Spring (1980), Irezumi (1982), Our Teacher (1983), The Silk Road (1988), Shogun’s Shadow (1989), War and Youth (1991), Rainbow Kids (1991), East Meets West (1995) and After the Rain (1999). Los Angeles Times, Dec. 8, 1999, A26; Variety, Dec. 20, 1999, 72.

Sayao, Bidu Brazilian operatic soprano Bidu Sayao died at a Rockport, Maine, hospital on March 12, 1999. She was 96. Miss Sayao was born Balduina de Oliveira Sayao in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on May 11, 1902. She began singing at an early age

Bidu Sayao

1999 • Obituaries

and performed throughout South American and Europe in the early 1920s. She made her singing debut in the United States in 1935 and two years later joined the Metropolitan Opera, performing the title role in Manon. She appeared in several hundred performances with the Met over the next two decades until leaving the company in 1952. She retired from performing five years later. Miss Sayao took part in the 1988 documentary film Toscanini: The Maestro. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 15, 1999, A14; New York Times, Mar. 13, 1999, A13; Times (of London), Mar. 16, 1999, 21a.

Schenck, Aubrey Film producer Aubrey Schenck died in Los Angeles on April 14, 1999. He was 90. Schenck was born in Brooklyn, New York, on August 26, 1908. Schenck was a New York lawyer before joining National Theatres as an attorney and buyer in 1944. The following year he went to Hollywood where he produced the 1945 Vincent Price horror film Shock. He subsequently produced

Aubrey Schenck

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196

such films as Strange Triangle (1946), T-Men (1947), Repeat Performance (1947), It’s a Joke, Son (1947), Mickey (1948), Raw Deal (1948), Port of New York (1949), Red Stallion in the Rockies (1949), Undercover Girl (1950), Wyoming Mail (1950), Target Unknown (1951) and The Fat Man (1951). He was co-founder with Howard W. Koch of the independent production company Bel-Air Productions in 1953. Schenck served as producer for over 30 films over the next several years including War Paint (1953), Shield for Murder (1954), Fort Yuma (1955), Desert Sands (1955), Big House, U.S.A. (1955), Three Bad Sisters (1956), Pharaoh’s Curse (1956), Hot Cars (1956), Emergency Hospital (1956), Crime Against Joe (1956), The Black Sleep (1956), Voodoo Island (1957), Untamed Youth (1957), Jungle Heat (1957), Bop Girl (1957), The Girl in Black Stockings (1957), Frankenstein 1970 (1958), Fort Bowie (1958), Born Reckless (1958), Violent Road (1958) and Up Periscope (1959). Schenck also produced the 1964 science fiction classic Robinson Crusoe on Mars. He produced Barquero in 1970 and the low-budget horror films Superbeast and Daughters of Satan in 1972. He also produced the 1973 tele-film The Alpha Caper. Schenck was president of the Producers Guild of America from 1971 to 1974. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 20, 1999, A24.

Schickele, David Film editor David Schickele died of brain cancer in San Francisco on October 31, 1999. He was 62. Schickele was born in Ames, Iowa, in March of 1937. He was the brother of composer and humorist Peter Schickele, and was involved in the creation of the fictional composer P.D.Q. Bach, who was often the focus of his brother’s comic routines. David Schickele was editor on such films as The Crazy-Quilt (1966), Funnyman (1967), Over-Under, Sideways-Down (1977) and 1996’s Chalk. He also directed the 1964 documentary about the Peace Corps, Give Me a Riddle, and the award-winning 1971 film Bushman, about an African student as San Francisco State. His final film was 1992’s Tuscarora. New York Times, Nov. 11, 1999, B15.

Stefan Schnabel

Schnabel, Stefan Veteran character actor Stefan Schnabel died of a heart attack at his home in Rogaro, Italy, on March 11, 1999. He was 87. Schnabel was born in Berlin, Germany, on February 2, 1912, the son of pianist Artur Schnabel. He accompanied his family to Italy in 1930 and went to London three years later to begin his career on stage. Schnabel came to New York in 1938 where he continued to perform on stage and in numerous radio productions. He also began performing in films, often portraying Middle European villains. His film credits include Journey into Fear (1942), The Iron Curtain (1948), Law of the Barbary Coast (1949), Barbary Pirate (1949), Diplomatic Courier (1952), Houdini (1953), The 27th Day (1957), The Mugger (1958), Town Without Pity (1961), The Secret Ways (1961), The Ugly American (1962), Two Weeks in Another Town (1962), The Counterfeit Traitor (1962), Rampage (1963), No Survivors, Please (1963), Blood Bath (1976), Firefox (1982) with Clint Eastwood, Lovesick (1983), Anna (1987), Dracula’s Widow (1989) and Green Card

197 (1990). Schnabel was perhaps best known for his long running role as Dr. Stephen Jackson on the daytime soap-opera The Guiding Light from 1965 through 1981. He also appeared in the tele-films Mr. Inside/Mr. Outside (1973), Stone Pillow (1985) and Brass (1985), and episodes of such series as Lights Out, Inner Sanctum, Captain Video, You Are There, The Rifleman, Bus Stop, The Wackiest Ship in the Army and Alfred Hitchcock Presents. New York Times, Mar. 17, 1999, C26; Variety, Mar. 29, 1999, 84.

Scott, George C. George C. Scott, who was awarded — but refused to accept — the Academy Award for his starring role in 1970’s Patton, died from a rupture of a major blood vessel in his abdomen, at his home in Westlake Village, California, on September 22, 1999. He was 71. Scott was born in Wise, Virginia, on October 18, 1927. He was raised in Detroit and began his acting career in the early 1950s after serving four years in the U.S. Marines. Scott appeared in numerous theatrical productions, leading to his being chosen by Joseph Papp, of the New York Shakespeare Festival, to star in Richard III in 1957 and As You Like It in 1958. He received the Off-Broadway Obie Award for these and for 1958’s Children of Darkness. He made his Broadway debut also in 1958 in Comes a Day, receiving his first Tony nomination. He was again nominated for Tony awards for 1959’s The Andersonville Trial, 1974’s Uncle Vanya and 1975’s Death of a Salesman. He made his film debut in 1959’s The Hanging Tree, as leader of the group that wanted to lynch Gary Cooper. He was nominated for an Academy Award for his second film, Anatomy of a Murder, also in 1959. He continued to appear in such films as The Hustler (1961), which earned him a second Oscar nomination, The List of Adrian Messenger (1963), Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove (1964) as General Buck Turgidson, The Yellow RollsRoyce (1964), The Bible (1966) as Abraham, Not with My Wife You Don’t! (1966), The Flim-Flam Man (1967) and Petulia (1968). Scott was again nominated for the Academy Award following his bravura performance as General George Patton in 1970’s Patton. He announced that he considered the awards demeaning to actors and would refuse to accept an Oscar if he won. He became the first

1999 • Obituaries

actor to decline the Academy Award when he was selected as Best Actor. Scott also refused to accept an Emmy Award for his performance in the Hallmark Hall of Fame production of The Price in 1971. The following year he was again nominated for the Oscar for his performance in The Hospital, but was not selected as the winner by the Academy. He continued to appear in such films as Jane Eyre (1971), They Might Be Giants (1971), The Last Run (1971), The New Centurions (1972), Rage (1972) which he also directed, Oklahoma Crude (1973), The Day of the Dolphin (1973), Bank Shot (1974), The Savage Is Loose (1974) which he produced and directed, The Hindenburg (1975), Islands in the Stream (1977), The Prince and the Pauper (1977), Movie (1978), Hardcore (1979), The Changeling (1980), The Formula (1980) co-starring with fellow Oscar rejecter Marlon Brando, Taps (1981), Stephen King’s Firestarter (1984), The Exorcist III (1990), Malice (1993), Angus (1995) and Gloria (1999). Scott also appeared on television from the 1950s, performing in such shows as the Du Pont Show of the Month production of A Tale of Two Cities, Kraft Theatre, Sunday Showcase, Ben Casey, the Breck Golden Showcase production of The Picture of Dorian Gray, Naked City, The Virginian, The Eleventh Hour, The Road West and Bob Hope Chrysler Theatre. He starred as Neil Brock in the critically acclaimed drama series East Side/West Side from

George C. Scott

Obituaries • 1999

198

1963 until 1964. He also starred as President Samuel Arthur Trench in the short-lived FOX comedy series Mr. President in 1987. Scott was also seen in television productions of The Crucible (1967), Jane Eyre (1971), Fear on Trial (1975), Beauty and the Beast (1976), Oliver Twist (1982), China Rose (1983), A Christmas Carol (1984), Mussolini: The Untold Story (1984), Choices (1986), The Last Days of Patton (1986), The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1986), Pals (1987), The Ryan White Story (1989), Descending Angel (1990), Finding the Way Home (1991), Curacao (1993), The Whipping Boy (194), In the Heat of the Night: A Matter of Justice (1994), Tyson (1995), Titanic (1996) as Captain Smith, Country Justice (1997), 12 Angry Men (1997), Rocky Marciano (1999) and Inherit the Wind (1999), and directed the Hollywood Television Theatre production of The Andersonville Trial in 1970. Scott also remained active on the stage throughout his career, rising from a sickbed in 1996 to star in the Broadway revival of Inherit the Wind. Scott, after two earlier marriages, wed actress Colleen Dewhurst in 1960. They were divorced in 1965, remarried in 1967, and again divorced in 1972. Scott subsequently married actress Trish Van Devere. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 24, 1999, A1; New York Times, Sept. 24, 1999, B10; People, Oct. 11, 1999, 112; Time, Oct. 4, 1999, 43; Times (of London), Sept. 14, 1999, 29a; TV Guide, Nov. 20, 1999, 8; Variety, Sept. 27, 1999, 161; Washington Post, Sept. 24, 1999, B5.

at NBC television in the early 1950s, becoming president of the network in 1959. He was instrumental in NBC’s decision to go with full-color programming in the mid–1960s. Scott became chief executive officer of NBC in 1965 and chairman of the board five years later. He retired in 1974. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 20, 1999, A20; Variety, Mar. 22, 1999, 52.

Seale, Douglas British actor Douglas Seale died in a Manhattan hospital on June 13, 1999. He was 85. Seale was born in London on October 28, 1913. He began his career on stage in a London production of The Drums Begin in 1934. Seale became a popular stage performer after service in the British army during World War II. He also was a leading theatrical producer and director, working with the Birmingham Repertory Theatre and the Stratford, Ontario, Shakespeare Festival. Seale was seen on Broadway in the 1983 production of Noises Off, which earned him a Tony nomination. He was also featured in over a dozen films

Scott, Ted Hawaiian actor and radio personality Theodore R. “Ted” Scott died in Redlands, California, on October 28, 1999. He was 85. Scott began working as a radio announcer in Honolulu in 1950. He also appeared as an actor in numerous films and television series filmed in Hawaii, including Hawaii Five-O. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 4, 1999, B7.

Scott, Walter Television executive Walter D. Scott died of complications from pneumonia in Carmel, California, on March 12, 1999. Scott began working

Douglas Seale

199 from the late 1970s including The Bermuda Triangle (1978), Amadeus (1984), Heaven Help Us (1985), Ernest Saves Christmas (1988), Ghostbusters II (1989), Mr. Destiny (1990), Almost an Angel (1990), For Love or Money (1993) and Palookaville (1996). His voice was also heard in the animated films The Rescuers Down Under (1990) and Disney’s Aladdin (1992) as the Sultan. Seale starred as John Clapper in the 1987 television series Rags to Riches and was featured in the telefilm Haunted by Her Past (1987). His other television credits include episodes of The Wizard, The Lucie Arnaz Show, Steven Spielberg’s Amazing Stories, Cheers and Hunter. His most recent performance was in a stage revival of John Osborne’s The Entertainer in 1996. Los Angeles Times, June 22, 1999, A24; New York Times, June 29, 1999, 39; Times (of London), June 23, 1999, 21a.

1999 • Obituaries

Shatner, Nerine Kidd Nerine Shatner, the wife of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk, William Shatner, accidentally drowned in the swimming pool at the couple’s home in Los Angeles on August 9, 1999. An autopsy report showed that she had been drinking heavily and taking sleeping pills at the time of her death. She was 40. Nerine Kidd, a fashion model, became Shatner’s third wife in a ceremony in November of 1997. They had met on the set of the television series Kung Fu: The Legend Continues, while Shatner was directed an episode Kidd was appearing in. The couple were also featured in the children’s show A Twist in the Tale, shot in New Zealand in 1998. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 11, 1999, B1, Oct. 1, 1999, B1; People, Aug. 23, 1999, 81.

Shaber, David Screenwriter David Shaber died in a Manhattan hospital of an aneurysm on November 4, 1999. He was 70. Shaber was born in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1929. He produced the 1962 Broadway drama A Gift of Time. Shaber subsequently wrote for films, scripting Such Good Friends (1971), Last Embrace (1979), The Warriors (1979), Those Lips, Those Eyes (1980), Nighthawks (1981), Rollover (1981), Flight of the Intruder (1990) and Lion’s Share (1999). Shaber was also a playwright whose works include Bunker Reveries (1987). New York Times, Nov. 20, 1999, C16.

Sharma, Kidar Indian filmmaker Kidar Sharma died in India on April 29, 1999. He was 89. Sharma was born in Narowal, Pakistan, on April 12, 1910. He began writing for films in the mid–1930s. He became a leading figure in the Indian film industry, directing such works as Chitralekha, Banwre Nain (Crazy Eyes), Jogan (The Female Mendicant) and Jaldeep (The Lighthouse), the latter which received an award at the 1956 Venice Film Festival. Sharma remade Chitralekha in 1964. He continued to produce movies until his retirement in the 1980s.

Nerine Kidd Shatner (with William Shatner).

Shaw, Robert Chorale director Robert Shaw died of a stroke at a New Haven, Connecticut, hospital on January 25, 1999. He was 82. Shaw was born in Red Bluff, California, on April 30, 1916. He founded the Robert Shaw Chorale in the late 1940s and served as the chorale’s conductor. The chorale toured and recorded throughout the 1950s and 1960s. Shaw also served as music director and conductor of the Atlanta Symphony from 1967 until his retirement in 1988. He received 14 Grammy awards during his career. Los Angles Times, Jan. 26, 1999, A16; Time, Feb. 8, 1999, 21; Times (of London), Jan. 27, 1999, 21a; Variety, Feb. 8, 1999, 91.

Obituaries • 1999

200 pital on April 5, 1999. He was 87. Shaw began working as a photojournalist with Colliers magazine in the 1940s. He also was a cover photographer for Life and Look in the 1950s. He was responsible for the famous photograph of Marilyn Monroe with her skirt billowing over a subway grate. Shaw began producing films in the early 1960s with Paris Blues (1961) starring Paul Newman and Sidney Poitier. He also produced several films for John Cassavetes including Husbands (1970), A Woman Under the Influence (1974), Opening Night (1977) and Gloria (1980). Los Angeles Times, Apr. 11, 1999, B5; New York Times, Apr. 9, 1999, A21; People, Apr. 26, 1999, 89.

Shepherd, Jean Robert Shaw

Shaw, Sam

Jean Shepherd, the radio storyteller who coscripted and narrated the popular 1983 comedy A Christmas Story, died on Sanibel Island, Florida, on October 16, 1999. He was 78. Shepherd was born in South Chicago, Illinois, on July 26, 1921.

Photographer and film producer Sam Shaw died of a stroke in a Westwood, New Jersey, hos-

Sam Shaw

Jean Shepherd

201 He was raised in Hammond, Indiana, where he began his radio career at the age of 16. After serving in World War II, he hosted radio programs in Cincinnati and Philadelphia, and briefly hosted the Philadelphia television program Rear Bumper. He subsequently moved to New York’s WOR, where he hosted a program for over 20 years. Shepherd also hosted the PBS syndicated programs Jean Shepherd’s America in 1971 and Shepherd’s Pie in 1978. His tales served as the basis for the 1983 sardonic holiday film A Christmas Story, with Shepherd serving as narrator of the story where his youthful alter ego, Ralphie Parker, is constantly warned against his desire for a Red Ryder BB gun for a Christmas present with the line “You’ll shoot your eye out!” He also wrote the television productions of The Phantom of the Open Hearth (1976), The Great American Fourth of July and Other Disasters (1982), The StarCrossed Romance of Josephine Cosnowski (1983) and Ollie Hopnoodle’s Haven of Bliss (1989). Los Angeles Times, Oct. 17, 1999, B8; New York Times, Oct. 17, 1999, 50; People, Nov. 1, 1999, 131; Variety, Oct. 25, 1999, 55.

Sherwood, Roberta Singer Roberta Sherwood died of cancer and heart failure in Los Angeles on July 5, 1999. She was 86. Ms. Sherwood began her career in vaudeville at an early age. During the 1930s and 1940s she primarily performed at the Miami, Florida, nightclub run by her and her husband, Don Lanning. She received accolades from such celebrities as columnist Walter Winchell, which led to appearances throughout the country and a

Roberta Sherwood

1999 • Obituaries

recording contract. She performed popular versions of such songs as “Up a Lazy River,” “You’re Nobody ’Til Somebody Loves You,” “How Deep Is the Ocean,” “These Foolish Things” and “Stormy Weather.” Ms. Sherwood was also seen on television on such series as The Ed Sullivan Show, The Jackie Gleason Show, The Garry Moore Show, The Steve Allen Show and Edward R. Murrow’s Person to Person. Ms. Sherwood also appeared as Mrs. Livingston in the 1963 film The Courtship of Eddie’s Father. Los Angeles Times, July 9, 1999, A20; New York Times, July 9, 1999, B9.

Shirley, Mercedes Character actress Mercedes Shirley died in Sherman Oaks, California, on January 29, 1999. She was 70. Shirley was featured in several Broadway productions including Desperate Hours, The Father and Heartbreak House. She appeared on television in the early 1960s on episodes of Playhouse 90, Have Gun, Will Travel, Twilight Zone, Gunsmoke, Boris Karloff ’s Thriller, Father Knows Best, Cain’s Hundred, Target: The Corruptors, Bonanza, The Mod Squad, The Invaders and Trapper John, M.D. She was also a recurring character in the 1964 sit-com The Cara Williams Show. Shirley was featured in a small role in the 1990

Mercedes Shirley

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202

film Defenseless. She was directing a stage production of Madame Butterfly in Los Angeles at the time of her death. Variety, Feb. 15, 1999, 74.

Shugrue, Robert F. Film and television editor Robert F. Shugrue died of heart failure in Los Angeles on November 27, 1999. He was 62. Shugrue began his career in television in the mid–1950s, working on such series as Leave It to Beaver, The Millionaire and Alfred Hitchcock Presents. Shugrue also edited such tele-films as The Doomsday Flight (1966), Sullivan’s Empire (1967), Something for a Lonely Man (1968), The Neon Ceiling (1970), D.A.: Conspiracy to Kill (1970), The Psychiatrist: God Bless the Children (1970), Owen Marshall, Counsellor at Law (1971), The Birdmen (1971), A Howling in the Woods (1971), The Screaming Woman (1972), The Adventures of Nick Carter (1972), The Longest Night (1972), Indict and Convict (1973), I Love a Mystery (1973), Partners in Crime (1973), The California Kid (1974), The Tribe (1974), The Invisible Man (1975), Guilty or Innocent: The Sam Sheppard Murder Case (1975), Gemini Man (1976), Stonestreet: Who Killed the Centerfold Model? (1977), The Dark Secret of Harvest Home (1978), The Bastard (1978), the 1979 mini-series Centennial, A Woman Called Golda (1982) with earned him an Emmy Award, The Thornbirds (1983), Poison Ivy (1985), Deadly Intentions (1985), Addicted to His Love (1988), Stephen King’s It (1990), And the Sea Will Tell (1991), A Mother’s Justice (1991), Condition: Critical (1992), Without a Kiss Goodbye (1993), Born Too Soon (1993), French Silk (1994), Never Say Never: The Deidre Hall Story (1995) and Born Free: A New Adventure (1996). Shugrue also edited a handful of films including Two Mules for Sister Sara (1969), Death of a Gunfighter (1969), Raise the Titanic! (1980), Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984), 52 Pick-Up (1986), Dead Bang (1989), The Fourth War (1990) and Street Fighter (1994). Los Angeles Times, Dec. 4, 1999, A23; Variety, Dec. 13, 1999, 121.

Richard B. Shull

Shull, Richard B. Comic character actor Richard B. Shull died of a heart attack in New York City on October 13, 1999. He was 70. Shull was born in Evanston, Illinois, on February 24, 1929. He was a popular stage performer, appearing on Broadway in productions of Minnie’s Boys, Goodtime Charlie and Victor/Victoria. He was also featured in numerous films including Made for Each Other (1971), Hail (1971), B.S. I Love You (1971), The Anderson Tapes (1971), Klute (1971), Slither (1972), Ssssssss! (1973), Cockfighter (1974), Hearts of the West (1975), The Fortune (1975), The Big Bus (1976), The Pack (1977), Dreamer (1979), Heartbeeps (1981), Lovesick (1983), Spring Break (1983), Splash (1984), Unfaithfully Yours (1984), Garbo Talks (1984), Seize the Day (1986), Tune in Tomorrow (1990), House Sitter (1992), Trapped in Paradise (1994), Cafe Society (1995) and Howard Stern’s Private Parts (1997). Shull starred as Howard Tolbrook in Diana Rigg’s television comedy series Diana in 1973 and was Detective Alexander Holmes, who was partnered with an android, in the comedy series Holmes and Yoyo in 1976. He was Jack Towne in the Lou Grant series in 1977 and had the recurring role of Lt. Gillis in Hart to Hart from 1979 until 1984. He was also featured in the tele-films Ziegfeld: The Man and His Women (1978), Studs Lonigan (1979), Will There Really Be a Morning? (1982) and Spot Marks the

203 X (1986). His other television credits include episodes of The Rockford Files, Young Maverick, Blacke’s Magic, Wonderworks and Tales from the Darkside. Shull was performing in the Broadway production of Epic Proportions at the time of his death. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 17, 1999, B8; New York Times, Oct. 15, 1999, B13; People, Nov. 1, 1999, 131; Variety, Oct. 18, 1999, 55.

Sidney, Sylvia Actress Sylvia Sidney died of throat cancer at a New York City hospital on July 1, 1999. She was 88. Sidney was born Sophia Kosow in the Bronx, New York, on August 8, 1910. She began her career on stage at the age of 15 and made her Broadway debut the following year in a production of The Squall. Her performance caused Hollywood to take notice and she began her film career in 1929’s Thru Different Eyes. A popular star over the next several decades, Ms. Sidney was featured in Five Minutes from the Station (1930), Ladies of the Big House (1931), Confessions of a CoEd (1931), An American Tragedy (1931), City Streets (1931), Street Scene (1931), Merrily We Go to Hell

Sylvia Sidney

1999 • Obituaries

(1932), Madame Butterfly (1932), The Miracle Man (1932), Make Me a Star (1932), Pick-Up (1933), Jennie Gerhardt (1933), Thirty Day Princess (1934), Good Dame (1934), Mary Burns, Fugitive (1935), Accent on Youth (1935), Behold My Wife (1935), Alfred Hitchcock’s Sabotage (1936), The Trail of the Lonesome Pine (1936), Fury (1936), You Only Live Once (1937), Dead End (1937) with Humphrey Bogart, You and Me (1938), One Third of a Nation (1939) and The Wagons Roll at Night (1941). During the 1940s and 1950s she appeared mainly on stage and television, but made a handful of films including Blood on the Sun (1945), The Searching Wind (1946), Mr. Ace (1946), Love from a Stranger (1947), Les Miserables (1952), Violent Saturday (1955), Man on the Ledge (1955) and Behind the High Wall (1956). Her television credits in the 1950s and early 1960s include episodes of Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, Tales of Tomorrow, Lux Video Theatre, Broadway Television Theatre, Ford Theatre, Philco Playhouse, Kraft Theatre, Climax, Ford Theatre, Star Stage, Playwrights ’56, 20th Century–Fox Hour, Playhouse 90, G.E. Theatre, The June Allyson Show, Naked City, Route 66, The Defenders, The Eleventh Hour, The Nurses and My Three Sons. She returned to films as a popular character actress in the 1970s, appearing in Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams (1973), God Told Me To (aka Demon) (1977), I Never Promised You a Rose Garden (1977), Damien: Omen II (1978), Copkiller (1983), Hammett (1983), Beetlejuice (1988), Used People (1992) and Tim Burton’s Mars Attacks! (1996). She also appeared in numerous telefilms including Do Not Fold, Spindle, or Mutilate (1971), Winner Take All (1975), The Secret Night Caller (1975), Death at Love House (1976), Snowbeast (1977), Raid on Entebbe (1977), Siege (1978), The Gossip Columnist (1979), F.D.R.: The Last Year (1980), The Shadow Box (1980), A Small Killing (1981), Come Along with Me (1981), Having It All (1982), The Brass Ring (1983), Finnegan Begin Again (1985), An Early Frost (1985) which earned her an Emmy nomination, The Witching of Ben Wagner (1987), Pals (1987) and Andre’s Mother (1990). She was featured in the daytime soap opera Ryan’s Hope as Sister Mary Joel in 1975 and was Mama Carlson on the pilot episode of WKRP in Cincinnati sitcom in 1978. She also appeared regularly as Binnie Byrd Baylor in the short-lived 1986 drama series Morningstar/Eveningstar. More recently, Ms. Sidney appeared as

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Clia in the 1998 revival of the Fantasy Island television series. She was married three times — to publisher Bennet Cerf, actor Luther Adler and publicist Carlton Alsop. All of her marriages ended in divorce. Los Angeles Times, July 2, 1999, A31; New York Times, July 2, 1999, C16; People, July 19, 1999, 79; Time, July 12, 1999, 21; Times (of London), July 3, 1999, 24a; Variety, July 12, 1999, 56; Washington Post, July 3, 1999, B6.

Silverstein, Shel Cartoonist and writer Shel Silverstein was found dead of a heart attack at his Key West, Florida, home on May 10, 1999. He was 66. Silverstein was born in Chicago, Illinois, on November 23, 1932. He worked as a cartoonist for the Stars and Stripes while serving in the military

in the early 1950s. He subsequently joined Playboy in 1956 where his work produced the popular collections Playboy’s Teevee Jeebies (1963) and More Playboy’s Teevee Jeebies: Do-It-Yourself Dialogue for the Late Late Show (1965). He also wrote the book Now Here’s My Plan: A Book of Futilities (1960) and the children’s book Uncle Shelby’s Story of Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back (1963). He received acclaim for his second children’s book The Giving Tree in 1964. Silverstein also authored two collections of children’s poetry —Where the Sidewalk Ends: The Poems & Drawings of Shel Silverstein (1974) and A Light in the Attic (1981). He was also a songwriter, whose work included Johnny Cash’s hit “ Boy Named Sue,” “Loretta Lynn’s “One’s on the Way” and “The Unicorn.” He appeared as a folk singer in Dustin Hoffman’s 1971 film Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? He composed music for that film and several others including Ned Kelly (1970), Free to Be … You & Me (1974), Thieves (1977), Coal Miner’s Daughter (1980) and Postcards from the Edge (1990). Silverstein won a Grammy Award for the 1984 album of Where the Sidewalk Ends. He was also the author of several plays including The Lady or the Tiger Show, Remember Crazy Zelda?, Gorilla, One Tennis Shoe and The Happy Hour. He also cowrote David Mamet’s 1988 film Things Change. His most recent work was the 1996 children’s book Falling Up: Poems and Drawings. Los Angeles Times, May 11, 1999, A20; New York Times, May 11, 1999, B10; People, May 24, 1999, 64; Time, May 24, 1999, 35; Times (of London), May 12, 1999, 21a; Variety, May 17, 1999, 76; Washington Post, May 11, 1999, B5.

Sim, Naomi

Shel Silverstein

Naomi Sim, actress and wife of Alastair Sim, died on August 2, 1999. She was 85. Ms. Sim was born on November 30, 1913. She met Alastair Sim during a theatrical production of The Land of Heart’s Desire when she was twelve years old. Though he was over twice her age, they became close friends and married when she turned 18. She largely abandoned her own acting career, though she did appear with her husband in the 1935 film Wedding Group. The couple remained together until Alastair Sim’s death in 1976. Ms. Sim au-

205

Naomi Sim

thored her autobiography, Dance and Skylark: Fifty Years with Alastair Sim, in 1987. Times (of London), Sept. 17, 1999, 27a.

1999 • Obituaries

tions from a brain tumor on February 20, 1999. He was 53. Siskel was born in Chicago on January 26, 1946. He began working as a journalist for the Chicago Tribune in January of 1969. Later in the year, at the age of 23, Siskel became the newspaper’s film critic. Roger Ebert was critic for the Chicago Sun Times, and a personal and professional rivalry developed between the two men. In 1975 the duo began appearing together on Chicago public television’s Sneak Previews. The show began airing nationally the following year, and was soon achieving the highest ratings of any PBS program. With their “thumbs up” and “thumbs down” review of films, they remained with PBS until 1982, when they went independent on the nationally syndicated Siskel & Ebert At the Movies. They were often a guest on The Tonight Show and appeared as themselves in an episode of The Larry Sanders Show in 1993. They were also heard in an episode of The Critic in 1995. Siskel underwent surgery for a brain tumor in May of 1998, but soon returned to the show. He had announced that he was taking a leave of absence to continue his recuperation several weeks before his death. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 21, 1999, B5; New York Times, Feb. 21, 1999, 46; People, Mar. 8, 1999, 64; Time, Mar. 1,1999, 25; Variety, Mar. 1, 1999, 95; Washington Post, Feb. 21, 1999, C8.

Sinkys, Albert Stage actor and director Albert Sinkys died of cancer at a New York hospital on July 25, 1999. He was 59. Sinkys received acclaim for his performance as Captain Queeg at New York’s American Jewish Theater production of The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial and in the lead role in From the Memoirs of Pontius Pilate in 1981. Sinkys was also featured in the films Ms. 45 (1981) and Woody Allen’s Zelig (1983), and appeared in the television soap opera All My Children. Los Angeles Times, July 30, 1999, A28.

Siskel, Gene Film critic Gene Siskel, who teamed with fellow Chicago critic Roger Ebert since the mid– 1970s, died in a Chicago hospital of complica-

Gene Siskel (left, with Roger Ebert).

Skeen, Charlie Stuntman William Charles Skeen died of a heart attack on the set of Chuck Norris’ Walker, Texas Ranger series in Cedar Hill State Park in Dallas on January 12, 1999. He was 49. His death occurred when the vehicle he was riding hit the ground during a car chase scene involving a 140foot launch from a ramp. He had a history of

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206

heart problems and had undergone surgery several years earlier. Skeen had worked as a stuntman since the 1970s on such films as Lone Wolf McQuade with Norris, The Patriot (1986), Avenging Force (1986), The Hidden (1987), Back to the Beach (1987), Feds (1988), The Night Before (1988), Bulletproof (1988), Shootfighter: To the Death (1992), Dead Center (1994), the 1996 telefilm Raven Hawk and Fire Down Below (1997). He had worked for the Walker, Texas Ranger series for the past four years.

Smith, Bernard Film producer and book editor Bernard Smith died in a Beverly Hills hospital on December 21, 1999. He was 92. Smith worked as an editor at the Alfred A. Knopf publishing company from 1928. began working in Hollywood as a story editor for producer Samuel Goldwyn in 1947. Smith produced the Academy Award nominated film Elmer Gantry in 1960. He also produced 1962’s How the West Was Won. The following year he formed a production company with director John Ford and produced Ford’s final films, Cheyenne Autumn (1964) and Seven Women (1966). Smith also produced the 1969 historical drama Alfred the Great. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 2, 2000, B6.

Norwood Smith

vision soap operas and series before his retirement in the early 1990s. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 27, 1999, B5.

Snow, Hank Country music signer Hank Snow died at his home, the Rainbow Ranch, in Madison,

Smith, R. Norwood Actor and singer R. Norwood Smith died in a Camarillo, California, hospital of non–Hodgkins lymphoma on August 24, 1999. He was 84. Smith was born on April 18, 1915, in San Francisco. He began his career in radio after serving in the Army during World War II. Smith starred on his own program, Norwood Smith Sings, in 1946. He subsequently went to New York, where he became a popular leading man in Broadway musicals. He played Daddy Warbucks in the hit Broadway musical Annie for over three years. Smith was also featured in several films including Huckleberry Finn (1974) and the tele-film A Family Upside Down in 1978. Smith continued to perform on Broadway and in touring productions. He returned to California in the early 1980s, where he made several appearances on tele-

Hank Snow

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Tennessee, on December 20, 1999. He was 85. Snow was born Clarence Eugene Snow in Brooklyn, Nova Scotia, Canada, on May 9, 1914. He endured a difficult childhood. He began his show business career playing songs on a Nova Scotia radio station in 1936. He modeled his appearance and style on Western movies, wearing cowboy boots and outfits for his performances. He became popular in the United States in 1949 when country musician Ernest Tubb helped him become part of the Grand Ole Opry. Snow had numerous hits songs including “I’ve Been Everywhere,” “A Fool Such As I,” “Hello Love,” “Let Me Go Lover” and “I Don’t Hurt Anymore.” His biggest hit was “I’m Movin’ On,” which was recorded by numerous other artists including Elvis Presley, Ray Charles and Emmylou Harris. Snow was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1979. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 21, 1999, A46; People, Jan. 1, 2000, 105; Times (of London), Dec. 23, 1999, 17a; Variety, Jan. 3, 2000, 93.

Soldati, Mario Italian film director and screenwriter Mario Soldati died in Rome on June 18, 1999. He was 92. Soldati was born in Turin, Italy, on November 16, 1906. He began directing films in Italy in the early 1930s, helming over 30 features through 1960. His film credits include La Signora di Montecarlo (1938), Betrayal (1938), Tutto per la Donna (1939), Due Milioni per un Sorriso (1939), Dora Nelson (1939), Old-Fashioned World (1941), His Young Wife (1945), Elena (1947), Flight Into France (1948), Her Favorite Husband (1949), O.K. Nerone (1951), Of Love and Bandits (1951), Il Sogno di Zorro (1952), The Wayward Wife (1953), The River Girl (1955), The Virtuous Bigamist (1956) and Chi legge? (1960). Soldati was also a popular screenwriter and novelist and also helmed numerous Italian television productions from the early 1950s. Los Angeles Times, June 22, 1999, A24; New York Times, June 20, 1999, 39; Times (of London), June 22, 1999, 23a; Variety, June 28, 1999, 83.

Mario Soldati

Spence, Skip Rock musician Skip Spence died of lung cancer in Santa Cruz, California, on April 16, 1999. He was 52. Spence was born in Ontario, Canada, on April 18, 1946. A drummer, he was an original member of the rock band Jefferson Airplane in the 1960s. He left the group after a year to form Moby Grape, playing guitar with the band. Spence recorded a solo album, Oar, in 1968. He left Moby Grape the following year because of problems with drugs and mental illness. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 18, 1999, B5; New York Times, Apr. 18, 1999, 47; Times (of London), Apr. 20, 1999, 27a.

Springfield, Dusty British pop and soul singer Dusty Springfield died of breast cancer at her home in Henley-

Obituaries • 1999

208

Dusty Springfield

Skip Spence (top, with Moby Grape).

on-Thames, England, on March 2, 1999. She was 59. Ms. Springfield was born Mary Isabel Catherine Bernadette O’Brien in London on April 16, 1939. She spent several years singing with her brother in the folk group the Springfields before making her solo debut with “I Only Want to be with You” in 1963. Her sultry voice led to a string of hits in the 1960s including “Stay Awhile,” “Losing You,” “You Don’t Have to Say You Love,” “I Close My Eyes and Count to Ten,” “Some of Your Lovin’” and “Look of Love,” which was heard on the soundtrack of the 1967 James Bond spoof Casino Royale. She also appeared often on the British pop music television show Ready, Steady, Go. Her 1969 album Dusty in Memphis produced one of her last hit songs, “Son of a Preacher Man.” Her career had a downward spiral during the 1970s and 1980s before she resurfaced with her collaboration with the Pet Shop Boys in 1987. They produced the hit record “What Have I Done to Deserve This?” and Springfield sang the tune “Nothing Has Been Proved” for the Scandal soundtrack. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 4, 1999, A21; New York Times, Mar. 4, 1999, B9; People, Mar. 29, 1999, 114; Time, Mar. 15, 1999, 29; Times (of London), Mar. 4, 1999, 25a; Variety, Mar. 8, 1999, 75.

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Baghdad and worked on the television mini-series adapted from Ray Bradbury’s The Martian Chronicles in 1980. He also worked on the pilot film for the Babylon 5 television series in 1993. Los Angeles Times, July 5, 1999, A16; New York Times, July 4, 1999, 24; People, July 19, 1999, 79; Times (of London), June 26, 1999, 22d.

Steinberg, Saul John Stears

Stears, John Oscar-winning special effects designer John Stears died in a Los Angeles hospital of a stroke on April 28, 1999. He was 64. Stears was born in Uxbridge, Hillingdon, Middlesex, England, on August 25, 1934. Stears began working in films in the mid–1950s, designing models for Reach for the Sky in 1956. He went on to work with the Rank Organization doing miniatures for such films as The One That Got Away (1957) and A Night to Remember (1958). Stears began working with the James Bond series in 1962 with the first film adaptation Dr. No. He served as special effects supervisor for the subsequent films From Russia with Love (1963), Goldfinger (1964) designing Bond’s gadget-laden Aston Martin DB5, Thunderball (1965) which earner him an Academy Award, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969) and The Man with the Golden Gun (1974). He also designed effects for the 1964 television series Court Martial and the films Call Me Bwana (1963), Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968) designing the flying car, Sitting Target (1972), The Pied Piper (1972), Ghost in the Noonday Sun (1973), That Lucky Touch (1975) and Sky Riders (1976). Stears was awarded a second Oscar for his work on George Lucas’ Star Wars in 1977. Stears designed the Death Star and Luke Skywalker’s small robotic friend, R2-D2. He also worked with John Dykstra on the film’s space battle sequences. Stears also designed effects for the films The Awakening (1980), Escape 2000 (1981), Outland (1981), Sahara (1983), The Bounty (1984), F/X (1986), Haunted Honeymoon (1986), Navy SEALS (1990) and 1998’s The Mask of Zorro. He designed a flying carpet for the 1978 tele-film The Thief of

Cartoonist Saul Steinberg died of pancreatic cancer at his New York City home on May 12, 1999. He was 84. Steinberg was born in Bucharest, Romania, on June 15, 1914. He studied art in Italy and came to New York during World War II. During the war he drew propaganda cartoons for the OSS. Steinberg was best known for his cover art and cartoons for the New Yorker magazine, which first used his work in 1941. He did over 80 covers for the magazine and produced several books including All in Line (1945), The Art of Living (1949), The Labyrinth (1960) and The Inspector (1973). Los Angeles Times, May 14, 1999, A26; New York Times, May 13, 1999, A1; People, May 31, 1999, 130; Time, May 24, 1999, 82.

Saul Steinberg

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Stewart, Donald

Stoler, Shirley

Screenwriter Donald Stewart died of cancer in Los Angeles on April 28, 1999. He was 69. Stewart was best known for scripting three films based on novels by Tom Clancy —The Hunt for Red October (1990), Patriot Games (1992) and Clear and Present Danger (1994). He also won an Academy Award for scripting the 1982 political thriller Missing. Stewart’s earlier works include the cult classics Jackson County Jail (1976) and Deathsport (1978). He also wrote the 1997 telefilm Dead Silence. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 30, 1999, A32; New York Times, May 9, 1999, 39; Variety, May 10, 1999, 150.

Actor Larry D. Stewart died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on July 8, 1999. He was 62. Stewart was an attorney and print model before he began his acting career, appearing often on stage in small theatrical productions. Stewart also had leading roles in several television soap operas, including The Young and the Restless and General Hospital, and was also seen in episodes of such series as The A-Team and Moonlighting. Los Angeles Times, July 14, 1999, A15.

Character actress Shirley Stoler died of heart failure at a New York City hospital on February 17, 1999. She was 69. Ms. Stoler was born in Brooklyn on March 30, 1929. The large, imposing actress was best known for her villainous roles, playing the Nazi commandant in Lina Wertmueller’s 1976 feature Seven Beauties. Her other film roles include The Honeymoon Killers (1969), Klute (1971), The Deer Hunter (1978), The Hamster of Happiness (1979), Seed of Innocence (1980), The Attic (1980), Below the Belt (1980), Second-Hand Heart (1981), Splitz (1984), Desperately Seeking Susan (1985), Three O’Clock High (1987), Sticky Fingers (1988), Shakedown (1988), Frankenhooker (1990), Miami Blues (1990), Me and Veronica (1992), Mac (1992) and Malcolm X (1992). Ms. Stoler was featured as Roberta “Tiny” Coleman on the One Live to Live television soap opera from 1986 to 1987 and was Mrs. Steve on the children’s show Pee-wee’s Playhouse with Peewee Herman in 1986. She also appeared in the tele-films The Displaced Person (1976) and Brass (1985), and in episodes of such series as Charlie’s Angels, Bring ’Em Back Alive, Skag, The Powers of Matthew Star and Law & Order. She was rumored to have played the title creature in the 1958 lowbudget science fiction film The Astounding She Monster under the name Shirley Kilpatrick.

Larry D. Stewart

Shirley Stoler

Stewart, Larry D.

211 New York Times, Feb. 28, 1999, A35; People, Mar. 8, 1999, 199; Variety, Mar. 1, 1999, 95.

Stone, Jesse

1999 • Obituaries

de Paques (1934), Rubens (1949) and Le Banquet des Fraudeurs (1952). Los Angeles Times, Sept. 21, 1999, A20.

Strack, Gunter

Songwriter Jesse Stone died at an Altamonte Springs, Florida, hospital on April 1, 1999. He was 97. Stone was born in Atchison, Kansas, on November 16, 1901. He performed in his family’s minstrel show as a young man. During the 1920s Stone, as pianist and arranger, led a jazz group. He went to New York in the mid–1930s and wrote the Benny Goodman hit “Idaho” in 1942. During the 1950s Stone wrote such early rock ’n’ roll hits as “Shake, Rattle and Roll,” “Money Honey,” “It Should’ve Been Me” and “Your Cash Ain’t Nothin’ but Trash.” Los Angeles Times, Apr. 3, 1999, A16; New York Times, Apr. 4, 1999, 29; People, Apr. 26, 1999, 89; Times (of London), Apr. 5, 1999, 23a; Variety, Apr. 19, 1999, 57; Washington Post, Apr. 3, 1999, B4.

German actor Gunter Strack died of heart failure in his hometown of Munchsteinach, Germany, on January 18, 1999. He was 69. Strack had been in poor health since suffering a stroke in 1996. He was born in Darmstadt, Germany, on June 4, 1929. He was a leading performer on the German stage since the late 1940s. He was best known to U.S. audiences for his role in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1966 thriller Torn Curtain with Paul Newman and Julie Andrews. Strack was also seen in the films Miracle of Malachias (1961), The Odessa File (1974), The Glass Cell (1978) and The Swing (1983). He was also a familiar face on German television, starring in such series as Ein Fall fur Zwei, Diese Drombuschs, Mit Leib und Seele and Der Konig.

Stone, Walter

Strasberg, Susan

Comedy writer Walter Stone died in Miami on October 20, 1999. He was 79. Stone was born in Dunellen, New Jersey, in 1920. He began his career in radio, writing for Robert Q. Lewis’ program. He subsequently worked on ABC’s Stop the Music before joining Jackie Gleason as a gag writer. Stone co-wrote Gleason’s popular 1950s television series The Honeymooners. He also scripted several specials for Gleason before retiring in the 1960. New York Times, Oct. 25, 1999, A29; Variety, Nov. 15, 1999, 102.

Actress Susan Strasberg, the daughter of legendary acting teacher Lee Strasberg, died of cancer in New York on January 21, 1999. She was 60. Ms. Strasberg was born in New York on May 22, 1938. She began her career on stage in the early 1950s and appeared on television as Emily Marriott, the daughter of Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy, in the summer comedy series The Marriage. Strasberg made her Broadway debut as Anne Frank in 1955. The following year she starred in the film Picnic. Her other film credits include The Cobweb (1955), Stage Struck (1958), the 1961 British thriller Scream of Fear, The Shortest Day (1962), Disorder (1962), Hemingway’s Adventures of a Young Man (1962), The High Bright Sun (1965), Roger Corman’s The Trip (1967), Psych-Out (1968), The Name of the Game Is Kill (1968), Chubasco (1968), The Brotherhood (1968), Jailbird (1969), The Sisters (1969), So Evil, My Sister (1972), The Other Side of the Wind (1972), The Legend of Hillbilly John (1973), …And Millions Will Die! (1973), Rollercoaster (1977), The Manitou (1978), In Praise of Older Women (1978), Sweet Sixteen (1981) and Bloody Birthday (1981).

Storck, Henri Belgian documentary film director Henri Storck died at his home in Brussels on September 16, 1999. He was 92. Storck was born in Oostende, Belgium, on September 5, 1907. He was best known for his 1933 documentary about striking Belgian coal miners, Misere au Borinage. Storck was the recipient of numerous awards during his long career. His other works include L’Ile

Obituaries • 1999

212 Schweitzer (1990), The Returning (1990) and the 1992 Italian production of The Cherry Orchard. She and her family were close to actress Marilyn Monroe, and Strasberg authored the memoir, Marilyn and Me, Sisters, Rivals and Friends. She also appeared in several documentaries about the legendary actress including Remembering Marilyn (1987), Marilyn Monroe: Beyond The Legend (1987) and Marilyn Monroe: Life After Death (1994). Los Angeles Times, Jan. 23, 1999, A21; New York Times, Jan. 23, 1999, A17; People, Feb. 8, 1999, 99; Time, Feb. 1, 1999, 21; Times (of London), Jan. 27, 1999, 21a; Variety, Feb. 1, 1999, 74; Washington Post, Jan. 23, 1999, B8.

Strauss, Lee Susan Strasberg

Ms. Strasberg was also a frequent performer on television, starring in the 1967 tele-film Cosa Nostra, Arch Enemy of the F.B.I. and the 1969 pilot film for Marcus Welby, M.D. She starred as Patty Toma in the 1973 drama series Toma with Tony Musante. She was also featured in the tele-films Hauser’s Memory (1970), Mr. and Mrs. Bo Jo Jones (1971), the 1973 version of Frankenstein, SST: Death Flight (1977), The Immigrants (1978), Beggarman, Thief (1979) and Rona Jaffe’s Mazes and Monsters (1982). Other television credits include episodes of Goodyear TV Playhouse, Kraft Television Theatre, G.E. Theatre, Omnibus, Hallmark Hall of Fame, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, Our American Playhouse, Play of the Week, Dr. Kildare, Bob Hope Chrysler Theatre, The Legend of Jesse James, The Breaking Point, Burke’s Law, The Rogues, Bonanza, Run for Your Life, The Virginian, The Invaders, The F.B.I., The Big Valley, The Name of the Game, McCloud, The Men from Shiloh, Alias Smith and Jones, The Young Lawyers, The Sixth Sense, Mannix, Night Gallery, The Evil Touch, The Streets of San Francisco, The Rockford Files, Roald Dahl’s Tales of the Unexpected, McMillan and Wife, Medical Story, Harry O, Lancer, Medical Center, Cagney and Lacey, Tales from the Darkside and Remington Steele. Strasberg’s later film credits include The Delta Force (1986), The Runnin’ Kind (1989), Prime Suspect (1989),

Actress Lee Strauss died of breast cancer at her Beverly Hills home on February 14, 1999. She was 46. Ms. Strauss appeared on stage and television and had small roles in several films including The World According to Garp (1982) and Independence Day (1996).

Strickland, David Actor David Strickland was found dead in a Las Vegas motel room on March 22, 1999. Strickland’s body was found hanging from a bed sheet tied to a ceiling beam. The death is considered a likely suicide. He was 28. Strickland was born in Glen Cove, Long Island, New York, on October 14, 1969. He was best known for his role as Todd, the music critic, on Brooke Shield’s television sit-com Suddenly Susan for the past three seasons. He also appeared on television in episodes of Dave’s World, Roseanne, Sister, Sister and Mad About You. He appeared in several films including Postcards from America (1994), Object of Obsession (1995), Delivered (1998) and 1999’s Forces of Nature starring Sandra Bullock. Strickland had been arrested in October of 1998 for cocaine possession and had been ordered into a rehabilitation program after pleading no contest. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 23, 1999, B8; New York Times, Mar. 24, 1999, B9; People, May 5, 1999, 181; Time, Apr. 5, 1999, 25; Variety, Mar. 29, 1999, 84.

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Sutch, Screaming Lord David Edward Sutch, the unorthodox British musician and political figure known as Screaming Lord Sutch, died of an apparent suicide in England on June 16, 1999. Sutch was born in London on November 10, 1940. He began his career as a singer and musician in the early 1960s, wearing odd costumes and horrific makeup and screaming at his audiences. He recorded several records during that period, but produced no major hits. Sutch became involved in politics in 1963, running for parliament on the National Teenage party banner. Sutch made 39 unsuccessful campaigns for the parliament over the next three decades. He formed the Official Monster Raving Loony party in the 1970s. His campaigns were as much performance art as they were political

David Strickland (with Ronny Cox from Forces of Nature).

Sugawara, Kenji Japanese actor Kenji Sugawara died of pneumonia in a Tokyo hospital on December 24, 1999. He was 73. He was born Shigemasa Komatsubara in 1926. He made his film debut in the early 1950s, appearing in the features Golden Demon (1953) and The Precipice (1958). He was later known for his roles on Japanese television in such series as The Seven Police Officers.

Sullivan, Vin Vin Sullivan died of cancer in the Bronx, New York, on February 3, 1999. He was 87. Sullivan worked at DC Comics in the late 1930s, where he was instrumental in the creation of Action Comics, where Superman was first seen. Sullivan subsequently worked at Columbia Comics on the series Big Shot and Skyman before going to ME Comics in 1947. He published such Western oriented comics as Tim Holt, Durango Kid, Bobby Benson’s B-Bar-B Riders, Ghost Rider, Straight Arrow and Best of the West. Screaming Lord Sutch

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214

statements. He wrote his autobiography, Life As Sutch, in 1991. Los Angeles Times, June 19, 1999, A22; New York Times, June 18, 1999, A33; Time, June 28, 1999, 21; Times (of London), June 19, 1999, 24c.

Swalve, Darwin Character actor Darwin Swalve died of a heart attack in Riverside, California, on May 5, 1999. He was 53. The 6-foot-9, 300+ pound actor was best known for his roles as hulking villains in films and television from the early 1980s. His film credits include City Heat (1984), The Zoo Gang (1985), Heartbreak Ridge (1986), Summer School (1987), Open House (1987), In the Mood (1987), Dead Man Walking (1987), Arizona Heat (1988), Jungle Assault (1989), Police Academy 6: City Under Siege (1989), Dead-Bang (1989), Barton Fink (1991), Viper (1994), It Runs in the Family (1994) and Tall Tale: The Unbelievable Adventures of Pecos Bill (1995). Swalve also appeared on television in an episode of The A-Team and had recently completed filming an episode of Nickelodeon’s The Journey of Allen Strange.

Birdy Sweeney

Sweeney, Birdy

Darwin Swalve

Irish actor Birdy Sweeney died of a heart attack in a Dublin, Ireland, hospital on May 11, 1999. He was 67. Sweeney was born in Dungannon, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland, on June 14, 1931. He began his career as a comedian at village festivals and on the radio. He was best known for his role as Eamon Byrne in the BBC television series Ballykissangel from 1996 to 1999. Sweeney also appeared in a handful of films including Neil Jordan’s The Crying Game (1992), Moll Flanders (1996), Downtime (1997), Space Truckers (1997) and The Butcher Boy (1997). His other television credits include productions of The Snapper (1993), The Old Curiosity Shop (1994), Scarlett (1994), Kidnapped (1995) and The Tale of Sweeney Todd (1998). He was cast in a new BBC sitcom, Give My Head Peace, at the time of his death. Times (of London), May 13, 1999, 29a.

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Sweet, Darrell Scottish rock drummer Darrell Sweet died of a heart attack after collapsing at an amphitheater in New Albany, Indiana, on April 30, 1999. He was 51. Sweet as a founding member of the rock group Nazareth in 1968. The group was recorded numerous albums including Nazareth (1971), Exercises (1972), Razamanaz (1973), Rampant (1974), Hair of the Dog (1975) and Expect No Mercy (1977). They were best known in the United States for their recording of the hit song “Love Hurts” in the mid–1970s. Nazareth continued to record and perform through the 1990s, and Sweet was heard on the albums No Mean City (1978), Malice in Wonderland (1980), ’snaz (1981), Fool Circle (1981), 2XS (1982), Sound Elixir (1983), Catch (1984), No Jive (1992) and Move Me (1995). Their most recent album, Boogaloo, was released earlier in 1999. Variety, May 10, 1999, 150.

1999 • Obituaries

Benz,” “Lifestyles of the Rich and Shameless,” “Renee,” “Music Makes Me High” and “Get Down.” A second album, Love Peace & Nappiness, was released in 1997. Time, Apr. 12, 1999, 35.

Tamerlis, Zoe Actress Zoe Tamerlis died of heart failure in Paris, Francis, on April 16, 1999. She was 37. Tamerlis was born on February 9, 1962. She began her career in films starring in Abel Ferrara’s Ms. 45 in 1981. She also appeared in Ferrara’s Special Effects in 1984. Tamerlis’ other film credits include Heavy Petting (1988), Exquisite Corpses (1989) and 1992’s Bad Lieutenant, which she also scripted. She was also seen in an episode of television’s Miami Vice in 1985.

TAH, Freaky Freaky TAH, a member of the hip-hop band Lost Boyz, was shot to death in New York City on March 28, 1999, by a masked gunman as he left a party. TAH, who was born Raymond Rogers in South Jamaica, Queens, New York, recorded with the band on the 1996 album Legal Drug Money. Lost Boyz, whose members also include Mr. Cheeks, Pretty Lou and Spigg Nice, had the hit singles “Jeeps, Lex Coups, Bimaz and

Zoe Tamerlis

Tani, Yoko

Freaky TAH

Japanese leading lady Yoko Tani died of cancer in Paris in July of 1999. She was 67. Tani was born in Paris on August 2, 1932. Originally trained as a dancer, she starred in numerous European features from the mid–1950s. Her film credits include Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves (1954), The Ostrich Has Two Eggs (1957), The Wind Cannot Read (1958), Fire in the Flesh (1958), The Quiet American (1958), First Spaceship on

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216 to write under false names. Tarloff resumed his career in 1964, co-scripting Father Goose. He received an Academy Award for his work. Tarloff also wrote the novel A Guide for the Married Man, which was adapted into a film in 1967. He also scripted the films The Double Man (1967), The Secret War of Harry Frigg (1968) and Once You Kiss a Stranger (1969). Los Angeles Times, June 28, 1999, B1; New York Times, July 5, 1999, B7; Times (of London), Aug. 9, 1999, 21a; Variety, July 12, 1999, 56.

Yoko Tani (from First Spaceship on Venus).

Venus (1959), The Savage Innocents (1959), Piccadilly Third Stop (1960), Marco Polo (1961), Samson and the Seven Miracles of the World (1961), Ursus and the Tartar Princess (1962), My Geisha (1962), Who’s Been Sleeping in My Bed? (1963), The Partner (1963), The Secret of Dr. Mabuse (1964), Invasion (1966), The Spy Loves Flowers (1966), Operation Goldsnake (1966) and Desperate Mission (1966). She also starred with Patrick McGoohan in the 1968 British tele-film based on the Danger Man series, Koroshi, and appeared in an episode of Man in a Suitcase. Frank Tarloff

Tarloff, Frank Screenwriter Frank Tarloff died of lung cancer in Beverly Hills, California, on June 25, 1999. He was 83. Tarloff was born in Brooklyn, New York, on February 4, 1916. He began his career in Hollywood at MGM in the early 1940s. He scripted the 1943 film Campus Rhythm. Tarloff, who was briefly a member of the Communist party in the 1940s, was subjected to the Hollywood blacklist in the 1950s when he refused to cooperate with the House Un-American Activities Committee. He and his family moved to England for the next decade, where he was forced

Taylor, Frank E. Publisher and film producer Frank E. Taylor died at his Key West, Florida, home on November 16, 1999. He was 83. Taylor was born in Malone, New York, in 1916. He began working in publishing in 1940 with Harper. Taylor served as editor in chief of Dell Books from 1952 to 1961. He subsequently worked at Avon Books and McGraw Hill until 1970. Taylor produced the film The Misfits in 1961, starring Marilyn Monroe, Clark Gable and Montgomery Clift. He previ-

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Roderick Thorp

Los Angeles Times, May 2, 1999, B5; New York Times, May 4, 1999, B14.

Tilberis, Liz Frank E. Taylor

ously served as producer for the 1950 thriller Mystery Street. New York Times, Nov. 23, 1999, B11.

Thorp, Roderick Detective novelist Roderick Thorp died of a heart attack in Oxnard, California, on April 28, 1999. He was 62. Thorp was born in New York City on September 1, 1936. He began writing after graduating for college in the mid 1950s. He achieved success with his second novel, The Detective, in 1966. The best-seller was adapted into a film starring Frank Sinatra and Lee Remick in 1968. He also wrote the novel Nothing Lasts Forever, which was adapted into the hit film Die Hard with Bruce Willis in 1988. Two film sequels were also produced. Thorp’s other novels include Rainbow Drive, which was adapted as a tele-film in 1990.

Elizabeth Tilberis, the editor of Harper’s Bazaar, died of ovarian cancer in New York on April 21, 1999. She was 51. Tilberis was born Elizabeth Kelly in England on September 7, 1947. She began her career in fashion in London, working at the British Vogue from 1969. She moved to New York in the early 1990s to become editor of Harper’s Bazaar. Tilberis was subsequently diagnosed with ovarian cancer and became a leading crusader for cancer research. She authored the 1998 autobiography, No Time to Die. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 22, 199, B6; New York Times, Apr. 22, 1999, C22; People, May 10, 1999, 247; Times (of London), Apr. 23, 1999, 27a.

Toms, Carl British theatrical designer Carl Toms died of emphysema in London on August 4, 1999. He was 72. Toms was born at Kirby-in-Ashfield,

Obituaries • 1999

218 Nottinghamshire, England, on May 29, 1927. He began his career designing sets and costumes for stage productions in the late 1950s. His work was seen in productions with the English National Ballet, the Royal Opera House, the Metropolitan Opera and the Vienna State Opera. He was the recipient of a Tony Award for his work on the 1974 production of Sherlock Holmes. Toms worked as a costume designer for Hammer films in the 1960s, working on such fantasy films as One Million Years B.C. (1966), Prehistoric Women (1967), The Lost Continent (1968), Moon Zero Two (1969) and When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth (1970). He was also production designer for the 1968 film The Winter’s Tale. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 7, 1999, A20; New York Times, Aug. 15, 1999, 39; Times (of London), Aug. 7, 1999, 22c.

Torme, Mel

Liz Tilberis

Carl Toms

Singer Mel Torme died of complications from a stroke at a Los Angeles hospital on June 5, 1999. He was 73. Torme, who was known as “the Velvet Fog,” was born Melvin Howard Torme in Chicago on September 13, 1925. He began singing at local clubs at the age of four and was soon performing in vaudeville and on the radio. He moved to Los Angeles in 1942, where he sang with the Chico Marx Band. He subsequently formed his own singing group, the Mel-Tones, who he performed with until going solo in 1946. Torme, often with collaborator Bob Wells, wrote over 200 songs during his career. His most famous was “The Christmas Song,” which was made popular by Nat King Cole. He appeared in several films from the 1940s including Pardon My Rhythm (1944), Higher and Higher (1944), Ghost Catcher (1944), Let’s Go Steady (1945), Junior Miss (1945), Janie Gets Married (1946), Good News (1947), Words and Music (1948) and Duchess of Idaho (1950). Torme hosted three television musical series in the early 1950s —The Mel Torme Show, TV’s Top Tunes and Summertime U.S.A. He also continued to appear in such films as The Fearmakers (1958), Girls Town (1959), The Big Operator (1959), Walk Like a Dragon (1960), The Private Lives of Adam and Eve (1961), The Patsy (1964), A Man Called Adam (1966) and The Land of No Return (1975). He hosted the 1971 series It Was a Very Good Year and appeared as himself in

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Los Angeles Times, June 6, 1999, A1; New York Times, June 6, 1999, 50; People, June 21, 1999, 131; Time, June 14, 1999, 41; Times (of London), June 7, 1999, 23a; Variety, June 14, 1999, 47; Washington Post, June 6, 1999, C6.

Torrente Balester, Gonzalo Spanish novelist Gonzalo Torrente Balester died of a heart attack at his home in Salamanca, Spain, on January 27, 1999. Torrente was born in Serantes, Spain, on June 13, 1910. He fought with General Francisco Franco’s Falange movement during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s. Torrente wrote his first novel, Javier Marino, in 1943. He also worked as a teacher, until his public break with Franco’s regime forced his ouster in 1962. He wrote Don Juan the following year. He became internationally known in the early 1970s following the publication of his novel The Legend/Flight of J.B., which incorporated some of

Mel Torme

the tele-films Pray TV (1982), Hotel (1982) and Spinal Tap Reunion: The 25th Anniversary London Sell-Out, and the comedy film Naked Gun 2∂: The Smell of Fear (1991) with Leslie Nielsen. Torme had a recurring role as himself in the television series Night Court from 1984 until 1992. The lead character, Judge Harry T. Stone, played by Harry Anderson, was a big fan of Torme and the singer would often drop by. Anderson later cast Torme as God in his subsequent series Dave’s World. Torme also appeared on television in episodes of The Virginian, Seinfield and Sliders. He was musical director for the 1963 television series The Judy Garland Show and wrote a popular book, The Other End of the Rainbow, about his experiences with Ms. Garland. Torme also wrote the novel Wynner and an autobiography. He was the recipient of Grammy Awards in jazz for An Evening with George Shearing and Mel Torme in 1982 and Top Drawer in 1983. Torme suffered a stroke in 1996 which forced him to cancel his singing engagements.

Gonzalo Torrente Balester

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the myths and legends of his native Galicia. His trilogy, Los Gozos y Las Sombras, completed in 1962, was adapted as a mini-series on Spanish television in the 1980s. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 28, 1999, A20; New York Times, Jan. 29, 1999, A17; Times (of London), Feb. 4, 1999, 23a.

Trapnell, Coles Television writer and producer Coles Trapnell died of coronary thrombosis in Los Angeles on January 29, 1999. He was 88. Trapnell began his career in show business as a reader at RKO in 1936. He soon began working for 20th Century– Fox, where he was a story editor and associate producer. Trapnell was story editor for the television anthology series Four Star Playhouse from 1954 through 1956. He also wrote and produced the popular television western Maverick, starring James Garner and Jack Kelly, from 1959 to 1962. Trapnell also wrote for such series as Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Lawman and Yancy Derringer. He worked as a story editor for Universal from 1962 until his retirement in 1975. Trapnell was also the author of a screenwriters’ handbook, Teleplay. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 4, 1999, A21; Variety, Feb. 22, 1999, 166.

Troup, Bobby Musician and actor Bobby Troup died in Los Angeles on February 7, 1999. He was 80. Troup was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on October 18, 1918. He was best known for writing the song Route 66, which he composed while driving to California in 1946. The tune, which ended with “Get your kicks on Route 66!” became the theme for the popular 1960s television series. Troup also appeared in several films from the 1950s including Bop Girl (1957), The High Cost of Loving (1958), The Gene Krupa Story (1959) as Tommy Dorsey, The Five Pennies (1959), First to Fight (1967), Number One (1969) and M*A*S*H (1970) as Sergeant Gorman. Troup was a panelist on the 1955 television quiz show Musical Chairs and hosted the 1958 series Stars of Jazz. He appeared as Bobby in the short lived

Bobby Troup

1961 adventure series Acapulco and co-starred as neurosurgeon Dr. Joe Early in the medical drama Emergency! from 1973 to 1977. He was also featured in the tele-films Benny and Barney: Las Vegas Undercover (1977) and The Rebels (1979), and appeared in episodes of The Bob Cummings Show, Perry Mason, King of Diamonds, 77 Sunset Strip, Surfside 6, Dragnet, Markham, Rawhide, The Big Valley, McMillan and Wife, Mannix, Simon & Simon and Highway to Heaven. Troup’s survivors include his wife, actress and singer Julie London, who co-starred with him on the Emergency! series. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 9, 1999, B1; New York Times, Feb. 10, 1999, C23; People, Mar. 1, 1999, 89; Time, Feb. 22, 1999, 31; TV Guide, June 19, 1999, 9; Variety, Feb. 15, 1999, 74.

Troutman, Roger Funk musician and singer Roger Troutman died of gunshot wounds in a Dayton, Ohio, hospital on April 25, 1999. He was believed to have been shot by his brother, Larry Troutman, who then committed suicide. Roger Troutman was 47. He was born in Hamilton, Ohio, in 1951. He was the leader of the funk group Roger & Zapp, which recorded the 1980 hit “More Bounce to the Ounce, Pt. 1.” Roger was lead vocalist and

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also worked on several films including Creature, One from the Heart and The Shape of Things to Come. Turner also served as editor of the American Cinematographer magazine from 1985 until his retirement in 1991. He was author or co-author of over a dozen books including Forgotten Horrors, Human Monsters, Wildlife in the American West, The Making of King Kong, The Cinema of Adventure, Romance and Terror and Hoof beats to Vengeance. Los Angeles Times, June 24, 1999, A28.

George Turner Roger Troutman

guitarist in the group which also included brother Larry on congas. Troutman also did the music for the 1996 film A Thin Line Between Love and Hate. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 30, 1999, A32; New York Times, Apr. 28, 1999, C24.

Turner, George E. Special effects illustrator George E. Turner died in Pasadena, California, on June 20, 1999. He was 73. Turner was born in Burkburnette, Texas, in 1926. He began his career as an illustrator for various books and magazines before working as a special effects designer for Disney’s Zorro television series in the late 1950s. Turner

Tyrell, David Stage and television actor David Tyrell died in Los Angeles on July 5, 1999. He was 86. Tyrell began his career on stage, performing on Broadway in productions of All Quiet on the Western Front, Love Goes to Press and Goose for the Gander. He also appeared in several films including Love Before Breakfast (1936) and Saintly Sinners (1962). Tyrell was featured as Coach Charlie Burr in Wally Cox’s 1952 comedy series Mr. Peepers. His other television credits include episodes of The Rifleman, Death Valley Days and Bat Masterson. Los Angeles Times, July 9, 1999, A20; Variety, Sept. 6, 1999, 76.

Obituaries • 1999

222 at his home in Savannah, Georgia, on November 22, 1999. He was 9. He had served as Georgia’s mascot from 1990, until his retirement earlier in 1999, when he was succeeded by his son, Uga VI. Uga V was seen with his owner, Frank “Sonny” Seiler, in Clint Eastwood’s 1997 film Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. He reportedly got the role in the film without an audition, unlike Eastwood’s daughter, Alison. He was also named Sports Illustrated ’s best college football mascot in 1997.

Valiente, Doreen

David Tyrell

Uga V Uga V, the bulldog mascot of the University of Georgia, died of congestive heart failure

Doreen Valiente, a leader of the British revival of Wicca, or witchcraft, in the 1950s, died in Brighton, England, on September 1, 1999. She was 77. Valiente was born in London on January 4, 1922. She claimed to possess clairvoyance while in her teens. She was initiated as a witch in 1953 and became high priestess of the coven. She was co-author with Gerald Gardner of The Meaning of Witchcraft in 1959. She also authored the books The Charge of the Goddess and The Rebirth of Witchcraft. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 5, 1999; New York Times, Oct. 3, 1999, 55; Times (of London), Sept. 27, 1999, 21a.

Doreen Valiente Uga V

223

Vallaro, Vic Actor and dancer Vic Vallaro died of complications from chemotherapy in Glendale, California, on November 1, 1999. He was 66. Vallaro often appeared on stage, performing in ballets and Broadway productions. He toured with over a dozen road companies performing the lead role in West Side Story. He was also seen in the films The Fortune (1975) and The Electric Horseman (1979), and appeared in the tele-films Night of Terror (1972), Goodnight, My Love (1972) and Red Flag: The Ultimate Game (1981). Vallaro had a recurring role in television soap opera Love Is a Many Splendored Thing and was featured in an episode of Mission: Impossible in the early 1970s.

Vander Pyl, Jean Jean Vander Pyl, the voice of cartoon character Wilma Flintstone, died of lung cancer in Dana Point, California, on April 10, 1999. She was 79. Ms. Vander Pyl was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on October 11, 1919, and moved to Los Angeles while in her teens. She began her career performing on the radio in such series as Amos and Andy, Father Knows Best, Lux Radio Theatre and Studio One. She began doing voice work for Hanna-Barbera cartoons in the late 1950s. She performed the voice of Wilma Flintstone for The Flintstones, the first cartoon series made for prime-time television, originally airing from 1960 to 1966 and in constant syndi-

Jean Vander Pyl

1999 • Obituaries

cation since. She was the last survivor of the cast that originally included Alan Reed as Fred, Mel Blanc as Barney Rubble and Bea Benaderet as Betty Rubble. Ms. Vander Pyl was also the voice of the Flintstone’s baby, Pebbles. She did voice work on numerous other cartoon series including Quick Draw McGraw, Huckleberry Hound, Top Cat as Goldie, The Atom Ant Show, Magilla Gorilla, Scooby-Doo, Where Are You?, Where’s Huddles?, The New Tom & Jerry/Grape Ape Show and The Jetsons as Rosie the Robot. She also performed in the animated films A Flintstone Christmas (1977), The Jetsons Meet the Flintstones (1987), Jetsons: The Movie (1990) and Hollyrock-a-Bye Baby (1993). She was also a regular on the 1966 television sit-com Please Don’t Eat the Daisies and reunited with fellow Flintstone voice actress Bea Benaderet in several episodes of Petticoat Junction in 1968. Ms. Vander Pyl was also seen in episodes of Leave It to Beaver, Murder, She Wrote and the 1994 live action film The Flintstones as Mrs. Feldspar. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 15, 1999, A26; New York Times, Apr. 15, 1999, B11; People, May 3, 1999, 93; Time, Apr. 26, 1999, 23; TV Guide, July 24, 1999, 6; Variety, Apr. 19, 1999, 57.

Vaughan, Frankie British singer and actor Frankie Vaughan died in Buckinghamshire, England, of a heart ailment on September 17, 1999. He was 71. Vaughan was born Frank Abelson in Liverpool, England, on February 3, 1928. He began his career in the early 1950s. Usually seen with his top hat and cane, Vaughan was best known for singing the hit song “Give Me the Moonlight,” which earned him the nickname “Mr. Moonlight.” He appeared in a handful of British films in the 1950s including the comedy Ramsbottom Rides Again (1956), Escape in the Sun (1956), Dangerous Youth (1957), Wonderful Things (1958), The Lady Is a Square (1959) and The Heart of a Man (1959). He came to Hollywood in 1960 to co-star with Marilyn Monroe in Let’s Make Love. The following year he starred in The Right Approach. The failure of his second U.S. film largely ended his career in the cinema. He returned to England where he remained a popular performer on stage and television. He was a regular performer on The Good Old Days series through the early 1980s.

Obituaries • 1999

224 dearing Young Charms (1945), Riverboat Rhythm (1946), Ding Dong Williams (1946), Bedlam (1946), Bamboo Blonde (1946), The Woman on the Beach (1947), The Devil Thumbs a Ride (1947), Heart of Virginia (1948), Impact (1949), Hollywood Varieties (1950), Lucky Losers (1950), The Wild Blue Yonder (1951), Belle le Grand (1951) and I Bury the Living (1958). Vernon also appeared frequently on television from the 1950s. He was seen in episodes of such series as Buckskin, Room for One More, The Fugitive, Perry Mason, Cimarron Strip and Columbo. He was featured in the 1986 tele-film Annihilator and episodes of The Fall Guy, Cheers, Golden Girls and Hunter. His later film credits also include Spaced Invaders (1990), Too Romantic (1992), So I Married an Axe Murderer (1993), the 1997 tele-film When Time Expires and Eating L.A. (1999).

Frankie Vaughan

Though he suffered from poor health over the last decade, he continued to perform until earlier in the year. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 18, 1999, A17; New York Times, Sept. 26, 1999, 51; Times (of London), Sept. 18, 1999, 24c; Variety, Oct. 11, 1999, 166.

Vernon, Glen Character actor Glen Vernon died of complications from a stroke at the Motion Picture & Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on October 27, 1999. He was 76. Vernon was born in Fall River, Massachusetts, in 1923. He began his career on stage, appearing on Broadway in the early 1940s in productions of Best Foot Forward and Junior Miss. Vernon went to Hollywood in 1944, where he and Gregory Peck made their film debuts in RKO’s Days of Glory. He continued to appear in such films as Youth Runs Wild (1944), Sing Your Way Home (1945), Those En-

Glen Vernon

Verrill, Virginia Singer Virginia Verrill died in Raleigh, North Carolina, of complications from Alzheimer’s disease on January 19, 1999. She was 82. Ms. Verrill began her show business career as an infant in her mother’s vaudeville routine. She began singing professionally at the age of three. She was chosen to sing the title song in Barbara Stanwyck’s 1931 film Ten Cents a Dance. Ms. Verrill dubbed the singing voices of several

225 leading ladies in the early 1930s including Jean Harlow for Reckless. She sang on the Socony Sketchbook for CBS radio from 1935 and recorded with the Isham Jones Orchestra. She returned to the screen in Walter Wanger’s Vogues of 1938, singing the song “That Old Feeling.” Los Angeles Times, Jan. 29, 1999, A30; New York Times, Jan. 25, 1999, A21; Variety, Feb. 8, 1999, 91.

Vinson, Helen Actress Helen Vinson died in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, on October 7, 1999. She was 92. Vinson was born Helen Rulfs in Beaumont, Texas, on September 17, 1907. She began her film career in the early 1930s, appearing in such features as Jewel Robbery (1932), Two Against the World (1932), Under-Cover Man (1932), The Crash (1932), They Call It Sin (1932), I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932), Second Hand Wife (1933), The Midnight Club (1933), The Little Giant (1933), The Kennel Murder Case (1933), Lawyer Man (1933), Grand Slam (1933), The Power and the Glory (1933), The Life of Vergie Winters (1934), Let’s Try Again (1934), As Husbands Go (1934), Gift of Gab (1934), The Captain Hates the Sea (1934), Broadway Bill (1934), Transatlantic Tunnel (1935), Private Worlds

Helen Vinson

1999 • Obituaries

(1935), King of the Damned (1935), The Notorious Gentleman (1935), The Wedding Night (1935), Age of Indiscretion (1935), Reunion (1936), Love in Exile (1936), Vogues (1937), Live, Love and Learn (1937), In Name Only (1939), Torrid Zone (1940), Married and in Love (1940), Enemy Agent (1940), Curtain Call (1940), Beyond Tomorrow (1940), Nothing but the Truth (1941), Bowery Boy (1941), The Lady and the Monster (1944), Chip Off the Old Block (1944) and Are These Our Parents? (1944). She retired from the screen after appearing with William Powell and Myrna Loy in 1944’s The Thin Man Goes Home. She and her third husband Donald Hardenbrook became leading figures on the New York social scene. She was previously married to businessman Neilson Vickerman and tennis champion Fred Perry.

Visitacion, Florendo Filipino martial arts expert Florendo Visitacion died in a New York hospital on January 4, 1999. He was 88. Visitacion was born on the

Florendo Visitacion (right, with student).

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226

island of Ilocos Norte, the Philippines, on June 11, 1910. He came to the United States in the late 1920s, where he began studying the martial arts techniques of jujitsu and stick fighting. He served as a medic in the United States army during World War II. After the war he continued his training, forming his own discipline which he called Vee-jitsu. The 5'2", 120-pound, Visitacion trained many students at dojos throughout New York. He was recognized as a grandmaster by his students and achieved near legendary status when the Kung Fu television series and the films of Bruce Lee propelled the martial arts into the public consciousness. New York Times, Jan. 10, 1999, 30.

Vlacil, Frantisek Czech film director Frantisek Vlacil died after a long illness in Prague, Czech Republic, on January 28, 1999. He was 74. Vlacil was born in Cesky Tesin, Czechoslovakia, on February 19, 1924. He began his film career in puppet animation and worked on documentaries and educational films before directing his first feature, Holubice (The White Dove) in 1960. He also directed the films Marketa Lazarova (1967), The Valley of the Bees (1967) and Adelheid (1969). Vlacil was involved in the Prague Spring political movement in the late 1960s and was subsequently banned by the government from working on feature films. He directed children’s films during the 1970s before returning to features in 1979. His final film, Mag (The Magician), was released in 1988. Variety, Feb. 15, 1999, 74.

Wainwright, James Burly character actor James Wainwright died on December 20, 1999. He was 61. Wainwright was born in Danville, Illinois, on March 5, 1938. He was featured on television as Lt. Frank Dain in the 1971 tele-film Jigsaw, and continued in the detective series of the same name from 1972 to 1973. Wainwright also appeared in the 1971 tele-film The President’s Plane Is Missing and co-starred with Clint Eastwood in 1972’s Joe Kidd. He was also seen in the films Mean Dog Blues (1978), Warlords of the 21st Century (aka Battletruck) (1982) and The Survivors (1983). He appeared more frequently on television in such telefilms as Killdozer (1974), Bridger (1976), A Woman Called Moses (1978) and Undercover with the KKK (1978). He starred as Simon Quaid in the short-lived science fiction series Beyond Westworld in 1980. His other television credits include episodes of Cowboy in Africa, Death Valley Days, Bonanza, The Guns of Will Sonnett, Gunsmoke, Lancer, The Virginian, Daniel Boone, The Men from Shiloh, Alias Smith and Jones, Cannon, The Rockford Files, Little House on the Prairie, The Sixth Sense, Kung Fu, The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries, The Oregon Trail, The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams, The Incredible Hulk, M*A*S*H, Dynasty, Fantasy Island, The Fall Guy, CHiPs, Stingray and Hunter.

Vore, Lucille Lucille Vore died of congestive heart failure in a San Diego, California, hospital on April 8, 1999. She was 82. It was reported that at the age of 4 Vore was cast as Baby Lucille in the silent Our Gang comedy shorts, though there are no records of this character appearing in the comedies. She was also said to have subsequently appeared in several films as Barbara Stanwyck’s stand-in in the 1920s before retiring from films to become a nurse. Variety, May 24, 1999, 85. James Wainwright

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featured on television in episodes of Wind on Water and Pacific Blue.

Warren, Mark Edward III

Billye Rae Wallace

Wallace, Billye Rae Character actress Billye Rae Wallace died of respiratory failure and emphysema in a Los Angeles hospital on March 3, 1999. She was 73. Wallace began her career on stage after training with Stella Adler. She was featured in several films including Shrunken Heads (1994), Pie in the Sky (1995) and Albert Brooks’ Mother (1996). Ms. Wallace was best known for playing Jerry’s Nana in three episodes of the popular television comedy Seinfeld in 1995 and was Mrs. Rubadoux, the wife of Red Button’s character, in several ER episodes in 1996. She was also seen in episodes of Who’s the Boss?, Coach, Beverly Hills, 90210, Mad About You and Ellen. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 16, 1999, A18; People, Mar. 29, 1999, 102; Variety, Apr. 5, 1999, 158.

Ward, David Oren Actor David Oren Ward was stabbed to death in West Hollywood following a traffic dispute on April 2, 1999. He was 27. Ward had appeared in several independent films in the past few years including Children’s Cry, My First Name Spelled Backwards, The Killer Eye, Witchhouse, Yellow Wedding and Pariah. He had also appeared in The Birdcage with Robin Williams, and was

Film and television director Mark Edward Warren III died of cancer at a Los Angeles hospital on January 11, 1999. He was 61. Warren was born in Harrodsburg, Kentucky, on September 25, 1938. He began directing for television in the late 1960s, helming episodes of Turn On!, Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In which earned him an Emmy Award in 1971, Sanford & Son, Barney Miller, What’s Happening!! and Fish. Warren also directed the features Come Back, Charleston Blue (1972), The Kinky Coaches and the Pom Pom Pussycats (1980), Tulips (1981) and Big City Comedy (1986). Warren was also the recipient of an NAACP Image Award for best director for his work on The Cosby Show. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 17, 1999, B5; New York Times, Jan. 25, 1999, 21.

Washington, Grover Jazz saxophonist Grover Washington, Jr., died in Manhattan after collapsing during a television taping for CBS’s The Saturday Early Show on December 17, 1999. He was 56. Washington was born in Buffalo, New York, on December 12, 1943. He began performing with the band The Four Clefs while a teenager in 1959. He continued to perform throughout the 1960s and made his debut album, Inner City Blues, in 1971. His album Winelight featured the 1981 hit song “Just the Two of Us.” Washington played his fusion of jazz and soul music at President Bill Clinton’s 50th birthday celebration at Radio City Music Hall in 1996. Washington also appeared as a member of the Louisiana Gator Boys band in the 1998 film Blues Brothers 2000. New York Times, Dec. 19, 1999, 67; People, Jan. 1, 2000, 105; Times (of London), Dec. 20, 1999, 19a; Variety, Jan. 3, 2000, 93.

Watson, Bobs Former child actor Bobs Watson died of

Obituaries • 1999

228 abandoned films in the mid–1940s to complete his education. He served in the infantry during the Korean War. He resumed acting in character roles in the mid–1950s, appearing in the films Deep in My Heart (1954), The Bold and the Brave (1956), What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962), Saintly Sinners (1962), First to Fight (1967) and Grand Theft Auto (1977). He appeared regularly in the 1960 television sitcom Hot Off the Wire (aka The Jim Backus Show) and was featured in episodes of The Virginian, Bonanza, The Beverly Hillbillies, Green Acres and The Mothers-in-Law. Watson also became a minister with the United Methodist Church in 1966. Los Angeles Times, June 28, 1999, B3.

Grover Washington

prostate cancer at his home in Laguna Beach, California, on June 27, 1999. He was 68. Watson was born on November 16, 1930, in Los Angeles, the son of silent screen actor Coy Watson. He began his film career at the age of one in 1931’s Riding to Fame. Over the next ten years Watson was featured in over one hundred films. He was best known for his role as Pee Wee in 1938’s Boys Town with Spencer Tracy and Mickey Rooney, and as Pud in the 1939 fantasy On Borrowed Time with Lionel Barrymore. His other screen roles include Show Boat (1936), Pay As You Exit (136), In Old Chicago (1937), Kentucky (1938), Go Chase Yourself (1938), The Story of Alexander Graham Bell (1939), Dodge City (1939), Blackmail (1939), Dr. Kildare’s Crisis (1940), Wyoming (1940), Scattergood Pulls the Strings (1941), Hit the Road (1941), Men of Boys Town (1941), The Devil with Hitler (1942) and Hi, Buddy (1943). Watson largely

Bobs Watson

Watson, Jack British character actor Jack Watson died in England of complications from a stroke on July 4, 1999. He was 84. Watson was born to a theatrical family in Thorney, Cambridgeshire, England, on May 15, 1915. He joined his father, who

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ing By (1978), Masada (1981), Diana (1983), The Climber (1983) and Edge of Darkness (1986) as James Godbolt. Watson’s other television credits include the tele-films Christopher Columbus (1985) and Sleeping Murder (1986) and episodes of such series as The Avengers, Into the Labyrinth, Dr. Finlay’s Case Book, All Creatures Great and Small, Z Cars, Dixon of Dock Green, The Hanged Man, Dempsey & Makepeace and Newman and Baddiel in Pieces. Times (of London), July 7, 1999, 23a.

Watson, Woody

Jack Watson

was billed as Nosmo King, on stage while in his teens. In the late 1930s Watson began working in radio, hosting a variety show and starring as Biggles in the popular series. He made his film debut in Michael Powell’s Peeping Tom in 1959. Watson continued to appear in such films as Konga (1961), The Queen’s Guard (1961), Out of the Fog (aka Fog for a Killer) (1962), On the Beat (1962), This Sporting Life (1963), Hammer’s The Gorgon (1964), Blood Beast from Outer Space (1966), The Hill (1965) with Sean Connery, Grand Prix (1966), Tobruk (1967), The Strange Affair (1968), Decline and Fall of a Birdwatcher (1968), The Devil’s Brigade (1968), The McKenzie Break (1970), Every Home Should Have One (1970), Kidnapped (1971), Horror on Snape Island (1972), From Beyond the Grave (1973), 11 Harrowhouse (1974), Juggernaut (1974), The Four Musketeers (1974), Brannigan (1975), The Purple Taxi (1977), Schizo (1977), The Wild Geese (1978), ffolkes (1980) and The Sea Wolves (1980). Watson was also a popular television performer, appearing as Bill Gregory on the long-running British soap opera Coronation Street from 1961. He also appeared regularly in such series and mini-series as Arthur of the Britons (1972), The Changes (1975), Sky (1976), The Georgian House (1976), Kidnapped (1978), A Horseman Rid-

Actor Raymond E. “Woody” Watson, Jr., was killed in a farming accident at his home in Trenton, Texas, near Dallas, on January 27, 1999, when he was run over by the back wheel of his tractor. He was 50. Watson appeared in several dozen films from the early 1980s. His credits include Back Roads (1981), Eddie Macon’s Run (1983), Pray for Death (1985), Dark Before Dawn (1989), Blind Fury (1989), I Come in Peace (1990), Robocop 2 (1990), Hard Promises (1991), All-American Murder (1992), Hexed (1993), A Perfect World (1993), The Stars Fell on Henrietta (1995), Powder (1995), The Evening Star (1996), The Curse of Inferno (1997) and Eyes of God (1997). Watson was also featured in numerous tele-films and mini-series including He’s Not Your Son (1984), Thompson’s Last Run (1986), Adam: His Song Continues (1986), Sarah, Plain and Tall (1991), Triumph of the Heart: The Ricky Bell Story (1991), Without Warning: The James Brady Story (1991), The Last Prostitute (1991), Fugitive Among Us (1992), Trial: The Price of Passion (1992), A Taste for Killing (1992), Skylark (1993), James Michener’s Texas (1994), Witness to the Execution (1994), John Jakes’ Heaven & Hell: North & South, Book III (1994), In the Name of Love: A Texas Tragedy (1995) and Two for Texas (1998). His other television credits include episodes of Dallas and Walker, Texas Ranger. Watson was also the spokesman for the Texas Lottery in commercials.

Watters, Donald Earl Character actor Donald Earl Watters died in Los Angeles on December 25, 1999. He was 63.

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230

Watters appeared frequently on television from the 1960s, appearing in episodes of Land of the Giants, Baretta, Soap and M*A*S*H.

Wechter, Julius Musician and composer Julius Wechter died of lung cancer in Los Angeles on February 1, 1999. He was 63. Wechter was a marimba player in Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass. He was best known for composing the hit song “Spanish Flea,” which was used as the theme song for television’s The Dating Game. Wechter began performing at an early age and appeared as the boy drummer in the 1950 film Young Man with a Horn. He worked with Sonny and Cher and the Beach Boys before joining Alpert’s group. He later formed the Baja Marimba Band, which recorded nearly twenty albums in five years. They were best known for the popular song “Comin’ in the Back Door.” Wechter also worked as a composer on several films including Gravity (1976) and Midnight Madness (1980). Los Angeles Times, Feb. 4, 1999, A21; Variety, Feb. 8, 1999, 91.

Wedemeyer, Herman Herman Wedemeyer, a college football star who became a regular cast member in the popular television series Hawaii Five-O in the 1970s, died in Honolulu on January 25, 1999. He was 74. Wedemeyer was born in Hilo, Hawaii, on May 20, 1924. He was an All-American running back with St. Mary’s College in California in 1945. Known as “Squirmin’ Herman,” he was a member of the Hawaii Sports Hall of Fame and the National College Football Foundation College Hall of Fame. His professional football career was cut short due to an injury. Wedemeyer became a successful businessman in Hawaii and was elected to the Honolulu City Council in 1968. Two years later he was elected to the Hawaii House of Representatives. He had no prior acting experience when he was cast as Edward D. “Duke” Lukela in the police series Hawaii FiveO in 1972. He co-starred with Jack Lord and James MacArthur in the series until 1980. Variety, Feb. 22, 1999, 166.

Herman Wedemeyer (right, with Jack Lord, William Smith, Sharon Farrell and Moe Keale from Hawaii 5-0).

Weed, Gene Television producer and director Gene Weed died of cancer in Los Angeles on August 5, 1999. He was 64. Weed was a popular radio disc jockey and host of the syndicated variety show Shivaree in the 1960s. He was involved in the early production of music videos, producing and directing over 200 by such artists as The Fifth Dimension, Creedence Clearwater Revival and Glen Campbell. Weed worked with Dick Clark Productions from the 1970s, producing and directing numerous award programs including the Golden Globe Awards and The Academy of Country Music Awards. He also produced and directed the television variety series Hot Country Nights in the 1990s, and the Live Aid concerts for television. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 6, 1999, A24; Variety, Aug. 9, 1999, 52.

Weisiger, Jim Cinematographer Jim Weisiger died of cancer at his Los Angeles home on June 30, 1999. He

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was 50. Weisiger worked as a special effects and miniatures photography director for the films The X Files (1998) and Fantasia 2000 (1999). He also served as a cinematographer for the 1999 film Pushing Tin.

Weiss, Jerry Veteran television cameraman and technical director Jerry Weiss died of cancer in Los Angeles on July 20, 1999. He was 73. Weiss began his career working as a cameraman for such live television shows as Lux Video Theater, Colgate Comedy Hour and Your Show of Shows. Weiss worked with NBC for 36 years, before going freelance in the early 1980s. He received Emmy Awards for technical director for Dick Clark’s Live Wednesday (1979), The Magic of David Copperfield (1982) and Married People (1991).

Welting, Ruth Soprano Ruth Welting died of cancer at her Fletcher, North Carolina, home on December 16, 1999. She was 51. Ms. Welting began her career in Memphis, Tennessee, winning a talent contest at the Mid-South Fair. She studied at the Juilliard School of Music and was signed with the New York City Opera in the early 1970s. She made her debut with the Metropolitan Opera in 1976 in a production of Ariadne Auf Naxos. She continued to perform with the Met through the early 1990s. Her performance in The Ballad of Baby Doe in 1976 was aired live on public television. Memphis Commercial Appeal, Dec. 20, 1999, B3.

Ruth Welting

formed with the puppet Pedro, a head in a box, who would reply, in a Spanish accent, “S’awright!” when Wences would inquire “S’OK?” Wences was also a popular performer on the Las

Wences, Senor Ventriloquist Senor Wences died in New York City on April 20, 1999. He was 103. He was born Wenceslao Moreno in Salamanca, Spain, on April 20, 1896. He became best known for his appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show from the 1950s. He created his most popular puppet, Johnny, by drawing a mouth on his balled up fist and draping it with a blonde wig. He also per-

Senor Wences (with his puppet Johnny).

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Vegas circuit and toured with Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis. He also appeared on television on The Andy Williams Show and The Muppet Show. He continued to tour and perform through the late 1980s. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 21, 1999, f; New York Times, Apr. 21, 1999, A21; People, May 3, 1999, 93; Time, May 3, 1999, 19; Times (of London), June 4, 1999, 25a; TV Guide, Aug. 14, 1999, 4; Variety, Apr. 26, 1999, 59; Washington Post, Apr. 21, 1999, B6.

Wendell, Bill Radio and television announcer Bill Wendell died of cancer in Boca Raton, Florida, on April 15, 1999. He was 75. Wendell was born in New York City on March 22, 1924. He began working in radio in the late 1940s after serving in the army during World War II. He worked as a straight-man to such comedians as Jack Benny, Bob Hope and Ernie Kovacs. He went to television in the early 1950s, where he continued to work with Kovacs on The Ernie Kovacs Show. Wendell also hosted the short-lived game-show What’s It Worth in 1952. He also served as announcer for The Tonight Show in 1954 and on Garry Moore’s To Tell the Truth from 1969 until 1978. He joined Late Night with David Letterman as the announcer in 1982, where his introduction of “Da-a-avid Letterman!” became a trademark of the show. Wendell retired in 1995. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 17, 1999, A22; New York Times, Apr. 15, 1999, B11; People, May 10, 1999, 213; Variety, May 3, 199, 100.

Wertz, Harold Harold Wertz, who appeared as Bouncy in several “Our Gang” comedies in the 1930s, died of complications from a stroke in San Diego, California, on November 21, 1999. He was 72. Wertz was born in Denison, Texas, in 1927. Wertz was chosen to play the “fat kid” in the Little Rascals, following in the footsteps of Joe Cobb and Norman “Chubby” Chaney, and preceding the bestknown, Spanky McFarland. Wertz played Bouncy in only 3 of the over 200 Our Gang comedies — Choo Choo!, The Pooch and Hook and Ladder— all in 1932. Wertz did not remain in show business, joining the merchant marines after high school. He subsequently began a pipe company in Long Beach, California, before retiring to Murieta, California. He made occasional appearances at conventions and talk shows to discuss the Little Rascals. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 5, 1999, B8.

West, Morris Australian novelist Morris L. West died of a heart attack while working on a new book at

Werbin, Stuart Film and television writer Stuart Werbin died of cancer at his home in Los Angeles on October 7, 1999. He was 52. Werbin was born in New York city in 1927. He began writing for Rolling Stone magazine in the early 1970s. He entered films as a script doctor for independent productions in 1975. During the 1980s he scripted segments of such television series as Cover Story, Tribes and Emerald Cove. He also scripted the 1998 tele-film No Laughing Matter. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 13, 1999, A16; Variety, Oct. 18, 1999, 55.

Morris West

233 his home in Sydney, Australia, on October 9, 1999. He was 83. West was born in Melbourne, Australia, on April 26, 1916. He wrote his first novel, Moon in My Pocket, in the early days of World War II, while serving with the Australian Imperial Forces. He was best known for writing the 1963 international best seller Shoes of the Fisherman, about the election of a Russian Roman Catholic pope. The novel was adapted for the screen in 1968 and starred Anthony Quinn, Oskar Werner, Laurence Olivier and David Janssen. His other books include The Devil’s Advocate, which was filmed in Germany in 1978, The Naked Country, which was adapted for the screen in 1984, and Children of the Sun. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 11, 1999, A20; New York Times, Oct. 12, 1999, B13; Time, Oct. 25, 1999, 48; Variety, Oct. 18, 1999, 55; Washington Post, Oct. 11, 1999, B7.

Wexler, Norman Screenwriter Norman Wexler died of a heart attack in Washington, D.C., on August 23, 1999.

1999 • Obituaries

He was 73. Wexler was born in New Bedford, Massachusetts, on August 6, 1926. He worked as a reporter for over a decade before scripting his first film, Joe, in 1970. He received an Academy Award nomination for his script. He received a second Oscar nomination in 1973 for co-scripting Serpico, based on the true story of a New York cop fighting against a web of corruption. Wexler subsequently scripted the 1975 tale of plantation era slavery, Mandingo, and its 1976 sequel, Drum. The following year he wrote the screenplay for John Travolta’s starring vehicle, Saturday Night Fever. The popular disco-era film spawned a sequel, Staying Alive (1983), also scripted by Wexler and directed by Sylvester Stallone. He also wrote the 1986 Arnold Schwarzenegger action film Raw Deal. Wexler also served as cinematographer for the 1979 film The Kids Are Alright and wrote the award-winning play Red’s My Color, What’s Yours? Los Angeles Times, Aug. 26, 1999, A20; New York Times, Aug. 25, 1999, B7; Time, Sept. 6, 1999, 25; Times (of London), Aug. 28, 1999, 22c; Variety, Aug. 30, 1999, 166.

White, Andrew Television and documentary writer and producer Andrew White died in Studio City, California, on March 29, 1999. He was 83. White began his career in radio, working on The Great Gildersleeve and The Fred Waring Show. He entered television in the 1950s, where he scripted episodes of such shows as Father Knows Best, The Donna Reed Show and McHale’s Navy. White also scripted episodes for Combat, The Loner, Cowboy in Africa, Gentle Ben, Lancer and Empire and was producer for Leonard Nimoy’s documentary series In Search Of…. White also produced several segments of the series The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau, receiving Emmy Awards for his work on The Sound of Dolphins and The Unsinkable Sea Otter. He also produced the documentary films Smile of the Walrus and Octopus and Tragedy of the Red Salmon. Variety, May 31, 1999, 47.

White, James Norman Wexler

Irish science fiction writer James White died on August 23, 1999. He was 71. White was born

Obituaries • 1999

234 and was seen on British television in the miniseries The Singing Detective (1986) and The Wimbledon Poisoner (1994). Variety, June 21, 1999, 91.

Whitlock, Albert J.

James White

in Belfast, Northern Ireland, on April 7, 1928. He began writing in the early 1950s and was best known for the popular Sector General series, beginning with the novel Hospital Station in 1962. His most recent novel in the series, Mind Changer, was published in 1998 and Double Contact is scheduled for publication later this year.

Academy Award winning special effects artist Albert J. Whitlock died in Santa Barbara, California, after a long illness on October 26, 1999. He was 84. Whitlock was born in London in 1915. He began his career working on British films while still in his teens. His artistic skills led work as a scenic painter and matte painter on numerous films. He was encouraged by Walt Disney to move to Hollywood in the 1950s, where he lettered the titles for 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. He subsequently began working at Universal Studios, where he headed the matte department. He worked often with director Alfred Hitchcock on such films as The Birds (1963), Marnie (1964), Torn Curtain (1966), Topaz (1969) and Frenzy (1972). He received Academy Awards for his work on the films Earthquake (1974) and The Hindenburg (1975). Whitlock retired from

White, Joan British actress and director Joan White died in Middlesex, England, on June 8, 1999. She was 89. She was born in Alexandria, Egypt, on December 3, 1909. White began her career on the stage, appearing in productions of Tobias and the Angel, Susannah and the Elders and Housemaster in the 1930s. She appeared in a handful of films in the 1930s including The Melody-Maker (1933), Lucky Loser (1934), Admirals All (1935), Shakespeare’s As You Like It (1936) with Laurence Olivier, Second Bureau (1937) and A Girl Must Live (1939). She appeared primarily on the stage after World War II, and toured with the National Company’s production of My Fair Lady in the late 1950s. She came to the United States in 1960, where she directed plays at the Berkshire Playhouse in Massachusetts for five years. She also appeared in numerous Broadway productions in the 1960s including A Passage to India and Stephen D. She returned to England in the 1970s

Albert Whitlock

235 Universal in 1985. His numerous film credits also include Mine Own Executioner (1947), The Bad Lord Byron (1949), Trio (1950), The Planter’s Wife (1952), The Net (1953), The Great Locomotive Chase (1956), Ten Who Dared (1960), Greyfriars Bobby (1961), Island of the Blue Dolphins (1964), Invitation to a Gunfighter (1964), Shenandoah (1965), Ship of Fools (1965), Mirage (1965), Blindfold (1965), The War Lord (1965), The Rare Breed (1966), Beau Geste (1966), The Ballad of Josie (1967), Tobruk (1967), The Way West (1967), The War Wagon (1967), The King’s Pirate (1967), Hellfighters (1968), Gaily, Gaily (1969), Colossus: The Forbin Project (1969), Catch-22 (1970), Skullduggery (1970), the 1971 James Bond film Diamonds Are Forever (1971), One More Train to Rob (1971), Raid on Rommel (1971), The Andromeda Strain (1971), Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five (1972), The Sting (1973), Cahill: United States Marshal (1973), The Day of the Dolphin (1973), Showdown (1973), Oklahoma Crude (1973), Papillon (1973), the 1974 tele-film Killdozer, The Man Who Would Be King (1975), Funny Lady (1975), The Day of the Locust (1975), The Front (1976), W.C. Fields and Me (1976), Two Minute Warning (1976), Family Plot (1976), The Sentinel (1977), MacArthur (1977), High Anxiety (1977), Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977), The Car (1977), The Wiz (1978), Dracula (1979), The Prisoners of Zenda (1979), The Blue Brothers (1980), Cheech & Chong’s Next Movie (1980), Ghost Story (1981), History of the World, Part 1 (1981), Heartbeeps (1981), Cat People (1982), The Thing (1982), Psycho II (1983), The Sting II (1983), The Lonely Guy (1984), Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes (1984), Dune (1984), Red Sonja (1985), Clue (1985), Millennium (1989) and The Neverending Story II: The Next Chapter (1990). Los Angeles Times, Oct. 31, 1999, B7; Variety, Nov. 1, 1999, 105.

Wiere, Herbert Herbert Wiere, the last surviving member of the Wiere Brothers comedy team, died in Simi Valley, California, on August 5, 1999. He was 90. Wiere was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1909. He and his brothers, Harry and Sylvester, formed a comedy act, performing on stage in Europe. They settled in the United States in 1937 and appeared in the film Vogues that same year. They became

1999 • Obituaries

Herbert Wiere (second from right with Harry, Jesse White and Sylvester).

popular night club performers and made occasional film appearances in such movies as The Great American Broadcast (1941), Swing Shift Maisie (1943), Hands Across the Border (1943), Showboat Serenade (1944), Road to Rio (1947) and Double Trouble (1967) with Elvis Presley. They also performed regularly on the Ford Festival variety show in 1951 and starred in the short-lived television sit-com Oh, Those Bells in 1962. The trio continued to perform on stage and television until Sylvester’s death in 1970. Harry died in 1992. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 9, 1999, A18.

Williams, Joe Jazz and blues singer Joe Williams died on a Las Vegas street after collapsing while walking from a hospital to his home. He had been hospitalized the previous week for a respiratory ailment. He was 80. Williams was born Joseph Goreed, in Cordele, Georgia, on December 12, 1918. His family moved to Chicago when he was a child and he began singing in the church choir. At the age of 14 he joined the Jubilee Boys gospel quartet and he was performing in nightclubs two

Obituaries • 1999

236 Keith Richards. Williams, often working with his wife, writer Leslie Libman, directed episodes of such television series as Homicide: Life on the Street, Out of Order and Oz. He also directed the tele-films Path to Paradise: The Untold Story of the World Trade Center Bombing (1997) and Brave New World (1998). Los Angeles Times, June 6, 1999, B5; Variety, June 7, 1999, 52.

Williams, Mae Joe Williams

years later. He joined Jimmie Noone’s band in 1937 and later performed in bands led by Coleman Hawkins, Lionel Hampton and Andy Kirk. He joined Count Basie’s band in 1954, singing the popular song “Every Day (I Have the Blues).” He appeared with the band on CBS’s television program Music 55 and was heard on the album Count Basie Swings, Joe Williams Sings (1955). He left Basie in 1960, forming a small group that included trumpeter Harry ‘Sweets’ Edison. During the 1960s Williams appeared often on the Tonight show with Johnny Carson. He was also seen in several films including Jamboree (1957), Cinderfella (1960), The Moonshine War (1970), Sing Sing Thanksgiving (1974) and Petey Wheatstraw, the Devil’s Son-in-Law (1978). He remained a leading performer over the next two decades, recording an album with Julian “Cannonball” Adderley, Joe Williams Live, in the 1970s. His final album, Feel the Spirit, was released in 1995. Williams was also seen on television as Grandpa Al on the popular sit-com The Cosby Show. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 31, 1999, A3; New York Times, Mar. 31, 1999, B8; People, Apr. 12, 1999, 103; Time, Apr. 12, 1999, 35; Times (of London), Mar. 31, 1999, 23a; Variety, Apr. 5, 1999, 158; Washington Post, Mar. 31, 1999, B7.

Williams, Larry Director Larry Williams died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on May 31, 1999. He was 48. Williams began working as a photographer for such magazines as Rolling Stone and Esquire. He subsequently began directing music videos featuring performers Paul Simon, Iggy Pop and

Actress and singer Mae Williams died of complications from a stroke in Studio City, California, on January 19, 1999. She was 77. Ms. Williams began her career as a teenager, singing with Tommy Dorsey and Benny Goodman’s bands. Her career was interrupted when she was stricken by polio, but she battled back from the disease and starred in Breakthrough, a 1950s television series about her struggle. Ms. Williams appeared in small parts in several films in the 1970s and 1980s including The Jerk (1979) with Steve Martin, Foxes (1980) with Jodie Foster, Coast to Coast (1980), In the Mood (1987) and Lone Star Kid (1988). She was also featured as Mrs. Tremond in the Twin Peaks television series in 1990. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 29, 1999, A30.

Wilson, Jack Stuntman Jack Wilson, who was known as “the Human Torch,” died of a heart attack in Mission Hills, California, on June 21, 1999. He was 73. Wilson was born in Chattanooga, Tennessee, in 1926. He was a Roller Derby star in the 1950s, billed as Fearless Jack or Black Jack. He subsequently became a stuntman in Hollywood, where he was known for his fire stunts. He was set ablaze for a scene in the 1967 film Tobruk starring Rock Hudson. Los Angeles Times, June 24, 1999, A28.

Wilson, Terry Actor and stuntman Terry Wilson died at his home in West Hills, California, on March 30, 1999. He was 75. Wilson was best known for his

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Terry Wilson

role as Bill Hawks in the Wagon Train television series from 1957 to 1965. Wilson was born in Huntington Park, California, on September 3, 1923. He began working in films as a stuntman after serving in the Marines during World War II. Prior to joining the Wagon Train cast he was featured in several films including Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954), The Searchers (1956), Pillars of the Sky (1956) and The Last Hunt (1956). He remained active in films and television after the series ended appearing in such films as The Plainsman (1966), The War Wagon (1967), Shakiest Gun in the West (1968), A Man Called Gannon (1969), Dirty Dingus Magee (1970), Support Your Local Gunfighter (1971), Rage (1972), Westworld (1973), One Little Indian (1973), Escape to Witch Mountain (1975) and The Treasure Seekers (1979). His other television credits include episodes of Hondo, The Virginian, The Men from Shiloh and Gunsmoke, and the 1975 tele-film The Daughters of Joshua Cabe Return.

1999 • Obituaries

man in Leeds, England, on November 27, 1925. He began teaming with Eric Morecambe at the age of 15 in a show called Youth Takes a Bow. They became a popular comedy act in musical hall shows in the 1940s. They were heard regular on the radio in the early 1950s and were given their own television series, Running Wild, in 1954. The series proved unsuccessful and they returned to the stage. In 1961 the duo were given another television series, The Morecambe and Wise Show, on ATV. The popular series ran for seven years and the comics also made numerous guest appearance in England and the United States, including regular spots on The Ed Sullivan Show. They also appeared in three films in the 1960s including The Intelligence Men (1965), That Riviera Touch (1966) and The Magnificent Two (1967). Morecambe suffered a heart attack in 1968, but soon recovered. He and Wise hosted a Christmas special for BBC from 1968 until 1978. They went to ITV that year, but Morecambe soon suffered another heart attack. He again recovered, but his health problems continued to plague the act. Morecambe died at the age of 58 in May of 1984. Wise attempted a solo career with some success,

Wise, Ernie Ernie Wise, the shorter half of the British comedy duo of Morecambe and Wise, died of heart failure and complications from a chest infection in a Slough, England, hospital on March 21, 1999. He was 73. He was born Ernest Wise-

Ernie Wise (right, with Eric Morecambe).

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appearing on stage and television in England and the U.S. He suffered a stroke in 1993 and retired two years later. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 24, 1999, A18; New York Times, Mar. 29, 1999, B7; Times (of London), Mar. 22, 1999, 23a.

Wiseman, Lulu Belle Country singer Lulu Belle Wiseman died on February 8, 1999. She was 85. She was born Myrtle Eleanor Cooper in Boone, North Carolina, on December 24, 1913. She accompanied her parents to Evanston, Illinois, while in her teens and began performing on the National Barn Dance radio program out of Chicago. After briefly teaming with Red Foley she began performing with Scott Wiseman, who would soon become her husband. As Lulu Belle and Scotty, the duo sang such folksy mountain songs as “Mountain Dew.” They continued to perform on National Barn Dance and made several appearances with the Grande Ole Opry. There were also seen in such hillbilly themes films as Village Barn Dance (1940), Country Fair (1941) and Hi, Neighbor (1942). They retired to North Carolina in 1958, where Lulu Belle served two terms in the state house of representatives. They continued to make occasional appearances at country music

festivals until Scotty’s death in 1981. Lulu Belle recorded a final album, Snickers and Tender Memories, in 1986.

Wong, Barbara Jean Chinese-American actress Barbara Jean Wong died of respiratory illness in Tarzana, California, on November 13, 1999. She was 75. Wong was born in Los Angeles in 1924. She began her career on radio at the age of 5, appearing in numerous radio programs in the 1930s including I Love a Mystery, Amos ’n’ Andy and Lux Theater. She made her film debut in the early 1940s, and was featured in Behind the Rising Sun (1943), China (1943), The Red Dragon (1945), The Trap (1947), Calcutta (1947), The Chinese Ring (1947) and Chinatown at Midnight (1950). She largely retired from acting after marrying in 1950, though she was seen in a small role in 1955’s Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing and was a voice in 1965’s The Man from Button Willow. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 22, 1999, A20.

Barbara Jean Wong Lulu Belle Wiseman (with husband Scotty).

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Woolf, Sir John British film producer Sir John Woolf died of heart failure at his home in London on June 28, 1999. He was 86. Woolf was born in Cricklewood, England, on March 15, 1913. He was the son of British film distributor C.M. Woolf. He succeeded his father as managing director of General Film Distributions in 1942. He co-founded Romulus Films with his brother James in 1948. Woolf ’s company produced the classic film The African Queen (1951) starring Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn. Romulus Films produced such other classics as Richard III with Laurence Olivier, Moulin Rouge, Beat the Devil, Room

Murray Wood

Wood, Murray Entertainer Murray Wood, who played a Munchkin in The Wizard of Oz, died in Miami on September 25, 1999. He was 91. Wood was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on June 12, 1908, and came to the United States with his family as a child. The 4'6" entertainer began performing professionally in New York as a tap dancer and singer. Wood was cast as a Munchkin in 1939’s The Wizard of Oz, leading Judy Garland’s Dorothy down the yellow brick road. He also portrayed the Munchkin soldier standing by Garland while the Wicked Witch’s death certificate was read. Though Wizard was his only film credit, Wood continued to entertain, performing with such stars as Kate Smith and Jackie Gleason. He also appeared on television in the 1960s in an episode of Gentle Ben with Dennis Weaver. Sir John Woolf

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at the Top (1959), Oliver! (1968), The Day of the Jackal (1973) and The Odessa File (1974). Woolf also founded Anglia Television in 1958, producing such television series as Orson Welles’ Great Mysteries and Roald Dahl’s Tales of the Unexpected. Los Angeles Times, July 1, 1999, A26; New York Times, July 1, B9; Times (of London), June 30, 1999, 25a; Variety, July 12, 1999, 56.

Woolliams, Anne British ballet dancer and teacher Anne Woolliams died of cancer in Canterbury, England, on July 8, 1999. She was 72. Woolliams was born in Folkestone, England, on August 3, 1926. She began studying ballet as a child, performing with British and Russian companies. Woolliams also danced in several films including the 1948 production of Red Shoes. She began teaching in the late 1950s and was a distinguished ballet mistress with the Stuttgart Ballet from 1963 to 1975. Woolliams subsequently served as artistic direc-

tor of the Australian Ballet and the Vienna State Opera Ballet. Los Angeles Times, July 25, 1999, B5; New York Times, July 23, 1999, A25; Times (of London), Aug. 4, 1999, 23a.

Worth, Marion Country singer Marion Worth died of complications from emphysema in a Nashville, Tennessee, hospital on December 19, 1999. She was 64. Known as Lady Marion Worth, she was born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1935. She began her career on the radio in the 1950s and became one of the first women singers to break into country music as a lead performer. She sang with the Grand Ole Opry from 1963 until her retirement in 1980. Worth’s hit’s include “Shake Me, I Rattle,” “Crazy Arms,” “Mama Says,” and “A Woman Needs Love.”

Wren, Christopher British actor and choreographer Christopher Wren died in England of lymphoma in the brain

Anne Woolliams

Christopher Wren

241 on December 11, 1999. He was 52. Wren was born Christopher Johnston in Leicester, England, on July 3, 1947. He began his career on stage at the age of eight, appearing in Annie Get Your Gun. He became a popular singer and dancer in the 1970s. Wren worked in television during the 1980s, directing, choreographing, and occasionally acting in such series as Funny Man, Miss Marple, Inspector Morse, Poirot, Heroes and Villains and Dennis Potter’s 1985 adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender Is the Night. Wren also directed for stage productions of Seesaw and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. He directed Switchboard in 1999 and was rehearsing Noel and Gertie when he collapsed from his illness. Times (of London), Dec. 15, 1999, 19a.

Wrixon, Maris Blonde actress Maris Wrixon died in Los Angeles on October 6, 1999. She was 81. Wrixon was born in Great Falls, Montana, on December 28, 1917. She began her film career in the later 1930s, appearing in Broadway Musketeers (1938), Jeepers Creepers (1939), Off the Record (1939), Each Dawn I Die (1939), Code of the Secret Service (1939), Adventures of Jane Arden (1939), Dark Victory (1939), Daughters Courageous (1939), Ride,

Maris Wrixon

1999 • Obituaries

Cowboy, Ride (1939), Dust Be My Destiny (1939), No Place to Go (1939), The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939), Santa Fe Trail (1940), The Man Who Talked Too Much (1940), Knute Rockne, All American (1940), Flight Angels (1940), Calling Philo Vance (1940), British Intelligence (1940), ’Til We Meet Again (1940), A Child Is Born (1940), Saturday’s Children (1940), The Ape (1940), Sunset in Wyoming (1941), The Case of the Black Parrot (1941), Bullets for O’Hara (1941), High Sierra (1941), A Shot in the Dark (1941), Meet John Doe (1941), Navy Blues (1941), Footsteps in the Dark (1941), Sons of the Pioneers (1942) with Roy Rogers, The Old Homestead (1942), Women in Bondage (1943), Waterfront (1944), Trail to Gunsight (1944), The Love of Ours (1945), the 1945 serial The Master Key, White Pongo (1945), Black Market Babies (1945), The Glass Alibi (1946), the 1946 horror film The Face of Marble with John Carradine, The Saxon Charm (1948) and Highway 13 (1948). Wrixon retired from the screen after appearing in 1951’s As You Were. Wrixon was married to film editor Rudi Fehr until his death in April of 1999.

Wunderlich, Jerry Film set decorator Jerry Wunderlich died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on May 16, 1999. He was 74. Wunderlich received Academy Award nominations for his work on the films The Exorcist (1973) and The Last Tycoon (1976). His other film credits include Please Don’t Eat the Daisies (1960), The Honeymoon Machine (1961), Boys’ Night Out (1962), Do Not Disturb (1965), The Singing Nun (1966), The Only Game in Town (1970), Vanishing Point (1971), When the Legends Die (1972), 99 and 44/100% Dead (1974), At Long Last Love (1975), Obsession (1976), The Goodbye Girl (1977), Audrey Rose (1977), Black Sunday (1977), Movie Movie (1978), Ordinary People (1980), The Entity (1981), The Four Seasons (1981), Looker (1981), Six Weeks (1982), WarGames (1983), Man, Woman and Child (1983), Racing with the Moon (1984), My Science Project (1985), Into the Night (1985), Heat (1987) and The Two Jakes (1990). Wunderlich also designed sets for the television series Evening Shade. Los Angeles Times, May 21, 1999, B4; Variety, May 24, 1999, 85.

Obituaries • 1999

242

Yamaoka, Hisano Japanese television character actress Hisano Yamaoka died of heart failure in a Kawasaki, Japan, hospital on February 15, 1999. She was 72. Yamaoka began her career performing in an allfemale musical troupe, before becoming a popular Japanese television performer in the 1960s. Often specializing in mother roles, she was featured in the drama series Kimottama Kaasan (Fearless Mama) and Arigato. She also starred in the sitcom Wataru Seken wa oni Bakari (Fiends Are Everywhere) in the 1990s until poor health forced her retirement last year.

Youle, Clint Television weatherman Clint Youle died at a Galena, Illinois, hospital on July 23, 1999. He was 83. Youle was born in Illinois on April 4, 1916. He began his career in radio and was a news editor in 1949 when he began presenting the weather on Chicago’s WNBQ television station. He appeared nationally on John Cameron Swayze’s The Camel News Caravan on NBC from May of 1949. Youle became known nationally as Mr. Weatherman. He left television in 1959. Youle subsequently engaged in various activities, including publishing several small newspapers, working as an investment banker and serving one term as a Republican in the Illinois House of Representatives in the mid–1960s. Los Angeles Times, July 28, 1999, A14; New York Times, July 31, 1999, B7; Washington Post, July 28, 1999, B5.

Ray Young

Young, Ray Actor Ray Young died in Los Angeles of lung cancer on July 6, 1999. Young was featured in films from the 1960s including Blood of Dracula’s Castle (1967), Coffy (1973), Blue Sunshine (1976), Chapter Two (1979), Hunter’s Blood (1987) and Out of Rosenheim (1988). He was often seen on television, appearing in such tele-films as Genesis II (1973), Cop on the Beat (1975), The Dream Merchants (1980), Goldie and the Boxer Go to Hollywood (1981), The Return of the Beverly Hillbillies (1981) as Jethro, For Love or Money (1984) and Greyhounds (1994). Young starred as Bigfoot in the 1977 children’s series Bigfoot and Wildboy. His other television credits include episodes of Bonanza, Nichols, The Bionic Woman, The Quest, The Fall Guy, CHiPs, Highway to Heaven, Mama’s Family, MacGyver and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.

Ystrom, Marv

Clint Youle

Special effects designer Marv Ystrom died of a ruptured aneurysm at a Sherman Oaks, California, hospital on June 4, 1999. He was 70. Ystrom was born in San Francisco on April 4, 1929. He began working in films after serving in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. Ystrom designed optical effects and titles for Desilu Stu-

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dios and worked on the I Dream of Jeannie television series in the 1960s. Ystrom founded the Optical House special effects company in 1969 and worked on such films as The Exorcist (1973), Sorcerer (1977), Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979), The Final Countdown (1980), Nine to Five (1980) and All of Me (1984). He retired in 1994. Variety, June 28, 1999, 83.

Zacchini, Mario Circus performer Mario Zacchini, known as the “human cannonball,” died of kidney failure in Tampa, Florida, on January 28, 1999. He was 87. Zacchini was the last surviving brother of the famed family, five of whom where known as human cannonballs. The brothers, who were fired from cannons, were a popular attraction at circuses, carnivals and world fairs from the 1920s through the 1940s. They performed with the Ringling Brothers circus from the late 1920s. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 7, 1999, B5; New York Times, Feb. 3, 1999, B9; Time, Feb. 15, 1999, 21.

Ted Zeigler

Zeigler, Ted Character actor Ted Zeigler died in a Los Angeles hospital of complications from pneumonia on December 12, 1999. He was 73. Zeigler began his career on television with the Uncle Bucky morning series in Chicago. He worked in television in Australia and Canada before moving to Los Angeles in 1970. Zeigler wrote and performed on such series as The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour, The Andy Williams Show, The Carol Burnett Show, The Hudson Brothers Razzle Dazzle Show, Shields and Yarnell and The Ken Berry ‘Wow’ Show. He also appeared in episodes of M*A*S*H and Mama’s Family. Zeigler was seen in the 1981 Disney fantasy The Devil and Max Devlin with Bill Cosby, and the 1981 tele-film Miracle on Ice. He was also a voice actor on the animated series Scooby and Scrappy-Doo, Heathcliff and Challenge of the GoBots.

Zipprodt, Patricia Mario Zacchini (right, with brother Hugo).

Costume designer Patricia Zipprodt died of cancer in New York on July 17, 1999. She was 74. Zipprodt was born in Chicago on February 24, 1925. She was a leading costume designer for Broadway shows, earning Tony Awards for her work on Fiddler on the Roof (1964), Cabaret (1966)

Obituaries • 1999

244 and Sweet Charity (1985). She also worked on such productions as Pippin (1972), Brighton Beach Memoirs (1983) and The Glass Menagerie (1983), as well as operas and ballets. Zipprodt worked on several films including The Graduate (1967) and 1776 (1972), and designed costumes for television productions of Pippin (1981), Alice in Wonderland (1983) and Sunday in the Park with George (1986). New York Times, July 19, 1999, A15; Variety, July 26, 1999, 45.

Zucco, Stella Stella Zucco, the widow of consummate screen villain George Zucco, died on April 7, 1999. She was 99. Ms. Zucco was a former stage actress. Her husband appeared in numerous horror films including The Cat and the Canary, 1939’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame, The Mummy’s Hand, The Monster and the Girl, The Mad Monster and The House of Frankenstein. He died in May of 1960. Variety, May 10, 1999, 150. Patricia Zipprodt