History of Westchester County, New York, including Morrisania, Kings Bridge, and West Farms [1,2]

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HISTORY of

WESTCHESTER COUNTY, NEW YORK including V.orrisania, Kings Eridge and West Farms

which have been annexed to New York City

by J. Thomas Scharf, AIM.

,

LL.D,

Volume, 1 Part 2

Philadelphia: L.E. Preston 1886

fc

Co.

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ortant political transactions in American history. The convention held in 1848 at Baltimore for the selection of a Presidential ticket to be supported by the Democratic party presumed to deny to the regular delegates from New York Slate, of whom Mr. Tilden was one, admission to their body upon equal terms with the delegates from other States, assigning as a reason that the convention which chose them had declared that the immunity from slavery contained in the Jeffersonian ordinance '-( 1787 should be applied to all the Territories of the Northwest, so long as they should remain under the government of Congress. Mr. Tilden was selected by colleagues of the delegation to

make

their report to

constituents,— a report which helps to make the Utica Convention of June, 1848, one of the most motheir

mentous in the history of the country.

Is

coma

full clrcla.'

ci.»»

once from tb.ir

1

four years from 1*69 to 1878 were mainly de-

voted by Mr. Tilden to the overthrow of what

was

known

as the Tweed King, which had thonughly debauched every branch of the New York City government, legislative, executive and judicial, and was threatening the State government also with its foul embrace.

"Tbe

total

surrender of

my

professional billlneas daring that period,"

be has said in one of his published communications, " tba nearly »t*olut» withdrawal of attention from my private affairs, and from all eoterprl.ra

which I am Interested, have coat in* a losa of actual income, which, with expenditures and contributions tba contort baa required, would I* a respectable •'

endowment

of a public charity.

do not speak of these things," he adds, " to regret them.

1

opinion, no instrumentality in

human

society

is

ao potential In

Ill

Uiy

lta Influ-

ence on the well-haing of mankind as the governmental Diacblnery which administers Justice and makes and executes laws. No benefaction of private benrvoleuce could

!«•

so fruitlul in benefit* aa the rescue of

from the |*

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ti. to enter the legal profe-sion, he studied law with Hon. William Nelson, was admitted to the bar in 1S.VS, and commenced practice in his native town. His natural ability, sound knowledge of the law and great oratorical talent caused his rapid advancement. In his youth he took part in politics, was a delegate to the Republican State Convention in 18o8, and a distinguished and effective speaker in the campaign

many

in history.

In every Presidential contest from that time

to the present, his

speeches have been listened to by

thousands of his fellow-citiz.ens, and

his opinions

have never failed to attract attention and respect.

In 1861

he was elected member of

Assembly, and re-elected in

18ti2.

which was marked with great

way

His

legislative

ability,

prepared

higher position, and in 18»»3 ho was elected Secretary of State. He received, but declined, the appointment of commissioner of emigrafor a still

one year as tax commissioner for York. In 18r>6 he received from

tion, but served for

the city of

New

President Johnson the appointment of minister to

Japan— a

position which he resigned after holding

the commission for one month. He was appointed one of the commissioners of the new capitol at Albany in 1871. The Liberal Republican party gave Mr. Depew the nomination for Governor in 1872; but he,

1

which be

still

Central and

retains.

For several

Hudson River

Railroad,

and is now i«i

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>i New York, became largely con nected with shipping interests, and the owner of several vessels. His children were Henry R.; Benjamin F., a sea-captain who settled in Peru, where his still

found; William E., of Daven-

died in 1884,

Harriet,

Mansion House,

in

now a portion of Woodlawn Cemetery. His mother, whose name he never fails to mention in terms of the utmost respect and affection, place of his birth being

was a woman of great energy and determination, which she transmitted to her son. His early

qualities

education was received at the public school, and when fourteen years old he entered the law-office of George

His natural quickness and

Wilson.

ability

were such

that in four years he was sufficiently expert to take charge of the law-office of John M. Bixby. From his earliest days he was brought in constant contact

wife

was admitted to the bar May being signed by Hon. Samuel

requisite examination, he

later

Supreme Court.

he was elected to the

office

of

Five years

civil justice,

and

held court at the corner of Bowery and Third Street,

and continued in this position till 1849, when the He seemed naturally destined office was abolished. for active political life, and his influence and ability were soon

felt in

the councils of his party.

nately for himself and the public, he was not a

Fortu-

man

to

be bound by party trammels, or to be the obsequious slave of party rule. He called himself a " National Conservative Democrat," and might almost be said to be his own party.

New York and

wife of

Graham; Jane,

Collins; Maria, wife of

March

was born at the Ford ham, August 27, 1821, the

B. Haskin, the second son,

Nelson, Judge of the

who

York, who

friends,

1KX4.

16, 1842, his certificate

port, Iowa,

New

by his many

died, greatly lamented

descended front a long line of true American ancestry. His grandfather, Benjamin V. Haskin, was a native of Sheffield, Massachusetts, where he was born in 1767, and removed when a is

descendants are

Af-

Ann, daughter of Benjamin F.

place must be given to Hon. John B.

Haskin, who

York.

death of Mrs. Haskin, Mr. Haskin was mar-

ter the

with politics and politicians, and having passed the

the political leaders of Westchester County

a prominent

New

treasurer of the Board of Excise in ried a second time, to

City.

Captain Isaac C. Smith. tain

561

In 1848 Mr. Haskin removed from

settled at

of his early childhood.

Fordham, near the scenes

The Democracy

of his native

of Casper Trumpy, now living at Greenwich, Ct. and Caroline, wife of William Brown, of Yonkers, who

county had to some extent escaped the corrupting influences which had made the party in New York a dis-

died in 18S5.

grace to the city and the State.

Here he came

in con-

tact with a class of politicians

who were more

able to

;

Henry R. Haskin, the 27,

17°4.

oldest son, was born October

and died January

He was

24, 1848.

cated at St. Mary's College, Maryland shipman in the War of 1812; was with ;

edu-

was a mid-

Commodore Chauncey at the battle of Sackett's Harbor, and was wounded there. He was a man of good education ability, and established business in a store on In 1816 he married Varrick Street, New York. Elizabeth, daughter of John Bussing, who lived near Williams' Bridge, and was a descendant of Aaron Bussing, who came from Holland, and settled at Har-

and

He

was the owner of a farm of four hundred lem. acres in the Manor of Kordham, which he left to his two sons, Johannes and Petrus. It remained in the hands of their descendants for one hundred and fifty years, and a portion of it is now in Bedford Park. The children of this marriage were Henry R., who John B. and William E., now died in California ;

;

appreciate his true position and ready to join their In 1850 he was elected superforcei with his own. visor,

and was

re-elected,

and one of his many

acts for

public benefit was his successful effort to erect a free bridge over Harlem River. In 1853 he was appointed corporation attorney

held office

till

1856.

In that year he

and was elected mem-

ber of Congress for the Ninth District ou the regular

Democratic not the

ticket.

man

to sit

It was soon evident that he Was on a back seat. His first speech

attracted at once the attention of the House, being

made

attempt of Alexander H. Admiral Hiram Paulding for lilibuiter, William H. This speech marked Mr. Haskin as one of

in op|>osition to the

Stephens

to disgrace

causing the arrest of the noted

Walker.

the accomplished orators of the House. political strife

In the fierce

which followed the attempt to introduce

5i

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

5612

slavery into the Territory of Kansas, he took at one*

the present school building at Fordham, at a cost of

a prominent position, and was one of the

seventy thousand dollars, which must ever remain a

his voice against the

Lecompton

fraud,

first

to raise

among

the

most active of the adherents of Senator Stephen A. Douglass, and an untiring organizer of the Democrats in the

As

House against the administration.

ter of course, a

man who

a mat-

ventured to kick over the

denounced as opposition to Buchanan by the impartial verdict

traces of party discipline was speedily

a traitor to his party, but his

has been more than justified of history.

In 1868 Mr. Haskin was an Independent candidate for Congress, his opponent

of Cold Spring.

being Gonvcrneur Kemble, ThiB was probably the most exciting

political contest ever witnessed in the district,

and

Haskin by a majority of thirteen votes. His nature showed itself when he from stated his Beat in Congress, " I came here with no party collar on my neck." His independence was too plain to be misunderstood, and an attack upon him in the personal organ of President Buchanan was answered by him in an able speech on the floor of the House, in which his position and relation to the Democratic party were fully explained, "lama Democrat —a Democrat in essence, in substance, and Democracy, according to my readnot in mere form ing, is the rule of the people under the law." In the Thirty-sixth Congress he was chairman of the Committee on Public Expenditures, and member of the Committee on Public Printing, and organized the reresulted in the election of Mr.

;

search into current corruption

Among

known

as the

"Covodc

most intimate friends Investigation." was Senator Broderick, of California, who had been his early schoolmate, and the friendship then begun continued till the day when theSenator fell, the victim of a duel occasioned by political animosity. It devolved upon Mr. Haskin to deliver a fitting tribute to the memory of his friend, which was a masterpiece of his

last

23, 18*11.

Their children are Elizabeth, wife of Emma, wife of Colonel J. Miltou Adele Douglass, wife of Joseph Murray, Jr.; and Mary. The estate of Mr. Haskin, at Fordham, though now a part of the great city, has not yet lost its rural beauty. Here, surrounded by all that can make life in the county.

Welsh John

E. V.

Wyatt

;

B., Jr.,

:

enjoyable, he passes his days in the society of his

family and friends. host one

who

is

review of the agitation which led to the great crisis expressed his belief that the perilous ;

condition of the country was directly traceable to the of

President Buchanan, and

The

contained a

scathing denunciation of the treasonable acts of his Cabinet.

During the course of the war a weaker man in his would have lieen a Copperhead, but in Mr. Haskin the Union found a strong supporter. In 1815a he was elected supervisor of West Farms, and conducted with success the measures for raising troops and assisting the government in its efforts to subdue Prominently identified with all local imrebellion. provements, his most active efforts were devoted to position

the establishment of the public school in his district

on a sure foundation. In the face of bitter opjNmition on the part of many of the wealthy men in the vicinity, he succeeded in procuring the erection of

visitor will find there as his

thoroughly versed in the ways of the

world, and whose intimate acquaintance with politics and politicians has made the name " Tuscarora Has-

kin " one of the best

As a

politician Mr.

known

in

Westchester County.

Haskin has been remarkably and influence

successful, but the secret of his success

may

be stated in a few words.

Utterly fearless in

the expression of his views, his friends

whom

one upon

know him

as

they can depend, while his enemies

him a man who can neither be frightened nor A weak politician of an inferior grade will cajoled. find in

truckle to his adversaries and strive to conciliate by

Mr. Haskin

unworthy means.

wbo

tician

them

is

the type of a poli-

boldly defies his opponents and challenges

to a contest

which they generally have the pru-

dence to avoid. Among the notable instances of his traits may be mentioned his fearless letter to the authorities of the St. John's College, of Fordham, representatives of a power to which weaker politicians would have yielded with obsequious reverence, while his bold and scathing rebukes of many of the

prominent politicians of the present time are too well known to require mention, and his firm self-reliance has shown by

its

speech in Congress was delivered February It was a characteristically bold and clear

in our history

conduct

to his energy and public spirit. Mr. Haskin married Jane, daughter of Peter Val-

entine, a representative of one of the oldest families

success the truth of the saying,

"They can conquer who

pathetic eloquence.

His

monument

believe they can."

MATHIAS BANTA. Mr. Banta, who is among the best known jurists of Westchester County, and by his activity in the esof every just cause has brought himself prominently before its people, both in political and pousal

was born in the city of New York, October was one of ten children ami the onlyson of Solomon Banta, who married Maria Roome, of social

3,

life,

1828.

New

He

Jersey.

While quite young

his father sent

him

to Public-

School No. 3, in the Ninth Ward, New York City, from which he graduated. He then attended the private school of Mr. Starr, in Amos Street, leaving it at the age of sixteen to enter the University of the City of In

New

184*,

York. after

his graduation

from

he manag-

college,

entered the law-office of David E. Wheeler as

ing clerk, remaining in this (tositinu till the death ol his employer, in 18tttt, when the business was divided,

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

562

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ami settled at Woodstock, in Morrisania. He afterwards removed to George Street, near the Boston

where he died in 1884. Judge Hall attended the old Public School No. Fordham Avenue (now Third Avenue), on

road,

3,

near to

One Hundred and Sixty-ninth when he graduated. He

1858,

Street, from 1851

then obtained a

position in the well-known publishing house of the

Putnams, and remained until 1860. In the fall of that year he began the study of law in the office of Henry of Morrisania. He continued there until

^pratley,

tion to the city of

New

York.

He was

subsequently

appointed by E. Dclafield Smith, then corporation counsel of the city of

New

York,

to attend to all suits

then pending affecting the annexed

district,

and was

continued in this position by William C. Whitney, the successor of Mr. Smith. He was also counsel of the Board of Excise, of the German Savings Bank and of the Fire Department of Morrisania. He is a member of Post Lafayette, of the Grand Army of the Republic, and assisted in its organization. Judge Hall's brothers, as well as himself, were actively engaged in the late war. Henry B. Hall was major of the Sixth New York Artillery, fought at the

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W ESTCH ESTER

HISTORY OF

5fi4

Run, wa« wounded at Brandy Station and wan discharged from service upon reCharles B. Hall was a member of the Seventy-first Regiment in 1861, and afterward joined the Ninety-fifth Regiment New York Volunteers, and his brother Alfred wasa member of the Seventy-first Regiment in 1862-63. Judge Hall has four sisters Annie, wife of Edmund H. Knight (she

Itowditch Blunt, remaining

battle of Hull

covering from his wound.



died in 1858, leaving three children); Emily, wife of

William Moinbcrger

Alice and Eliza, both unmar-

;

ried.

Judge Hall married Charita, daughter of Cyprian Tallicnt. Their children are Charita, Alma and Edna.

He

known

well

is

member

able and distinguished

as an

of the bar, and

especially noted for the

is

clearness and perspicuity with which he delivers his

charges to the jury. Gifted with a voice of remarkable power, his enunciation and his reasoning are

Every point of the subject

alike perfect. in so careful

manner

a

the most

to

as to render

common

intellect,

it

is

laid

down

perfectly plain

and with an impar-

which leaves no ground for the charge of intentional bias on either side of the case. As an active and energetic politician, he is one concerning whom tiality

safe to prophesy still

is

it

higher positions

the

in

1852,

till

when he was ad-

mitted to the bar.

1863,

in

COUNTY.

!

Immediately after admission Mr. Johnson removed to Cattaraugus County, N. Y., where he remained for thirteen years in charge of a large landed interest. In 1865 he retired from active life, removing at the same time to Rye Neck, where he hits since resided. He has been active in the politics of the county ever since his arrival in it. He early connected himself with the Democratic party in the home of his choice and has held several important political positions. In 1871 he was appointed by Governor John T. oilman commissioner-general and chief of ordnance for the State of New York. He has been nine times elected supervisor of the town of Rye and was for two years chairman of the board. For three years he was a member of Assembly from the Second District of Westchester County. It is a remarkable fact that he is the fourth member of the family in the direct line who has represented a constituency in State 1 1

He

I-egislatures.

From

affairs.

also interested himself in

18/»3

from the State of

to

New

of brigadier-general.

He ent a

has been prominent in club

member

of the Manhattan,

New York

life iind is I

He

future.

The brothers of Judge Hall constitute the wellknown firm of H. B. Hall's Sons, steel engravers, and their name is known in connection with the finest

director in the North River Fire Insurance

art to

be found

in this

country.

City.

is

16'J6,

and died

a great-great-grandson of the dis-

in

New York

New 1*7!».

member

and resides with his

City,

Mr. Johnson is a highly respected and useful citizen and his liberal spirit and cordial disposition ha*

same

State,

June

made him many warm and

lasting friendships.

6,

HON.

1772.

His son, William Samuel Johnson, was

member of

first

The

presi-

the conven-

tion that framed the Constitution of the United States first

a

Guilford, Conn., October 14,

at Stratford, in the

dent of Columbia College, a

and the

is

father.

tinguished American clergyman, Dr. Samuel John-

who was born

a

Company

He married Miss Frances Ann Sanderson, of York, who died at her home in Mamaroiu-ck in of the bar in

HON. SAMt'KL WILLIAM JOHNSON. Mr. Johnson

also

is

and a trustee of the Port Chester Savings Banks.

Their only living child, William Samuel,

son,

at pres-

diversity and St.

Nicholas Clubs, of

specimens of that

military

1872 he held commissions York, the last one being that

delegate in the Senate of the United

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'»•, 1774, and married Sally Smith November 2'.i 179U. She was a granddaughter of Benjamin Stebbius. who came from England and settled in Deerfield, Mass., and was probably the ancestor of the families of that Phillip and Sally Smith loname in this country. cated shortly after their marriage at Bedford, Westchester County, N. Y. and were members of the old Episcopal Church of that place. They were parents of eight children, of whom Chauneey Smith was the sixth and was born November 10, 1810. Bedford was then the county-seat and a place of no small importance; in fact, the principal village of the county. Mr. Smith at an early age entered the High School and academy at Bedford, which was an institution of note, second to none in the State, and included among its pupils Hon. William H. Robertson, Hon. James W. Husted and many others of distinction. A short time after graduating he studied law, and was admitted to the bar January 7, 18ol. He married Hannah, daughter of John P. Horton, of New Castle, Westchester County, whose wife was

Smith was born

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origin

York, an

CIIAITNTEY SMITH. Phillip

Life

within the polar circles, and further, that by the cool-

New

to relieve



Begin?" This work, which appeared in November, 1883, immediately attracted the attention of the invesIt is a carefully pretigating and scientific public. pared and forcibly written treatise, having for its object the establishment of the theory that all

of

of both the British and

Mr. Scribner has six surviving children, Gilbert Hilton, Jr., Howard, Floreuce, Marion, Marguerite and Osgood Pettengill.

upon

would

Where

member

election in the city of Rochester.

appear Devoting his leisure time and equally hopeless. thought to this and kindred subjects, Mr. Scribner has embodied his theories and the results of his investigations in

which has done much a

The ancestors of name were four brothers, Matthew, David, Andrew and Bcnjamiu, who came from Yorkshire, England, in 1640, and settled in Newburyport, Mass., whence they removed to Salisbury. The mother of Mrs. Scribner was Emetine, daughter of Maulius G. Woodbury, who was an earlysettler and was made alderman iu the first charter

manifes-

its first

the determination of which

connected

the various families of this

To

our planet has engrossed the attent ion of the greatest minds in the world of Bcience, but still remains a question to which there seems no reply. Next to this tation,

president,

also

N. H., and settled at Ogden, Monroe ^County, in the

years con

life

is

early part of the present century.

Rochester Theological Seminary. origin of

institution

suffering;

Captain

tinued its meetings, and embraced in its membership some of the brightest men and Women of the city which he had made his home. He was also for many years a trustee of the Bible Union and also of the

The profound problem of the

He

holds.

American Associations for the Advancement of Science, and trustee of St. John's Hospital in Yonkers. He married Sarah Woodbury, daughter of Hon. James Osgood Pettengill of Rochester, who, as a legislator, and as an officer and patron of the Rochester Theological Seminary and other institutions of learning, is well known in Western New York. His father,

due the credit of establishing the Bancroft New York, and also "The Society ol

many

when he was chosen still

of the Skin and Cancer Hospital

Society of

Pundits,", a literary circle, which for

1880,

many associations of asocial and charitable nature, being a member of the Union League Club, president with

derwriters in

of his profession or the routine of daily labor.

of vice-president of the Belt KailNew York, and retained that

a position which he

The

of Assembly.

office

road (so-called) of

united in a complimentary tribute to Mr. Scribner for his intelligent, able ami successful opposition to un-

I

Elizabeth Fowler, l>oth descended from old

West-

chester County families.

Elizabeth was a

first

cousin of Isaac

Van

Wart,

who

was one of the captors of Major Andre. Mr. .Smith moved to White Plains and was appointed deputy

Digitized by

LiOOQle

THE BENCH AND BAR. county clerk

In

and appointed county clerk the

in 1847,

same year, to

fill

wholesale fancy goods house, but his pareuU having removed, on May 23, 1866, to the village of North Tarrytown, in Westchester County, he entered his

a vacancy.

January, 1847 or 1848,he was appointed agent of

Sing Sing State Prison,

and

after leaving

Sing Sing

father's silk mills, in that village, to learn silk

law in White Plains for several years.

practiced

facture,

He removed to Morrisania shortly after the settlenew village, about thirty years ago, and

industry.

successfully

of his profession up to the winter of 1877,

the practice

families of Westchester County, she being a grand-

when he was compelled to give up business on account

He

of i paralytic stroke.

niece of

gentleman, highly respected in all the walks and active in the true interests of the society

life,

and

community

in

first

con-

and prosperity of Morsuch as Nicholas McGraw, Jordan L. Mott. risania,

the same course of reading

Henry and

Gouverneur,

as he

William H. Morris, Rob-

and many others was well known

day, pursued his studies at

throughout

the

in

He was naturally of a disposition, and

although often urged

public

accept

He

refined.

death,

the

morning, thus mastering many thousands of pages of legal text works necessary to a thorough understanding of the printhe

to

office, he continued

ciples of law.

from 1877 to

an invalid

the mills during the

night and early in

county.

retiring

his

re-

if attending

law school, and while busy

tiitford

and

would have been

quired to take

Hon. Silas D.

H. Elton,

ert

Vice-President of the

For several years after marriage Mr. Ixivatt remained at his trade, but it being distasteful to him he determined to become a lawyer, which had always been his great ambition. In order to do this, not having the means to attend college, he laid out

which he lived. He was intiand highly respected by. the

with the growth

nected

Daniel D. Tompkins, formerly

New York and

United States.

mately acquainted with,

men who were

the Hon.

Governor of

was an old-school type of a

Christian of

manu-

and acquired a thorough knowledge of that

On May 22, 1871, he married Miss Sarah TheodoBia Tompkins, a descendant of one of the most respected

ment of the

opened a law-office where he continued

567

which occurred

luw-office in

he completed

Entering a Tarrytown,

December 25, 1883, at the homestead in which he

years' clerkship then ne-

more than

cessary for a student's ad-

had resided for

twenty-five years.

He left

two daughters and

mission to practice.

February

one

W. Stebbins Smith, who is a member of the har. in

in

1878,

^Ts-t-fsC^-z^i th in the ordinary Educated in the classics in the public schools of that city, he graduated with high honors at the Public High School when he was but fifteen years old, receiving his diploma on July 21, 1865. He then went to the city Of New York and began life as an errand boy in a Mr. Ix>vatt was born

was John Lovatt and

I/ovatt.

May, was admitted

as a Counsellor of

Westchester. Mr. Smith studied law in the office father and attended the Columbia College Law School, from which institution he received bis diploma, and was admitted to the bnr.Iune 12, 1871.

Ann

he

law, and in

V

of his

Hi- father

On

as an attorney-at-

active prac-

New York

1878,

amination, was sworn in

particularly

the counties of

14,

passed the prescribed ex-

son,

tice,

the three

He

being the I

ments

in this State under the amendCode of Criminal Procedure, by which

first tried

to the

can be appealed and execution of sentence thereby stayed until the appeal can be heard. all capital

j

cast's

HISTORY OF WESTCH ESTER COUNTY.

5b"S

He

has also tried a great

number of

civil

causes

CHAPTER

and has met with unusual success. He was one of the counsel in the famous "Anderson Will Case," in which a large sum of money was recovered for his clients, two little girls, aged ten and twelve years,



BY

(;

provided with

is

No person

all

to

the surroundings and appoint-

make

it,

what

it

certainly

is,

a

EXCBPTIHG to gentlemen there j

is

of the medical profession, nothing particularly interesting in the life of

a physician or the transactions of a medical society, Each family, though familiar with its own radical adviser, seldom looks

beyond

in

believer

in

a

of character, the

technical

the public-

cians,

who drive with

abreast

one of its most active and is now president of the Board of Education of the village. Mr. Lovatt has always been an ardent Republican, and upon the principle that all good citizens

and

to

the

keep rapid

progress of the medical

is

no interest or charm to the general public. It is only concerned with powers and results, and these only

supporters

sciences, possess

when

disease

interferes

with the performance of the daily routine of busi-

should participate in the politics of the State

The

studies,

subtle researches of physi-

firm

school Bystcm of the State,

he

favorite to learn the

the skill of others.

educational

Being

matters.

its

traits

extent of acquirements or

in his neigh-

borhood takes a deeper interest

M.D.,

Of Sing Sing.

tice,

ments necessary happy home

NUMB,

KO lit iR JACKSON

grandchildren of John Antlerson.

He has built up an extensive and lucrative prachas acquired property, and his pleasant ami modest house on Beckman Avenue, North Tarrytown,

XII.

THK MKIMCAL PROFESSION.

and

and

ness

pleasure,

or

country, he has taken a

when

very active part, having

life.

been a delegate to most of the conventions held

difficult,

by his

a thankless task

to at-

tempt

sketch

less,

party.

In March, 1883, although running against a

danger

So

it

threatens

becomes

a

perhaps a needand almost certainly to write the

proposed.

On

highly respected citizen

the

1st

day of June,

of his village, he

IX08, the writer

was elected president, having re-

of this

ceived four-lifths

address, as presi-

of

the

dent, before the

ballots

Medical Society of the County of Westchester, taking for his

cast.

In

November

of the same year, in the Republi-

can County Convention, he was unanimously nominated for district attorney of Westchester County. He is a member of the Republican County Committee and enjoys the friendship anil confidence of He is of a genial and the other leaders of the party.

and has a large circle of warm friends. He is a member and trustee of SL. Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church of North Tarrvtown.

social

He

disposition

is

an effective public sj>eaker, easy in his manand fluent in speech, possessing a large

ners, ready

fund of mother wit.

chapter

read the annual

His studious

habits, quick per-

ception, faculty of illustration, clear

judgment ami

logical conclusions carry conviction with them.

theme

" Biogra-

phical Sketches of the Deceased Physicians of West-

chester County, N. Y.," which address was subsequently published in pamphlet form, "by order of the Society." (New York, 1861, 8vo., pp. 52.)

He make

must now go back seven and twenty years, and extracts from that " plain, unvarnished tale of

character, merits, traits ical

the

and experience of those med-

men who have previously been the incumbents of field we now occupy," to which will be added

brief sketches of several honored

loved profession

who have

—some

members of our be-

since been called from

end of man's allotted time, and others abruptly, in the prime of mau-

their labor

at the full

Google

THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. hood's vigor,

in the midst of their greatest Use-

and

1

fulness.

Over twenty years ago, Dr. James Fountain gave the writer a

document

little

supposed to be irrecoverably

ical

restored to the society, It

was previously which contains the

that

lost,

meetings of the MedSociety of Westchester County. This book was of the

original records

first five

by which

is

it

now

preserved.

County of W*»uh«ster Wllluun Darker In the

reapeetable Meeting of Physician* of the

"At a

Day

mention is made concerning the sermon, and we are left in doubt as to whether it was preached or not i The fourth meeting occurred September 12, 171 at Mr. Sutton Craft's, with eight members present. This is the first meeting at which it appears that anything strictly medical was proposed. " Doctor Ebenezer White was appointed to deliver a dissertation on the utility of a Medical Society," at the next meeting.

begins thus,—

on th« «tb

5«y

No

of May, 17»7

—«t the

Home of

The

meeting took place at White Plains, 31st day of October, a.d. 1797." Eight At this meeting the constitution was adopted. This is given in full in the minutes. The sixth, and last meeting recorded in this little manuscript of thirteen pages was the annual meeting, which was held in Bedford on Tuesday, May 8, 1798, at which twelve members were present. Dr. Lemuel Mead " delivered a dissertation upon Physiology to the fifth

"Tuesday the

doctors were present. '

Lyman

Archibald McDonald. Charles McDonald. John Ingenoll.

Cook.

David Rodger*.

Mataon Smith. EHju Cornell u*.

Kliiha Pruietcr,

a due Improvement and proper regulation* may be maid In the Physic within the Count j of Westchester and lor the Pur|>o*» and Immediate comp1iai»ce with the Law of the Legislature

" That

Practice of

ef * necessary

Tbe Physician* anVresaid formed themselves known and called hereafter by the name and Kyle of

(aesed the laal Session.

be

into • .Society to

Jf«»W &/ titt Oaalf of WrMcktMtr. I'pon Motion Duct*. A. McDonald, of the whIU plain., was Elected indent of the Society fn Doctr. Mataon Smith, of New

satisfaction of the Society."

The

la»

,

:

t

i

(Heir ends the

able dissign." *

upon the moet

fair

and reap

sessions a year, each of

L,l.

Physicians of the County shall

to unite with the present

first

to

this

In the

fjueoWy Jomrnal and Mount Pfeoaiat /feaistf : " StooUtd upon motion the Physicians of Westchester County be Indiscriminately Informed that

it i*

hearty wish uf the

the Inleution aiul

M suitors of the Society that there may be a |«rfect union of the Profee Una of Phynr within tbe County for the purpisjc ol establishing the upon a liberal and satisfactory i'lau, that there may be a due •

of the law paeaed at the

i

of uniting with the Society

gentleman

.-an

anion

of tbe legislature of the

on the 13th Day of June m-xt, at House of ,4 hope this mode will be considered unShould auy gentleman neglect the present

M»j>. Jess* ILally, in

season

last

the Meeting affuresaid, no

after

which

its annual meeting, held in the Sing Sing June 3, 1856," 8vo., pp. 50, Sing and two pamphlet* of " Biographical Sketches of Deceased Physicians of Westchester County, X. Y.," 8vo., pp. 52, 1861 " In Memoriae.,'*

village of

1857

;

;

8vo., pp. 41, 1875

and a " List of Registered Physi-

;

cians," 1881.

The

individual

members of the

no insignificant additions

Meeting at Bedford, which Constitution

i:ith

shall be Subject to

plete

at the

House of MaJ'

.lease

Hally, in

next.

"Mat*.* S«nu, " Secretary Pro. Trm,«.r*."

13, 1797, at

After the transaction of

which seven-

been put

in print

K\

This

that the Kev-o Robt.

s.ft»re

the

7.

l>ut

..unties of

.

."OXTHIIUTtoN* To MEDICAL

it

to those

who may

our Matt' has

amount

to

the Klh Day of August Next, at 10 o'clock

Church, on

A.M."

Only

six

members were

present at the third meeting.

-

iter ...

the

is

In

men which have

Im-.ii

James Fountain, M.D.

inserted in

Use editor of this history are Indicted by foot-not.*, and

no way responsible ,

for

nn.l are inserted in

them.

TW>

hav.-

prepared

accordance with the wishes of

B ATI' UK

itrihuted as

much

If

(OV>

]

the.

each of

as Went, better, the.

of no inconsiderable value.

" An Account of an Kpidemir Erysipelatous Fever Prevailing in the Counties of Westchester and Putnam, in the State of New York." By

New r.

4«G.

New

V

Pp. 3n.

[.V.

Y.

.Vol.

..».(

P*». Jr., vol

Iv.

pp.

York. IW.V] i

of living medical

Tl'

1 K'i'.- 1

l«i

33ii-3.V;i.

i

LI [

follow us in the future.

many volumes

,tat the

'.

[.V

I.

oMWdenta of Me.1.

\m>l W-."Title, of Article, in the Trana M. 8 of 8. of . 1WJ-1S..7 " "lieneral Index of Trail*. M. 8. of 8. of N. Y ,

IKU-Itw.-'

By June* Foun-

N. Y.

Series, pp. :)iik-31.i.

Y." " Li.t

N

of the State of

Me.1

York, IMS.]

on Punctured Wound*."

of Yorktown,

.

l%if

vol. viii. p. ta>.\

[Trail*.

of N. Y

M«t n.d

lKr>7,

.

of Chronic Tubercular Spleuitla."

lly ti. J. Fiaher, M.D. Med. Soc.S. of N. Y.. 1«7, p. I75-17T] " Komark. on Table of Content* and t General Index of Trainactiona of

Pp.3.

1*21).

Uin,

IM

Monthly for

"Al'w

"A

••

p

'

P.

York.

182*.

IN.

[P-el.,

4.

of a Large Fihroua Naaal I'olypiu, by the Knife." By (i. FUher, M.D. Pp.2. [Am. Mrd .Monthly, vol viii. p .14-17.] Double Monrtmalty." By ii J. Fisher. MIL Pp.2. [.4Ǥ. Jfed.

J.

Km

J,.,

yfcy-.

lHtt.]

Pp.

Pp.

M.I>.

"B»moval Iv.'T.

" OlwnntioiH on Intermittent Pp. «7.

"

Fi.ber,

IA',7.

.467]

[.V.

U. J.

of

WV

(/Md., vol. v. pp.

5.

Hy

Weatfheater C^unly."

Into the Oauee.,

1*61.

l

"A

IW

8uc.ee»ful

By

of ovariotomy."

O.

J.

FUher,

AM.

M.D..

,

104-146; April. ]*4n,

"Congenital Enlargement of Kidney.-

Med

Jr.

N

>,..

8., rol. iv. p. 47o.

lly

of Sin K Sing,

IM.

U. J. FUher.

[Am.

" Amputation

April, 1*4*.]

of the

Thigh

"

for Cailee

By O.

J.

Fisher. Ml).

"On

Pp.

prtrf (,//„»

r .7

By ««..

1*43."

Fbher, Mil.

J.

for

'"

»«/

t

li.,,.,

Phy.lcian and Surgeon

the year ISM."

./

By G.

..f

N,.w York State PrUon* at

FUher, M.ll.

.1.

p. j'JS^ilo

for 1M 4.

I,

Pp.

Anuin*and Employment

" I'riw K»«y.

M.l
8.j

By Dr. William

M.D.

'-Inaugural and .tnniversary AddreeMM delivered before the Medical the City of Albany, February

;

Fislier,

Cyrlopuslla,'' vol. iv. p. 782-785.]

Society of the

P|>.

rea.1 before

M.D., of Peekskill, Katonah, N. Y„ 1874.

4.

9.

Criminal

of {.pars

Pp.

Katonah, X. Y., 1875. "Teeratology." By George Jackson

Pryer.

[Papers r»»d hafore the

'•MelW-Legal Consideration* upon Al-oholumi. and the Moral and By Paluel De Marmou, M.D. Responsibility of 1 nehrUles." Brad before the Med.-I.eg. Soc. of the City of New York, March 21 Reprinted Irom the MtJ. IIWJ, Dec. 1871 also in Bnrt series 31, 1*>7I

e»o, pp.

1874.

lli,

"Biographical Sketch of Philander Stewart, N. Y."

"Biographical Sketch of Peter Moulton, M.D."

Kalative to the Sequestration of the Person of Alleged

By

Katonah, N.

Pp.

Nov., 1871.]

Y. .Wed. J>.,

June

James Fountain, M.D., of JefferWestchester County, N. Y'." By James H. Curry, M.D.

Biogra|diica] Sketch of the Late

son Valley,

John's Riverside

St.

1870."

Biograpliical sketches of lately de-

Katonah, N. Y., 1875.

40. '

R' i«rt of the Surgical Case* Treated in the

Hospital, Yonkers, N. Y., during, the Year

Bonum.

Nil Nisi

Published by the vote of the Society, |ausMsl

JeTed. Jr., Dec., 1 KT1 .]

Late Dr. John Conolly, of liauwell, England." By Charles A. [Reprinted from the Am. Vtuct. for Aug. 1*71.] IL Pp. 12.

De Mortuis

ceased luemliers of the Medical Sitlety of the County of Wewtchester."

" Olswrvatluua on the Digestion ol Milk." [\. 1. X. l. Jr., Sept.,1879.]

By

E.

F. Bruah,

M.D.

1872.] 187M.

*•

Thermometry

M.D

Pp.

1-t.

in

Cerebm-Splnal Meningitis."

By

C. K. Risleiisteln,

[Rea/I before Mel. Soc. of the County of Weatchesler

Repnnte.1 from Dr. Brown-Se-iuanl ng Island, and served as surgeon's mate in tbe Revolutionary army. After the close of the war he settled in the western part of Somera, where he practiced his profession over forty years with eminent success and credit. During the Revolution he contracted the habit of smoking, snuffing and tippling,

1B81]

"

Being a Royalist, he retired declared. His fine

army when war was

his service as one of the three captors of Major Andre. He was probably the most accomplished physician of his day in this country. Dr. Stanly, of Cortlandtown, was cotemporary with Dr. Hugeford. He emigrated from Connecticut, and settled in Cortlandtowu, at precisely what date is not known. He was celebrated for his great caution ; he carried with him hiB scale and weights, and at all times weighed carefully every dose of medicine he

fore th.

Soc. April 22, 1881."

in an ancient

farm of two hundred acres was confiscated, and subsequently given by government to John Paulding, for

Brush, M.D.

I

" Kumyss." By E. F. Broeb, M.D. "One Phase of the Germ Theory.

which now hangs

vious to the Revolution. to the British

[Tbe Med. Record, vol. XX. p. lett-lM.] as an Article of Food." By E.

"Skimmed Milk

vol. »x.

portrait

his granddaughter, Mrs. Betsey Field, a

widow of over eighty years, residing near the village of Peekakill. He was a successful practitioner pre-

1881.

M. Y.

full-length

parlor of

Albucaali, Avenxoax.)

commenced taking

the

first

medical periodical ever

published in America, viz. The Medical Jtejxmtortf, and ever since continued to read it. He had also all the principal authors of his day, and studied them thoroughly. Having been inspired by a genuine love, w ith the requisite enthusiasm, for his profession, he gave it his undivided attention, {and the whole :

Digitized by

Google

THK MEDICAL PROFESSION.

Dr. William Baldwin, late of New York City, lies beneath a large, plain, but handsome monument, in the yard of the first, or old Methodist Church, of White PlainB. He was born in Northford, Conn.,

energies and talents were made subit. He died at the age of sixty-eight having been blessed with a large family, whieh were carefully and respectably bred. One of his sons, having been thoroughly educated, became one of the most celebrated and accomplished divines in the force

of his

•ervient to years,

New England States." He commenced life

Owing to the unsettled state of the country he frechanged his residence and field of practice. St John's, with

quently

Being a Royalist, he embarked for

other refugees, but soon returned to his native State

consequence of the inclemency of the Canadian He finally settled in Yorktown, in this which was the native place of his wife, where he continued to reside during the remainder of his in

climate.

county,

White

Plains, where

he practiced with conHe then located himEast Broadway; became a prominent aud suc-

siderable success

removed self in

and married ElizaJohn Falconer, a prominent citi-

practice about 1800,

beth, daughter of

in

engaged in practice for a short time.

cessful

for

about

to the city of

fifteen years.

New York and

practitioner in that section of the city,

and

gained a more thau ordinary- practice aud honorable •

position

among

his professional brethren.

He

left

a

widow, but no children. Dr. Seth Miller, of Sing Sing, was born in April, 17f>. He came from Lower Salem, and, after practicing several years at New Castle, settled at Sing •

Sing, before

17!>0,

being the

first

physician to locate

in the latter village. Mrs. John Miller, who, in 1858, was eighty-six years old, stated that Dr. Miller had attended her husband when he was suffering from the yellow fever. It was the first case of the disease known in Sing Sing, and did not spread, Mr. Miller being the solitary victim. He had contracted it during a visit to New York, where it was raging at the time. Dr. Miller's eldest daughter married Dr. Kissam, of New York, and his second became the wife of Dr. Wallace, of Troy. She was extremely beautiful and highly accomplished, and is said to have been so well versed in medicine that she undertook to continue

her husband's practice after his death. Her father is and enjoyed the confidence of a large circle of friends and patients. His health began to fail several years before his death,' and he invited Dr. Jeremiah Drake Fowler to settle at Sing Sing and participate in and eventually suc-

said to have been very skillful

life.

Yorktown he seems

have commenced anew. He joined the Baptist denomination and became an active member. With a few othere he built a church, which, under the charge of Elder E. Fountain, was a prosperous society, was kept together forty years by their united aid, and continues to the present. He was a modest, quiet and unassuming man, and a pious, consistent and benevolent Christian. His Sunday earnings he invariably set apart for the benefit of the church, believing that, as his duties on that sacred day were labors of love and necessity, he had no right to appropriate the avails thereof to the common purposes of life. He died in his eighty-sixth year, leaving several children and many friends to lament his loss. Dr. Francis Fowler practiced in White Plains and vicinity about eighty or ninety years ago. He came from Newburgh, Orange County, N. Y., and soon afIn

ter his

W.

commenced zen of

extreme poverty, and left his heirs an estate of nearly fifty thousand dollars. Dr. Lyman Cook, of Cortlandtown, was an eminent and successful physician. He was chosen the delegate of the Westchester County Society, which he represented by attending the first meeting of the State Medical Society in 1807. He engaged somewhat in politic*, and was once elected to the office of high sherifr of the county. He removed to one of the Western States, where he located as a physician. Dr. Elias Quereau, of Yorktown, was born in the city of New York, and pursued his medical studies under Dr. Hugeford. Early in the Revolutionary War he married in the city of New York, where he

573

to

arrival married a sister of ex-Sheriff

Hatfield, of

White

Plains.

His

Amos

and and gave

talents

practice are said to have been respectable

ceed to his practice.

He died November

23,1808, in the

forty-second year of his age, and was interred in the

eemcUry

at Sparta,

below Sing Sing.

Dr. Archibald Mat-donald, of White Plains, was one of the most distinguished of the early physicians of the county and prominent among the founders of the Medical Society. He was a native of Inverness, Scotland, and came of the Glengarr^ branch of the Macdonalds. His father, in 1745, joined the forces of Charles Edward, the last of the Stuart pretenders who endeavored to regain by arms the British throne, and perished in battle when his son was but a few weeks old, so that the parent and his youngest child never saw each other. The embryotic physician was brought to this country about 1757, when he was twelve years old, by his brother, a British officer serving in Canada.

He

received his medical education in Philadel-

ious to or

White Plains prevabout the time of Dr. Fowler, but nothing

phia, at the charge of this brother, who may be supposed to have procured him the position which he subsequently held of surgeon in the King's army. After practicing in North Carolina, in 1787 he married in Dutchess County, N. Y., and in 1795 removed

further is

known

to

promise of good success, but in a few years after tling in

White

set-

Plains, he died, leaving a widow, but

no children. Dr. Brewster also practiced in

of him.

White

Plains,

where he practiced

until his death,

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HISTORV OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

f)74

December

21,

The

1813, in his sixty-ninth year.

genealogy of the family indicates that one of his ancestors married a daughter of Robert Bruce.

Per-

sonally very popular, hi* practice was large and his professional reputation

so

high that he wan often

called long distances for consultations.

His son, James Macdonald, studied medicine with Dr. David Palmer, of White Plains, and Dr. David As an investigator of insanHosack, of New York. the treatment of which he became an expert, he visited the principal lunacy asylums of Europe; and, on his return to this country, was one of the founders and proprietors of the Sanford Hall Asylum,

county.

at Flushing, L.

He

I.

died in

graduated at Yale and pursued hi*

on a fast gray mare which is still associated with his memory. To his excessively arduous labor is attributed his premature death, for he passed away Decem-

He ber 29, 1820, in the thirty-ninth year of his age. was the preceptor of Dr. Joseph Baily and Dr. Mead, of Tarrytown.

Dr. Ebenezer White, son of Rov. Ebenezer White,

ity, in

1*49, leaving his

He had

medical studies under Dr. Perry, at Ridgefield, Conn. Prompt in response to calls, he rode the country over

of Southampton, L.

was born

I.,

in the

lower section

of Westchester County, in 1744, located in that the British

Yorktown

and was so ardent a patriot

before the Revolution

made

several

attempts

Once a squadron of horee were

to

capture

Crnm-

brother, Allen Macdonald, in charge of that institu-

him.

tion.

pond with orders to surround his house and take him prisoner, bo that he might be exchanged for a A British surgeon whom the Americans held. friendly warning enabled him to escape, but they seized Dr. James Brewer, who resided in the neighborhood, and in a skirmish with a party of Americans who fired upon them as they were passing along Stoncy Street, Dr. Brewer was mortally wounded. He

Dr. Stephen Fowler, a native of Orange County,

N. Y., practiced in New Castle, Westchester County, eight years previous to his death, which occurred in 1814,

Dethirty-five years of age. was quite successful, and accumu-

when he was but

spite his youth, he

He died

lated in that short time a moderate fortune.

from typhoid pneumonia, which was then epidemic neighborhood. Dr. Joshua W. Bowron was one of his students, and upon his death located in the in the

immediate vicinity of his office. Dr. Donal, ofColaburg (now Croton),on the Hudson, was a young man who began practice in 1814, during the prevalence of typhoid pneumonia, and won

much

praise for his successful treatment of the dis-

ease by the stimulating plan.

York and died

He removed

to

New

there.

Dr. Clark Sanford resided at Greenwich, Conn., but for thirty years prior to his death, in 1*20,

was over sixty years

old,

when he

had a wide professional conHe was a native of

nection in Westchester County.

Vermont, and the manufacturer of a superior article His grinding-mills of pulverized Peruvian bark. were at Byrom's Mills, now called Olenville; they were the first establishment of the kind in the United States, and his Bon John continued and enlarged the business with great profit. He is spoken of as " a bold pract itioner of both medicine and surgHe was a very eccentric man and an inveterery." ate smoker, always carrying his pipe between his lips or in his boot leg. He could never endure the smell of ipecacuanha, which produced in him an asthmatic affection.

sephus,

He

who

educated to the profession his son JoSouth and died there. An-

settled in the

other son, Henry, became an apothecary in

New York

City.

in

Dr. William H. Sackett, born at Greenwich, Conn., 1781, made his home at Bedford, Westchester

County, about 1805, and married a daughter of Col. Jesse Holly some three years later. A man of splendid general culture, and a keen student of the new lights then being thrown upon the science of medicine by Cullcn, Brown, Darwin and Rush, he was es-

teemed

the

most accomplished

physician

in

the

Bent to

next morning, November 20, 1780, in He was a native of Massaand the husband Brewer, by whom he had four sons and

expired the

the arms of Dr. White.

chusetts, but thirty-nine yeare old,

of

Hannah

Dr. James Brewer, of Peekskill,

three daughters.

was his grandson. Dr. White was prominent in jioliHe was once elected to the tics and the church. New York State Senate, and died March 8, 1825, aged eighty-one. Dr. Henry White, son of Dr. Ebenezer White, wa* born at Yorktown, August 31, 1781, and studied medIn 1802 he aticine under the tuition of his father. tended the medical lectures at Columbia College. In 1803 he was in partnership with Dr. Joshua Secor, in New York City, but in the same year returned to the In 1804 he practiced at Hackcame back to Yorktown in the The Westchester County Medical So-

place of his nativity.

ensack, but once more

same

year.

ciety, in 1809, elected

ciety for four years.

him delegate

He was

to the State

So-

for several years surro-

gate of the county, and in 1823 became one of the He continued judges of the Court of Common Pleas. the general practice of medicine until about 1840, after which he accepted no calls except as consulting physician.

He

died

in

November,

1857.

Dr. Elisha Belcher was lx>rn in Lebanon, Conn.,

and became surgeon s mate and surgeon in Stationed at Greenwich, the Revolutionary army. Conn., he made that place his residence after peace bad been declared, and extended his practice acrr*s the He educated State line into Westchester County. in 1757,

many young men

in the profession, including his sons Dr. William N. Belcher, of Sing Sing, and Dr. Elisha R. Belcher, of New York City. Four of his seven daughters married physicians the fourth becoming the wife of Dr. Stephen Fowler, of North Castle, and



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THE MEDICAL PROFESSION after his

death the wife of Dr. Henry White, of York-

Other daughters married Dr. Darius Mead, of Conn., Dr. David Palmer, of White

town.

Greenwich,

and Dr. Bartow F. White, of Homers, son of Dr. Elisha Belcher died in Dr. Ebenezer White. December, 182."), as he was approaching his sixty-

kill,

575

where he died

in

December, 1831.

He

preceptor of his son, Dr. Eugene J. Strang, at the

was the

who

died

age of twenty-seven, after practicing one year.

Dr. William F. Arnold, born at Chatham, Rensse-

Plains,

Horseneck prior to 1804, and settled three miles north of Yonkere, where he died of delirium tremens in

County, New York, June 1, 1809, learned the drug business iu the storeof Drs. Piatt and Nelson, at Rhinebeck, and was aided by friends to attend a course of lectures at Rutgers Medical College. When he located at White Plains, about 1829, he was almost penniless, but bis abilities soon procured him a remunerative practice. In May, 1832, he married Miss

about

Williams, of Rhinebeck, and shortly afterward removed

ninth year. Dr.

John

Ingersoll, born about 1745

his nativity is

August,

unknown

;

Being

1827.

the place of

;

came from the

the

first

vicinity of

physician

him to ride of White Plains,

laer

New York

City on account of his failing health,

Yonkers, he had a practice which obliged

to

from King's Bridge to the outskirts

but within a brief period returned to White Plains,

and he would encounter the darkest night and the

where he and his brother conducted a drug-store

most pitiless storm rather than neglect his duty at the

connection with his

bedside of a patient.

Until inebriety

conquered him

he was fairly successful as a physician and was espe-

favored in obstetrical cases, but his surgery

cially

recorded to have been very

bungling



is

probably be-

office practice.

1843 he went to St. Thomas,

ment of

his health

his disease gained

W.

I.,

In the

in

autumn of

for the

improve-

and practiced dentistry there, but on him so rapidly that in the home and

course of a year or two he started to return died on the voyage.

cause of a lack of training in that department.

Dr. Howard Lee, of Sing Sing, practiced there Samuel Adams, a Scotchman by birth and surgeon in the British army, went upon the medical staff previous to 1838, but made no mark on cotemporary records. of the American forces during the Revolution, and Dr. David Rogers moved from Fairfield, Conn., then bought a farm near Mount Pleasant, which for nearly fifty years he cultivated while practicing his to Rye, in 1810, where he spent the remainder of his profession. Uncouth in his manners and abrupt in days in retirement. His son, Dr. David Rogers, Jr., speech, his surgical skill yet caused him to be em- settled at Mamaroneck in 1800, and from 1817 to 1820 ployed in difficult cases in all parts of the county, was president of the Westchester County Medical Soand his services were in constant requisition. His ciety moving to New York City, in 1820, he died there Dr.

;

aged nearly seventy. His sons, Dr. David L. and Dr. James Rogers, followed him in the

energy and will were indomitable, his perseverance

in 1848 or '44,

and he was a tyrant over his professional His operations were of associates and his patients. the heroic kind, and their progress emphasized with

profession in the city.

unflinching,

profuse oaths, the expressions of his passionate temper.

He

seems

to

He served

atheist.

have lived

and died an avowed

a term in the State Legislature,

and was over ninety years of age when he died, about 1828.

Dr. Matson Smith, of

New

Rochelle, was born in

Lyme, Conn., where he studied medicine with Samuel Mather, whose daughter became his first wife. In 1787 he came to New Rochelle, and, notwith1767, at

Dr.

standing his youth, quickly established a remarkably large practice, which iu time covered most of the

Peekskill, studied at the College of Physi-

southern towns of the county. A memoir of him, prepared by his son, Dr. Joseph Mather Smith, says:

and Surgeons, New York City, where he received his degree, and located at Sing Sing. No medical man could have been more popular than he was in his day, and he earned his eminence legitimately

" Devoted to the practice of physic proper, obstetrics and surgery, it may, perhaps, be said, aside from some of the rarer and more delicate operations of surgery, which he referred to special experts, that he was

Dr. 178."),

Jeremiah Drake Fowler, born December at

28,

cians

He was a prominent memWestchester County Medical Society, and

by skill in his profsssion. ber of the

several times

its

delegate to the State Society.

In

1817-18-he was elected justice of the peace and was Through going security for

also a practical surveyor.

friends

he nearly ruined himself

financially,

and died

October 28, 1828. Dr. Samuel Strang, of Peekskill, was a son of Ma-

Joseph Strang, of Revolutionary fume. The famname of L'Estrange has been corrupted from the French form. They were Huguenot emigres and came to this country in HJ86. Dr. Strang was born in Yorktown in 17(56, studied with Dr. Ebenezer White, married his daughter and moved to Peeksjor ily

original

equally skillful in these departments."

He

vaccination at a very early date after

introduction

its

adopted

and took great pains to remove the doubts of those whose minds wavered in relation to its value. He was a close student of the modifications of disease induced by atmospheric influences, and of rare and new forms of epidemic maladies. His "Account of a Malignant Epidemic which prevailed in the County of Westchester in the Summer of 1812'* was a most important contribution to the history of the scourge of typhoid pneumonia, so fatal about that time in the Northern and Eastern States, and a valuable aid to the treatment of it. He was for several years president of the Westchester County Medical into this country,

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

576

degree of Doc-

Shrub Oak, Weschester County, was a student under Dr. John Collett, and in the spring of 1846 obtained

Christian and

his diploma from the University Medical College, in

Society, ami in 1830 received from the regents of the

University of

New York the honorary He was a devout

tor of Medicine.

foremost in educational projects, as well as in advo-

cating the temperance cause.

He

died

March

17,

1845.

New York

His career was brief, as he died at City. Yorktown, where he had practiced, on February 22, 1849.

Dr. Nathaniel Drake, born in Yorktown, August was a pupil of Dr. Peter Hugeford and Dr. Ebenezer White. He attended medical lectures and having studied with Dr. William H. Sackett and at- dissections in New York City, and was one of the tended lectures at the New York City Hospital and students obliged to Beek safety in flight from the mob the Medical Institution of the State of New York. which attacked the dissecting departments. SubseOpening an office two and a half miles southeast of quently to practicing for a short time in the town of Sing Sing, he remained there a year and spent the his birth, he changed his location to Peekskill, where next year at Bedford. For the succeeding fifteen he died February 1, 1850. With him perished the years he had his office within a mile and a half ofTar- name of his family. While in his general practice he rytown then moving, in 1835, into that village, he always had his fair proportion, it was in the obcontinued his practice up to his death, on December stetrical branch that he especially bore off the palm. He died of ship-fever, contracted while atDr. George C. Finch was born April 6, 1817, at 27, 1847. tending at the almshouse upon emigrants, among Croton Falls, Westchester County, and had for his whom the disease had broken out at sea. first preceptor in medicine Dr. Seth Shove. Jefferson Dr. Joseph Roc, born near Flushing, L. I., in 1811, Medical College, Philadelphia, granted him his graduated at the College of Physicians, New York degree as Doctor of Medicine in the spring of 1841. City, having previously been instructed by Dr. John He employed the next term iu the Medical DepartGraham and Drs. Bedford, 1'endleton and Bush. Lo- ment of the University of the City of New York, and, cating at White Plains, he went into partnership with after being associated with Dr. Shove, went to his Dr. David Palmer, then the only physician in the native place to practice. So strong was his oppoplace. He contracted ship-fever at the same time and sition to the followers of Hahnemann, that when under the same circumstances as Dr. Scribner in at- invited to meet a distinguished member of that school tending upon the latter he sacrificed his own strength, iu consultation, he replied: "I would be pleased to and died January 11, 1848. For many years he meet with Dr. J. as an old friend aud preceptor, but not availed himself of the practice of the county alms- as a physician." For six years he was supervisor of house as a school of olwervation, and wax exceedingly North Salem in 185a represented his district in the kind to the forlorn and helpless paupers. He was Legislature, and at the time of his death, May 28, the inventor of an improvement on Amesbury's splint. 1856, was one of the committee for erecting new His name was couplet! with that of Dr. Scribner in public buildingB for the county. Steven Archer was the son of John Archer, of Tarresolutions of regret passed by the County Medical Society, June 6, 1848, for " the death of two of our rytown, where he was born September 9, 1803. He married Emeline Ascough, and after her death was most worthy and esteemed professional brethren." Dr. Isaac Gilbert Graham, born at Woodbury. married to Delmrah Underhill. His children were Conn., September 10, 17150, was a son of Dr. Andrew Sarah, wife of William Macy, of New York; Isaac; Graham, who fitted him for the profession. At a and Emma, wife of Dr. Joseph Hasbrouck. He died very early age he was appointed assistant surgeon in December 16, 1877. Dr. Joshua W. Bowron, born at Washington, the American army, and at West Point came under the personal notice of Washington, who is said to Dutchess County, iu April, 1788, a pupil of Dr. Stephen have conceived a warm feeling for him, because of Fowler, graduated at the Barclay Street College of his medical knowledge and his sturdy patriotism. He Medicine, New York City. He began practice near Sing was granted an annual pension of four hundred and Sing, but soon removed to New Castle to occupy the forty dollars by the government for his services. In field vacated by the death of Dr. Fowler, which he, 1784 he settled at Unionville, Westchester County, filled for nearly forty years. In 1848 and 1849 he was and practiced for nearly half a century. He was president of the Westchester County Medical Society. considered very skillful in treating cases of small-pox, His labors were so enormous that when about sixtyor " winter fever," as it was then called, by inocula- two years old he broke down under an apoplectic stroke, and died February 20, 1857. tion, ami is alleged to have earned fourteen hundred Dr. Benjamin Basset t, born at Derby, Conn., Dedollars in one season by this branch of practice, although he devoted much time to the poor, from cember 6, 1784, was a graduate of the University of whom he never looked for any recompense. He Pennsylvania, practiced at Yorktown from 1826 to 182°, and then settled at Peekskill, where he died died September 1, 1848. March 21, 1*58. He was president of the WestchesDr. Stephen Allen Hart, born June 11, 1820, at

M. Scribner was born at Bedford, Westchester County, May 11, 1793, and was licensed by Dr. Joseph

27, 1763,

the Medical Society of the county in April, 1817, after

;

;

;

by

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THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. County Medical Society in 1846 anil 1847, ami in the Latter year delivered an address " Ou the laws of epidemics as exhibited in those that had prevailed in the county the preceding twenty years." In 1831 he wrote a valuable treatise on " Epidemic Dysentery and Intermittent Fever," published in the JUtw York Meiiieal Journal for May of that year. About the same time he prepared several articles on the effect ter

of sulphate of quinine, but

were published.

it is

He honored

not

known when they profession

his

except

placing too low an estimate on the value of his

in

services

"his charges were so small that he was un-

;

able to live in the

suitable to a

man

of his

and position."

ability, skill

Dr.

manner

the biographat the

County Medical Society, of the most remarkable men of his time, in the region round-about him." Born at Bedrequest of the Westchester

as

577

and without the aid of the chemist, prescribed

such potences as

lobelia, Scutellaria, actia

sanguin-

Indian hemp and many of the But he was by no means restricted

aria, ergot, juglans,

vegetable acids. to

any

of drugs or stereotyped forms of practice.

set

If heroic practice

means anything, Dr. Fountain was

a hero of the boldest stamp.

mercury, tartar

Arsenic, strychnine,

emetic, the lancet

and the

blister

were the great weapons of his warfare, and he waa not afraid to use them. In his treatment there was no half and half he gave disease no quarter and it must be confessed that often, in drawing out the enemy, he shook the citadel terribly, but when he had





slain the foe, if the patient survived, like a discrimi-

James Fountain was spoken of in

sketch prepared by Dr. James Hart Curry,

ical

ually,

"one

nating general, he was quick to take advantage of cir-

cumstances, stopping medication

wheu he thought

the case would warraut, or modifying

toms might demand.

it

as the

symp-

In his treatment of old dis-

eases, especially those of the lungs, as

in

asthma of

ford, January 80, 1790, he began the study of medicine under Dr. Sackett, and was one of the first, if not the

very

student from Westchester County to matric-

first,

and Surgeons of City, where he graduated March Hi, 1812. Beginning practice in his native county, in a year he moved to Staten Island, but, at the solicitation of his father, soon returned to Jelferson Valley. He had become a member of the Westchester County Medical Society a year before his graduation, and when, fifty years afterward, he resigned, he said, in his charulate in the College of Physicians

New York

acteristic letter

"I « ltn.w.1 in

:

nli- s.*i.t.V.i gradual rise to distinction until, in the

Kffif of its usefulness and glory

To

lrgi«Uturp.

It

wiucrl|>pled by

an act of our Ignorant

court popularity and to support a mistaken

Hcmwru j,

among men, passed a law deand the moat learned physician on a perfect

tuey, in their zeal tu level all distinct ons

claring the Ignorant that now a large portion of oar beat practice U enjoyed by ignorant quack* under the cloak of homoeopathy. The consequence* to our society are almost ruinous. Shorn of its power, its members hate become discouraged, and a few only of the mist faithful are found attending Its meetings. All our struggles must be laborious so long as ignorance of physiology prevails among the people, and tliat must continue a long time.

"I am now dead.

It

knowledge

in my seventieth year. I consider myself professionally U my last prayer that you may persevere until the rays of aliall

llliuiilue

the eyes of the people aud induce theiu to

value the realities) of knowledge over ignorance and regard our profession to its true

M.l>.

standing (or rather by the aid of) blood-letting, antimony, ptyalism and blistering, he was remarkably successful, often holding the disease in

many

years after

it

abeyance for had become apparently incur-

able.

light."

He was

frequently a delegate to the New York Medical Society, and at the session of 184U was made a permanent member. His numerous contributions to the medical journals, as full a list of which as can lie made is embodied in the foregoing schedule of professional writings by Westchester physicians, State

hear witness to his profound research as well as to his

pugnacious disposition. early

JAME8 FOUNTAIN,

the aged, hydrothorax and bronchorrhoea, notwith-

Having been thrown in own resources

practice greatly upon his

his for

medical agents, no drug-stores being near him, he became, eral peritonitis, treated by " opium Tlce-pre«td«nt and committee to r»|«ort on ISM, committee on surgery ISM, vice-president essayist, alio committee on Indigenous Medical Botany and IMS, delegate to American Medical committee six yean; aened on ibi* 1S63, vice-pmident and delegate to American Medical A*Association 1W16. delegate to American Medical Association. torut.,,1,

annual sessions. As an operating surgeon, for yean he was among the first in all the region about him. His manipulations and operations for strangulated hernia were very frequent and successful, as was his management in all cases of difficult parturition. He performed many amputations. His hand was steady, his instruments many and various, his knives were

;

;

"Ship Fertr

;"

;

;

;

;

On December ited

1873, Dr,

1,

Moulton rose

various patients, traveled to

early, vis-

New York

City and

sharp, his determination

back on professional business, and in the evening

made ners,

visits to

M&maroneck and

office all

Scaradale, in the teeth of an When he reached home he was too ascend to his bed-room and remained in his

night in his wet clothing.

Pneumonia

pervened and he died on December 7th. a meeting of the citizens of

New

On

the 9th

Rochelle, at the

resolutions of respect to his

mem-

and similar action was taken by the Board of Education and the Huguenot Lyceum, of both of which he had been a member. He had been made an honorary member of the Westchester County Medical Society at its annual meeting in 1869, and at the meeting in 1872, at Whit* Plains, he met his brother members for the last time. On the day of his funeral, buainess was suspended in New Rochelle, flags hung at half-mast from the public and many private buildings, the church, school and engine-house bells were tolled, the schools were dismissed and the scholars stood bare-

;

>

ory,

headed in the street as the cortege passed. No such honors had ever been paid to any private citizen of the town. Dr. Philander Stewart was born in Danbury, Connecticut, June 20, 1820, and in 1840 began to study for the profession in Brookfield, the adjoining town. At the medical institution of Yale College he attended his first course of lectures and graduated at 1

Jefferson College, Philadelphia, in

1844.

After two

years of practice in Roxbury, Connecticut, he to

Peekskill, and although

remunerative

established there,

he returned

in

came

three years he had

professional

connections

to Philadelphia to avail himself of

another course of lectures and clinical observations under Prof. Pancoast. Then he resumed his field of labor at Peekskill thirty years.

and cultivated

In the year

1857

it for upwards of he made a trip to

Europe and pursued his investigations for some time the hospitals and medical schools of the United Kingdom and the Continent. He early attached

in

'

Biographical .ketch by

nator Count)

Medical

I>r.

Jam-

SocMy

at if

Hart Cnrry. read

If his diagnosis was sometimes shaped too much by notion of things, and hence may have missed the mark, it was no more so than is pecuHis prognosis was reliar to independent minds. markably true he had an almost intuitive knowledge of the end from the beginning. By being thrown from his carriage on May 2»>. 1869, Dr. Stewart broke an arm and was stunned by a blow upon the head. Terrible paroxysms of pain in the head attacked him in October, 1872, he began to lose memory of names and places, his penmanship became entirely changed and he wrote with difficulty. A consultation with Dr. Bruwn-Sequard on December 3, 1873, resulted in pronouncing his case hopeless. He visited patients the next day, but was at once prostrated mentally and physically, and after ten weeks of darkness of intellect he died February 11, his preconceived

su-

j

Town Hall, passed

almost dogged, his judg-

ment good and he was never taken by surprise. In auscultation and percussion he was far above the average, his touch being delicate and his ear acute.

the sick in East Chester, Cooper's C or-

easterly storm. feeble to

579

himself to the Westchester County Medical Society, in which he held every office, many of them for suc-

was an accomplished botanist and drew many of his medicines from native plants gathered in his daily It ia not known at what date ho became a walks. member of the Westchester Counter County Medical

;

i

!

1874.

Dr. Havilah

Mowry

Sprague,' born at Scotland,

Windham

County, Conn., July 4, 1835, received his first tuition in medicine in the office of Dr. Hutchins. West Killingly, Conn., and in 1858 became a student

under Professor A. C. Post, New York City. He attended the New York University Medical College,

and received first

at the close of the session of 1859-«}0the

prize for the best report of clinical

mortem at his

set

cases—a

post-

of instruments, which were finally used

own autopsy.

He

graduated March 4, 1H»»4, receiving also a "Cerof Honor" for having pursued a more extended course of study than is required by law. In the competitive examination for the position of " Junior tificate

Walker" in the New York Hospital, he passed an examination of superior excellence and was appointed. While here he passed the United States Army Medical Examining Board, standing No. 2 in general merit out of one hundred and twenty-five candidates examined (it is said that X". 1 was the son of the president

1-eforc the W.-rt-

aomial meeting. June

1*74.

i

Biography by Dr. John Parson., King'. Bridge.

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

6H0

of the Examining Board). He was commissioned assistant surgeon United States army May 28, 1861,

and ordered

to

New

Paris). !

Mexico, but upon his arrival

Missouri was attached to the army of General Lyon, was present when he was killed at Springand subsequently received the thanks of the commanding general for bravery and skill in attendance upon the wounded. Dr. Sprague was transferred to Assistant Surgeon General Wood's office, in St. Louis, where he remained until early in 1863, when he was placed in command of the Eliot General Hospital, in St. Louis. That was shortly discontinued, and he took charge of the boa-

In May, 1*56, he located in Yonkers a*

A

general practitioner of medicine, surgery and obstet-

In August, 1861, he entered the service of the United States Sanitary Commission aa hospital visitor

ric*.

in

field,

,

>

pitalsteamer" City of Memphis," transporting the sick and wounded of Grant's army around Vicksburg to hospitals up the river. During the final days of the siege of Vicksburg he displayed exalted bravery and fidelity in attention to the men torn with shot and

and associate secretary, and in May, 1863, succeeded Frederick Law Olmsted aa general secretary, an office which, in May, 1865, he was compelled to resign because of the failure of his health in the performance of it* arduous obligations. He renewed his practice in Yonkers, and, in 1869, made a second voyage to Europe. On June 21, 1877, he was elected president of the Medical Society of the State of New York, but declined to accept because of his doubt as to the legality of the meeting at which he was chosen. Other offices which he held were aa follows: Physician of the St. John's Riverside Hospital, at

Yonk-

surgeon of the Yonkers Board of Police senior warden of St. Paul's Parish, Yonkers president of the Yonkers Medical Association (of which he was one of the founders) president of the Westchester County Medical Society vice-president of the New York Obstetrical Society permanent member of the American Medical Association member of the Amercan Public Health Association corresponding Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine; member oi the American Social Science Association. In 1878 he spent six months at the sanitary resorta along the Mediterranean for the benefit of hia health, and for ers

;

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shell, sent to his steamer for such aid as the surgeons could render them. In November he was ordered on duty as secretary of the Army Medical Examining Board, in New York City, and then to command of the McDougall General Hospital, at Fort Schuyler, New York Harbor. Thence he was returned to the Examining Board, and in May, 18(55, resigned from the army, his name stauding high on the list for promotion. He began the practice of medicine at West Farms, and in 1868 moved to Fordham. He was appointed health officer of the town of West Farms, nearly three years after his return kept steadily at his was the first physician to the " Home for Incurables," work. He died October 9, 1882, and, as an expresand first physician to the " House of Rest for Con- sion of the esteem in which he was held, the Yonkers sumptives," at Tremont. He was a member of the Medical Association, at its next meeting, unanimously Westchester Count/Medical Society, president of the resolved to change its name to the "Jenkins Medical Yonkers Medical Association, was elected a dele- Association." Dr. Jenkins was a student and an ardent lover of gate to the American Medical Association for 1874 from the latter society, and was preparing to at- medical literature, both ancient and modern. He tend its meeting at Detroit, Mich., when he was collected a large and valuable medical library. His arrested by death was a corresponding member of contributions to the literature will be found in the list the American Microscopic Society, and member of the at the head of this chapter. New York Pathological Society. He was deeply Dr. Henry L. Horton was born at Croton, Westlearned in pathology, and marvelously skilled in the chester County, December 6, 1826, and accumulated use of the microscope and the preparation of speci- by manual labor the money which enabled him to mens. On May 30, 1874, he died at the " House of enter the Albany Medical College, from where he Rest," where he had been seized with a malarious at- graduated in 1S58, but continued to serve some time An autopsy afterward as house surgeon. In 1859 he removed to tack during a visit on the previous day. was made, and his brain was found to weigh sixty Morrisania and entered upon a large and successful ounces. practice. In 1879. and again in 1881, he visited John Foster Jenkins, A.M.. M.D., was born at Europe, but his health, which had greatly failed, was Falmouth, Mass., April 15, 1826. His preliminary only partially restored, and on September 18, 1884, course of medical reading was under Dr. Alexander he again sailed. At Florence, Italy, a cold, which be M. Vedder, at Schenectady, N. Y., and in 1848 he re- caught while waiting outside the railway station, deceived his degree from the Medical Department of the veloped into p leurisy and ended fatally on February University of Pennsylvania. The next year he de- 24. 1885, at Rome. His remains were brought to his voted to an extra course of didactic and clinical lec- home and interred March 3d, at Sing Sing. From Dr. Piatt Rogers Halsted Sawyer, born August 14, tures at the Harvard Medical School, Boston. May, 1849, to May, 1*56, he practiced in the city of 1834, at West port, N. Y., studied medicine with Dr. New York (except that from November, 1850, to July. Bridges, at Ogdensburph, X. Y., while engaged aa After a principal of the High School of that town. 1851, he was in Europe, employing most of that time ;

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course of lectures at the University of

Vermont he

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and Isaac. The Mr. Jay seems to daughter's name was Frances. have been solicitous to have one of his sons educa-

but ultimately settled in

1697 he married, in

Holland to

country, trace their ancestry to Pierre Jay,

;

France and England his mother had

sister

Paris and take refuge with his wife and children in

town of Ossining, which forms one of the

chapters of this work.

THE

and

Maria, daughter of Ralthazar Haynrd, the descendant of a Protestant professor of theology at Paris in the reign of Louis XIII., who had been compelled to leave

latter de-

partment is quite rich in specimens of the stone implements of the American aborigines. tory of the

He re-visited

his father

six,

and died

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17.-.1.

Peter Jay, only son of Augustus, married Man.-, daughter of Jacobus VanCortlandt, January 20, 1728. Like his father, he was a merchant in the city of New York. Having earned a fortune which added to the property he had acquired by inheritance and marriage, he thought sufheient, he resolved when little

more than forty years old, to retire into the country, and for this purpose purchased a farm at Rye, where he died April

17, 1782.

.lames Jay, third son of Peter, born

October

16,

became Sir James Jay, Kt.; he resided for some years in England, and returned after the Revolution 1732,

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181A.

or 1785,

emigrants

establishing settlements of

among

the

and convertthem to Christianity. General Washington in h letter to him dated January 25, 1785, expresses his entire approval of the plan, and suggests that it Indians, with a view to civilizing them, ing

should be brought before Congress.

1

and brother of the December IK, 1734, and married in Mary Duyckinck. Though he had the misfor-

Peter, fourth sou of Peter Jay,

tormer, waslnirn 1781»,

tune of losing his eyesight attack of small-pox,

many

lated of his ingenuity

in early life

through an

interesting stories are re-

and sagacity and he

is

said to

have|>oesea»ed a tine mind and an excellent character. Peter, was lum December 12, His boyhood was spent at Rye and New He was admitted to the bar in 17(58. On April 28. 1774, he married Sarah, daughter of William Livingston, afterwards governor of New Jersey. He

John Jay, sixth son of

1745.

Rochelle.

soon took a foremost position in the politic* of the country,

and was prominent

in the debates of the first

and the second Continental Congress. In 1777 he was appointed chief justice of the State of New York. In In 1779 1778 he was elected president of Congress. he was sent as Minister to Spain, and from thence, in 178»>, went to Pans as Commissioner to assist in the negotiation of a treaty of peace with Great Britain. He returned to New York in 1784, after an absence of five years, and was received with tokens of esteem and admiration. December 21, 1784, he was appointed by Congress, secretary for foreign affairs, and held He was one of the conthe office for five years. tributors to The Fadernlift. In 1 781* he was appointed chief justice of the United States, an office which he was the first to fill. In 1794 he was sent as special Minister to London, upon a delicate and most inijMjrtant mission, relating to difficulties growing out of unsettled boundaries and certain commercial complications. He discharged this duty with great ability, and upon his return to America, in 171*-), was elected by a large majority Governor of the State of New York. At the end of three years he was reelected, and at the expiration of a second term was



solicited to

become a candidate

Hut he had determined

time.

for election a third to

renounce public

and though nominated again

in 1800, to the of chief justice of the United States, declined the honor, and retired to his paternal estate, at Bedford a property part of the Van Cortlandt estate lite,



>tfice



;

which

father

his

had

acquired

Man.-, a daughter of Jacobus

he lived

Van

by marriage with Cortlandt.

There

tweuty eight years a peaceful and honIn 1N27 he was seized with severe illness, ored life. and after two years of weakness and suffering, was tor

May 14, 1829, and died throe days He was buried in the family cemetery at Rye. His public reputation as a patriot and statesman of the Revolution was second only to that of Washington, and his private character as a man and a Christian is singularly free from stain or blemish. 5 Peter Augustus, eldest son of John Jay, was born January 24, 177b. He graduated from Columbia College in 171*4 and studied law under Peter J. Monroe. He married Mary Rutherford, daughter of General Matthew Clarkson, and became prominent struck with palsy, after.

-

Writing

of WwLingloii." by .t.nxl S,*rk..

Vol. IX.,

the legal profession and public

in

member

a

of

He was

affairs.

of the State Assembly in 1816; recorder

New York

in 1818; a

member

of the convention

which framed the constitution of the State in 1821, and for many years president of the New York Historical Society, trustee of Columbia College, etc. He received the degree of LL.D. in 1831, from Harvard, and in 1835 from Columbia. He died February 20, 1843.

John Clarkson Jay, M.D., eldest sou of Peter Augustus, was born September 11, 1808, and married Laura,

daughterof Nathaniel Prime. He isthe proatRye,andthe present well-known

prietor of the estate

representative of the family in Westchester County.

After a thorough preparation in private schools,

among

which were those of the blind teacher, Mr. Nelson, and the McCulloch school at Morristown, N. Y., he entered Columbia College, from which he graduated, together, with the late Secretary of State, Hamilton Fish, and many other distinguished men in the class of 1827.' In 1831 he took his degree as M.D. He has been a deep student of natural history, especially of couchology, and the valuable collection of shells, formerly in his possession, aud which

is

now

in the

New York Museum

of Natural History, having been purchased by Miss Wolf and presented to that institution by her, in memory of her father, has the reputation of being the finest in the country. On this blanch Dr. Jay has written several pamphlets, among

which are the Shells,

following:

New York, New and Rare

etc.,"

scription of

"Catalogue of Recent r ,tJ ;" De-

1835, 8vo, pp.

.

Shells, with four plates,"

A Catalogue, &c., pp. 78; together with a description of new and Rare Species," New

York,

New

York, pp. 125,

183(5,

2d

ed.,

4to., ten plates. The article on Commodore Perry's expediJapan, is also by him. He has been connected with many prominent literary and social organizations, both in Westchester County and in the

shells in the narrative of

tion

to

city of

He

New

York, where he spends

has been for

College,

and

many

has, at

much

of his time.

years a trustee of Columbia

two

different periods, served as

and Surgeons of the City of New York. He was one of the founders and at one time recording secretary of the New York Yacht Club, the annals of which w ill show the lively interest which he took in its management and general trustee of the College of Physicians

= i

583

"Tlie Lite of

Jithri

J«»," in

'J

tols.

Ity

"Continued dialogue of Columbia

*.n, Wllltiuu Jay. Colle*,.."

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

584

affaire.

Therecordsof theNew York Lyceum of Natural

History,

now known

as the

New York Academy of

Natural Sciences, will exhibit the interest inani lested

by him in that most useful organization. Dr. Jay is an Episcopalian and has been connected many years with Christ Church, Rye, of which he

for is

warden. He is well known throughout WestchesCounty, where he has long been greatly appre-

ter

ciated for his social and literary qualities.

These and many other illustrious names have adorned the history of the Jay family in America, the members of which have ever been faithful to their country, faithful to their religion and faithful to themselves. Their residence there has added lustre to Westchester County, and their noble influence will be remembered while American history continues to be read.

WIIXIAM ANDERSON VARIAN. William Anderson Varian, M.D., an old French family, who came to

descended from this country at an early date, the regular line of descent being as follows: First, Isaac, who was living in New York in 1720 and died about 1800 second, James, born Januis

;

ary 10. 1734, died December 11, 1K00; third, James, born November 22, 17»>5, died December 26, 1841 fourth, Dr. William A. Varian, who was born at ScarsHis mother was Elizabeth, dale January 23, 1820. daughter of John Cornell, a member of the Society of Friends and of a family noted for patriotism and virtue.

He

it

necessary for him to labor for his

own

sup-

while he was employed as a teacher in East Chester. He afterwards entered the office of Dr. James R. Wood, a prominent physician of New

port,

and

for a

York, and remained under his instruction for three same time attending the lectures at the

years, at the

medical department of the University of the City of New York, where he graduated, with the degree of M.D., March 4, 184*). After practicing for one year in New York he removed to King's Bridge, which has ever since been his home, and has been constantly employed in the practice of his profession. In 1849

he purchased a portion of the old .Macomb estate and He married Frances erected his present residence. Elizabeth, daughter of Francis Losee, September 11, Their children were Sarah (deceased), Pamelia 1845. (


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THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. who was a Van Guilder. Here, doubtJames Fountain made her acquaintance.

with her aunt,

Dr.

less.

Hosea Fountain received

hit*

English education

THF.

family is of French Huguenot and descended from Abraham Hasbroucq, who was a native of Calais. His father moved to the Palatinate, in Germany, with his two sons, Jean and Here they lived for Abraham, and a daughter. Beveral years, and in 1675 Abraham Hasbroucla,

the

fession,

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IU

and

gustus

;

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married

Stillwell, of

;

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at

Europe and the Fast, visiting Egypt and Palestiue and most ot the countries of the Old World. Returning from his travels in 1883, he settled in Yonkers, which has since been his home.

the hurying-

Bruyn's family."

Antie, died October

and settled

three years in the practice of his profession.



at the

New York

ated from the

Isaac Hasbrouck, the second son of Joseph, was March 12, 1712 (o.s.). In 1700 he married Antic Low, widow of John Van Gaaaheck. They had three children Joseph, Flsie and Jane, wife of John Crispell. Isaac died April 0, 1778, "and was buried

born

nmi.. t*ii 1(t «lx

Joseph Hasbrouck, M.D., was bora in Bergen County. New Jersey, March 20, 1839, and remained in

his native village

till

the age of fifteen,

when he

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THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. commenced teaching

which he was engaged

school, in

two years.

fur

New

At the establishment of the

S hool

Jersey Normal

he entered that institution, and graduated in He then engaged in teaching until he

due time.

During the

reached the age of twenty-nine.

latter

he pursued the study of medicine, graduated from the Medical Department

part of th it* period

ami in

18»">9

York. He immediately investigated the system of homoeopathy, and has since practiced it. His first year of practice of the University of the City of

was

at

New

(ioshen, Orange County, N. V.

he removed

From thence

Newton, Sussex County, N. J., and was the first to practice homoeopathy in that county. In 1*75 he removed to Dobbs Ferry, which has since to

He

been his place of residence.

is

a

member

of the

Westchester County Homeopathic Medical Society,

and was its president for two years. He has been four times married. His wives were Sarah and Anna both daughters of El ias Dayton, of New Jersey, !>.. and cousins of Hon. Wm. L. Dayton; Emma, daughter

of Steven Archer; and Ellen M., daughter of Rev.

Marks, of the New York Conference. Of the children of Dr. Hasbrouck, his eldest son, Dayton, who died January 13, 1885, at the age of twenty four, D. L.

was at the time of his death a

of the

class

member of

the senior

New York Homoeopathic College.

His

surviving children are Edith S. and Mabel E., twin

daughters, and an infant son, David Marks.

Although not a professional politician, he has always taken a deep interest in political affairs, and is especially interested in all that pertains to the welfare

of the locality in which he lives. He has been member of the Board of Education

for

several years a

of

Dobbs

Ferry, and

is its

present president.

He

is

also health officer of the village,

and president of the has been connected with the Republican party since its organization, and haB always taken a deep interest in its success.

savings bank.

His residence

is

one of the historical land marks It

is

the old Livingston

mansion, formerly the residence of Van Brugh Livingston. It was at this house that General Washington, Governor Clinton and General Sir Guy Tar le ton met on the suspension of hostilities, May 8, 1783, to arrange for the evacuation of New York. The man-

which is a well-preserved relic of olden times, stands on the east side of the old Albany post road, a short distance below Livingston Avenue. The place sion,

was sold by

Van Brugh

Livingston to Steven Archer

and was his residence till the time of his which occurred in 1877, and was purchased from his heirs by Dr. Hasbrouck in 1882. Dr. L«vi Wells Flagg was born in West Hartford, Conn., February 14, 1817. After receiving a thorough primary education, he became a student of Yale College, where he graduated in 1839. Among his classmates were Charles Astor Bristed and John Shcrwood, of New York, Rev. Francis Wharton, joint in

183o,

death,

Wharton and Stillc's Medical Jurisprudence," and Hon. H. L. Dawes, of Massachusetts, exGovernor Hull of Missouri, Prof. J. D. Whitney, of California, the eminent chemist and geologist, and others who have become distinguished. After graduating he went south and spent three years in teaching in St.

Francisville, Louisiana. Re-

turning to his native place in

1842, he studied medi-

W.

cine for a year with Dr. Pinckney

Ellsworth.

the expiration of that time removing to

At

New York

City, he entered the office of Prof. Willard

Parker,

with whom he remained two years. In 1847 he graduated at the College of Physicians and Surgeons (old Crosby Street school), and in the following year established himself in cian.

Yonkera

as an allopathic physi-

Shortly afterward he was induced to investi-

gate homoeopathy, the result being a conviction as

he said of

its

practice.

He

over

superiority at

became

once

and the pioneer practitioner

the its

system

old

of

strong advocate

His suc-

in the county.

cess in introducing the

new system was most marked

he grew rapidly

with the community, acpre-eminent position among

;

in favor

quiring wealth and a

the physicians of the locality.

Notwithstanding his change of faith, the relations between himself and his old teacher, Professor Parker, greatly to the honor of the latter ever continued of the most friendly character. Dr. Flagg avoided politics entirely, and never held any public office of a political character. He always devoted himself wholly to his profession, in which he was a zealous and untiring worker a portion of a year spent in Europe and a short time in Mexico, being almost the only relaxation he allowed himself between the commencement of his practice and his death on May 15, 1884. ;

He

of Westchester County.

587

author of "

When,

in 1865, the

Westchester County Homreo-

pathic Medical Society was organized, he was elected its president and held that office for three years. He was also a member of the American Institute of Homoeopathy. He married on May 17, 1848, Charlotte Whitman, of Hartford, Conn., and had eight children, five of whom are still living. Their names arc Howard W., Marietta W., Lucy W., George A. and Robert N.

Flagg,

M.

D.,

who

succeeds to

the

practice of his

father. 1 It is

with pleasure that

we

present

our readers

with the above brief outline sketch of one of the most

popular and successful physicians as

as most useful and upright citizens that it has ever been the good fortune of Westchester County to possess. Dr. Flagg came to Yonkers when the village was in its infancy and for thirty-six years watched its development and growth. No one was or could be better known than he. By his steadfast integrity, his pro>

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

588

and hid genial and winning manner he wou for himself the respeet of the business community, an extensive and lucrative practice and a high social standing. His death not only creates a vacancy beside the family hearth, but is also a loss to the city and county in which he lived, which is irrefessional ability

latter

emigrated to this country in

after his

arrival

went

1S.">3,

versity of Virginia.

Missions, as medical missionary to Japan.

ADRIAN

HUFFMAN.

K.

Hodman, who

that country he organized a hospital

remembered

one of the most distinguished physicians of Westchester County, was born at the Manor of Livingston, in Columbia County, March 20, 1797. Entering the profession of medicine at an early age, his first experience was on a three years' cruise as surgeon's mate on board the United States man-of-war " Franklin," commanded by Commodore (afterwards Admiral) Charles Stewart. After his return Dr. Hoffman settled at Sing Sing, and for nearly half a century pracHis reputaticed his profession with great success. tion was widely extended, and he was justly esteemed by his fellow-citizens as a wise and skillful physician and a prudent and able man of business. He was chosen several time* as president of the village of Sing Sing by unanimous elections. He married Jane, daughter of Dr. John Thompson, of Saratoga County, with whom he had studied mediThe issue of this marriage were Cornelia, who cine. married Alfred Buckhout, and died in January, 1*66; is

John Thompson, who became in succession twice mayor of the city of New York and twice Governor of the State, and who married Ella, daughter of Henry Starkweather, of New York Mary ;

E., wife of Colonel Charles sani,



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THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. of two sons, Joseph M. and James W. The former was born May 11, 1793, and was a prominent physician. He married Rebecca, daughter of Thomas Ward, of Sing Sing, of a family long known in this c«»unty, and died December 28. 1847, leaving four

hatred for shams of cess



;

menced the study of medicine with his father, who was then, and had been for many years, one of the physicians in charge of the Westchester County almshouse, where the son had ample opportunity of seeing much practice while yet a student. After attending three courses of lectures at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, he graduated

M.D."

in 1847.

The next year he began practice in his native town, and continued it until the close of his life, being invariably favored with a large, remunerative and responsible practice. He became his father's successor in the profession, aud was appointed to fill his place at the Almshouse. During his entire life Dr. Scribner held a high position

among

his

professional

brethren

1



the

in

county. So acute were his perceptions, so widely read was he in his profession, and so skillful in applying his acquirements to practical use, that if he

had made a specialty of any one department of medicine, he would have become renowned as a leader in it. But he devoted himself to general practice,

and was

satisfied to

gain a local reputation as a

ful physician, surgeon

and

obstetrician.

It is

SAMUEL SWIFT. Samuel

seldom j

sent for when consultation was required in cases of prolonged illness or in emergencies. He

induced

to the friends

without

or

complaint, ministering

far less in need of help than he was himself, until his force was all expended, and he laid down hia labor and his life together. In all

his

professional

relations he was pre-eminently a man, never gossiping about his cases in the room, and seldom indulging in conversation, even upon topics of general interest. Though dignified and courteously reserved in his intercourse with the world, among his friends he was always cheerful and fully enjoyed light amusements and harmless jokes. silent

sick

descended

from an old

history of that portion of the country. till

1858,

Dr. Swift re-

when he went

chusetts and entered Williston Seminary.

he entered Yale College, and graduated

to

murmur unto hundreds who were night,

is

to New England at an His immediate ancestors were residents of Dorchester, Mass. He was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., August f), 1849, his father, Samuel Swift, being then a prosperous merchant in New York. His mother was Mary, daughter of Samuel Phelps, of West Hampton, Mass., of a family well known in the

sided in Brooklyu

he

could seldom be

withdraw himself from his work for relaxation or amusement. During the last year of his life, while suffering from the acute pains of a malignant disease and from the depression naturally arising from it, he attended regularly to business day and

M.D.,

who came

early date.

one always

was devoted to his profession and had acquired in following it, aud

Swift,

English family

skill-

that any one becomes as accomplished in all these divisions of practical medicine as was Dr. Scribner. His counsel was frequently sought by physicians at a distance, and in his own neighborhood he was the

all kinds. His profession was to amuse, and he never sought to win sucby any means outside of his skillful treatment of cases. Operations of a complicated nature and requiring the highest skill were performed by him but his modesty kept him from reporting the cases, and they remain unknown to all except the ones who were directly benefited by his art. It is needless to Bay that his moral and professional worth were alike appreciated by the entire community. For several years he was elected president of the village, held the highest offices in the Westchester County Medical Society, and was a delegate to the National Medical Association in 1871. He was also a member of the New York State Medical Society and of the American Medical Association, and an honorary member of the California State Medical For several terms he was chosen president Society. and director of the Westchester County Agricultural Society, and was an able and efficient member of the Board of Education of Tarrytowu. He married Margaret E. Miller, and left two daughters, Josie and Ella. By his death, which occurred January 28, 1880, the community suffered an irreparable loss; all classes mounted him as a friend, and it was with feelings of no common veneration that his friends and neighbors bore to their fiual home the remains of one who had been in all the relations of life a useful and honored man.

cure, not to

children, Dr. James W., John C, Mary (wife of Robert Jameson) and Philip W. His son, James W., attended the public schools until he was fifteen years old, when he was transferred to the collegiate school of Bedford, of which Samuel Holmes was principal. Having acquired a good classical educntion, he com-

as -

593

Dr. Scribner's professional silence grew out of his

the degree of Ph.B.

In the

fall

to

MassaIn 1866

in 1868

with

of 1809 he joined

the Medical Department of Cambridge University, ;

where he remained one year. He then entered the Medical Depariment of Columbia College, and was M. Markoe. In 1872 he graduated and received the diploma of M.D., and was the valedictorian of his class. After completing his studies he made a short tour to Europe, where he spent six months, principally in Germany. Previous to his trip he had been appointed resident physician at the " Nursery and Child's Hospital," in New Y'ork, obtaining this position by a successful competitive also a private pupil of Dr. T.

examination after completing his services there he was lor a time connected with the Northeastern ;

Digitized by

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY. In the

fall

of 1K73 he mine to Yonkers, where he

Here he entered

him since resided.

into a business

partnership with Dr. J. Foster Jenkins, a physician

of great tinued

skill

and reputation, and

this connection con-

the death of Dr. Jenkins, in 1882.

till

In hit

Dr. Swift has attained an enviable and

profession

He

well-merited reputation.

member

a

is

of the

New

Medical Society of the State of

York, of the New York Academy of Medicine, of the Westchester Medical Society, the JenkinB Medical Society of Yonkers and the Boylston Medical 8ociety of Boston,

H« has

always been identified with the Demoand in 1882 was elected mayor of the city of Yonkers. He has also been president of the Board of Education, and is justly recognized a*» a prominent and useful citizen and a skillful medical practiMass.

cratic party,

landt, w

ho died a bachlor and left his large estate, Van Cortlandt Manor, to be divided between his two nephews, Pierre Van Cortlandt and including the Philip G.

Van Wyck.

Dr. Van Wyck's mother was Mary Smith Gardiner, daughter of Colonel Abraham Gardiner, who was one of the lineal descendants of Lion Gardiner, of Gardiner's Island.

Coming of a

race of those

who had from

history of the country been

foremost iu

the earliest patriotism,

generosity and the development of

all

human Cortlandts, Van

from the

of

traits

nature, descended

Wycks, whose names are

so

intimately

and

own

country, he

forgot the traditions of his ancestry, but was

New

the genial, high-toned, honorable gentleman.

York, and has one child, Martha. He is a member of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, where he has served

entered

as vestryman since 1877,

cla*s of 1845.

and

at

is

present junior

Beginning

life

Van Van

interwoven

married Lucy, daughter of Hon. Henry E.

Davis, late judge of the Court of Appeals of

nobler

the

Rensselaers, Gardiners

with the early history of our

tioner.

He

His father, Philip Gilbert Van Wyck. was the nephew and adopted son of General Philip Van Cort-

never always

under these favorable auspices, he

Princeton College and graduated with the

He

warden of the church.

began the study of medicine under the care of He was afterwards a student of Physicians and Surgeons of New York, where he enjoyed the benefit of the instructions of the celebrated Dr. Willard Parker. He graduated in 1849. ami was afterward* appointDr. Adrian K. Hoffman.

at the College

AlV.rSTUS Dr. Augustus

Van

VAN CORTLANDT.

Cortlandt was born August 81,

and died December

1826.

24, 1884.

He

was the son

Van Cortlandt and Harriet, daughter of Peter Jay Munro, of Mamaroneck. His paternal grandfather was James Morris, of Morrisania, of Frederick Augustus

and

his

grandmother Helen

father took the estate at

name

of

Van

Van

His inherit an

Cortlandt.

Cortlandt to

Lower Yonkers, now called King's Bridge. in which Dr. Van Cortlandt was born was

The house

afterwards purchased, property, by

Van

with a small portion of the

ed by President Taylor, United States inspector of drugs, at the port of

While holding

New

this

York.

position he

Radway &

became interested

which he still held an interest at the time of his death. In 1862 he was appointed by President Lincoln assessor of internal revenue for the Fourth District of New York. iu the firm

He

Hon. Waldo Hutchings.

of

Co., in

organized the district and continued to adnru-

ably and efficiently until it was consolidated In January, 1882, President Arthur appointed him superintendent of the United States and learned very broke out he went to California, and upon his return Assay Office in New York, to succeed Mr. Thomas C. to New York began the study of medicine. When Acton, who was made Assistant Treasurer of the the war opened he joined the Ninth New York Regi- United States. ment and went to Washington. With a number of In politics he was a Whig until 1856, when he others, heshortly left the Ninth and joined the Twelfth. joined the Republican party during the Fremont camHe had always been prominent in the counpaign. (In the return of his regiment he went out w ith the Seventh. On returning home he was sent to David's cils of his party and was many times sent as a deleand National Conventions, and was one Suite gate to Island as physician. Subsequently he commenced the practice of medicine in New Rochelle, which he of the famous three hundred and six who voted so persistently for General Grant at Chicago in 1**0. continued until his death. When the nomination of General Garfield was His practice was never very remunerative, being principally aim ng the poor, by whom he seemed to announced, Governor Dennison of Ohio, came to the New York delegation and said that any candidate be much beloved. they named for Vice-President would be nominated. Dr.

Cortlandt was sent at

an early age to a

He had a wonderful memory rapidly. When the California fever

school at White Plain*.

Dr.

PIERRE (ORTI.ANKT VAX WVCK. Pierre Cortlandt

Van Wyck, M.D., was born

ister

in

at the

old Van Cortlandt Manor-house, on the banks of the Croton River, September 24, 1824.

it

1871.

Van Wyck proposed

the

name of Chester A.

Arthur, which was unanimously indorsed. Dr. Van Wyck had been the personal

President Arthur for

friend

of*

twenty years, and was with

him on that memorable night of September

H',

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HISTORY OF WKSTCH ESTER COUNTY.

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.



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THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. attention to the wants of his patients,

careful

mid economy

management of

in the

he has accumulated

faire,

for

and

his private af-

himself an

extensive

Anno nk,

Hill,

and

is

greatly re-

spected in the city of his adoption both as a private

officer

prai

and a moderate

tii-e

fortune.

He

is

He

and an influential physician.

RALPH BARXARD 9RI8WOLD. The family of Ralph Barnard Griswold, M.D., was The

English.

originally

first

ancestor in this coun-

to New London, and it is supposed that Griswold, near that city, was named after some

was Roger Griswold,

try

who came

Conn., before the Revolution, Fort

members of the

of the

He

acceptable

member

for

twenty-eight

For fifteen years Dr. Griswold has managed the er.

financial

valuable service sary for

May

Winsted in 1848, he attended the district school, after which he became a pupil of St.

taught

Griswold,

taught

practicing medicine Greenwich, Conn., and Julia Alice Griswold are

He

in

the

living. Hehas held the office of commissioner

Stroudsburg,

of highways of his town

also

For

tarry

to

M.D.,

Ph.B.,

now

and

still

for five consecutive

terms

of three years each, and

great there that

urged

Four

Early.

were born to them, of whom William L.

His success was so he was

Pa.

1858, he married

children

Winchester

and

months at

1,

support.

nine

academy at Centre

its

Mary Jane

where

Coe. school in

in the

collection of funds neces-

vil-

lage of

School,

matters of the

church of which he is a member, and has rendered

His parents

R.

hold-

years,

schools, either as a pupil, superintendent or teach-

family.

Colebrook, Litchfield County, Conn., January

James'

health

ing the offices of trustee, steward and chorister from the time of his arrival to the present. He bus been since his earliest recollec tion connected with Sabbath-

at

James

his

County.

Church at Winsted, Conn., in his seventeenth year, and in 1857 brought his letter from this church to the Middle Patent Methodist Church, where he has been an

.'

by Revs. Jonathan

Castle,

also

is

joined the Methodist Episcopal

Barnard GrisM.D., son of Lucius and Julia Elizabeth Barnard) Griswold, was born

1835.

North

town physician and of the Board of Health. is

Ralph

18,

Long Ridge,

Castle and

the leading physician in

wold,

moved to the thriving

New

post-office address being Banksville. Fairfield

Conn.

citizen

5f»7

Bedford,

still

longer.

holds the position.

He has also been tendered

however, it been his desire to become a physician, and years,

had

the

nomination

pervisor, but

for

su-

owing

to of

while yet en-

pressure

gaged

a

professional

in

business, has

as

teacher

en obliged

Stroudsburg, he fully

to decline the

de-

cided to exe-

honor-

He read

He

medicine with H. B. Steele,

has always been a temperance man, and became espec-

M.D.,of Winsted, Conn., and attended his first course of

work in 1870, when he assisted in organizing the Middle Patent Division of the Sons of Temperance. He was made its first Worthy Patriarch, and some three years afterward was elected Grand Worthy Patriarch of the Grand Division "Sonsof Temperance " of Eastern New York, embracing in its jurisdiction some thirteen counties of the State. He is also

cute this purpose.

lectures at

York, tute

the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New

and a

full

course at the Eclectic Medical Insti-

of Cincinnati, O., where he graduated in

Feb

1857.

been his father's wish that he should spend some time in Europe to further advance his medical education, but being of an ambitious turn of mind, and having confidence in his own ability, he decided not to accept the kind offer thus made. In April, 1857, he came to North Castle, where he immediately began the practice of medicine and has succeeded in building up a business second to none in this part of It

hail

the county.

He

is

now

called to Stanwich.

Round

ially active in that

an ex-officio member of the National Division of the association. He has always been a consistent Republican, not having missed either a town or State election in over twenty-eight years. He has

same

identified himself, irrespective of party,

church or

state,

with any and every cause which he thought was for the

W ESTC H ESTER

HISTORY OF

5!»S

community, being always ready to lend a helping hand. He has often, after a day of toil or a thirty or forty-mile ride, driven away again some heuefit of the

mile* to

five

drill

of singers in for

or

company

take charge of a

giving a

weak

«ome

or entertainment

concert

His

society.

liberal

tendencies,

together with his cordial disposition and the valuable

and still conwhich lie lives,

services which he has in times past tines

to render

the

community

in

have endeared him to its people and made an honor to the county of his adoption.

his

name

COUNTY.

at the University, after

completing which in 1878 he

removed

to Katonah, where he still resides. has by care and industry succeeded in building up for himself an extensive practice, and has during

He

his residence in

Katonah

will render his reputation in the place

many

effected

permanent and

cures which his

presence

He

a continual agency for good.

is

a

member of the Methodist Church of Katonah, and also a member of the following Masonic organizations

:

Kisco Lodge, No. 708

202; and Crusade

Croton Chapter, No.

;

Commaudery, No.

56.

He

WALTON JAY CASPBXTEB. Walton Jay Carpenter, M.D.,

is

descended from an

married April 30, 1884, Miss Anna L. Green, daughter of Alsoph Green, of Katonah. Dr. Carpenter is connected with the Westchester

English family who came New England during

Medical Society,

to

the

the seventeenth century.

is

Fiona thence a branch reof Pur-

widely respected-

among

members of which he known and as

widely

moved to the town chase,

Westchester

in

CHAPTER

County, where they took up land and engaged in farming. Charles B. Carpenter, father of

RY MEN, OK WESTCHESTKR COUNTY.

Walton

Jay, was of this line. He married Rachel White,

and of their

j

live children.

BY thos.schauf, a.m., lui>

Westchester County

Carpenter was the He was born in Duanesburgh, .Schenectady County, N. Y., September 11, 1862, and reDr.

has good reason to pride

oldest.

herself

on her contribu-

tions to the literature of

Few,

the country.

moved with his family when but four years of age

if

any,

counties in the Union, can

show au equally brilliant record. She has given

After a stay

to Illinois.

XIII.

AWU L1TKRA-

I.ITERATl'RE

of two years in the West the family returned to

ters

Duanesburgh where the youth attended the public

The

great-

est literary genius,

proba-

birth to

many noted

and

many

has

more.

wri-

nurtured

our

school, leav-

bly, that

ing at the age

country has produced, the weird, uncan-

of fifteen for

the Delaware Literary

ny Poe, found inspiration

In-

stitute.where

he passed two wintors. A period of three years, divided between teaching and study followed; then a two years' course of select studies at Union College and a term of medical preparation under the celebrated professor, Dr. Alfred Iyoomis, of

New York.

In the

fall

of

1

s7"»

he entered the medical department of the University of the City of New York, and finally finthe spring of 1877,

ished his course in

when he

graduated.

He

first

settled at

he practiced

Round

for a few

Hill, Connecticut,

where

months, in connection with his

M.D. but this town not offering the advantages which he craved, he returned to New Y'ork City and entered upon a post-graduate course uncle, J. C. White.

;

her borders, on the Hudson, and that sunny,

within

banks of the lordly facile

intellect

which

dwelt in the pure and lofty brow of Washington Irving found equal delight in exploring the mystic

nooks and windings of its "Sleepy Hollows." Fenimore Cooper, the great pioneer of American fiction, roamed over its rugged hills and through its pleasant meadows, and treading close upon his heels came James Kirke Paulding, Irving'* friend and collaborateur, whose strong Americanism was quite as pure and unadulterated as was that of the patriotic Cooper.

Among

political

writers,

Westchester pre-

names of Hamilton, Tom Paine, Seabury, Wilkins, the Jays, Gouverneur Morris, Daniel

sents the great

Google

LITERATURE AND LITERARY MEN. Tompkins. John Bigelow, Horace Greeley, James Watwui Webb, besides a hast of lesser celebrities. George Washington, though not, properly speaking, a

I).

the valleys of San Joaquin and Sacramento and the

Returning to Washington in 1844, he report, and upon its completion literary character, deserves to be included among those set out on another expedition to the Pacific, the rewho have transmitted noble thoughts as well as noble sult of which was the acquisition of California by the deeds to his countrymen. His association with the United States, lie was sent to Washington in 1850 people of Westchester County during the Revolution- as the first United States Senator from California. ary era is fully set forth elsewhere in this work. In 185*5 he was the Republican candidate for PresiAmong his writings are to be found vivid bits of dent of the United States and during the Civil War description of Westchester localities, with which he held a commission as major-general in the Union became familiarized in passing through the county. army. A superb edition of his reports, entitled " FreThe Sparks collection of Washington's writings fills mout's Explorations," was published in 1859. Among other names associated with the history of twelve large octavo volumes. His first appearance as an author was in the publication, in 17">4, at Williams- Westchester County which have attained to distincburg, Va., and in London, of his journal of his pro- tion in literature are those of J. Rodman Drake, John ceedings " To and from the French of the Ohio," a Savage, William Leggett, Robert Rogers, David brief tract written hastily from the rough notes taken Humphreys, Gulian C. Verplanck, Ann Eliza Bleeckon his expedition. His State papers, correspondence er, Mrs. Haven, James Partou, Rev. Thomas Allen, a and " Farewell Address " are too well known to need chaplain of the Revolutionary army at White Plains, description here. Major John Andre, whose monrnful who took an active part in the political discussions of fate is indissolubly linked with the glorious deeds of the time; Charles Tafin Armand, the Marquis de la Washington, spent the closing days of his career in Rouarie, an eloquent and persuasive speaker and Westchester. He was a poet as well as a soldier and writer, who, in 1778, was actively engaged in Westau accomplished man of letters. chester County in opposing Simcoe, Emmerick and Daniel D. Tompkins, Vice-President of the United Baremore,the Loyalist, whom he captured near King's States, belongs to the political, rather than to the Bridge November 8, 1779; Aaron Burr, who was staliterary history of Westchester County, although his tioned in Westchester County in the winter of 1778talents as a speaker and writer, entitle him to recog- 79, and whose duel with Hamilton took place at nition as u man of letters. He was a native of Scars- Wechawken; Nathaniel Chipman, LL.D., the Verpublished another

jurist, who participated in the battle of White Plains Joel Barlow, the author of the " Columbiad," and Rev. William Crosswcll, D.D., clergyman and scholar, born at Hudson, November 7, 1804, and

mont

dale.

Samuel category,

J.

Tilden

may be included

and can be claimed

as

in

the

one of the

same

celebri-

Westchester County, where, at his beautiful estate " Greystone," he spends much of his time in ties of

elegant and scholarly retirement.

General John C. Fremont, the soldier, explorer, author and politician, resided at one time at Mount Pleasant, in the house built by General James Watson Webb. His wife, who is the daughter of Senator Benton, of Missouri, is a woman of great accomplish-

ments and decided literary tastes. General Fremont, who was born at Savannah, Ga., January 21, 1813, is known to literature by his graphic reports, which were published

by the federal government, of his Western explorations. Devoting himself in early life to civil engineering, he obtained an appointment in the government expedition for the survey of the headwaters of the Mississippi, and was afterwards employed at Washington preparing maps of the country explored.

In 1842, at the head of a small

force,

he

Rocky Mountains and opened to commerce and emigration the Great South Pass. His report of his adventures was so interesting that it was reprinted by publishers in this country and in England and was translated into various foreign language*. He next accomplished an expedition to Oregon, and, striking southward and westward, after crossed the

incredible hardships, succeeded in exploring the

gion

gold region.

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gers' Slide " on I^ake George, so-called from the daring act of Rogers iu escaping from the Indians by sliding down the steep After face of the mountain to the shore of the lake. many romantic adventures in this country and in

of his best

Hamilton wrote fifty-one out of eighty-five His life and public services are too well His fame will

21, 1818.

to

with the literary chron-

man suffer death Of the famous

and minister to Spain, 1797-1802.

Rangers.

j

of the county, and one of his strongest, political

" Never, perhaps, did any

held the diplomatic post of ambassador

New Haven, February

Robert Rogers, the noted ranger and writer, narbeing captured by Ix>rd Stirling's troops at Mamaroneck, so that his associations connected with Westchester County were not, perhaps, of the pleasantest character. He was then a colonel

of the fate of

papers was his reply to Dr. Seabury's supposed " WotChester Farmer" pamphlets. Of Andre he wrote,

He

died at

rowly escaped

of a tragic char-

that he lost his

the duel with Burr, July 12, 1804.

He

After the war he resided with

plays.

to Lisbon, 1794-1797,

life to

Alexander Hamilton with the

Weehawken

of Washing-

Washington at Mount Vernon, and when he became President, traveled with him to New York. Among his poetical productions is " Washington's Farewell to the Army,"

the Examiner and the

of Westchester County

acter, for

entered the Rev-

wrote a life of General Putnam, and a number of poems

and

eculptor.

association of

He

member

family, with the rank of colonel.

ton's military

the Erie Canal and chairman of the canal

Houdon, the

New York

He was the son of a Congregational clergyman, Rev. Daniel Humphreys, and was born in Derby, Connecticut, in 1753. He was educated at

In October,

was an early advocate of commissioners from their first appointment, in March, 1810, to the time of his death, which occurred November His life, with selections from his corre(5, 181(5. spondence and papers, by .lured Sparks, was published In person he so closely resembled Washin 1822. ington that he stood as a model ot his figure for

is

and Charleston.

He

I'nited State* Gazette.

being in possession of

at Peekskill, the foe

he returned home. In 1799 he was chosen United States Senator from New York. He sided in the Senate and for the remainder of his life with the His term closed in March, 1803, after Federalists. On Christmas day, which he resided at Morrisania. 1809, he married Miss Anne Carey Randolph, of VirMr. Morris delivered funeral orations on ginia. Washington, Hamilton and Governor George Clinton and an inaugural discourse before the New York Historical Society ou his election as president, aud the

and

etc.,

David Humphreys, the soldier poet of the Revolulution, composed his " Address to the Armies of the United States of America" in 1782, while encamped

1798,

contributed frequently in the later years of his

has written tragedies, poems, prose,

a highly cultivated and accomplished litterateur.

soon after was pro-

He

and

his subRogers published in

ster,

"Journals,"' a spirited account of his early adventures as a ranger, and in the same year. " A

abundant

Concise Account of North America."

ury Department.

"he smote the rock of the national resources and streams of revenue gushed forth. He touched the dead corpse of the public credit and it

sprung upon

its feet."

176.1, his

In the following year, he published a tragedy, " Pouteach," founded

on scenes of frontier

life.

Digitized by

Google

LITERATURE AND LITERARY MEN.

was ordained a Presbyterian minister and rethe degree of D.D. from Hampden-Sidney His brother, E. D. Prime, also of Obterter, and W. C. Prime, formerly of the New the York Journal of Commerce, were also residents of Sing Sing in early life. John Swinburne, A.M., the distinguished scholar and teacher, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., August 11, 1803. His father was a native of England, and came His mother was to this country when a young man. a native of Ireland, and was brought to the United

Rev. Nathaniel Scudder Prime, D.D., author of a "Treatise on Baptism" and the "History of Long Island," died at

was born

Mawaroneck, March

at Huntington, L.

I.,

April 21, 1785

;

1829,

ceived

He

27. 185fi.

College, Virginia.

gradu-

ated in 1804 at Princeton College, from which, in

he received the degree of D.D., and was ordained a Presbyterian minister October 24, 1809. In the spring of 1830 the Rev. Dr. Prime came to Sing Sing with hia family from Cambridge, WashingHe had been invited by the ton County. N. Y. trustees of the Mount Pleasant Academy, in Sing 1848,

States by her parents in early childhood.

its principal and had accepted the appointment. Having been the princ ipal of the academy in Cambridge, he brought several pupils with him, and a high reputation as a scholar and teacher. Dr. Prime was a very remarkable man. His father and grandfather were men of learning, and he himself had made great attainments in the ancient languages, philosophy and mathematics. There was probably no superior to him as a teacher in this country at that time. His two eldest sons, Alanson Jei main and Samuel Iremeus, were associated with him in the work of instruction. The Female Seminary in Sing Sing, then under the care of Miss Dawson, was soon purchased by Dr. Prime, and his daughters, Miss Maria M. Prime and Miss Cornelia Prime, conducted the school with great

Sing, to be

The academy



John was the

Dr.

Prime in

to it

tion,

from

its earliest

When

three.

twelve

His educa-

stages until he entered on the

life, was directed by an English gentleman of rare attainments as a scholar and eminent as a teacher, and the successful results of his

duties of active

skill

training were

finely

illustrated

in

the subsequent

After leaving school he turned his attention fur a short time to mercantile career of his gifted pupil.

pursuits, and was engaged as book-keeper by a large commercial house in North Carolina. Not finding this sphere of effort congenial to his taste, he returned, after a year and a half, to Brooklyn, where he established, and successfully conducted for ten years, a select school. On October 5, 1825, he was married to Mary W., daughter of Isaac Searles, of Brooklyn. A few years afterward he accepted an invitation to the

flourished and attracted students from

of the village invited

take charge of the pulpit, and he as stated supply about three years.

eldest of the

years of age he lost his father by death.

distant parts of the country.

preached

After their

marriage his parents settled in Brooklyn, where they had three children. two sons and one daughter.

success.

The Presbyterian congregation

605

position of principal of

He

White Plains Academy, an

incorjiorated literary institution

improvement of the place, all public movements of a

under the care of the

This position he

identified himself with the

regents of the State.

taking an active part in philanthropic and moral character.

highest credit to his ability as an educator of youth.

While principal of

In addition to

the sons and daughters already named, two sons more were trained in the academy, Edward D. G.

this

academy he

filled

with the

received, as

entirely voluntary tribute to his learning

and

The

Prime and William C. Prime, the first-named graduating at Union Colli go and the other at Princeton.

leyan University at Middletown, Conn.

The

degree, said, in his letter to ProfcssorSwinburne

oldest son, A.

.J.

for

president,

Rev. Wilbur Fiske, D-D., LL.D., in presenting this

Prime, pursued the study of

medicine with Dr. A. K. Hoffman, and was

an

skill,

the honorary degree of Master of Arts from the Wes-

many

honor

is

regarded

by our

:

"This

Faculty and Board of

years a successful physician at White Plains, where he died April 3, 1864, aged fifty-three years.

Trustees us justly due to your superior scholarship, as

During the time of Dr. Prime's principal* hip of the academy, and almost entirely through his perseverance and enterprise, the large and handsome stone building now occupied by the institution was built, and it stands as a monument to his memory. In the vear 183.*) Dr. Prime and his family removed to Newburgh, N. Y., where they conducted a female seminary and also the Newburgh Academy. His son, Rev. Samuel Iremeus Prime, D.D., who died in 1885, was for many years the editor of the York Observer, and known throughout the J\,'ew country aa a graceful writer of travels and religious

Institution, are the best fitted of

works, as well as

the

(tbterrcr.

November

4,

for his able editorial

He

was boru

at

proved by the fact that your scholars, In 1841, Professor Swinburne,

enter our

desired a school

which should be subject to his solo authority, and in which he might carry out practically and fully his views of the proper education of boys,

established

"The White Plains Institute," a boarding-school for boys. The reputation of its proprietor and principal, as an accomplished instructor

and as a Christian gen-

tleman of the highest qualities, was so extensively known and fully established, that from its opening applicants for admission to the institute were more numerous than could be received. He now found

management of

Ballston.

N. Y.,

1812, graduated at Williams College in

who

any we receive."

who

1

himself in just the sphere of educational effort which he had long wished. His school was his own, wa»admirably located, liberally furnished in every depart-

Digitized by

HISTORY OF WESTCHESTKR COUNTY. 1

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«» address before the Historical Society of New York. Iu grotesque descriptions of Duteh manners and customs iu the colony of New Netherhinds are full of humor. Alter the publication of this work Irving engaged as silent partner with two of his brothers in mercantile business. The second war with (ireat Rritain breaking out, he joined the military staff of Governor Tompkins, with the rank his health

»»y

way of Switzerland

" f colonel.

After the war he paid a

British Islands,

and intended

to

make

visit

to

the

a tour of the

Continent, but business reverses involving the ruin his firm compelled him to abandon his purpose, Irving now turned to literature for support, and through the friendly aid of Sir Walter Sett, secured the publication of the "Sketch Hook " by Murray, M

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LITERATURE AND LITERARY MEN. Paris

he wrote

"

Bracebridge Hall."

1822 was spent in Dresden.

The winter

Returning

to Paris

of

erected by the vestry to his memory.

in

is

1*23 he published, in December of the following year, his " Tales of a Traveller," for which he received from

Murray the sum of £1500.

In

18215, after

fill

In the centre

the Irving coat of arms and on the stone the fol-

lowing inscription WiuliliiRtoti Irving,

spending a I«..rti

in thf f'itv of

»w

V..rk. A|ril

.1,

17*3.

winter in the south of France, he went to Madrid, r'..r

where he wrote his "Life of Columbus," the English edition of which brought him 300) guineas. His Conquest of Granada" and "Alhambra" followed. In July, 1829, having been appointed Secretary of Legation, at I/indon, he left Spain for England. In 1*31 he received, from the University of Oxford the degree of LL.D. After an absence of seventeen years he returned to America, in May, 1832. His arrival was commemorated by a public diuner in New YorkCity, at which Chancellor Kent presided. A few months later he made a journey west of the Mississippi, which he described in his "Tour of the Prairies." In 183ft he published " Astoria " and subsequently the "Adventures* of Captain Bonnevill." From 1839 for two years he contributed a series of papers to

i.uinv y.jin. »

KnirkertiOi-ter

Mmjnziite.

A number

of these

papers, together with others, were published in 1855, a volume which

in

received

the

title

"Woolfcrt's

Roost." In 1842 Irving was appointed Minister to Spain, an

which he retained for the next four years. He then returned home and for the rest of his life resided at his cottage residence " Sunnyside," near Tarryoffice

town, the spot which he had described years before in the " legend of Sleepy Hollow " as the castle of the



Herr Van Tassel, and of which he wrote " If ever I should wish for a retreat whither I might steal from the world and its distractions, and dream quietly away the remainder of a troubled life, I know of none more promising than this little valley." Here in this retreat he lived in the midst of a family circle composed of his brother and his nieces, hospitably entertaining his friends and engaged in writing his biographies of Goldsmith and Mahomet and his " Life of Washington/'

His

life

at

affectionate.

"Sunnyside" was simple, kindly and friend and neighbor and

He was a good

a devout communicant at Christ Episcopal Church in

Tarrytown. For many years he was a vestryman and warden, and it was his practice during the greater part of this time to take

day

services.

Ho

up the

collection at the Sun-

never married, having

lost

by death

betrothed wife, Matilda

Hoffman, a beautiful young girl. His death occurred at Tarrytown, Nnveml>cr 28, 1850, and he was buried in the beautiful cemetery of Sleepy Hollow. The ivy upon the tower of Christ Church was taken from "Sunnyside" and planted by Irving himself. It was originally brought from Melrose Abbey. His pew in the church i> marked with his name and was set apart years ago by the vestry for the use of any members of the Irving family who might wish to worship there. As near his

the

pew

as

it

could be placed

is

a

mural

tablet

nu.l wurdfli of tl.U rhurrli.

Ami on* of

K..|.-..t«llv

'•

the

roiiimmiUnnt

Of l.uYixl,

II..

icun» to

It*

tin-

tl>-

Cotiwiillnu

IMocesr.

llomiml, lU-rerwI.

Ml

;»l.t.p in

N\.»< n.l»r

J~us, IRVl.

Irving died at " Sunnyside." having just taken leave

Three days later he was buried in Church cemetery, where he had some time

of the family-circle. the old Dutch

before selected the spot for his grave, and where the

remains of the brothers and sisters who had died before him were buried. An account of the funeral says " It was a remarkable assemblage from the city, of men of :

worth and eminence, the friends of his youth andmiddle-life,aud universally of the population of the town and adjacent country, where he was beloved by all. The area of Christ Church, Tarrytown, where the funeral services of the Episcopal Church, of

which he had

been n member, were performed, was much too limited to contain the numbers which thronged to the

The neighboring hillside was covand the road to the cemetery lined with spectaand others, clad in their Sunday attire. The shops of Tarrytown were all closed. Thus was

simple ceremony. ered,

tors, villagers

borne to the grave with simple but heartfelt honors that

was mortal of Washington Irving. Eulogies,

all

res-

olutions and addresses from civic, religious, literary

and other societies followed his death. The city government of New York, the Athemeum Club, the New York Historical Society, the Massachusetts Historical Society, heaped these honors on his tomb, while personal tributes in sermons, editorial articles and various reminiscences were called forth in great number." " By his will, says the same account, " which made ample provision to continue the home at 'Sunnyside' to the brother and nieces by whom Mr. Irving had

been surrounded, he ew, Pierre M. Irving,

some of

his

left his

manuscripts to his neph-

who had been

more important

his assistant in

labors of research, as his

Mr. Irving afterwards published a memoir of his distinguished uncle. Mr. George P. literary executor."

Putnam, the New York publisher, issued a uniform Washington Irving'* works, in 1847, which yielded Mr. Irving and his representatives more than edition of

*150,0opular work,

its

as

the

in

forty

in

serial,

number appearing

Commanders-in-chief

by the successive

appointed

through

C.13

the vouchers of

the auditors

found

;

and a very elaborate analysis of

"

The

Fomg Island " for the Long Island Historical Society, together with several minor tracts, and numerous articles for periodicals with which he has had no editorial connection; and he edited, in

INtil, for

the Mercantile Library Associa-

New York City a volume of original pajK?rs, War, to which he added voluminous notes. The introduction to the last-named volume, which ltore the title of "NewYork City During the American Revolution," attion of

generally of the Revolutionary

tracted

much

attention, since

it

contained a carefully

,

1

Nelson, of the

Supreme Court of the United

States,

ordered a great case to be re-argued, in order that ar-

which had appeared

ticles

bearing on

after

the case had been argued, could be judicially

it,

in the Gazette

admitted as authorities before the decision of the court was given and it is said that the authoritative ;

character of those articles, which

were from Mr. Dawson's pen, were seen in the decision of the court given by that distinguished jurist. In Brodhead's "History of the State of New York," and in otherworks of equally high character, the historical articles which Mr. Dawson prepared for The Gazette, were repeatedly referred

numbers of the sought, and liouiid

to

as

Odd

standard authorities.

Gazette of that period are eagerly

command

high prices;

and carefully preserved libraries; and

historical society's

in it

of

files

are

state

and

known

that,

the is

it

fifteen dollars were paid for an file of it for the twelve months during which Mr. Dawson was its editor. Four volumes of selections from the more im{ortant articles in the Gazette have been printed un-

during the past year,

unbound

der the general titles

of

title

of the " Gazette Series."

the several volumes are:

vol.

i.

The

"Papers

concerning the capture and detention of Major John Andre," collected by Henry B. Dawson, Yonker*, vol. ii., " Papers concerning the boundN. Y., ;

ary between the States of

New York and New

sey," written by several hands, Yonkera,

Jer-

IHlili;

vol.

"

Papers concerning the town and village of Yonkers, Westchester County," a fragment, by Heury

iii.,

Digitized by

Google

LITERATURE AND LITERARY MEN. 18**6 vol. iv., "Rambles in Henry B. DawTbe authors of the articles in Cochrane, Attorney-Genii. were General John of New York Hon. J. Rouieyu Brodhead, (two

Dawson, Yonkers,

B.

her of the

;

Westchester County," a fragment, by son, vol.

eral

Institute,

Society; an honorary member by the Minnesota and the New England Methodist Historical Societies, and a corresponding member by the Massachusetts, Vermont, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia. Wisconsin, Chicago, and New England HistoricGcnpalogical, the Long Island, tbe Oneida and the Cayuga County Historical Societies; and also by the

Yonkers, 186«.

tical

;

William A. Whitehead, of Newark, in reply Dawson bimself, who endeavored to act as umpire between the two; Mr. Whitehead, in reply to Mr. Dawson; Mr. Dawson, in reply to Mr. Whitehead aud the Attorney-General of New York article*)

;

tu

the last; Mr.

in

closing the argument.

Worcester (Massachusetts) Society of Antiquity, the

;

with a postscript by Mr.

The correspondence closes The volume was

American

Dawson.

in

one of the boundary

suits;

and the argu-

Dawson presented in his articles, are said to have influenced Judge Nelson in determining the case for New York. The Andre is

probably the most perfect " Andreana" in

The series of volumes has been sold at one hundred dollars for the set, the edition being very small, only twenty-six copies having been printed. print.

A month

or two after dissolving his relations with

Mr. Dawson purchased The Hittoricnl became the editor and pubHis first number was that for July, 18Gd. Ten volumes having been completed at the end of the year, he began in January. 1867, a new and enlarged series of the work giving double the number f pages and making two volumes in a year. As editor of this publication Mr. Dawson has achieved wide reputation among literary people, and especially among the student* of every branch of American history. The magazine became a mine of historical information, and continues to be regarded as one of the standard references of American literature. In ixr.s the " Manual of the New York Common Council" passed into the editorial care of the new clerk, Joseph Shannon, and his deputy, F. J. Twomey. It now began to be issued in an enlarged and improved form. Mr. Dawson, ou invitation, furnished the historical material and added some new features to the work. The Charter of the city was collated 1'V him, critically, with the ancient parchments, and the

(lazrtie,

troversialists.

In religious opinion he is a resolute and uncompromising Calvinistic Baptist; and in politics an oldHe voted for fashioned "States-rights Democrat."

Magazine, of which he lisher.

was

first

printed accurately in the manual.

Polk that "

tle

of



but his selection indicates the estimation in which he is held as an authority ou historical questions relating to New York. Mr.

Dawson

pondence with in

has long conducted an extensive corresliterary people

public events.

and conspicuous actors

He has been elected a resident mem



last-named, however, not as a " Republican," but as

"a Democrat opposed

to the administration."

Since

War he has been, as he maintains he had been before the War, a Democrat and a rigid opponent of centralized power both in State and Federal government. Mr. Dawson was married May 2.H, 184~», to Catlierine, daughter of Abraham D.and Father (Whelpley) Martling, of Tarrytown, Westchester County, N. Y., one of the oldest families of the county. They have had nine children— 1, Spencer H. C, born May 11, 1S4.«i

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LITERATURE AND LITERARY MEN. York Conference where he continued to engage in

city of

until 1854, when he wan chosen presiIndiana Anbury University, at GreenAfter three years he returned to

logical

work

pastoral

dent of the castle,

Indiaua.

New York and

in

1864 was elected editor of the

New

He was

New York

in

021 1848 and at the Union Theo-

Seminary in 1852. He was ordained for the ministry and in 1852-54 was the American chaplain in

Rome,

Italy.

In 1859-01 he was the minister at

the Reformed Dutch Church on Bergen Hill, Brook-

and since May 9, 18*51, has been pastor of in 1888 and 1872, and in 187G became the editor of the the Presbyterian Church of Rye, N. Y. Dr. Baird ljiditJ Rc/to»itory of the Methodist Episcopal Church. has written "Eutaxia: Historical Sketches," New Dr. Curry ha9 written much for the periodicals of York, 1855; "A Book of Public Prayer," New his church in addition to the articles which he York, 1857; " History of Rye, N. Y.," 1870; "Hisrare to his regular editorial work. He has pub- tory of Bedford Church," 1882; "History of the lished a " Life of Wyckliff," " The Metropolitan City Huguenot Emigration to America," 2 vols., 1885. of America," and a " Life of Bishop Davis W. Eliaa Cornelius, D.D., the educator and missionary, Clark," and has edited the writings of the late Rev. was born at Somers in 1794, graduated at Yale ColDr. James Floy, and an edition of Southev's " Life lege in 1813 and died at Hartford, Conn., February of Wesley." 12, 1832. In early life he studied theology and in Rev. Robert Baird, D.D., the author and philan1816 visited the Cherokee and Chickasaw Indians as thropist, spent the closing hours of his busy life in a missionary. In 1818 he went to New Orleans in Westchester County, dying at Yonkers on the* 15th of the employ of the Missionary Society of Connecticut. In July, 1819, he was installed with Dr. Worcester at Salem, but upon being appointed, in September, 1826, secretary of the American Educational Society he was dismissed. He contributed to the i^tartcrljf Journal and published the reports of his Vhritiian Advocate, at

York.

re-elected

lyn,

N.

Y.,

educational society.

His father was surgeon's mate of Colonel Angell's regiment during the Revolution, and at one time an inmate of the " Jersey " prison-ship. He died at Somers, June 13, 1823, aged sixty-five years. Among the eminent men who, after having

made high

reputations

localities, selected

vanced

life,

Bartlett.

is

for

themselves

Y'onkers as the

Professor William

For more than

forty years

with the United States Military Point,

first

as a cadet,

home

he was

Academy

March,

186.'}.

Born

1835 to in

in Fayette Co., Pennsylvania, in

1843 he was the most part of the

time

Europe, striving to revive the Protestant faith

and

of temperance in the North.

of valuable works.

to

He

identified at

The

West lead-

ing particulars of his life, obtained in outline from Cullum's " Registerof the Officers and Graduates " of

T>.l>.

1798, he wan graduated at Jefferson College in 1818, and received the degree of D.D. in 1842. From

the south of the continent,

other

and subsequently as Professor

of Natural and Experimental Philosophy.

REV. PAN' I F.I. CURRY,

in

of their ad-

Holmes Chambers

in

promote the cause

published a number

His son, Professor Henry M.

LL.D., of Yonkers, professor of Greek in the University of New York, is a distinguished scholar and historian. He has published a book of travels entitled, " Modern Greece," aud more recently a " History of the Rise of the Huguenots of France." 2 vols. 8vo., which has taken rank among the more important historical works of -the day. Another son, Rev. Charles W. Baird, D.D.. is the author of two chapters of this work, the histories of the the towns of Rye and Harrison, and is a distinguished Baird, D.D.,

He was born in Princeton, N. J., August and was graduated at the University of the

we have been able from other sources, are as follows Bartlett was born in Pennsylvania in September, 1804, but as his parents removed immethe academy, with such details as

to gather

Professor

diately after his birth

to

St.

Louis, Missouri, his

childhood and youth were passed in the latter State, and it was from it that he was in due time sent to West Point. His parents were poor, and as there were then no schools at the West, he had no home

advantages for education. Attracting, however, the notice of Missouri men who were able to command the influence of Senator Thomas H. Benton, an ap-

pointment was procured for him as a cadet. He was received at West Point on the 1st of July, 1822, at seventeen years and eight mouths of age, stood at the

head of his class through his whole four years of was graduated at its head on the 1st of

study, and

July, 1S26, having served as Acting Assistant Profes-

literateur.

sor of Mathematics during the last

28, 1828.

course.

From August

30. 1826. to

two years of his August 30,1829,

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

622 he continued to be employed

at the aeaileiuy, first a>

In addition to these labors, the Professor, duiinjr

Assistant Professor, and later as Principal Assistant

his long service at the Point, prepared several text-

In 1828 he took part as

Professor of Engineering. assistant engineer

in

the construction of

Monroe, Va.. and from 1829

to 1832

books for the use of the cadets. In 1839 he pulia "Treatise on Optics;" in 1858, one n

Fortress

was engaged

lished

"Synthetical Mechauics," and another on "Spherical Astronomy," and in 18->9 one on "Acoustics and Optics" and another on "Analytical Mechanic*." Before finally retiring from his professorship he also published an article entitled "Strains on Rifle (inns," which will be found in the Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, Volume I. It was also separately published. All tlm shows the years of his life at West Point to have been busy and productive.

in

the construction of Fort Adams, Newport Harbor. K.

From

I.

1832 to 18H4 he was assistant to the chief

engineer at Washington, D. C.

In

the latter year

he returned to the Point, and became Acting Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy. To the full professorship in this department he finally received an appointment from General Jackson in 183b', and continued to fill the position until 1871, when he resigned and was appointed colonel in the regular army on the retired list. The instrument by which he was appointed to his professorship in 183b* is still in his possession. It was forwarded to General Cass, and sent by him, through his son, to Professor Bartlett. It was as follows: " of

I

herebjr appoint tMwontl I.ltut. William

Engine*™,

Prof,

of Nat. ant!

Kxper.

11.

In 1847

degree by the College of ten years before. ical Societies

(rW

professor

of Master

He

is

a

New

Jersey, at Princeton,

member

of the Philosoph-

of Philadelphia and Boston, and

is

oue

of the original corporators of the American Academy of Science, incorporated by Congress.

('..urtmy

rwipm'd.

His books and A.vimrw Jai kwn.

(Signal,)

The degree

j

0. Martini, of the r..rp*

riiilwsophy

Geneva College conferred upon the

the degree of Doctor of Laws.

of Arts had been conferred upon him as an honorary

monument

to

his writings in

Professor

Bartlett's

periodicals arc a

scholarship and

During the student days of Professor Bartlett, as we industry. The value of his books may be inferred have seen, he spent two years in teaching in the acad- from the fact that they have passed through a succesemy. Many men, afterwards distinguished in United sion of editions. The ninth edition of " Analytical We judge from States history, and several who, on both sides, in our Mechanics" was published in 1874. civil contest, became men of mark, were at the institua mere passing sentence in the preface to the second I^eonidas Polk, a relative of James K. Polk, and edition that, in the so-called conflict between sciention. afterwards Bishop of Louisiana, was Iub room-mate, tists and the Bible, thiB eminent scholar and scientist and Albert Sidney Johnston, afterwards killed at the has no sympathy with Anti-Theism. Speaking of a battle of Shiloh, was both his room-mate and class- mathematical formula which he framed and which mate. Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee and Charles expresses the laws that govern the action and reaction Mason (afterwards Judge Mason, of Iowa) were under of forces upon bodies, he says of this formula " It embraces alike, in their reciprocal action, the his instruction, as were many others who in due time "gigantic and distant orbs of the celestial regions became widely noted. While engaged in the construction of Fort Adams, " and the proximate atoms of the ethereal atmosphere between 1829 and 1832, Professor Bartlett contributed " which pervades all space, and establishes an unto Sillimiin'* Jo rrt'it a paper on "The Expansibility of " broken continuity upon which its divine architect Coping Stones," which has been frequently referred " and author may impress the power of His will at a to by foreign writers. During his life in Washington " single point and be felt everywhere." This, even in an academy text-book, is a strong (1832 to 1834), as first assistant to Chief Engineer (General) Gratiot, he had a great deal to do witb the engitribute to Theism, and when it is added as a fact that neering on the Cumberland National road, and with Professor Bartlett is a worthy member of the Episo>fortifications all over the country. In 1840 he was pal communion, |it may be safely taken as a trilmte ordered by President Van Buren, through his Secre- to Theism in its Christian phase. tary of War, Mr. Poinsett, to examine the European In 1871, at sixty-seven years of age, Professor On the 1st observatories, with a view to improving the course Bartlett was retired at his own request. of instruction in astronomy, practical and theoretical, of July he removed from West Point to Yonkcrs, in the Military Academy. In this work he was absent and took possession of a fine residence which he had from the country about five months, and made many purchased for himself on Locust Hill Avenue. Here valuable acquaintances in Europe. On his return he has since lived. At the time of his retirement he submitted to the War Department the report of from the Point he was elected actuary of the Mutual his work, the receipt of which was duly acknowledged. Life Insurance Company of New York, and this po1

1



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a misfortune, however, that this valuable report

hits

in

tion he still

holds, faithfully fulfilling

its

duties day

;

some way been

lost.

Frequent

M arch

has j

been made

for

it.

but without success.

a plan for an observatory to be located in City.

It

suggested

Washington

1

by day, even at eighty-one years of age. He has rendered exceedingly valuable service to the company. Among his labors have been the construction of tables to facilitate their office work,

and the prepuni

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or, February 4, 1S29, to Miss Harriet Whitehome, daughter of Samuel Whiu-horne, a merchant of that place. He has had eight children, of whom four sons and three daughters are yet living. Mrs. Bartlett is also still -pared. The professor, though somewhat infirm, is still both mentally and physically active, keeps up a deep interest in passing events, and is a fluent and sprightly conversationalist and companion, full of reminiscences of the country's history, and of an eventful Professor

Bartlett

and interesting personal life. Rev. John A. Todd, D.D., pastor of the Second Reformed Church of Tarrytown, N. Y., who contributed to this work the two chapters on the history of the townships of Grecnburgh and Mount Pleasant, is a native of Somerset County, N. J., and a graduate of Rutgers College and of the Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church, at New Brunswick, N. J. After completing his course at the Seminary, in 1H48, he was settled towards the latter part of that year as pastor of the Reformed Church of Griggstown, N. J. His personal connection with Westchester County

dates back to 1855,

when he accepted

the call of the

Second Reformed Church of Tarrytown, and entered upon his duties as pastor. Having lived since then in themidit of the historical scenes of which he has written, and having enjoyed the friendship of many who3e ancestors had long lived there before them and had borne a prominent part in the great revolutionary struggle, he has had peculiar opportunities of information in regard to the localities described. Among other productions of Dr. Todd's pen may be mentioned his " Discourse on the Character and Death

of Washington Irving," 1859 " Memories of the Rev. Peter Labagh, D.D., with Notices of the History of the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church in North America," I860 "The Law of Spiritual Growth, a review of Roardman's Higher Christian Life,'" in the ;

;

'

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;

"

The Man

for the

Times," an Oration delivered before the < Sovernor of the State, the Trustees, and the Alumni of Rutger's College, at the Dedication of Geological Hall,

Brunswick, N.

J.,

June

18,

1872;

"The

New

Posture of the

Ministers and People of the Reformed Dutch Church

during the Revolution," prepared by request of a committee of the General Synod, and published by order of the Synod in the volume of Centennial />i>courses, 1876; "The Good Fight and the Victor's Crown, a Memorial Discourse on the Life, Character

and Services of the Rev. Abraham Moesle, D.U., 1882 " Letters from Europe, from Canada and the Sagucnay, from Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Cape Breton, and Newfoundland," 1880-1884. Dr. Todd has also published a number of translations from the Ocrman and the Spanish, both in prose and ;

verse.

623

Since completing the two chuplers included hi this work, he has resigned his pastoral charge, but will continue to reside in Tarrytown, and be chiefly occupied in literary pursuits.

James Parton. the well-known

historical

writer,

received his early education in Westchester County.

He

is

a native of England, born at Canterbury, Feb-

ruary

9,

1X22.

Brought

to the

United States when

New York White Plains. finally becoming

but five years of age, he was educated in City and vicinity, chiefly at a school at

For seven years he taught school, as a writer by his editorial contributions to Home Journal. His first published work, which appeared in 1&*>5, was the " Life of Horace Greeley." It was a successful piece of work, and secured the

known the

author employment in the compilation of

"The Hu-

morous Poetry of the English Language," which appeared in 1X'>7. It was followed, in 1859, by the " Life and Times of Aaron Burr," and in I860 by the "Life of Andrew Jackson." In 1864 his "Life of Benjamin Franklin" appeared. Since then he has been a

prolific writer

of recognized popularity.

In

1856 he married Sara Payson Willis, sister of N. P.

and herself widely known for her productions under the nam deplume of Fanny

Willis, the poet, literary

Fern.

John Bigelow, the veteran writer and

politician,

was, for three years, a resident of Westchester

County

one of the inspectors of the state prison at Sing Sing. Mr. Bigelow was appointed to this ]>ositiou in 1845, and during his term of service introduced various reforms in the prison discipline. Mr. Bigelow is a native of Maiden, Ulster County, N. Y. He was born November 25, 1817; graduated at Union College 1835; studied law, and was admitted to the bar in New York City in 1839. For ten years he was engaged in the practice of his profession, occupying as

himself, at the

and

same

time,

literary journalism.

more or

less

In 1850 he

with literature

became one of

New

York Keening and sustained this relation more than ten years. Fremont, life of General when the latter was a candidate for the Presidency. He spent the years 18.r>9 and I860 abroad, writing letters to the Evening Post. He had previously written interesting narratives of trips to Jamaica and Hayti the former presenting his views of the practical working of emancipation in Jamaica. Early in the administration of President Lincoln he was appointed consul at Paris, and upon the death of the minister, Mr. Dayton, in 18i>4, was chosen to succeed him. While consul, he published in French, for the information of the people of Fram e, a valuable work on the resources of the United States. Early in 1867 he returned to the Unit«-d States, bringing with him the original manuscripts of Benjamin Franklin's autobiography, which he published in the following year, with noti* and an introduction by himself. Mr. Bigelow is the author of some valuable mono. the proprietors and editors of the Po»t,

In

1856 he published a

;

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTKR COUNTY.

f,24

graphs on social and tory, an well as of

political phases of

many

French

writings was published by the Harper's in 1*43.

his-

Mathews was

other papers and sketches.

ling, of New York, an elaborate scheme for the commemoration of the first centennial anniversary of American independence in 187*5, which was published in the New York Tribune, and first directed public attention to the approach of that occasion, Mr. Bigelow was a warm supporter of Governor Tilden for the Presidency, and for some years lias been prominent before the public as Mr. Tilden's trusted adviser and intimate friend. Early in 188tj he was apjK)inted United States Sub-Treasurer at New York, and confirmed by the Senate, but, before qualifying,

resigned the

position, not caring

Upon

arduous duties.

to

undertake

the

its

New York

number of poems and underthenameof " Cousin Alice," isa resident of Mamaroncck. She was born at Hudson, N. Y. Her maiden name was Bradley. She became a contribuAlice B. Haven, the author of a

tor to the periodicals of the day at an early

age, and Joseph C. Neal, author of the

Upon his death a few months later, she took charge of the literary department of NeaCt Gazette, of which her husband had been a and conducted it for several years with She also contributed frequently to the lead-

proprietor,

magazines. "The Gossips of Rivertown, with Sketches in Prose and Verse," from her pen, was published in 18f>0. She is also the authoring monthly

ess of & series of popular juvenile works published under the name of "Cousin Alice." In 1853 Mrs. Neal was married to Mr. Samuel L. Haven, and has since resided at Mamaroneck. Cornelius Mathews, the novelist, play-wright and journalist, was a native of Port Cheater. He was born October 28, 1817. His early country life on the banks of Byratn River and the rolling uplands of Rye and it« picturesque lake, made a deep impression on his mind, as is shown by trace* in many pages of his writings. He was among the early graduates of the New Y'ork University in 183o, and began his literary career while still a youth. To the American Monthly Magazine of 183f>, he contributed both prose and verse. He was also a contributor to the New York Eerier and the Knickerbocker Magazine. In 1837 he was admitted to the bar. In " Behemoth " he produced an original romance, describing the efforts of a supposed anti-Indian race to overcome the pre-historic

her

animal known as the mastodon. 1840,

to

May

1*42,

he

edited

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of

the

international

copyright

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success.

discussion

William Leggett, the well-known writer, married in New Rochelle and spent the closing years of his life there. Mr. Leggett was born in New Y'ork City in the summer of 1802 and was partially educated at Georgetown College. In consequence of his father's failure in business, he was withdrawn before the coinpletiou of hU course, and in 1 Kl J accompanied his father to Illinois, where the family settled. In 1822 he entered the navy as midshipman but resigned his commission in 1820. Shortly afterwards he published " Leisure Hours at Sea," a volume of verses written at intervals during his naval career. He also wroU- a prose talc "The Rifle," in which he portrayed the scenes and incidents of western pioneer life. Other stories followed and were afterwards collected and published under the titles of " Tale* by a Country School-master," and •* Tales of the Sea." In 1828 he married Miss Almira Wariug of New Rochelle, and commenced the in November of the same year publication of The Critic, a weekly literary periodical. It was discontinued at the end of six months and united with the Minor, to which Mr. Leggett became In the summer of 1825», he became, a contributor. with Wm. C. Bryant, one of the editors of the NewYork Evening I*o»t, a position which he retained He became a zealous Demountil December, 18,%. erat and an earnest advocate of free-trade, as well a* a strong opponent to the United States Bank. After his retirement from the Evening Po«t, he established The /'lain Deafer, which he conducted with ability. however, in the failure of its pul>It was involved, Usher, and ceased to exist at the end of ten months. Mr. Leggett did not engage in any literary or newspaper work after this, his health having become impaired. He passed the brief remainder of his life at his country place at New Rochelle, which had been his residence since his marriage. In May 1839 he was appointed by President Van Burcn, diplomatic agent to the Republic of Guatemala, but he died while preparing to start for his post, on the 29th of May, 1839. He was a writer of great fluency and persuasive force, and a man who possessed in an emi-

Time*, but found the labors of daily journalism too arduous for his tastes.

in 1S40 was married to " Charcoal Sketches."

Mr.

journalism

question.

the retirement of Louis J.

Jennings, he was appointed editor of the

also a constant writer in the

of the day and has been prominently identified with

In December, 1871, he submitted to Senator Conk-

nent degree, the courage of his convictions. Klise Justine Bayard, daughter of Mr. Robert Bay-

Glen wood, near Fishkil), was the author of a number of poems, some of which have appeared in the Knickerbocker Magazine and Literary World. She

ard, of

married Mr. Fulton Cutting, and died about 1830.

Decern-

Hon. William Cauldwell, so well-known as the and proprietor of the New York Sunday Mer-

Arcturiu,

comedy and In 1843 he published a volume of

a monthly magazine, besides writing a

editor

another novel. pocms, and in 1840 his tragedy "Witchcraft," was successfully produced. This was followed by a rium-

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UTKRATTHE AM) LITKRAR Y MEN. Mevcrtje, Apolloniu, Lecndert, Arent, list) Arent, i,2d),

and

Theunis

Pieter.

Jacob Barentscu Kool (born before 1639) and MarretjeSiiuonH had eight children,

viz.:

Barent(lst),

Simon, Arent, Marretje, Barcnt (3d), and Jacob. Jacob Kool (baptized at Kingston, N. Y., January I, 1673) and Barbara Hanse settled at Tappan. N. Y., about l(Jl)/», and united with the New Reformed church, organized the year before. They had six iliil'iren born in Tappan between 169">and 1707, viz.: (n-ertje, Jacob, Jr., Tryntje, Jan, Barent and Abraham. This family first introduced the Kool line into the lower part of Orange (now Rockland) County, where its representatives have beeu numerous and (2d),

liarent

laartje

(

•'!.

Abraham Kool

(baptized at

Tappan November

2,

Annetje Meyer had eight children, viz. .Jacob, Ide (1st), Ide (2d), Isaac, Johannes, Rachel, Abraham and Andreas. Isaac Kool (born January 21st and baptized at Tappan February lfl, 1741) and Catharine Serven (horn at Tappan August 28, 1747) were married at Tappan by Rev. Samuel Verbryk, pastor of the Tappan Reformed Church, October 15, 1764. They settled at New City, in their native county, and had fifteen children born there, viz.: Abraham, Breghje, Rachel, John, Jacob, Anna, Elizabeth, David, Isaac, Jr., Mary, Margaret, Philip, Catharine, Andrew and Sarah. In 1794 the parent* removed to Broadalbin (or Fondabush), in Fulton County, where the father died and was buried in October, 180(1. The mother, 17".'7)and

').

death, returned to Rockland County, where

after his

-he died

in

1832.

It

Maria Shatzel, born in the city November 3, 1797. His history is given with fulness of detail in the Rockland County," published in 18*4, under the editorial direction of his son. After several years of teaching in New York City he entered the Theological Seminary at New Brunswick, N. J., in 1K26, and having been licensed to the missionary in 1829, at once became pastor of the Reformed Church at Tappan, in which his ancestors had worshipped from its beginning, more than a century and a quarter before, and continued in his pastorate, with au interval of one year, till his retirement from the " History of

active duties of the ministry in

the 30th of August, 1878, he lived at Spring Valley

was

in

this generation

that

of the family name was changed to The pronunciation under its earlier and later forms was the same. The change in spelling was adopted to protect the name against mispronunciation

dred years, which he had inherited from his father.

His sterling character, his remarkable structor, his special

incoming people not acquainted with Holand sounds.

David Cole (born at New City September 26th and baptized at Clarkstown, by Rev. Nicholas Lansing, October f>, 1777) married Elizabeth Meyer, at Kakiat, January 11, 1798, the ceremony being performed by Rev. George O. Brinkerhoff. The wife was a daughter of Johannes Meyer and Tryntje Van Houten, l>oth born in the county, but of Holland descent. These had three childreu Isaac D., Catharine and Kliza. The last died unmarried in 18>">1. The second,



Thomas Lippincott, who died September 23, is represented numerously by descendants in New York City and elsewhere. The first was the

Mr>.

KSl.

father of 7.

Rev. Dr. Cole.

Rev. Isaac D. Cole was born at Spring Valley,

K'xklarid at

County, N. Y., January

2-*>th

and baptized

Kakiat by Rev. Ceo. G. Brinkerhon",

17W.

He was

brief intervals,

November

3,

a resident of

New York

March

2*>,

City with

from 1801 to 1826, and was married,

1821. by Rev. Christian

Bork. to

Anna

in-

are so fully put on

no reproducing here. The children of Rev. Isaac D. Cole and Anna Maria Shatzel were eight, viz.: David, Caroline, Elizabeth, Juliana (1st), Juliana ( 2d, Cathar)

Ann, Benjamin Wood and

ine Amelia, Margaret Isaac D., Jr.

Of

these children, Juliana (1st), Caro-

James J. Stephens), CathaAmelia (Mrs. Benjamin L. Disbrow) and Isaac

line Elizabeth (Mrs. Dr.

rine I).,

Jr., late

president of the Knickerbocker Fire In-

surance Company, of away.

What has

New York

City, have passed

thus been given shows that Rev. Dr.

Cole belongs to one of the oldest

New York

families

not believed that there are any older, though

there

an

an

record in the history mentioned above that they need

It is

0.

memory

the preciousness of his

"Cole."

land forms

gift* as

the ministry, the

life-work in

valuable influence of his precept and example and

the spelling

by

1864, at sixty-five

Subsequently and until his death, on

yeare of age.

upon the family home-ground of more than a hun-

prominent ever since. 4.

031

may be

a very few others as old.

The family

of the Reformed Church of Holland from

its

is

very

was identified with the organization of the first Reformed Church in New " Amsterdam (the Church in the Fort ") and subsequently with the organization of the Reformed Churches of Kingston, Tappan, Clarkstown and West Hempstead (or Kakiat), and it also, before 1800. founded a Reformed Church in Fondabush, Fulton County, which, however, was changed to a Presbyterian Church in 182T>. Rev. Dr. Cole is thus, through his father, of strictest Holland descent. He start

leels

in that

country.

It

the derivation of his

stock and

is

name

Ironi

so historic a

equally alive to the character for sim-

and spotless business integrity which has been handed down through the American generations. With the exception of the first member of the line, who was a government officer, all the generations, down to his father, were farmers. All of them were continuously, and many of them officially, connected plicity

and work of the Reformed Churches. probity in dealing, steadiness of aim and purpose have been the heritage handed down to him, and this heritage he cherishes with the most with the

life

Purity of

life,

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HISTORY OF WESTCHKSTER COUNTV.

632

sacred reverence and would not exchange for any

house for the purpose in the suburb-. h. founded and conducted a large Sunday-school in it and soon after began, while still a layman and principal of an academy, to preach twice in it every Sabto build a

other form of inheritance whatever.

Rev. Dr. Cole was horn at Spring Valley September 22, 1822, during a brief summer visit of his parents, then residents of

homestead.

New York

Being the

first

bath, and lecture in the houses of his hearers on Thursday evenings. From this work and from his professorship in the State Normal School he passed

City, to the old family

child of a conscientious

engaged his father's close thought. The course taken with him was such as to give to his mind an early and strong bias

and

gifted teacher, his training naturally

into the ministry in

at four, in Greek at six and in and was prepared for college at No effort was spared to lay his foundations solidly. The consequence was the awakeningof an enthusiasm for languages which hasshapeda From life, and is one of its leading characteristics. twelve to sixteen years of age study was suspended during the summers, and training on a farm substituted, for the building up of a physical and mental strength that had been too severely taxed. The

was started

Hebrew

in Latin

at nine,

twelve years of age.

In

November,

Grammar

he entered School of Rutgers College. After a

as

year spent in reviewing old studies, and especially work upon mathematics, he entered the college in October, 1839, from which, in July, 1842, he was graduated. Being too well prepared for college at his entrance, he had thrown

after graduation

through almost the whole period

to the

he Tappau,

life

of that church. the de-

in that

Many

incidents of interest in his history

connection might be related, but want of

space excludes them here.

During his work as a teacher he prepared many young men for college, several of whom were graduated with honor. His greatest successes as a teacher were attained during several years in the principalship of an academy at Trenton, N. J., during which his students were sent to Princeton, Rutgers, Harvard, Yale, Union, Amherst and the Universities of New York and Pennsyl-

Dr. Cole's activity as a writer began soon after bi-

graduation from college, but confined itself for some years to newspaper articles. His first book was a small "

Manual of English Grammar," published

and life

in

1848,

book Written during his teaching was a larger one, entitled " Principles of English his only other

Grammar

Applied," issued in 1853. These books were intended mostly for his own use, but had a con-

vania. 1855,

behalf.

its

teaching

of the Latin and Greek languages alone.

In

and

New Brunswick

Lancaster, Pa.

and continued teaching from August, 1842, to November, 1858, more than sixteen years, devoting himself

month he has been connected,

his professorship at

The period from 1861 to 1865 was with Dr. Cole one of strong decision and great activity. From the firing on Sumter he took the most pronounced position for the Union, and during his pastorate at East Millstone, and his college life at New Brunswick, was at all times forward in sustaining the government ami making sentiment for it by writing and speaking in

himself upon his past studies to a large extent, and as a result, came to his graduation, though with credit,

At once

the 10th of that

pastor, with the history

gree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon him by the trustees of Franklin and Marshall College, at

Sophomore Class of the

to teach near his father's residence at

its

During

in earnest

began

The teaching in the college was a fascination to him, but the attraction to the pulpit proved the stronger, and in December, 1865, a call from the Reformed Church of Yonkers was accepted.

From

1838, at sixteen years of age,

yet without distinction.

Several offers of pulpit-

the pastorate. I

winters, however, continued to be devoted to study.

the

1858.

were at once made to him, but he decided to accept the charge of the new Reformed Church at Ka-t Millstone, N. J. Here he was ordained November 23, 1858, and remained pastor until April 1, 1863. In February of that year he had been called to the professorship of the Greek language and literature in Rutgers College, and had accepted the call. Entering upon his new post March 1(5, 1863, he remained in it till January 1, 1866. During this period of three years, however, he was several times urged to re-euti r

study of languages, without, however, impairing his education in other branches. But his father's view of the importance of languages was such that he for the

prominently through his influence, the

siderable circulation in the schools of

Normal School of New Jersey was brought

New

Jersey

in

was not till about 1855 that he began to appear much as a public speaker. At this time, in addition to his evangelistic work, before alluded to. in Trenton, he became deeply enlisted in a new their day.

It

ing his trusteeship to accept the post.

educational

movement

years duriug his teaching

and, by permission of the State legislature, joined

State

into being, of which, by the appointment of

Rodman M.

Price,

he was one of the

Governor

first trustees.

In

1857 he became a professor in that institution, resignlife,

For several however, he had been

in the State of

New

Jersey,

privately studying for the ministry, and, in connection

with others in pressing the interests and wants of the

with his teaching work, had established and carried on an enterprise, on which, as a foundation, many years ago, grew up the present Fifth Presbyterian Church of Trenton. Having induced his pastor and

public schools upon the

friends of the First Presbyterian

Church of

that city

members assembled

purpose in joint session. !

company who

visited

State, speaking

everywhere

education.

He

also

for the

formed one of a

the various counties of the for the

cause of popular

Several of his addresses on these subjects.

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LITERATURE AND LITERARY MEN. 1855 onward, were printed.

from

Besides this,

he

various places upon topics connected with

ajtoke in

higher education.

In December, 1854, he read an

important paper at the Smithsonian Institution on

Education," which was published in BarAmerican Journal of Education, and drew

" Classical

nard's

commendation from both sides of the Atlantic. In 1855-5b' he was New Jersey editor of the New York After Teacher and wrote many of its editorials. hU entrance into the ministry, in 1858, he dropped

" Response "

the

to

" Address of

the

session

Welcome,"

which was printed in a volume with the proceedings. His latest publication has been the " History of Yonkers," contained

work. In all his published he has had in view one controlling most conspicuous light the

in this

historical addresses

object

— to hold up in the

Providence of God as manifested in the details of church, historical, community and family

life.

special interest of edu-

Dr. Cole married, on the 18th of April, 1844, Abbie

Wyckoff, a daughter of Jacob Wyckoff and Elizabeth Van Deventer, of New Brunswick, both of purest

and writing

in the

Union cause during the war.

defense of the

During

ministry he has been absorbed in two specialties,

his

first

of the centennial of the same seminary, and delivered

finding enough to do for his pulpit and in the

speaking cation,

633

in the same capacity, he presided at the

the one

being his principal and the other his second-

1).

Holland descent. The children have been six in number, of whom the third died in infancy, in 1855,

Mary Elizabeth

(wife of Rev.

James Henry

ary object of pursuit.

viz.:

The former is the critical study of the Bible originand the development of the Bible's thought, and the latter is the tracing of Divine Providence through history. Of the results of his Bible study, he has written and printed very much, but not in pamphlet or Upon history, his researches have been book-form. mostly of local bearing, being developments of church and local annals. In October, 1865, he delivered an historical address upon his first church at East Millstone, then ten years old; in 1868, another upon his church

Bertholf, of Nassau, Rensselaer County, N. Y.), Isaac

als

at

Yonkers, then twenty-five

were published

these

;

same church, then

upon the

and

1883, a third

in

forty years old.

by the congregations.

and

(W76) on

"Our American

it,

and

the Reformed

Church published also a sermon he preached before it in 1874 on " Offerings to the Lord," being its " Annual

Sermon on Benevolence."

In

1876, Dr. Cole

himself published a large octavo volume, the fruit of very great labor, giving the

genealogy of his own

Holland family from 1580 to date. at the

call

livered in

air, to

a bi centennial oration

ing of the

In October, 1882,

of his fellow-citizens of Yonkers, he de-

the open

ulany thousands of people,

commemorative of the found-

Manor (now the

city) Hall

of Yonkers,

which was printed and very widely circulated. 1883

and 1884 he

edited the " History of

County," alluded to above. president of

the General

In

Rockland

In September, 1884, as

Synod of the Reformed

Church, he presided at the installation of Rev. John C. Lansing, D.D., as

professor in

the Theological

Seminary at New Brunswick, and delivered a sermon on " God's noteworthy preparations of the two original languages of the sacred Scriptures to become the conveyancers of His divine revelation to men, and His no less noteworthy preparations of a modern language to effect the spread of this revelation over the earth."

The sermon was published with

proceedings of the day.

Thomas Henry

Griffith Durst.

descended from Samuel Edsall, Esq., a native of Reading, Berkshire, England, by his marriage with Ruth Woodhull, daughter of Richard Woodhull, Esq., a native of Thenford, Northamptonshire, England. Samuel Edsall came to Edsall

is

among the Dutch in and afterwards became

Boston, Mass., in 1648, settled

quite prominent in the colonial affairs of

Republic, the Child of

The General Synod of

Howard, Bessie and

His

Thanksgiving sermon

from the uniting congregations that heard

published.

Harry W., Charles

tholf have four children, viz.:

New Amsterdam

Providence," was called for by a representa-

Special tion

his Centennial

None

All

Thanksgiving sermon of 1866 was also published by his people,

Wyckoff, Frank Howard and Edward R. of the sons are married. Rev. and Mrs. Ber-

D., Ella, J.

the

In October of the same year,

New

and

in

Jersey. Mr.

1655,

Woodhull came

to

New York

Lynn, Mass.,

about 1640, and was an early settler and leading citizen of Southampton and Brookhaven, L. I. Other immigrant ancestors of Mr. Edsall came in the seventeenth century from Holland and France (Huguenot). In the last century several of his progenitors bore

armB

in the old

French

War aud

in

support of Amer-

He is the ican independence during the Revolution. only son of the late Thomas Edsall, Esq., and Phebe A. Jones, daughter of the late Hon. Nathaniel Jones, of Orange County, N. Y., and was born October

7,

1840, in the city of

New

York.

ing his academic education he entered

After complet-

Brown Univer-

and was graduated in 1861. The following year he Assisted in raising a regiment of infantry, which was afterwards consolidated to form the One Hundred and Seventy-sixth New York Volunteers— " Ironsides "—of which he was commissioned adjutant. The regiment was assigned to the " Banks Expedition " and served in the Department of the Gulf. During the summer and autumn of 1863 Mr. Edsall was detached and assigned to duty at headquarters under the chief engineer of the department. In November be returned to New York and was mussity at seventeen,

tered out with his regiment.

with O'Connor

Law 1865,

&

Dunning and

He

then studied law

at

Columbia College

School, was admitted to the bar in the spring of

and has since been

City.

He

Edsall,

Hart

is

iu

now a member of A;

practice in

New York

the firm of Dunning,

Fowler.

59

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

034

For several years Mr. Edsall has devoted much attention to historical and genealogical researches, and has contributed several papers on those subjects to the New York Historical and the New York Genealogical and Biographical Societies, some of which have been published. He has given special study to the early history of King's Bridge and its neighborhood, where he has resided for several years, in SpuyMr. Edsall has prepared a very interfor this work,

tcn Duyvil. esting

and valuable history of that town

which

is

He is a member of the New York Historical Society, a

published elsewhere.

University Club, the trustee of the

New York

Genealogical and Biograph-

and the vice-president of the Society of the Sons of the Revoluical Society

acquired

paper

is

Episcopal Church at White Plains. first

Joseph H. Anderson. Their children were William Anderson, who is now a manager of one of the departments of the New York Safe Deposit Company, of New York City, and Anna Caroline. His second wife was Margaret i/ouise Dusenbury. Their only child

is

Charles Halsey.

Rev. William Samuel Coffey was born in the of

New York

in 1827,

Columbia College.

and

1847

in

city

graduated from

After studying for the ministry

he graduated from the General Theological Semiuiiry of the Protestant Episcopal Church in lS->0,

Sherman Mitch-

of Minot Mitchell,

ell, son

His

Mr. Mitchell has been twice married.

wife was Elizabeth Anderson, daughter of the Hon.

tion.

Josiah

The

converts in the latter place.

its first

deposited with the pastor of the Methodist

one of the most distinguished members of the

and was ordained deacon

Westchester County bar, was born at White Plains, February 2, 1816. He

ity

studied law in his father's

hood at Grace Church, Brooklyn Heights. On February 1, 1852, he be-

office,

He is

came

(1886) pursuing the

White

his pastorate has continu-

ed to the present time, a

and

in

is

period of over thirty-four

upon

has been most

and active

that

Besides writing

terial

the very able and interhistory of

which he

years, during

recognized

as an authority subject.

esting

rector of St. Paul's

Church, East Chester, and

devoted a good deal of study to the history of his locality,

York.

Mr. Mitchell has

resides

Plains.

at Trin-

New

orders of the priest-

full

practice of his profession,

and

same year

Church,

In 1851 he received the

and was admitted

to the bar in 1845. still

in the

in

efficient

his minis-

and

labors,

has

greatly endeared himself

White

the community.

to

He

Plains for this work, he

has held the commissions

has written a number of

of the State as chaplain

other articles on subjects relating to

of the Third Regiment and consequently of the Twenty-seventh Regi-

White

Plains, or other points in the county,

but none

ment N. Y.

of them have hitherto

appeared form.

He

in

w

printed

prepared two

papers on "The French in Westchester County," which were read before a social club of White Plains, and has read two papers before the Westchester County Historical Society, of which he is a member, one of them being a "Life of Ann Hutchison," the other a review of the events succeeding the battle of White Plains, giving reasons for Howe's retreat. A paper has also been written by Mr. Mitchell in which he brings forward arguments to show that the sect of

S.

N. G. In

1856 he founded Trinity

Church

at

Mount

Vernon. Mr. Coney's literary work haa only been second in importance and value to his labors in the ministry.

He delivered the centennial address of the laying of the corner-stone of St. Paul's Church, East Chester, in October, 1K65,

and a memorial paper in 1875 upon

life and services of Rev. Thomas Standard, D.D., the dedication of a tablet erected in his honor in

the at

the church.

He

also delivered a historical

in October, 1884, in St. Peter's

address

Church, Westchester,

Methodists acquired a foothold in Westchester County before having done so in New York City, a conclu-

upon the eminent career of Rev. Samuel Seabury as rector of that parish. To these volumes he has con-

sion contrary to the received teaching on that

tributed three important



which

is,

point,

that the Methodist Societv in this countrv



chapters, " The General History of Westchester County from 1683 to 1774;"

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LITERATURE AND LITERARY MEN. "

The General History

of Westchester County from 178M to 1860," and the " History of the town of East

Cheater," which

is

a complete review of that town in

all its social, political

and

religious aspects from the

earliest period to the present year.

The

He became

635

colonel and aide-de-camp to the general

of the army in March, IX60, and continued to May, 1869,

when he was

retired.

tion to the English court at

Rev.

public ad-

Win

He was secretary of legaLondon.

E. Turner, of Elmsford, kindly furnishes

upon religious and secular topics and occasions have been numerous, while for many

the following account of the early

years he has contributed to the newspapers of the

a mere lad, wrote the history of Delaware County

dresses of Mr. Coffey

country the results of his profound thought and thorough scholarship as brought to bear upon the questions which interest mankind. On October 4, 1876, he married Henrietta, daughter of Henry P. Kellogg, of New Rochelle, and has two sons, both of

whom

are living.

John William Draper, M.D., LL.D., the late chemist and physiologist, was born in Liverpool, England, May 1811, and at the time of his death, •">,

in

1886, lived at Irvington, in Westchester County.

He was

educated at the University of London.

Emi-

grating to America in 1833, he continued his chemical and medical studies at the University of Pennsylvania, where he took the degree of

M.D.

in 1836.

"Jay Gould did not were

treatises,

besides con-

early

first in

:

life enjoy the advanHis only opportunities

a private school taught in the neighbor-

of a literary taste, but rather a business education.

He did, however, write the history of Delaware County, which is still extant and certainly a very creditable performance for a youth of sixteen years His education, as we have said, was more of a business character. Hence we see him, after spend-

of age.

little time as clerk in a country store, engaged measuring the distances and assisting in plotting maps of Ulster and Scoharie Counties. We should not forget to mention that his first business venture was with a mouse-trap which he had constructed and brought to the city of New York for the purpose of

ing a

forty

literary

hood, for the benefit of a few of the neighbors, by a

the

183S and 1867 he furnished to the JCdinburgh Philo-

and

young man named Oliver. He subsequently removed to the academy in Franklin, where young Gould followed him and very early finished his education. Hence it could not be said that he ever acquired much

valuable works to the literature of America. sophical Journal about

in

tages of a literary education.

Besides holding prominent professorships in various seats of learning, he contributed a large number of

Between

life

labors of Jay Gould, the noted financier, who, while

in

He was the author of a "Treatise on the Organization of Plants," placing it among the curiosities and useful exhibits of 4to, 1844; a popular "Text-Book on Chemistry," the Crystal Palace. This venture seems, in some re1846; another on "Natural Philosophy," 1847; a spects, to have been unfortunate; for, while on his "History of the Intellectual Development of Europe; " way, as he was admiring the wonders of the city, a "Thoughts on the Future Civil Policy of America; " thief stole the trap. The offender, however, was " History of the American Civil War," 3 vols., 1867-68 caught and on his arraignment before the Police Court and " Memoirs on the Chemical Action of Light." it was recorded that the mouse-trap had taken larger His roost elaborate work is a treatise on " Human game— it had caught a thief. " At an early age before he was twenty he left Physiology, Statical and Dynamical," 1856. Robert Bonner, the proprietor of the Nev> York his native town to engage in a large business in Pennfadt/er, born in Londonderry, Ireland, about 1820, of sylvania managing the financial aflkireof a tannery, Scotch-Presbyterian ancestry, is or was a resident of said at that time to be the largest in the country, if Westchester. While a lad in the printing-office of not in the world." the Hartford Oourant it is said he could set up more Mr. Gould's life story, as told by himself before the type in a day than any man in the State. He went Senate Labor Committee in New York, in September, to New York City in 1844, purchasing the Ledycr, 1883, was as follows Having stated that he was born then an obscure sheet, and brought it to the position it in Roxbury, N. Y., on May 27, 1836, he said he asnow occupies by engaging Fanny Fern, Edward Ever- sisted his sisters in tending the cattle and one day he ett, Henry Ward Beecher and other eminent writers said to his father he would like to go to school. The as contributors. father replied that he was too young, "but," said the General Adam Badeau, the author of a " History witness, "I was determined to secure an education, of General Grant" and numerous newspaper and as I was then fourteen years of age. At last," said magazine articles, was born in New York and resided the witness, with a smile, "I fell in with a blackin Westchester County. He was made captain and smith, and as I could write a good hand, I told him I aide-de-camp of United States Volunteers in April, could keep his books. He consented and that was 18*52, and afterward appointed on the staff of General the first occupation that brought me remuneration." Sherman. He was severely wounded at Port Hudson, He had a taste for mathematics; used to get up at joined General Grant in January, 1864, as his military three o'clock in the morning and study till six and secretary, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, anil in this way prepared himself for a start in life. was made brevet brigadier-general United States Mr. Gould then proceeded to say that he heard of army for faithful and meritorious services in the war. a man in Ulster County who was making a map of tributing to other scientific journals.

;







:

Digitized by

C3f,

HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY. took possession of them were al>out seventy thousand

that county, and having a great tuste for surveying he (the witness) went ami offered his assistance.

He

In building

dollars.

up

five

of

hundred thousand

this system,

the Southwest

has been opened up and the country thrown open

to

Mr. Gould stated that he was a director in the Chicago and Northwest, Chicago and Rock Island, Delaware, Lackawanna and Western, New

civilization.

York and New England and

several other smaller

lines.

Incidental to his railroad interests largely interested

in

he has become

the telegraphic business.

This

was on account of the intimate connection between the two industries. He was instrumental in starting the American Union to the Western Union.

make

a competing line with

it

He

found it would be impossible to accomplish this on account of the extent of the latter's connections. He then turned his attention to getting control of Western Union by buying stock when it was low. Finding it a paying investment, he

After the panic of 1857 he came to New York and, owing to the depreciation of values in property, he was able to buy on credit the bonds of the Rutland and Washington Railroad for ten cents on the dollar. He took charge of the railroad and was its president, treasurer and general manager. He conducted the road until its consolidation with the Rensselaer and Saratoga road, when he was able to sell out his interest at a large profit. Subsequently he took a bankrupt friend's interest in the Cleveland and Pittsburgh road and held it till he was able to sell it to advantage. He became a large owner of Union Pacific-

had been constantly increasing

his

interest.

His

subsequent history as a successful business man, and finally as one of the greatest magnates of Wall Street, is well known, but has little to do with the

Westchester County. Another Westchester County litterateur, Mr. Fred-

literary annals of

erick Whittaker,

widely taker

stock

parties interested

1

known is

is

a prolific writer of stories, and

for his

"Life of Custer."

Mr. Whit-

the second son and fourth child of Henry

Whittaker and Catharine Maitland, and was born in Sloanc Street, London, on December 12, 183S. Hi* father was a solicitor with a large practice, but was ruined by indorsing for a noble client, Lord Kensington, the original of Thackeray's "Lord Crabs" in the " Yellowplush Papers." Mr. Whittaker wag compelled to flee from England to escape imprisonment for debt. For some years he wandered from place to place with his family on the Continent, and finally, in 18-tQ, came to this country, settling in New York, where he obtained a good practice as a lawyer, and wrote the " Whittaker'* first book on practice, under the code. Practice " was a standard book until superseded by later decisions and later books. Frederick Whittaker's education in the mean time was of a desultory character, and bis attendance at school was limited to six months at a Mr. Walker's private school in Brooklyn. His father tried to make a lawyer of him, but the boy's tastes inclined to literature.

At

sixteen

|

he entered the

office

yer, as office-boy, !

of N.

Dane Ellingwood,

a law-

and two or three years

later ob-

Henry G.

Harrison,

tained a position in the office of

A defect in his eyesight, however, which was now discovered, put an end to his efforts to become an architect. In the mean time he had made many boyish attempts at literary composition, and finally succeeded in getting into print in a magazine,

architect.

spread through Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Mis-

Arkansas and Indian Territory, Texas, Louisiana and Mexico. There .are central connections at Cincinnati, St. Louis, Chicago and New Orleans. All the construction of thi-s system of roads was completed in 188'J, and represented about ten thousand The earnings of the lines when he miles of road.

earnings for the month

August, 18*3, were five million

capital.

in consequence of a misunderstanding with and also owing to the illness of Mr. Horace K. Clark in Chicago. The road was then in a bad way, the stock going down to fifteen, and the only thing he could do to save himself was to hold on to what he had, while at the same time he still kept buying. He made up his mind to stick to the road and build it up, and he persevered till it at last Ifefore the road became a success a paid dividends. great clamor arose that it was Jay Gould's road, as though that was a dangerous thing. He was then engaged in selling out his stock, which waa soon in the hands of seven thousand investors, representing the earnings of many willows and orphans. The next venture was the building up of the Gould railroad system in the South and West. It began with purchase of the Missouri and Pacific from Commodore Garrison. Other roads were purchased ami connections were made to different points. Mr. Gould said that he had at this time passed the point where money-making was an object, and his only idea was in carrying out the system to merely see what could be done by combinations. The lines now

The

a month.

dollars

was thereupon engaged at twenty dollars per month, hut his work proved so unsatisfactory that his employer told him the work he performed was a silly lot of stuff. "After that," said the witness, " I had not the heart next day to ask anybody to give me a dinner." lie finally went to a quiet place, where nobody could see him, and had a good cry. He then went to his sister's house, where he went up stairs and prayed, after which he felt better. After that he resolved not to go home again, but to go ahead and die in the last ditch. He returned to his task of completing the map and made similar surveys of Delaware and Albany Counties, from which he realized five thousand dollars, which was his first

souri,

j

I

now

extinct,

When

called

the Civil

War

The Great JtepuMic Monthly. broke out he joined a cavalry

regiment, and on his return obtained employment as

Digitized by

Google

LITERATURE AND LITERARY MEN. a

hook

canvasser,

and afterwards as a school-teacher.

Alter repeated failures to secure the puhlication of of his writings he attracted the notice of Mayne Reid, who published a little song " Starlighted Midnight " from his pen in hisiReid's) magazine, Onward. Reid gave him some good advice, and pointed out the course he should pursue in order to succeed.* Mr. Whit taker's next step was the publication by Frank Leslie of some stories of adventure which he had submitted, hi 1870, with some money inherited from English relatives, he was enabled to buy his present home at Mount Vernon. Ho also married and set to work in earnest to earn a living by his pen. This he succeeded in doing by writing serials and dime novels for Munro, of the Fireside Companion, Beadle and

some

He also contributed a Army and Nary Journal, called

others.

set of papers to the " Volunteer Cavalry the Lessons of the Decade." These attracted much attention, and in 1874 Mr. Whittaker became the tint National Guard editor, and afterwards assistant

New York

637

His literary work has comprised a and newspaper articles, the Westchester Historical Society and secretary of the Westchester Bible SoCity.

number of

historical papers

and he

member of

a

is

ciety.

Mr. Charles E. Culver, author of the town histories Somen and North Salem in this work, was born on the 6th of April, 1842, in the town of Somen, in the house now owned and occupied by James P. Teed. His father was Edward W. Culver, the son of Joshua Culver, and he was born in the' house directly opposite Mt. Zion Church. The Culver family are of Welsh descent. Charles E. Culver's mother was Sarah J., daughter of Samuel Toed. She was born in the Teed homestead, now the residence of her brother, James P. Teed. The Teed family are of French extraction. His parents removed to New York City when he was a child, and among the earliest of his of

recollections

is

the attendance at a private school in

" Life of General Custer." In the following year he returned to the Journal and also wrote a good deal for the Galaxy magazine. He also published a novel, " The Cadet Rutton," about this time. Cilice then he has been engaged in writing

Amos, (now West Tenth) Street. Owing to continued ill health in childhood and by advice of a physician, his father disposed of his business in the city, and removed to North Salem on a farm. Charles then attended the preparatory department of the North Salem Academy. John F. Jenkins, A.M., was the principal, his daughter, Miss Mary Jenkins, having

serials for a living, and has also written a play, " Napoleon," intended for Edwin Booth, but never

charge of the preparatory department. The family then removed to Whitlockville, (now Katonah,)aud

editor of the Journal.

In 1876 he left

it

for a

time

and wrote the

acted.

" Civil

He compiled for this work, the War" in Westchester County.

Eliza

born

at

W. Farnham,

chapter on

philanthropist and author, was

Rensselaerville,

November

17. l^lo,

aud died

New York City, December lft, 1864 Her maidenname was Burhaus, She went to Illinois in 183-5,

in

and was married there in the following year to J. Farnham. In 1841 she returned to New

Thomas

York, and was employed in visiting prisons and to women. In the spring of 1844 she

lecturing

accepted appointment as matron of the Female Department of the State Prison, at Sing Sing. In 1848 she was connected with the Institution for the Blind, in Boston, and from 1849 to I8ft6 resided in California. She returned to New York and published "California, in Doors and Out." She was also the author of several books, and was active iii promoting social reforms and the rights of women. Rev. William James Cumming, author of the histories of the towns of Cortlandt and Yorktown in thiB work, and compiler of the Civil List, was born in New York City, July 22, 1847, and is the son of John Pollock Cumming and Isabella Pollock, both of Bangor, Ireland. He was educated at the public schools •of New York City and in the College of the City of New York, where he graduated in 181)7. He studied for the ministry at the Union Theological Seminary, graduating in 1871 and was ordained August 8, 1876, since which time he has been pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Yorktown. Previous to that time, 87 2-7ft, he taught school at Norwalk, Conn., and in .

1

Charles attended the private school of Mrs. Miller and Miss Mitchell, near that place. He continued his studies, after the close of the latter school, at the

In I860 he began public school and under tutors. New York, intending to complete the coune at the Baltimore Dental College, but the approach of the war and excitement of the times turned his attention to other than civil pursuits. In 186 1-62- -63 he was engaged in various government employments, both under the State and nation. He was married in New York City in 1863, and removed to West Farms, where he carried on the manufacture of writing ink. In 1864 he removed to Northern Illinois and remained West ten yean, being the study of dentistry in

a resident of Chicago during the memorable 1871,

where

his

fire

of

publishing business, as well as his

home aud everything he

possessed, including a fine

were completely destroyed, his family and

library,

himself escaping with but the clothing they wore. In 1869 he started the publication of the Chicago Iht/>atch,

a

weekly Sunday paper, under the firm-name

of Culver, Harris Pretzel

l

is

now

& the

Wilson. Charles E. Harris (Carl publisher of

1'retzert

Wrekly.

Wilson was from Alabama, and had charge of the Masonic department of the paper. After the firm had sold out the publication, Mr. Culver became connected with the daily press of Chicago, having began to write for the press when a mere lad. His fint real newspaper work was done for the late Horace Greeley about 1861, since which time he has been more or less actively engaged as correspondent or in Col. T. B.

igmzea Dy

Google

HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

638

He

an editorial capacity.

has had two children, both

now

deceased. In politics he is a Democrat. Rev. David Cole, D.D., of Yonkers, who has con-

much towards this history of Westchester County, has furnished us with the following interest8 ing sketch of a few of the authors and writers in hi

tributed so

locality

Pastors, editors

and newspaper correspondents have,

of course, in Yonkers, as in other places, written volu-

We

minously.

have already spoken of

all

editors

and conductors of papers who live in the city, and will not bring them in here. But, among paper correspondents, many facile Yonkers pens, driven both by ladies and gentlemen among us, have been driven to purpose upon articles that have appeared in our own and in outside papers and periodicals. We cannot mention these, but confine ourselves, in the following catalogue, to writers who have published pam-

its

vicinity.

He

has grappled with history, with

and with social, political and financial economy, and has written considerably on them all, and many articles he has printed. One little waif of his, in doggerel verse, will keep his memory alive. It is entitled, " Chronicles of Yonkers." It was published in 18T>4 without name, and thrown upon the tables of a fair held in the interest of the New York Sanitary Commission, to be sold for the benefit of the fair. It is sprightly and pungent, full of caustic allusions to the science

early history of Yonkers, as well as hits at the living

men and

the usages of the place at the time in which was written. Rut, most of all, it helps to reveal mind and vivacity of the writer, who has himself been one of the institutions of Yonkers siuce 1849. Hon. G. Hilton Scribner, who came to Yonkers about twenty years ago as a practicing lawyer, and who, from 1871 to 1873, was Secretary of State, it

the

now long

confined himself to the

management of

phlets or books.

has

Lyman Cobb, Sr-, born in Massachusetts in 1800, and one of the greatest educators and most indefati-

a New York City railroad. He is, however, another of the amateur writers of Yonkers. His most nota monograph, published about two Where did Life Begin ? " It has

gable authors of his time, spent the last five years of

able production

his life in Yonkers. Mr. Cobb began teaching at sixteen, and published his famous " Cobb's SpellingBook " at nineteen years of age. This book went

attracted wide attention for

into all the schools of the country. His subsequently

several

published books were very numerous-

They included

five reading-books, a speaker, a dictionary, itor,

a miniature lexicon and extended to

At

an expos-

many other

is

years ago, entitled "

its

subject, for the

way

in

which the subject is treated, and from the fact that minds on both sides of the Atlantic seem almost simultaneously to have set forth its theory, which is. that all life of all varieties began at the poles.

Mr. Scribner does not make writing a pursuit,

his death he left unfinished a concord-

but writes in a neat, self-controlled and pleasant style,

ance, a national dictionary and a pronouncing Testa-

which always insures respectful attention for whatever he prints. Foremost among the writers of Yonkers is the R«v. Henry Martyn Baird, Ph.D.. D.D., LL.D.. an accomplished linguist, and one of the best read and most scholarly of men. He ha» been professor of Greek in the University of the City of New York since 1859. His writings have been numerou*. A list of them may easily be obtained. It is enough here to cite his last and greatest work, entitled " Rise of the Huguenots of France," published in two volumes in 1879. Dr. Baird was widely known before, but this masterly work gave him a greatly increased

volumes.

ment.

Mr. Cobb was as active

as he was in educational

and

in

humane

enterprises

literary work.

He

was

a member of each of many benevolent societies of prominence, and a leader in them all. He was noted for intelligent zeal, for promptness in action, for kindHis ness of heart and for simplicity of conduct. death occurred on October 26, 1864, and he left in Yonkers four children, two of whom arc prominent in

Yonkers business

life,

and have both been men-

tioned in their places in this work.

Henry Poolcy, M.D., who has been spoken of among the Yonkers physicians, was, during his long J.

residence and practice in Yonkers, a frequent writer of pamphlets and fugitive articles upon professional subject*, some of which at least attracted wide notice.

These were his diversions.

He

did not

make

writ-

ing a profession.

men of Yonkers have done amateur writing, now and then throwing pamphlet form. Among these, one is Mr. Robert P. Getty, whose overflowing life has made itself* felt in so many and such various direcMr. Getty's home delight has been in his tions. library, within the walls of which he has collected and systematically filed newspapers and other registers of passing event*, with which he has kept up familiarity to such a remarkable degree that he is almost un encyclopiedia of the history of New York and Several leading business

more or

less

their productions into

reputation. terest, its

Its

grasp

style is

The

is

a model,

profound, and

it

thrills

with

altogether

it

inis

a

by foreign as well as home journals, while independent and in many cases ably critical, have been most flattering, and some have not hesitated to rank the work with the great histories of Prescott and Motley. Dr. Baird is still prosecuting his researches into his great subject, and masterpiece.

further volumes,

notices of

it

we understand, may be expected

in

due time. Dr. Dio Lewis, the author and teacher of physical culture, died at his residence in Yonkers, in 1886, from erysipelas. A couple of weeks before his death he fell from his horse and received an injury to his On Wednesday following left leg, below the knee. he came to New York, and in returning home was

Digitized by

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CIVIL HISTORY. carried past a distance

too

Yonkere

The

of about four miles.

much

his injured

for

He walked home,

to Hastings.

exertion proved

causing erysipelas to

leg,

sec in.

Lewis was a native of Auburn, N. Y., and was sixty-three years old. He studied medicine in the Harvard Medical School, and began the practice of Dr.

bis profession

in

Two

twenty-two.

Auburn

in

1845,

at

the

age of

years later he removed to Buffalo,

where he practiced five years, and wrote and published a

number of papers on the

causes and treat-

ment of cholera, which ravaged that city in 1849 and Dr. Lewis during those years of practice be-

1*51.

came impressed with the necessity of physical culture prevent disease, and in 1855 he gave up the prac-

to

tice

and began a course of lecturing and personal During four years he lectured almost every giving his days to the invention of his new

of his profession,

and writing on the subject of public hygiene. night,

system of gymnastics. I860,

In

having perfected

he aban-

this system,

doned the platform and settled in Boston, where he established his

He was

normal school

assisted

in

for physical training.

i;:s2 J, " which provided that any member of the company who should purchase of the Indians, and found in any part of New Netherland (except Manhattan) a colonie of fifty

found here.

"Strange as it may seem, while every colonie, and almost eiery hamhad its local magistracy, the citizens of New Amsterdam [.New York whole province, continued, greaUy to their illa-

let,

City], too capital of the

The government of the

all

In

Thomas

Van

A

any twron of the Middle Ages. The power of the Patroon* o»er their tenant* was almost unlimited. No man or woman, son or .Uughter. inanHa-rvant or maid-servant erity of th* colony."

In

were called "Schepens." * s The civil designation originally given to Throckmorton's setOostdorp or East town, was continued. tlement officers

" Id the municipal government of those setUemanl* two system*,

fore,

in In

es-

.

these

i

O Callahan's -

History of the

Sow

Netherlands,"

vol. u. p. ;»>.

p. 57. Civil List of State of Xew York, «0'C*llaghan-s - Hist, of X. II." ... Callanhan'. " History of X. II ," pp. 31i-:ii:i. » There is unions the records of the town of Westchester one

commune

latter. * November l"\ lt>3, Westchester was ceded by JStuyvesant to Connecticut, ami English law and customs prevailed. Less than a year later, September 8, lt>)4, the New Netherlands surrendered to an

of the

They

Their uthcial term was one year. sheriff, a secretary and a marshal. One huudrwd year* Is-fore the Dutch settlement there were in Holland

hare, there-

government of

[or Civil] Law, the imperial statutes of Charles and resolutions of the United Netherlands" and such ordinances as the Dutch West India Company should prescribe. The boundary between the New England colonies and the New Netherlands had been in dispute. By the treaty of H>50 Greenwich on the main land and Oyster Bay on Long Island became the eastern limits

.

were incorporated and held land in fee, and possessed the rights ul Tliey named persons from whom the executive selected ofll. pat room. cers called 'srhepen*.' These constituted* Uwrdorcminunicatiou with their sovereign head, were a local court of justice, and had u sellout or

the

Roman

the some relation he occupied towards the supreme

.

—in Colendonck

V., and the edicts, customs

head of the Stale. ... In return for this olx-dienc* the patroon was bound to protect the colonists, who bad the ailditioual right to ad/draw themselves by appeal to the supremo authority at Amsterdam, in aue they were either aggrieved or oppressed. "Towns or commune* sometime* acquired Independence of feudal lonU, and held their privileges directly from the crown.

'

now Westchester County we

some local autonomy. The New Netherlands were governed by the "Dutch

himself lord paramount in his uuuior, where he u»t only represented the sovereign, but exercised feu.UI Jurisdiction over his colonist*, who lit

is

both systems

or town, with

tending power was lodged in one Individual, who, though the immediate vassal of the sovereign authority from which h«| derived hit lauds, was

stood townr-ls

what

a patroon or feudal baron, in Oostdorf the

In the "Colonies* the superin-

sentially different in principle obtained.

The company retained the company The Patroon of Reus-

Several director* of the

availed themselves of the advantage* offered.

court,

Their ofi'er was ac-

They requested the privilege of choosiug own officers and of making and administering own laws. They were granted the same privi-

These

them from taxation for Church** and schools were required to be established, and

the manufacture of cloths was prohibited.

cepted.

their

on part of the patroon. nils charter prescribed regulamid granted privilege* with regard to trade, gave to the freemen

the land they could cultivate, and exempted

ten years.

the 18th the prisoners offered

submit to the Dutch authority.

as absolute a rule as

tract existed

'

force, sent for the purpose,

arrested twenty -three persons and brought

their

:

;

manor with

great

Pell, of Fairfield, Conn., laid claim

New Amsterdam. On

Douck

the Itirector-tieneral and Council; In short, to bold and guvern hi.

Vredelaud under color of an Indian conveyance s of November 14, loV>4, and called it Westchester. Settlement took place shortly after by the English from New England. April 2, 1655, the Dutch ordered them off. March 15, U>5t>, an order was issued by the director-general and Council for the arrest of

to

der

"The Patroon had power to appoint officers and magistrates in all towns and cities on his lands to hold manorial courts, from whkh, in caaes where the judgment exceeded fifty guilders, the only appeal was to I

to

the English intruders.

;

and Exemptions" issued by the West India Company's College of Nineteen, June 7, 1 >:*!>, in accordance with which the grant was made to Privileges

re-

civil division.

Ui. >f>,

affairs.

l)lre to 16*3 the old settlers. Governor was, promised more privileges than he ever inhabited portion this county formed, with Staten Island, Kings County and Newtown, the West Hiding gave. County inder English Ri le.—Changes in the of Yorkshire. Westchester County, with substantially the same proprietors and systems brought with them local boundaries as at present, was erected, November change*. Colendouck (Yonkers), the second civil division of what is now called Westchester County, had 1, 1»>83, by the following act of the General Assembly, been blotted from the map by the massacre of its inassented to by the Governor and Council habitants by the Algonquin Indians in September, " An Act U> dirt confirmation by the justice, whose hands the local administration was really vested. Long Island, Staten Island and parts of West1st

election in

were united in a shrievalty called Yorkshire,

The

and divided into three districts, called ridings.

English system of sheriff" s courts was introduced. The Governor and the Council appointed each year a sheriff for the whole of Yorkshire, and three justices of the peace for each riding, who were to continue in office during the Governor's pleasure, and were to hold a Court in

of Sessions in each riding three times a year,

which thedovernoror any of his councilors might Besides their local duties, the high sheriff mid

preside.

were to sit with the Governor and his Council Supreme Court of the Province, called the Court which was to meet at New York once a year, on the last Thursday in September. This court was also a legislative body, as it was invested with 'the supreme power of making, altering and abolish-

justices in the

of Assize,

>

Bancroft'*

"Htatory of the I.

S.,'

tative*,

vided Into twelve county* a* followetb.

.

the Highland.

"The Council,

is

a mistake

and Jotin Quinby.

;

Wratcheatrr

vol.

vu

.

.

.

having been three time* read before the governor and first „f November, 1C83."»

asaented to the

i.

p.

618 hut edition i

I.

represented by Kduard Jessjup

is

confirmed by one passed October

1,

1691 (3d William and Mary).

The dividing

between this State and Connecticut was in dispute. As this was a border county, it was involved. Prior to the taking of the New Netherlands by the English a controversy was going on between the Dutch and colony of Connecticut. This was inevitable from the fact that the charters came There could have been from different nations. but one outcome the Dutch were obliged to yield and the inhabitants of Connecticut would have pushed their settlements to the Hudson River. The charters granted by the English did not settle matters. The Duke of York's domain extended to the Connecticut River, that of Connecticut to the "South line



Sea."

The determination of the boundary line settled the of Bedford and Rye. Both colonies acknowledging one supreme authority an amicable adjustment was possible. Commissioner* were sent over The line decided upon was for the purpose in lbo4. to be twenty miles east of the Hudson River and was located at the Mamaroneck River. The towns named above fell to our neighbor. The matter na« reopened in luK3 and the dividing line placed by agreement at Byram River. Iiedford and Rye became a part of civil status

U *

•This

bill is

This act

provided

freeholders of

and adopt local ordinances, subject to the approval of

chester

it enacted by the Governor. Council and the Represenand by the authority of the same, that the said Province be diThe County of Westchester to West and Eartcheater, Bronx-land, Fordham, Anne Houk'a Neck, Rlcubell'a, Minlford's islands, and all the land on the uiaine to the eastward of Manhattan'* Island, a* fane aa the government extend*, und the Yonker'a land, and northward along Hudson's River as farre aa

in Uie same, be

conk-yne.

feature of the code was

organizing the town courts.

the election, by a majority of the

each town, of eight overseers, to try

the

:

;

ivil 1.1st

of State of

New

York, Is*", pp. 45ai«U«.

Provincial Ij«»s of X. Y., Co. Clerk's Office, l/ueeh

quoted by Bolluii — " History of West Co.,"

vol.

i.

pp. 7

s Co.,

and

8

L.

I.,

aa

(new edi

IV hi

«M>1

Digitized by

Google

I

HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

G42

New

The King

York.

County

died before this settlement re-

Tbe.ll,

ceived his approval, and the subject was an open one

once more. March 29, 17U0, William III. approved of the agreement of 1083. The line was not finally established until May 14. 1731, by which the "Oblong,' a tract of sixty-one thousand four hundred and forty acres, extending as far north as the Massachusetts line, was ceded to New York, in compensation for loss of territory along the Sound, in addition 1

to the towns named above. That portion of the " Oblong " which belongs to this county was erected into

By an

the town of Salem (now Lewisboro).

act enti-

tled "

An Act to ascertain Part of the Southern and Western Boundaries of the County of Westchester and Eastern Boundaries of the County of Orange and Part of the Northern Bounds of Queens County," passed December 31, 1708 (9th Oeorge III.), the water boundaries were given more definitely. Cot-KTs.— By the act of 1083, Westchester was made the county-town, and the courts there estabFrom the report to the Committee on Trade lished. on province of New Y'ork, of February 22, 1087, made by Governor Dongan, who had summoned the General Assembly of 1083, we gain some idea of the courts established by the act referred Court, of Justice are

now

to,

and they

established by Act of Assembly,

an The Court of Chancery, consisting of Governor and Council, is the Supreme Curt of tail province, to which *p{>eals may be brought from auy other court. " Th- Assembly finding the inconvenience of bringing y peace, *•

1

.

:

Caleb lleathcote, K«ir.. Judge of

Wm.

;

County

tee, Clerk of



" SimgU Justice. Kvery Justice of the any suite or controversy to the value of *'

(/sorter StMiont.

— The Justice* of

;

I

10*.

have

the Pear

Mich power* and authorities a* are grante

all

of

y

Peace in Kngland.

Common

'•mmtf tiimrt.— The County Court or

Plea* hath cognizance

of Civil Accoti* to any value, excepting what concern*

title of land and noe Acenu can be removed from thl* court, if the damage be under ta>. ".saprs-iNe Court. - The Supreme Court hath |s>wers of

Common

Plea* * Kxchcqncr in England and no* Accdn can be i from this court If under ilWJ. " Ck-meTf.— The Coventor Jt Council are a Court of Chancery and have |wiwer» of the chancery In Kngland, from whose sentence or decree nothing can be removed under CKKj. " I'nrt^falat I.Umri.

—Tbe Governor

in granting adminiatracAns

Register.

The governor

I*

discharges the place of Ordinary

and proveing

estates

and pruvidslng

for

The Secretary

Wills, etc.

remoter

altout to appoint Delegates in the

part* of the Government, with •upenriaors

for looking

after

Intestate *

orphans."

Minor criminal offenses were looked after by the Court of Sessions, and the more flagrant by the judges of the Supreme Court in their circuits through the counties. They had for this purpose "a commission of oyer and terminer and general jail delivery, in which some of the county judges were joined." 1 Smith, in his " History of New York,"' gives us an interesting account of the courts as thev were in 1757,— " Justice* of the peace are appointed by commission from th* (Governwho, to serve their purpose* in elections, sometime* grant, ss It I*

ors, till*

government

New

to

York, did, instead of iheCourt of Artie* which

was yearly held for the w hole Government of Ihispruviuce, erect a Court and Terminer, to be held once every year within each county, for the determining of audi matter* an should urine within them respectively, the member* of which court were appointed to be one of the two of oyer

judge* of this province, assisted by three justice* of I he peace of that wberelu Kiich court Is held, which Court of Oyer and Terminer haa likewise power to hear appeals fimii any inferior Court.

"4. There

New

I.

likewise In every county, twice in every year (except in

York, where

It*

four tim.-..M in Albany, where

it-

thrice!,

Court*

of He«*lon< held by the Justice* of the Peace forth. respective counties, as in Kngland.

".Y lii every town within j» Government there are :i Commissioner* appointed to hear and determine all matters of dltlereiire not exceeding

the value of

t...

which shall h*p|*u

In the respective

towns."

each county, which is civil and military and by these mean* Ju»have been astonishingly multiplied. There are Instance* of soma of who can neither w rite nor read. These Genii, besides their ordinary powers, are by act* of assembly enabled to hold court* for the determination of small cause* of pounds an J under but the parties an privileged, If they rboose It, w ith a jury the proceeding* are in a sumcalled, th* administration to particular favorite* in

the nomination of officer* then*

.*>

;

:

mary way, and the conduct of the justices ha* given Jn*t cause to innumerable complaints. The justices have also jurisdiction with crime* under the degree oi grand larceny for any three of them (one being of the quorum) may try the criminal without a jury, and in diet piiniah ineut* not extending to life or limb. ;

•'

Thm .Hrsmas ami

A Supreme the judicial system of the province. Court was established, the Court of Oyer and Terminer a-i a distinct court was abolished, and its jurisdiction vested in the Supreme Court, which retained also the

name

for its

criminal circuit, the functions of the

Court of Sessions were confined to criminal matters, and a Court of Common Pleas, erected for each county, with cognizance of all actions, real, personal and mi veil, where the value exceeded five pounds/*" From the civil

we

list

of the province of

New York

for 1093

learn something of civil affairs in this county,

i

o'l nil ..^Imi,

-

o




It Is

The jndsrs are

Council.

By the act of General Assembly passed May 0, 1091, and nrdiuance of 1099, several changes were made in

r

.,/

common

/•tea*.

-The

Court of

Common

demand

Plea, take* cwgnlnanro of all cause* whore the matter in

value aNive

I

;

tices

is

Id

establUhed by ordinance of the Governor

id

ordinarily three,

and hold their

office*

during

Thro' the Infancy of the country, few. If any of them, art acquainted with the law. The practice of these courts I* similar to that pleasure.

of the

common

They have each a

twtirh at Westminster.

clerk, commis-

sioned by the Governor, w ho lames their writs, enter* their minutes and

keep* the records of the country.

They

These judges, together with some of the a court of general session* of the peace.

'•Sa;.r*w


, the Courts of Sessions levied the taxes upon the towns. By an act of the (ieneral Assembly,

legislative

October 18.1701 (13th William III.), the jusof the peace, in special or general session, were

Mamaroneck, 1697; but what were their duties it ter, ir>86;

|

'.

The

to 1772 I

New is

Rochelle, 1700),

impossible to state.

records of the proceedings of the supervisors prior

having been

lost

during the Revolutionary

War, we can only surmise what sections of the county came under the provisions of the act. East Chester, * Westchester, Philipsburg, Pelham Manor, Morrisania, Mamaroneck, New Rochelle, Bedford and Rye probably elected these

some idea of the

officers.

The census*

civil divisions

usage, with the population of ••

for

1712 gives

recognized by law or

each.—

WVrtch«ter Ea«t Chnter Kya

,VT2

3KI 5lfl

:M

Younkers.

i6o

Pliilipaburn

MH

Mo

Marronack

once a year the necessary county and and allowance for their representative Assembly, to make provision for the poor, issue warrant* for the election of two assessors

H4

Morrisania

62

'•lhatn

62

Bedford

172

Cortland-. Patt«ut

ttl

Bykr-.Pattcnt

32

Scandal*

IS

Total

November

1,

2*15

1722 (9th Geo.

I.),

directed to levy

entitled "

town charges

ors in the county of Westchester,

iu the General

and to

and not judi-

towns before the passage of the act of 1703 (East Ches-

passed ti?es

which was

Supervisors had been chosen in several of the

N"«w Kochvllr

first

and the

Sessions was thus relieved of that por-

tion of its duties cial.

one inspector of election

from each town.

to

The Court of

County Board

election district.

who were required

ors were authorized to choose annually a treasurer.

to

the Secretary of State,

An Act

to increase the

an act was passed

number of Supervisand that no wages

of Supervisors shall be any part of the said county's rate for the future."

After authorizing the choice of

a freeholder by the freeholders and inhabitants, '

l"

"An

KM*

it

was

»et In flx anil ascertain the place for election of n-pn-Mintative* in Orii'ral

AwrniMy

.Wmher, mi."

for

county of Wr»trlic«tcr, pawil the 25th

>Ciril Ltat, Ikwi, p. *

am.

OVallag-hat.'. " Doc. Hbt. of X. Y.," vol.

1.

Digitized by

Google

HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COCNTY.

646

elect, or where there were not more than twenty inhabitants, the owner of

provided that in case of failure to the

manor

The

or his steward should be supervisor.

Manor of Cortlandt were authorby the act of December 16, 1737, to elect annually one supervisor, one treasurer, two assessors and one collector, and Ryke's Patent, by the act of January 27, 1770, were granted a similar privilege. While freeholders of the used,

much

left

is

to surmise

prior to the year 1772, the

who

records give both the towns and the supervisors

represented them from that day to this.

ing

the

is

" Wm.

list for

Barker, Eaq., for Scaradale

Ju.

Cortlandt, for Yonkers; ford;

Jm.

AbUah

Gilbert,

for

Pouodridfa

Byka Pmtten

The

Pelham ;

Col.

Cul.

;

;

;

Graham,

for the

supervisors met at

Jaa. Crunkhtte, for

;

White Plain*." first

This place

Westchester.

Htk*

from Wnlch ritt'

CtrntUg.

Name.

Senators

No. of Congrem.

;

while owners of freeholds of twenty pounds were entitled to vote for Assembly-

in value, etc.,

men.

The Second Convention convened sie

June

ture,

Federal

consider the

July 26th the convention thirty 3d, 4th.

Z-Wlali

to

following

Mill.

all

of

were

the

whom showed

ratified

it

not

by a

On

vote

their good sense

of

The

voting.

from

delegates

Legisla-

Constitution.

seven

twenty-seven,

Poughkeep-

in

an act of

17th, 1788, pursuant to

to

Westchester,

by voting

to

ratify Lewi* Morri*.

Th»dd*ru Orann. Richard Hatfield.

Lott

LMngrton.

Philip

Pierre 8tepli.

W. Sari,. Van Cortlaudt.

Philip

The Third Convention

is

that of 1801,

which was

held at Albany October 13th to 27th, pursuant to an

Van Cortlandt Ward

passed April

ii

tith

versy which had arisen regarding the relative powers

C-OMMITTKE OK SAFETY AND Coi'NCH. OF SAFETY During the recesses of the Congresses, a Committee of Safety from its members was entrusted with

of the Governor and Council of Appointment

executive functions.

diency of altering the Constitution in regard



stitution

After the formation of the Con-

of 1777 a temporary form of government,

called the Council of Safety, was appointed until a

Van

Cortlandt.

The latter was the presiding officer. State Conventions. The Fourth Provincial Congress, which assumed the name of the Conven-



tion of Representatives of the State of

New

office,

and

respect-

to consider the expeto the

number of Senators and Assemblymen, with power to reduce and limit the same. The Convention ment had equal powers of nomination with the Governor; fixed the number of Senators at thirty -two and the Assemblymen atone hundred, to be increased

Jonathan G. Tompkina. Pierre

ing nominations for

unanimously decided that the Council of Appoint-

Governor and Legislature should be elected. Mrtnbrrt /mm Watehr&ter Cuintfy. GouTorneur Morria.

act

of that year, to settle the contro-

York,

re-

solved itself into a convention to frame a Constitu-

August 1, 177, a committee' of to prepare a form of This committee rejiorted March 12, the first and Constitution was adopted April 1777,

after each census, at the rate of

two yearly,

reached the number of one hundred and

Thoma* Inrael

Pierre

Ferrin.

Honeywell.

until they

fifty.

Van Ortlandt, Jr

Ebeneier White.

Jouathan G. Tompkins.

tion for the State.

thirteen

members was appointed

government.

20th, following.

It is

saturated with the principles for

which the people had contended 1

for

more than

For iiaiu«* of r*-pr*-*ul»ti»i-» of Fourth Pn>*inH»l

•«".»•.

Gouv.rneui Morn.,

,.f

W«t.-|,e»ier County,

a cen-

Congrw,

eee Hut

wa» on the com-

The Fourth Convention was held in Albany AugNovember 10, 1821. The question of a Con-

ust 28 to

vention for the Revision of the Constitution was sub-

mitted to the people, majority.

It

The burning

was carried by a very

large

questions of the day were

about the Councils of Revision and Appointment. The former was objected to as exercising its veto

power contrary to the ideas for which the coloni*t» contended, and as being beyond the reach of the peo-

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Googl

CIVIL HISTORY. pie

aud the

because

had assumed judicial

Senate consisted of twenty-four members, apportioned

authority. The Constitution of 1321 was ratified by the people February, 1822. The vote was put into the hands of all white male citizens, virtually without

among the four districts, which bore the designations Southern, Middle, Eastern and Western. The Convention of 1801 increased the number of Senators to

;

latter,

it

The Councils of Revision and Appointment were abolished. Appointments, for the most made by the Governor, by and with the advice aud consent of the Senate. The number of elec-

condition.

part, were

and the State was divided into eight

thirty-two,

dis-

Since the adoption of the Constitution of 1846 there have been thirty -two districts, each entitled

tricts.

to one member. The term of office is two years under the Constitution of 1777 it was four. Westchester County has belonged, successively, to the Southern, First, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Twelfth. ;

tive officers was increased. Mtgitti from WutcheUer «*m< y Peter

A Jar.' Ward.

.

Peter J. Munro.

.

Lit of Ilr»i.U»U of Wtttchr&r Count), who hare BepretenUd

The Fifth Convention met, pursuant to the vote of the people and an act of the Legislature, at Albany,

June !>th

1,

1846, and continued in session until October same year. The new Constitution was rati-

of the

fied by the officers

in each

popular vote November

The

ticket.

3,

Judicial

1846.

were made elective. Members of Assembly county had been hitherto elected on a general third Constitution of 1846 directed the

Boards of Supervisors to divide their counties into ly Districts.

John Hunter, t

IrutM to which

Name*. Benj. Hramlreth William Cauldwt.ll Dariui Croaby Samuel [flight Richard Hatfield John Hunter Sir Jamea Jay Philip I.Mugiton

it

hat belonged

Yean

1850-51, 1868-69.

1797-1800. 17U5-l8l>,trkt.

the

Cvunlf, 1777-18*5.

1807.

17U6-M. 1*38. 1847.

Joseph Benedict

Thomaa Bowne Aaron Brown

Una n

1778-79. I7W5.

1823-30.

ITkwki.

Nehemlnh Brown, Jr

1823-24.

EU ne/rr S.

17H4-KS.

BurllhB

AawmUy.

I8.W-10, 1812-14, 1*18-19.

Kranci. Ilarrette

Jamea

E. Beer*

in

1825.

Benjamin Barker William Barker

Joaeph T. Carpenter to the

Yean

John Barker

Joaepli Carpenter

'La»», 1872, ch. 884.

«

Nann* William Album

Joseph

tnrt

%

the

As-

used in elections.

Senate.—Under 1

all

on a general

1777 to 1847.

I).

State

I'een

elected

number

since then the counties have been divided

.

State of

fixed the

of the Constitution of 1846

members of Assembly were ticket

IM

MrfrtW*

Constitution of 1821

17!*us7.

Ih4H2. 18".

Digitized by

Google

HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

650 Anthony » ouatant John t'onatant Thaddeua Crane I.

....

.

Edwin Croaby

Pierre

Van

Curtla ndt, Jr

1B2»,

Aaron Vark

.

.

1777-79, 1788-89. 1821.

Stephen Ward

.

.

1811-12.

Cmlij

Darin*

184."..

.

.

St.

Ml.

.

8am uel Drake

1777-81.

Benjamin Ferria Samuel B. Ferria

l*w,

irai.

Ebene*er White, Jr

1*18-17.

John White Jame. Wiley

1814.

1794-96.

1828.

W right

'SO, "8

1844.

Yonug.

'24.

1796, 18U9-10.

1*39-40.

1848 to 188.V

2.

Albert Badeau

William Flaher Peter Fleming

1*36-37.

2.

Alfred

1791.

.

.

.

.

.

1792. 1794-95.

177".

1827-28.

Froat

.

1*32-33.

1M.1-44.

John W.

.

Wataon Ebeneaer White

Andrew Findlay John Fkdter

Joel Froat

.

Israel II.

W.

1

Theodore

lNf*, '08.

1.

(>rrin A.

18.12.

2.

L

Yean

Name.

DirtricL

H

Aa»i

1872. 1»7I.

ftnedlct

1851.

I

tieorge A. Brandretb

88, -91,

L

Daniel

1777-78, DWO-I.

3.

Benjamin

1*19-21.

2.

William H. ratlin William Cauldwell

1779-Sfi.

in

Itartl.tt

Hark

18*4,

Brigga

1782-84, 1789-92. 1796-97.

2.

Ell L'nrtU

Richard Hatfleld

1794.

3.

Llianncry M. Dc|iew

.

.

John R_ Hay ward Saniuel L. Holme*

1846.

1.

ArnHI

.

.

1857.

M.I.

1.

Claiboriw Kerri-

.

18*9.

Urael Honeywell. J r

1777-79.

larael

I

Honeywell

.

.

W

L

Franklin

1788-91.

2. 2.

Newberry D Haleted Abraham Hat Be M .

W llllain

187, 1814-lf., '18. I

iiiltey

.

.

Herring

John Lawrence

1782-8.1.

John Hoag

Elijah Lee

1798-99.

Fruat llortun

Thuma*

174 V

:i

Gaylonl

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

....

Hubbell

B.

.

.

.

.

Philip Livlngaton

1788-89.

1.

Danlrl

Ebeneier L3.

April

3,

1

W

ft,

1867

2,

lw!».

2, 1x7ft.

Coi nty JriHiE*.—The Court of Common Plea* whs erected by the act of 1691. It was composed of one judge und three justices, who were appointed by the Governor and held office during his pleasure. In 1702 the judge wan assisted by two or more justices Under the first Constitution there was one judge and several assistant judges.

The

act of

March

27,

1818,

abolished the office of assistant judge and limited the

number of judges

Under the State government the appointment was at first vested in the Council

by two freeholders appointed or elected for the purpose. Surrogates were appointed by the colonial Governor at a very early date for Westchester County as early as 1780. They had very limited powers.



ft,

November November

Jackaon O. I'ykniau

1X59.

1XC7.

ft,

Novemtier

B. Tapiieu

1H57.

X,

November.'!,

No.emtier

\V. tilltwrt

r

Abraham

Calvin E. Pratt

.1,

;vi.

to five.

Since the organization of the State the surrogates have been vested with the authority to grant probates, subject to appeal to the Court of Probates. Counties where the population exceeds forty thousand may be authorized by the Legislature to elect such an Otherwise the county judge acts as such. officer. The office was filled by appointment of the Council of

Appointment;

Later, the Governor, with the advice

and consent of the Senate, appointed the county judges, and the term was five years.

of 1846 years.

The

Constitution

made the office elective and the term four The amendment of 869 extended it to six years. I'lrat ^U»itf Cmrt {>\A.muU\. 1

Jvljn /(Ae Omrt of tjommo*

Appointed

•Sum-

ing power.

Since the for four years. term has been six years.

Note (Wiratioa* of 1777 M.rri.

Ap|wlnted.

Marx,

'

W anl

Kln-iieier

1777.

February

Hulx-rt liraliaru

Stephen

1735.

2,

22, 1752.

17V..

™«./ 1X21.

Name.

U«i.

X,

May .

.

17,

177x.

17x1

II.

March

1791.

1*>,

Jonathan O. Tompkln*

February

It;.

El»-ne«er Punly Jonathau «. Tompklln

February

23, 1707.

Klijali I.ee

January 2". 1*>2. March 29, l*o2. June \ i*o7,

John Watt. Caleb Tornpkina

William Jay Caleb Totnpkin. Itobert S

Han

Albert I^:*ra 1/ockv.ood

March

February

July

Ebetierer While, Jr

February

Jonathan Wart

March

II.

March March

May

WvU-kt^r f.vulf

i.«-(er tkt

II. C. l'i*

liifTonl

J. .bii

Oven

l>.

W.

16, 1810.

X,

19, 1x13. 16, 1815.

1X19.

1.

17, 1821.

2X, 1828. 7. 1840.

1x41.

CuaaMrafMa 0/1846. Elected.

....

C. Piatt

IMwrt Sllao

19, lat/I.

10, 181*.

February

Well.

"/

17S7.

Feltrnary 12, 1811.

Name.

LewU

1821.

2H, 1802.

Samuel Young* E*ra Lock wood Samuel Youngx Henry White Samuel Young*

Alexander

ittul

23, 1778.

January

June, 1x47.

November, 1k.V>. February ft, 1X62. November. 1x62.

Mill

Novenilvr, 1870.

T. Coffin

June, 1x4". !

i

of 1777

............. Oc'tutww 31* lWO.

Frederick J. Coffin

27. 1x4-1.

1766.

Appointed.

March March

1793.

Jnr... 7. 1-20.

9, 17.V4.

10, 1761. 9,

fa* OonMitmtuiut

Philip Pell.Jr

.x«rrojr>l-

February 16, 17WI. January 111, 171*.

Cold.n

Ad of 1801.1 Xante.

Richard

Appointed,

Rlkrr

.

.

August 1U, 1H01. February 1.1, 18ln.

.

Cadwallader D. Colden

.

Richard Rlker

ebruary

Barent (Jardenter

March

Thomas

April

Leater

S.

ID, 1811.

H,

1815.

Appointed

June

Aaron Ward William Nelson Rlrhanl

11.

July

12, 1818.

Roger Barton

8,

1819.

November,

.Mol^r.

Millet

Nicholas Cooper

1H-VS.



v During the colonial period the sheriffs appointed annually by the Governor, usually in

The

Constitution

of 1777

appointment in the Council of Appointment. The term was one year, and no person could hold the office for more than four successive years.

vested the

The Constitution of 1821

Jamea

I>e

Octolier, IT*'. J une i 1770.

Lancey


.

Octolier.

Isaac Wlllrt

Lewis Graham John I>e Laneey

No,..,

November, 1871 November, 1874. November, 1877.

month of October.

.

October.

Elected.

Baker*

election for

1723.

October. 1727.

10/ 1821a*! 1846.

Brlgp

II.

1702.

o.tol*-r, 1709.

W illet

OlllH-rt

Ward

Robert Cochran

the

l>clo»*r,

Honeywell, Jr

Israel

Jacobus Van Dyck

Elijah

June. 1847.

pykeman

0.

Daniel C.

the

17ointed.

John Rider

May

Jo*eph Lee

September

Edward

I8mn.

Joseph

Collier

n«rk

l>anie]

William Former Benjamin Xlo.ll

14,

held in November, 1859.

IT. lflus.

OetoU-r

4,

.r.

May

Richard HntneM Ttioma. Kerri*

September

r

Mur.

l

.

I,

TJiird / Htrict.

»

William K-.,u» ft.

Bute.

S.

Bat*

February

loll.

1—ju: V. Wright.

John S. Hatea. Henry White,

1'latt

llerry A. Well..

Jamea

Kitwanl X. narrelt.

17. 1S2I.

oimI IS4«

Elected.

Norember,

1*22.

.

I7IJ

.

2f,,M7

l.M« XT, 131

"1

-

1

1711

Mutmiti

hoekwood

I

:is,7»o

Robert K. "wkley

Julm I' Jeukiu. Hiram P B. w.11 Chauri'

ut.

vi.

t-

Sawyer,

liKumtHi.t.

". Vn.u.of North C«.tle,

who

liirumt..etil.

Appointed

.'(.jk.

ilirllinhrllt.

Ap|ulut«y

C«rt-

Patent.



.

hap.

'il.t ..f

He. onl» of Board of

Kannaand King'. Bridg*

law* or 1873.

Su[»rfi»m.

Digitized by

Google

CIVIL HISTORY. Abljah Gilbert

655 17«*3.

.

William Davis David I»aton Stephen Ward Lockwvod.

Philipabnrgh.

North Castle. Kaat Cheater.

.

.

Joseph Strang

Manor

Petor Fleming

Bedford.

Abljah Gilbert

Salem.

Jame* Cronkhite

.

.

1774.

Van

Ilarre

White Plain..

.

Cortland!

Cortlandt

Junes Holme*.

Bedford.

Sanim-I

Rye.

Havilaiid

John Thome*

Rye.

William Paulding

Philipabnrgh.

Jonathan G. Touipkln*

Manor of Scandal*. Manor of Cortlaodt.

I

Jo*eph Strang. ... Thaddaiia Crane

David Datoti

North

Jame*

Westchester.

Town of I'pper New Rochelle.

OO

Castle.

William Suttou Ebenezer Lockwood William Davis

Maniarnneck. Poundridge.

Ryck * Patent. Whit* Plalna.

roiikb.lt.>

Graham Stephen Wanl Robert

Kaat Cheater.

Salem.

Honeywell William Miller

Harrison's Precinct.

EheueU'r Locltwood

Poundridge.

Klienvter K. Burling

Kaat Chester.

Yonkers.

1

Ferris


aU>n. 177t*.

Ebenezer Lockwuod.

Jacob Pnrdy. Abljah Gilbert.

Joseph Strang. Israel

Lyou. January

5, 1779.

KbeneOT Lock wood.

Urael Lyou.

Abyah i

19,

1779. Israel

AbUalj

Mm*

Lyon. I

.......

Borough Town of Weatcl

Manor Manor

Town

of Philipabnrgh. of Scandal*. of Cpper Salem.

William, Miller

Harrison's Precinct.

Joseph Strang

Manor

Ebeneaer Lockwood

Precinct of

Gilbert Budd.

Kbrtien-r S. Burling

Town Towu

Daniel Horton

Precinct of Whit* PUiue.

Honeywell

Israel

Gilbert

Precinct of

...

Van

of

Cortlandl.

of

of

Yonkers.

John Thomas

Town

Philip Pell

Manor

Benjamin Stevensou William Morris

Manor of Morrisania.

Abgah

Gilbert

Gilbert

Bndd

Town

of Rye. of Pelham.

of

New Rochelle.

IB, 1779.

June >, ITHA. Lockwixitl.

Joteph Strung.

William Darts Jtf.* 13,

Jonathan G. Tompkins

17W.

J.avph Strang

Samuel llaight Jacob Purdy

Manor

Israel

Loon William Danoh

Bedford.

Abljah Gilbert

Sale

of Cortlandt.

North C*

(«oft«r 9, 17 SO.

Lyon. William Dan, Israel

Kbenexer Lockwd

Poundridge.

Peter Fleming

Bedford.

Abraham Leggott

West, heater.

Daniel Morton

Whit* Plain*.

Abel Smith Jame* Cronkhite Jamea Hunt

Ryck's Patent,

North Caatle. East Cheater.

HarrW.

William Miller

J >l.u Van Ta«el

Precinct.

Kye.

Kvck'. Patent. 1781.

Samuel Halght

Manor

Abij.h Gilbert

Salem.

Samuel Haight Urael Lyon W ill tain Kanchrr

Manor

of Cortlandt.

Jmrnvr,

Hunt

Benjamin Stevenson

Bedford

William Davi*

Poundridge.

Daniel

Salem.

Ahijah Gilbert

Oelohtr

Jew of Cortlandt.

While

Manor Manor

Samuel llaiglit Kt^nezer Lockwood

Manor

Abljah Gilbert

Sal.ni.

Fleming Lockwood

rane

of Cortlandl.

Pniindndge.

Jlf.ij*

Peter

I

Bedford.

Mills

29,

Jam«-« I'ronkhile

Jonathan G. Tompkins Joseph Strang

17S'.'.

AM Smith

Bedford.

Town of Hye. Town of New Rochelle. Manor of Phllip»burgb.

Lewi* Morris

Theddeus Zel«-iiah

17tCi.

Hunt

Philip Pell

17W.

4,

Isv-kwood

Town Town Town

Plain*.

of Morrisania. of Pelham. of I'pper Salem.

of of

Ilyrk's Patent.

Manor of Scandalo. Manor of Tortlandt. Bimrii-i of

North

District of

Poundridge.

ffestle

Eben«»."-r

Poundridge.

KU-n.'in-r

James Cronkhite

Ryck's Patent.

.lunio.

Abljah Gilbert

Salem.

William Miller

Harrison's Precinct.

AbijahGilb.

Town

t

Haight

Manor of

Ortian.lt.

Town

Hunt ii

of Kaat Ch.wter. of

Lower

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

G5IJ

Jf.is 9,

17*5.

iwrrow Cart's .... Francii M. Gar|»nt*r X«» Bochrlle . . ll*nry H. Plielpa North Sal. iu 04*1 rlctober 27, lKO] ."

the slaves in the town slowly diminished until, in 1820, there remained but seven, while the free colored population

numbered

thirty-five souls.

This was nearly

The

The same made and the

potatoes, 104 acres, 5265 bushels.

dairy products

wards the following document appears in the town records, followed by others of a similar nature: "I, Bartholomew Ward, of the town of Scarsdale, County

certify to the

;

de-

products, together with the

year 262 yards of homespun cloth were

this time, 1795', the Legislature took steps gradual abolition of slavery, and shortly after-

of

By the State census of 1835 there were 3039 acres of improved land in the town and on the farms were 472 neat cattle, 84 horses. 024 sheep and 464 hogs. This is all we know of the agricultural interests of the town until 1845, the census for this year giving full and interesting particular*. The improved land aggregated 4391 acres, the inhabitroving swine.

were at the same time in the town twenty

About

find that the

continued, the duties of

increase than before for the half-century, while there

for the

was voted

bottom rail, except well underpined with stones, nor to exceed six inches betwix rails until it comes to

acres,

colored persons.

it

inches high and

that they were " not to exceed six inches under tbe

oats,

free

in-

the vote of this town-meet-

shall bo lawful, if

similar votes, as well as others in respect to the fenc-

was twenty-four, showing even a smaller

of

it

instances sufficiently

any hogs are found on the highway not ringed or snouted, to drive them to pound, and the owner of said hogs shall pay the poundage." This appears on the minut«s of the meeting of April , 1784, and was followed by many ing that

the town, which then only included Scarsdale proper, ratio

"Also

dicates:

many

amounted

to 18,685

pounds of

butter.

live-stock on farms consisted of 78 horses, 420

neat cattle, 416 swine, 386 sheep, yielding 730 pound*

No

of wool.

returns are given in respect to the value

of farm stock or of farm produce, but the latter, so far as the outside market is concerned, was probably inconsiderable, most being devoted to

home

con-

sumption. In 1855,

when the next

State census was taken, the

population numbered 445. of owners-

whom

45 were land-

The value of farms was estimated

at £427,140"

and the acreage of the town was classed thus Improved, 2801 acres; unimproved, 1132 acres; pasture. 977 acres and meadow-lands, 786 acres. The yield of hay was 1225 tons. The amount of the principal crops was as follows Corn, 5982 bushels oats, 2376 :

;

:

;

bushels; wheat, 1054 bushels; potatoes, 2080 hush-

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SCARSDALE.

661

1395 bushels. The dairy products creased to three hundred and eighty-six. It is very pounds of butter and 19,540 gallons of probable that before the first-mentioned date the numconsumed at ber was even greater; but the decrease has been home: 435 pounds of honey were gathered this year, steady, and at the present date the industry is

eU;

turnips,

were:

17,339

milk, the latter being exclusive of that

and poultry wore sold to the value of $1853.

The

practically

farm stock consisted of 1H5 horses, 375 ueat cattle (in-

milch cows and 68 working cattle), 325 swine and 261 sheep, yielding 636 pounds of wool. The census for 1865, some of the statistics, however, eluding

referring figures

whom

;

"213

1

population amounted to 557 persons, of

The farm

61 were land-owners.

valuation was

acres

;

•435 bushels

;

oats,

4898 bushels

;

730

acres.

pounds, and the value of jwultry and eggs sold was

The

$1325.

dairy product was

Butter made, 12,143

:

pounds, and milk sold, 2800 gallons.

The

live-stock

consisted of 142 horses, 322 neat cattle (including 190

milch cows and 60 working oxen), 219 swine (199 being slaughtered and yielding 32,440 pounds of pork ), and 214 sheep giving a clip of 363 pounds.

The

last

State census, that of 1875, gives the follow-

ing statistics, which, in general,

show a

falling off

from

The population was 529, of whom The farms of the town were

previous figures.

94 were land-owners.

and the acreage was Improved, 2566 acres; unimproved,

put at a valuation of $630,500,

described, thus

:

875 acres: woodland, 531 acres; pasture, 503 acres

The crops were as foland meadow, 1207 acres. lows: Hay, 1635 tons; corn, 5145 bushels oat*, 2490 bushels rye, 2668 bushels potatoes, 5275 bushels. The apple orchards contained 995o trees and yielded 37,975 bushels of fruit. Grapes were produced to the amount of 6375 pounds. The value of poultry and eggs sold was $3358, and the dairy product was 9790 pounds of butter made and 4925 gallons of milk sold, The live-stock consisted of 131 horses, 259 neat cattle including U9 milch cows), 177 swine (140 slaugh;

;

;

i

tered

and yielding 28,360 pounds pork), and 67 sheep

giving a clip of 321 pounds.

The

gross receipts from

in

The

it

and that the

figures in relation to the raising of sheep show most marked decline. In 1835 there were six hundred and twenty-four sheep owned in the town, but in the ensuing ten years the number had de-

the

forty

;

of

i

[



Manufactures and Other Enterprises. Manufacturing has always occupied a very secondary place in Scarsdale, but little capital being devoted to it and almost all capital going to farming. Just above and a short distance to the west of Scarsdale Station, on the Bronx River, and within the limits of the Popham This estate, are the ruins of a grist-mill and its dam. was built prior to the Revolutionary War and was used as a grist and saw-mill, a dam about fifteen feet high intercepting the river at this point and furnishing good water-power. This belonged to the estate of the Honorable Richard Morris, whose house was not far distant, and one Crawford by name was employed as Here was the timber sawn out of which the miller. Morris house and several others of the old mansions were built, but the mill has not survived as long as they. For many years it was put to its original purposes, but some time previous to the War of the Rebellion it was used for the manufacture of axles, and in 1862 it was converted into a manufactory of shoddy. As no mention appears to have been made of it in either the town records or census re|x>rts its output in cither capacity was probably not great. Within a year from this time, in 1863, it took fire and was burned to the ground and has never since been rebuilt. Nothing but a few ruins and several fragments of

a comparatively short time, as in 1856 the building

regard to the agricultural interests of the town,

is

last State

capital invested in

to

is very probable that the decrease in farm products mentioned for 1875 has been continued with little in-

farming in the town

number and

time of the

town aggregated

not as large as in former years.

amounted

figures are the latest official returns

terruption ever since,

in the

machinery remain to mark the site of this venerable mill, which was probably one of the first in the The dam, also, has almost entirely disappeared, having slowly fallen into ruin. The building now known as " The Scarsdale OperaHouse," but formerly the " Fox Meadow Chapel," was originally used as a carriage factory, but only for

farm produce during the previou* year $32,945.

Although these

The farms

these,

and the cider product aggregated 450 to

following extracts relate to the

two contained from three to ten acres, two from ten to twenty acres, five from twenty to fifty acres, eighteen from fifty to one hundred acres and thirteen from one hundred to one hundred and fifty

rye, 1850 bushels;

The honey gathered amounted

their depre-

thinned down the Hocks so that they were but a small fraction of their original size, and in that year

census:

7872 bushels; turnips, 2570 bushels. In the orchards were 5512 apple-trees, giving a yield of 13.663 bushels,

to

when By 1884 they had

the Hocks until the year 1874,

size of the farms existing at the

potatoes,

barrels-

among

The principal reason for this made by stray dogs. No exact

be had in relation

they killed at least twelve sheep.

The

acres;

cipal

to

twenty sheep fell victims to them, thus practically putting an end to this branch of farming.

and the acreage divided thus: Improved, unimproved, 94X acres; pasture, 1264 meadow, 993 acres. The yield of the prineicrops was as follows: Hay, 1436 tons; corn,

£71 2,800,

3168

extinct.

has been the havoc figures are

dations j

the previous year, gives the following

to

The

:

,

county.

was added, together with the neighboring property, to the Fox Meadow estate and converted into a chapel. figures to show the extent of the manufacturing interest carried on here, but it was doubt-

There are no

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

662 less

John Cornell being

Almost opposite

very limited proportions.

f

and about four hundred rods to the north on the bank of the Bronx River, formerly stood

selected to

the positions.

fill

In

this building,

1792, nine years after the

of

Caleb Tompkins, town clerk Jonathan G. Tompkins, supervisor; J. G. Tompkins, John Barker, John Cornell and William Popham, commissioners of highways; William Popham and Jonathan G. Tompkins, poor masters Elijah Cudney, constable and collector John Barker, Caleb Tompkins and Thomas Cornell, assessors Benjamin Underbill and Caleb Angevine, overseer* of highways; Ferris Cornell and Elijah Purdy, Jr.. fence and damage viewers; and Bartholomew Griffin, pounder. Up to this year Jonathan (i. Tompkins and Benjamin Cornell had held the offices of supervisor and town clerk respectively since the first meeting. On April 5, 179»», commissioners of schools were chosen for the first time, as before mentioned. In 1801 and for several succeeding years Caleb Tompkins whs chosen to the offices both of suj>ervisor and of town clerk, thus being created a precedent which was frequently followed in subsequent town elections. In 189 he was succeeded as town clerk by his brother Enoch, and held no local office of importance until 1822, when be was for the third time chosen supervisor, and that year Enoch Tompkins was succeeded in the town clerkship by Richard M. Popham. In 1823 William A. Popham held his first town office, that of school commissioner, and in 1825 he was chosen town clerk to succeed his brother Richard, hold-

it,

a powder-mill, the property of a German named Haubold. This was erected about the year 1847, when |

struction,

thing remains of either cooper-shop or magazine. About the year 1880 this property came into the hands of Mr. Leggo, who has erected several small buildings there and started an establishment for the

manufacture of lithographic stones and plates, which is now most successfully carried on. Political History. The present township of Scaredale was organized on the 7th of March, 1788, but previous to this meetings had been annually held for the election of town officers, under the acts of the Legislature as early as 1783, and before that even, by the terms of the royal patent granted to Colonel Heathcote, though no records are extant so far as we know of meetings or proceeding of the town prior to the latter date. The first entry in the town records



as follows, given verbatim

is

:

"By order oflheCoun.il uf Appolntiii.nt, Intltled

an Art

enemy

shall

of the mine, and until the Legislature can ITT9. te>r

And

t.y

the Act of the l-eitudatiire,

to provlda fur thi> teui|».nil &>ir rumen! of the

porta of the State, whenever the

l»-

abandon or

convened.

virtue of direction, Je»»e Hunt, K»|

l.y

,

l>e

Southern

diap«aae>*eer any person or persons, sole or corporate whatever, except the right or privilege of burial in said ground ; 8, 1849, under the name and style of "The Hector, Church Wardens and Vestrymen of the Church of and upon the further condition that religious services St. James the Less, in the township of Scarsdale," and in said church during said time shall be performed steps were at once taken towards the building of a according to the form prescribed by the Book of church edifice. Pending the completion of this, ser- Common Prayer, or the administration of the sacravices were held for some mouths in the former resiments and other rites and ceremonies as prescribed in dence of Hon. Richard Morris, then occupied by said book for the use of the Protestant Episcopal William S. Popham, son of Major Pophum of Revo- Church of the United States of America, and of the lutionary fame, at which the Rev. Dr. Morton, of doctrine and discipline therein set forth, and the Philadelphia, and others of the clergy officiated. canons of said church by a duly and regularly orThe corner-stone of the first church was laid on the dained minister of said Protestant Episcopal Church, 29th of June, 1850, by the Rt. Rev. W. R. Whit- or by one allowed by the canons of said church to tingham, D.D., bishop of Maryland. The conse- officiate, or by a duly ordained minister of the Church cration of the completed edifice took place on the of England as now by law Established, and none 28th of June, 18ol, the services being conducted by other; provided always, nevertheless, that if the rent the Rt. Rev. W. H. De Lancey. bishop of Western above reserved shall not be demanded by, or paid to, New York, acting in the disability of the bishop the said party of the first part, or his heirs on or of New York. The first wedding in the new before the Feast of St. Andrew in every year, after church was celebrated on the 27th of May. \s',2, the same shall have been due, that then said parties and the first confirmation service took place on the of the second part shall forever thereafter be disPith of September of the same year, seventeen per- charged from the payment of the same." The church is situated upon a slight eminence, a sons receiving the rite. Owing to the small population of the parish Un- quarter of a mile from the Bronx River and the Harbuilding of the church had been no easy task, but all lem Railroad, mid about the same distance from the gave as they could, and heartily seconded the efforts old Boston turnpike, in a convenient location, while to the south and west of the building is the portion of the original movers, and the result was the sion of a church building that proved a great blessing of the grounds set apart as the parish burying-place. To quote from a sermon of the present rector Bolton gives the following concise and interesting deto all. scription of the first church edifice: "The style of of the parish. Rev. Francis Chase, which was delivciety of Friends was slowly

;

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SO A RSDALK. the building is early English, or ing to Riskman's Nomenclature.

likewise presented

pointed, accord-

first

It is

667

constructed of

lighted

by

The

friends.

which

triplet,

the chancel, was subsequently

filled

memory

with

of Mis*

native stone, with dressings of the white doloniitic

beautiful, stained-glass windows, in

marble, and consist* of a nave, chancel, with sacristy The nave, which is 50 feet by

Cornelia H. Guion.

24 feet in the clear, with sittings for about 211, is divided into four bays, the flank walls ot which are pierced with couplets, excepting the first bay from the west end, on the south side, which contains a door

Saviour holding in his arms the Sacramental Loaf.

The

attached, and porch.

leading to the porch. The roof diagonally traced. The pulpit

A

corner of the nave.

is

in

in the southeast cor-

supported on a cen-

tral

It is circular,

octagonal stem, surrounded by four detached

lars of white marble,

of the

first

pil-

and was presented by the sisters The seat* are open and



the church being supported by voluntary contributions at the The organ, presented by a member of the vestry, is situated at the west end of the nave. The chancel, 20 feet by feet, in the clear, is separated from the nave by the chancel arch. The choir is raised two steps above the nave and has two stalls on the south side. On the north it opens, by a door, into the sacristy. The sanctuary, elevated above the choir by two steps, is about 8 feet in depth, containing an altar 6 feet by three feet, on a foot pace, a credencc»helf on the south side and bishop's seat on the north. The chancel is lighted by a triplet of richly-stained glass, the middle lancet of which contains a cross within the Vrrira piseis ; the south, a dove and font and the north, a paten and chalice. The rest of the glass (excepting the west end of the nave, which is richly grisailed, and the southern windows of the chancel, which have colored l»ordcrs) is plain enameled. The whole of the stained glass was manufactured by Mr. John Bolton, of Pelham. Over the central lancet, in the chancel, and in the middle of the offertory.

W

west gable, are triangular, trifoliated

experienced

communion

Bolton's " History

is likewise taken Westchester " " The on the day of consecra:

tion, consists of the following articles:

scribed

'

The blood of Jesus

A

day,

offer unto Thee the and a silver alms-basin." The bishop's chair, bearing on the back the symbol of the episcopal office the bishop's mitre— was the '

Thanksgiving

will

I ;

'



gift

of the builder,

cloth

and

Henry

Cornell, while the altar-

linen, as well as the

service-books, were

November

Montg

*

paten, with the legend

settling matters with the

insurance

preferred to rebuild themselves rath-

4th, by the

assistant

Rev. Dr. Olsen, a former rector;

all

Sin;' two silver chalices, each having the following inscription: I will receive the cup of Salvation;' a Sacrifice of

the build-

and delay were

bishop of the

diocese, aided by the Rev. Francis Chase, rector; the

flngon, in-

Christ cleanseth from

difficulty

work on a new church was finally begun, and after many mouths of anxiety and trouble the new building was completed, services being meanwhile held in private houses. The services of re-consecration took place on the 4th of November, 1 883, just nineteen months after the conflagration, and were conducted by the Right Rev. H. C. Potter, assistant bishop of New York, aided by several others of the clergy. Of these ceremonies the Churchman for November 17th has the following account: " This church was re-consecrated on Sun-

service

of

service, presented

in

who

much

er than pay the insurance,

Frank Wills, of New York, was the and the cost of the entire edifice is put by Mr. Bolton as about five thousand dollars; but this is probably too small, as much labor and material were contributed by individuals which are probably not included in the above estimate. The following defrom

and, although

companies,

ored glass."

communion

and, as

Fortunately, there was an insurance on ing,

architect,

scription of the

and

large bell,

walls remaining.

with col-

lights,

The

Less.

by Meneely, of Troy, was a present to the parit was found to be too large for the small summit of the west gable, it was put in position near the porch, upon the ground. On October 15, 1804, William Sutley Lang, a resident of the parish, communicated to the vestry the offer of a chapel, to be attached to the church. This offer was promptly accepted, and the chapel, being a memorial of the lately-deceased wife of the donor, was erected shortly thereafter. The structure was to the north of the chancel and communicated directly with the sacristy. It was lighted by a couplet at the east end, facing which was the entrance-door and the reading-desk. In the north wall, and facing the entrance to the sacristy, was cut a tablet to the memory of Susan Bailey This edifice contained sittings for about I«ang. thirty-three persons, and was chiefly used for the Sunday-school and for week-day services. On the evening of Palm Sunday, April 2, 1882, the beautiful little church was almost totally destroyed by fire,— owing apparently to a defective Hue.— and the chapel and almost all the furnishings were involved in the general destruction. The ruin was nearly complete, nothing but a small portion of the ish,

rector of the parish.

entirely free of any charge for rent or use

James the

belfry at the

font of the largest size (2 feet

ner of the nave.

lancet represented St. Philip,

cast

the northeast

6 inches across the bowl) stands

left

that of the right, St.

open, with rafters

is

central lancet contained a representation of the

The glass of the

erv, of

Mamaroneck

;

the Rev.

W. W. Van

the Rev. F. B.

Kleeck,of White PlainB and the Rev. Messrs. Forbes Orisler. The church, repaired and rebuilt after fire of last year, and adorned with many gifts from parishioners and friends, was bright and cheerful. A large congregation was in attendance and the music, though simple, was perfect. The bishop delivered the sermon, which was worthy to be heard in ;

!

and the

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history of Westchester county.

«i;h

Edmund LudSamuel E. Lyon, Augustus Bleeckerand Orrin Weed, vestrymen. The following are the present officers of the parish, the senior wardenship being now vacant on account of the recent death of the Honorable William S. Popham, who had held the office of senior church warden continuously since the foundation of the parish, viz. Lewis C. Popham, church warden Alexander B. Crane, James Bleecker, Charles K. Fleming, Oliver A. Hyatt, S. Bayard Fish, I^wis B. Atterbury, Henry W. Bates and Cornelius B.

every quarter of the commonwealth.

Francis McFarlan, Joshua Underbill,

Three persons were confirmed. In the afternoon the Rev. Dr. Olsen preached to his former flock. It was a day to be long

remembered

in Scarsdale."

In external appearance the new church the

no

building, differing in

firat

low,

is

very like

essential particular,

although the workmanship in parte is inferior to that of* the former. Within, also, the church is little changed, the arrangement and construction of chancel, nave, roof and windows being as before. The tone of the walla and woodwork

however,

is,

:

;

much

lighter than in the former building, while the stained

Fish, vestrymen.

but a parody upon the beautiful chancel windows of the old church. The font has been almost exactly restored, and stands just outride of the chan-

one hundred and ten.

glass

cel,

The interments

is

on the

The new

right.

altar, chancel-chair,

double

memory

parish, in

It is

the

of friends of the

gift

of Mrs. Valeria Baugess, a former

whose remains lie in the little churchyard. Other gifts include a full set of lesson -books, and pulpit-lamp, altar-cover, altar-vases and almsbasin, all in brass. The organ, of one manual, parishioner,



from the shops of Hood & Hastings. Boston, is very prettily decorated, and was purchased with the insurance money of the former organ, occupying the same position,— at the western end of the nave. The chapel

is

nearly an exact counterpart of the one

it

**

a

commodious

you frien'Ii who nrc gathered here Heboid the grave wherein I »leep

re-

rectory,

I

1

April

1.

31.

ltv'->,

ISM.

lumber 3,

lt..v

|

At the northwest corner of the Fox Meadow estate, and within a few rods of Hart&dale Station, stands a small two-story frame structure formerly

M. Ohwn .... Steph.n F. Holm.* .

.

October

1,

May

1*72.

1.

known

as the

" Fox Meadow Chapel." This building was first used as a carriage factory, but soon after the estate passed into the hands of Charles Butler, in 185*5, it was converted

under the above name.

The

first floor contained seatiugs for about a hundred persons and at the south end of the room was a dais with a small pulpit. The second story was merely

HonignatioD.

J»n.r. y. L* Baron

n..y. Willi.ru

1*71. Ror.

weep,

entombed h» writ at 1ML"

into a private chapel Election or Acr-epUnc* of Oil.

to

;

situated on a pleasant spot nearly due north of the church, and nbout five minutes' walk from it. Following is a list of all the rectors of Scarsdale

January

McFarlan and Pop-

All

You'll I*

I

is

number

the southwest of the church

iTepare for death while you are well,—

places.

Belonging to the church

To

families, and in the last-named repose the remains of the late William Popham, of Revolutionary fame, and his son, William Sherbrooke Popham. In this churchyard lie the remains of several unknown persons who died within the town limits, and so were giveu burial here. The following curious epitaph,— the only peculiar one in the little buryinggrouud,— appears on the tombstone ofJames Bell. The stone was prepared by him and the lines were presumably of his own composition,

reading desk, pulpit

and brass lectern, is quite different in style from that which it replaces, but is handsome.and harmonizes well with the surroundings.

the parish graveyard

ham

furniture, consisting of

stall,

in

are the vaults of the Bleecker,

IH71.

used as a loft. For many years the cha|>el was used by no organized society, but its pulpit was occupied, upon invitation, by various Presbyterian clergymen, In 1X53, two years after the consecration of the among others, by the Rev. Drs. Lyman Abbott and church, the following were the published statistics of Irenicu* Prime. At a later period the chapel was Families, 20; souls, ll.r>; baptisms, 4 used by the Methodist Society of Hartsdale, who held the parish communicants, f>0. In 1S.W the church building and there their Sunday-school and afternoon services,— church being inconveniently situated. lot were valued at #V>00, and the seating capacity of their own the former was for 211 persons. The attendance was This was continued until the building of anew church 120 persons, and the communicants numbered r>3. In by the society rendered the use of the chaj»el unnecessary. Since then the chapel has not beeu used 1 W> the valuation of the property had risen to £8000. There were HO communicants and an average attend- for religious purposes beyond the holding of an ocance of 40 persons. The following are the latest par- casional prayer-meeting within its walls. For some ish statistics: Families, 4o souls, 214; baptisms, 7; time thereafter the upper floor was occupied by a confirmations, 8 marriages, 3 burials, 6; communlocal temperance club as its meeting-room, and in 187') and again in 1882 the lower floor was used as a icants, 74; Sunday-school scholars, 44 teachers, 7. Total amount collected for all objects, $2.W>.02. theatre for the presentation of amateur performances, The following were the original officers of the par- under the name of the " Scarsdale Opera-Home." ish William S. Popham and Mark Spencer, church The building is now arranged for such purposes, with wardens; Charles W. farmer. William II. l'opham, a stage, etc., on the ground floor, the auditorium July

1.

Henry Webb*

t-72, Rev.

January •->*. February 1,

1*74, B«».

Augnrt.ll, 1873.

William A. llolbrook

.

.

Octobers, 1K77.

l*7u. Rev. Francis Chaae.

:

1

.

;

;

;

;

:

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8CARSDALK. having a seating capacity for about one hundred and twenty-five persona.

Although, until the building of the Church of St. James the Lena, Scarsdale had no place of worship besides the Friends' Meeting-House, services were held in the town for many yearn previous to that date. For thiB purpose use was made of the old " Fox Meadow" school-house, which formerly stood on Fish's Hill, the Methodiat* and Presbyterians holding services on alternate Sundays. The Rev. George Donovan, a clergyman of the former denomination,

who contributed

so

much

to the early

success of the

6»J!>

Popham, their offices being in addition to the school commissioners before mentioned. During these early days of the century the school came to be known aa the " Scarsdale Academy," from the high grade of its Later on, however, when the conduct of

instruction.

passed

school

the

into

much

other hands,

of

its

lost, and it is stated that two of the time pedagogues came to untimely ends from their fondness for strong drink. One was drowned,

reputation was old

while intoxicated, in the deep spring on the west side of Dobb's Hill, just south of the site of the birth-place

of Governor

Tompkins and the other

in a

druukeu

public school, often officiated here as pastor as well

frenzy committed suicide in a field nearly opposite the

pedagogue. Again, during the Rebellion, when there appears to have been some interruption in the services at Fox Meadow Chapel, services were frequently held in the house of Dr. Kruen, on the former

present school. This second building was

Cooper

to

estate.

Schooi-s— Although

the early record* of the Scars-

dale public school have entirely disappeared, there ap-

pears to have been such a school in existence at the end of the last century, for the town-meeting of 1784

held "att the School-house in said

was

Manner near Captain

Jonathan Griffin's." The building here mentioned wa« probably the first one in the town and stood at the top of the steep bank to the west of the White Plains road, Station.

north of the road to Hartsdale

just

Nothing now remains

to

mark

the spot but

a portion of the foundations, the building itself hav-

been

ing

century.

by

destroyed In

17W

fire

early

in

the present

the offices of "Commissioners of

Schools" were first instituted in the town, J. Barker, William Popham and Caleb Angevine being chosen to fill

the position for the

first

year.

In ISOy was built a new school-house to replace the

one destroyed, and

this still remains, but

occupied as a dwelling.

It

is

now

formerly stood part way

up Fish's Hill to the north of the roadway, but was moved many years ago to ita present site, to There is the north side of the Hartadale road. much of interest connected with this old schoolhouse, though in itaelf it is quite unpretending. It a small frame building of two stories, is measuring about twenty-five by twenty feet in the ground plan, and unpainted. The school-room was on the ground Hoor and above was a loft. Soon after

the erection of this building the school acquired

considerable prominence from the scope of it

York sent

their children

is

related

its

curric-

that people living in

ulum, and

New

board

in

the town that

they might enjoy the advantages of

its

public school.

to

This prominence was largely due to the ability of the Rev. George Donovan, before mentioned, a graduate of Trinity

College,

Dublin, who, on

becoming

a

resident of the town, in 18052, at once interested himself in

the school, and introduced there the study of

the aucient languages, in addition to the

school branches. "

common-

In 1817 we find that he was elected

Inspector of Schools," his colleague being William

known

as the

"Fox Meadow School-House" and we mentioned as a frequent place ings.

The

The

find it thus holding town meet-

State census of 1845 gives figures in relation

the school as

hundred dollars tendance,

for

;

follows,

Number

Value of building, one of pupils, 35

average at-

;

18.

present school records only cover a period of

about twenty years, and are very brief. In 1H70 the school trustees were Philip Watere, James McCabe

aud John Carpenter, Benjamin Palmer being clerk. In this year five hundred dollars was voted for the expenses of the school, and the teacher was Misa Eliza Algood, who occupied the position for a number of years. In 1874

it

was determined to erect a new and more and a thousand

suitable building for school purposes,

was voted by the town

dollars

for

procuring the nec-

essary land, while in the following year twenty-five

was appropriated for the building hundred itself and nine hundred for furnishing it suitably. The building committee consisted of Benjamin F. Butler, Benjamin Carpenter, Peter Doblxs, James McCabe and John Read. The building was begun early in February of the centennial year, aud was ready for occupancy the following September. In 1880 the schooltax amounted to $7!H5.25, being aasesscd at the rate of $\M per thousand dollars. For that year the statistics were as follows There were one hundred aud twentysix children in the school district between the ages of five and twenty-one, and sixty between the ages of eight and fourteen. School was held during fortytwo weeks of the year. The trustees were John II. Carpenter, Peter M. Dobbs and James D. McCabe, Gilbert W. Dobbs being clerk. The teacher was Miss Ameigh. At this time the library contained one hundred and fifty volumes. dollars

:

The

following are the statistics for 1884

Trustees,

:

David A. Weed, Benjamin J. Carpenter and F. W. Brooks Clerk, Gilbert W. Dobbs; Teacher, Miss Marsland; number of weeks of school, forty-three children in district between the ages of five and twenty-one, one hundred and thirty -six between the ages of eight and fourteen, sixty-six. Books in library, two hundred and fifty. The school-tax for the year amounted to ;

;

;

#841

.25,

being assessed at the rate of $1.92 per thousand.

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

«I70

The new school-house is situated at the junction of bly accounts in some measure for the decrease. The new White Plains |»ost roads, just at the attendance at the night-school aggregated twenty-one, thus giving a total of fifty-one scholars. The parish

the old and

foot of Fish's Hill, a little north of the Hartsdale road,

and

faces

due

west.

It is

about

by thirty

fifty

feet

on

contribution had fallen to

the ground plan, with two stories and a basement, the

Shortly after this

now

apparently from

entrance to which

on the

is

east.

The

latter

is

is

very pleasing, the basement being of stone and

the upper part frume, clapboarded, and a slate roof. front gable is surmounted by a small open cupola,

from

its

ing

which hangs the school

Hell.

The building

The ground

floor

proper

is

the

occupied by

owing

I

j

I

]

parish school, but

in

1866

we

find

the following:



"Daily Parish Schools, One, part free Males, G; Females, 11." That year eighty dollars was contributed by the church toward the parish school building. The next year the number of scholara had risen to twenty males, fourteen females, six and one hundred dollars was contributed by the parish towards the





;

support of the school. Two years after, there were males, seventeen fethirty scholars in the school male*, thirteen and the reports say of the school,





"Teacher boarded

free of

porting." In 1869 the

;

charge; otherwise self-sup-

number of scholars was

largely

increased, the average attendance being, males, twenand the total number of ty-five; females, seventeen ;

who had attended at least one quarter was sixtyThe parish contribution towards the school year was seventy-five dollars. The following year, 1 Sr>0, is the last in which mention is made of those four.

this

the school in the convention reports, and it shows a falling off in the attendance,— namely males,

great

report

the only record that

management,

it

leaves

be desired by the townspeople.

—Among

all

more prominent in the history of the county than Daniel D. Tompkins, Governor of the State, andafterwards Vice-President of the nation. His ancestors were among the first to settle in the town, and they 1

I

1.61

This stood in a pleasant situation a few hundred yards to the northwest of the road leading through the private church, and on a Pophain property to Scarsdale Station. The next year the convention records contain no report of the

is

the natives of the town, past or present, no one has been

j

built."

built

them have been

The census

Leaping Residents and Families.

:

now being

to remain.

to the excellence of its

little to

percentage of illiteracy in the town has of late years been very low, as is evidenced by the following figures,

is

which was

remains of them. Another was Btarted about the year 1871, but proved unsuccessful, and shortly after was closed. Thus the public school is the only one now in existence, but,

but this

of the room, the walls being finished in plaster. In this connection it is interesting to note that the

School

school-

was moved

of 1845 makes brief mention of two private schools,

commodious and well-arranged school -room, fitted up with modern school furniture, and adjoining are the vestibule and cloak-rooms, the former opening upon a small porch. The loft above is unfurnished, but the basement is fitted up for the uses of the town with benches and a small dais at the west eud

undertaken, and the first notice of this is found in the report of the convention of New York for 1863, which says. " A small building for the purposes of a Parochial

It

schools there have been several in Scars-

sufficiently successful

a

per cent. Shortly after the erection of the Church of St. James the Less the organization of a parish school was

rectory of the church,

dale at different times, but none of

is

taken from the State census reports In I860 it was l.lo percent.; in 18456, 1.07 per cent.; and in 1876,

and the

lack of support,

original situation to a position nearly adjoin-

Of private

neatly painted in a light shade of gray, with darker

trimmings.

dollars for this year.

the school was given up,

in 1860.

The in

fifty

building was used for other purposes.

u*ed by the town as a place of meeting and for the holding of elections. In it* external aspect the building

last report

have at

all

It is said

of

times figured conspicuously in

him

its history.

that he embodied in himself, besides

the noble virtues, the more copimon place, but none the less important ones of activity, energy and perseverence, while his talents, no matter how tried, were The reputation he always equal to an emergency. gained at the bar and in the gubernatorial chair, was one of unflinching integrity combined with an un-

common charm

of manner and the greatest consider-

ation for the feelings of

all.

His administration

of

the office of Governor during the trying times of the

second war with Great Britain was unimpeachable, while his generous and entirely unsolicited financial aid to the government was especially noteworthy. In the capacity of military

commander he

likewise suc-

ceeded admirably, being especially thanked

for his

services by the President. Governor Tompkins died on Staten Island June 11, 1826, and his remains are interred

in

the

vault of the

Tompkins

family, at

Mark's " in the Bowerie," New York City. Jonathan Griffin Tompkins, father of the Governor, though not as distinguished in the history of the nation, was more identified than his son with the But besides holding very many history of the town. town offices, he was a member of the State Convention which adopted the Declaration of Independence and the first Constitution of the State. Mr. Tompkins was one of the inspectors of the first town meeting held under the national government, and was chosen first supervisor of the town. This office he

St.

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675

SCARSDALE. Richard Cornell, grandson pf Thomas Cornell, of Cornell's Neck, and eldest son of John and Mary (Russell) Cornell, of Cowneck, in Hempstead, was born

and died

about 1671",

at Scarsdale in 1757.

He

ried, I

:

inari

!

who had removed to the Lome. He aat in tin* Pro-

o>ntevedtt to hi* eldeit eon, William Wlllett, ruoLtT «f Wwrtchester vincial

ub

»

Aasrnibly as one of the representatives of Westchester County, apbrief iutermWuM, from 17t>2 to hi* death, in 17X1, and

»u

trot

,,.

.luted

i.

rM

-Judge of the Common Pleas inthe Count.T "

iu 1721. But this

the place to pursue the history of the Wlllettaof Westchester, fur-

show their descent from Thnuuis Cornell, of Corneli

than to

ii. *r

and made the .Nwk

a

Neck.

TV- Nrtk has wonielimtw been railed Willett's Nwk. Rshecca Cornell, a younger daughter of Thomas Cornell, win with her •iitt-r Mi, In New Amsterdam, and there married, in 171

was born ut WestNeck and Throggs Neck, ou the Uth

Eire Cornell, the founder of Cornell

Landing, between Cornell

rhester

-

*

University,

January, 1*17, and waa descended from

i.f

N« k, through

his sou .Samuel

Thomas

Cornell, of Coruell's

and grandson Stephen, who

»ettle

One of

the grandson* of

was Whitehead

Cornell,

Thomas Cornell, of who represented

State Assembly in 17SS-BS, and lived in dignity In homestead of hi* grandfather, while his elder and his younger t.n.th.rs, who were BoyalisU in the Revolution and offlcers iu the British Artuj, were gh»d, after th© war, to take refuge in Nova Scotia. One of Whitehead Cornell * grandsons is John B Cornell, now for many years tU brad of the well-known iron-work* of New York. John Cornell, of Cowneck, another son of Thouuts Cornell, of Cornell's Seek, and tbe ancestor of the Scarsdale Cornells, had been in Dartmouth, Mswbosetta, perhaps alto on Ihc Penolss-ot, but came in lirjfi, w ith

V««ns County inthe old

rl.,

Mary

and several small children, to II. mpetrad, under Governor Andros, having been driven, the records say, This was the date of King tbe East by the Indian*. Philip's War. (Jovernor Andros granted to John Cornell, in H>77, a tract "f Uo l on Manhassett Bay, a couple of miles south of Siiud's Point, on »Li. h be spent tiie remainder of his life, and un

f

'm oft^n *:"t

Thorne.

3.

1»>70;

still

retain that form.

HI* children were;

married Hannah Thorne.

Mary, born 1679

1CM; married Mary

Starr,

ft.

Haguer. 6. Rebecca, married Cowneck. always wrote his name

heii r»derhill.

17'.»T.

died 1H7S;

married J.-ordi

Arnold.

Wh. Mary

F.,

nund 10th.

IK- .7,

l,oru

died

,11.-1

York, equal to about one hundred and

is

James, his son, born

certain.

in 1700,

I

Kit

1S7I

;

married Mary

A. Arvon in 1724, and had seven sons and three Their fourth child, Francis, was born in daughters. 1732.

He

purchased the present homestead

dale in 1775. the original deed of which possession of the family. in 1701,

He

York

at Scars-

is

still

in

married Sarah Horton

and had three sons and

kins, sister of Daniel D.

ISM marSarah Mott. born I7U1, died 1*72,

4th. SlU*. N,rn 17*9. died at ltooh«.ter,

daughter

New

from the second son, Daniel, that Francis Secor descended. How many children Daniel had is not

five daughters.

oldest son, Caleb, born in 17H8, married married David Ar-

;

nolil.

ri«J, 1M.%,

of

dollars in gold.

It is

Alio* Sutton. daughter of

Dorm Happ

him

Coquiller.

j

of 3d month, 1783,

to

:

fine personal appearance, nearly six feet

Ninth— Benjamin, born 17«\ died Tenth— BMjarnln, born 17M, died

now come down

and the old clock, now, for at least five generations in the family, has been standing for the past twenty years in Mr. Cornell's house in Yonkers. The name of the Secor family has been variously spelt Sicard, Secord and Secor. In 1090 Ambroise Sicard came to this country. He was a French Huguenot, and was forced to the step in consequence of the persecution to which he was subjected at home. He married Jennie Perron, and the first entry upon the ;

Fiva children were named in his will, as follows Ambroise, Daniel, Jacques or James, Marie, wife of Ouillaume Landrian, and Silvie, wife of Francis

as for

and bearing himself with grace and dignity. The only portrait of him is here copied from a pencil sketch, said to have been a good likeness at the time, made when he was eighty years old, in 1841, by his

Yonkers, to

Huguenot Church in New York City (now the French Church Du St. Esprit) hi that of the baptism of a daughter of Ambroise Sicard, the exile.

some years after, and then as su|>crvisor. Like his father and his grandfather, he was in drew and manner a strict member of the Society of Friends, of high charin height,

«»f

records of the

in

left

now

1

;

until indorsements for hiB friends

C. Cornell,

whom the old gentleman then promise*! the inheritance I

'

T. Cornell, of Mamaroneck,

Bank

677

Thomas

grandson,

His

Anna Tomp-

Tompkins, Governor of

New

in 18f>0.

The son had one son and three daughters. Francis, subject of this sketch, who was also the oldest child, was born June 5, 1810. He spent his early life upon the farm, from which, as a result of his labors, he accumulated a considerable property. He was a man of fixed and unswerving principle, quick to decide, and ever ready to pertbrm any labor to which his conscience pointed him as a duty. In 1849 he was elected supervisor of the town of Scarsdale, and the ottice remained in his hands for twenty-six years. For thirty years he was an active and consistent H«»

member

of the Presbyterian

Church of White

Plains,

and the confidence of his brethren in his integrity was manifested by their election of him to the eldership. Ten years afterward, when the church adopted the rotary system, he was re-elected, but two years previous to his death, feeling that his strength would not admit of a longer service, he declined the honor

marri.-d Kd-

Field.

Beqjamin. born

Isl

t.

died 1M4.

i

l're|*re.|

and inserted by the publisher*.

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HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY. which was

lor

the

tliird

time proffered him.

of Third

His

death took place at hit home. May 8,1885. He was connected with all the laudable enterprise* of Scarsdale and was lamented by a large circle of acquaint-

works.

director

senger boats to Fulton Slip, and in 18*1 he purchased the boats and organized the North and East River

ances and friends.

His son, and only child, Chancer T. Secor.still Uvea at the old homestead and is its owner. He is a prominent Democrat, and was formerly justice of the peace in Scarsdale. For three rears he has held the office of superrisor. The family from which Orecn Wright is descended were early settlers in Putnam County, N. Y. His grandfather, Caleb Wright, a resident of Carmel, married Mary Cunningham. Their children were Sarah, wife of David Trarris; Polly, wife of Budd Sloat; Eunice A., wife of Newell Barley Green, Stephen T. and Gilbert. Gilbert married Eliza, daughterof Solomon Wright, and they were the parents of ten children Green Elizabeth, wife of Lewis Trarris; Darid; Jackson, who married Sarah A. Hall, and is now living at White Plains Susan, wife of Ampelias Youmans Zilphia, wife of David Parent Simon, who married Kliza Hance, and resides Pheda, in New York

Of this Steamboat Company the following year. company he was elected president, and still holds the jK>sition.

The new company runs three boats — the Harlem and "Shady Side" and



"Morrisania,*' "

charters boats from other companies.

1

Mr. Wright became an extensire owner of real estate in Morrisania at an early date, his city residence being at One Hundred and Fiftieth Street and Westchester Avenue, where he owns twenty-three lots.

;



Avenue was one of the most important of his About 1861 he became connected with the Company, and was made a This company ran freight ami pasin 1870.

Morrisania Steamboat

He

is

the possessor of extensire tracts iu other portions of the Twentythird

;

town of Scarsdale.

Cornell, and the old Cor-

near the site of the present

wife of

Adams

Hall, of

Mount

is

and

;

A., wife of

he remained at his father,

and

who

Seeking

a



of

commenced

business as a contractor, and followed it for many years with great energy and success. In the prosecution of

he entered largely into the building of inason-work, grading streets, excarating rock and building sewers, having rery extensive contracts with the Port Morris Company. A rery large part of the grading of the streets of Morrisania was done by him. r In 18. >4hebuiltthedamonBronx River at West Farms,

i

Mount P ,easant T,iev Moses

and, in addition to his public work, performed exten-

provements on the estates of Colonel Richard M. Hoe, William Fox and many others. The grading

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SCARSPALK. the

Manor of Phillipsburg, which he afterwards pur-

chased.

His sou, Isaac Hall, who married Klizabeth

Fields, was the lather of Moses Fields, who married Mahula Fowler. Their children were Nathaniel F., Tauiar J., Sarah A., Aaron, Daniel, Mary A. and Klizabeth, who married Green Wright, as mentioned alwve. The old homestead of the Hall family is now

079

of Mr. Fish,

who made

his

home

there until his death,

in 187'), and from that date till 1885 the mansion was occupied by his widow and family now, however, no longer residents of the town.



On

the crest of the

and

house,

hill just

south of the school-

to the west of the old post road, stands

the Sedgwick house,

now

the residence of Bernard

owned by Fields Hall (brother of Moses Hall), and hi* son Jackson is now of the fourth generation on

Tone, but before the Revolution occupied by Jonathan Gritfin, and celebrated as the place where was

the inheritance.

held the

About a half-mile from the northern limit of the and just west of the post road, among a group of trees, stands a pleasant old house dating from the This was formerly the resiend of the last century. dence of George Washington Tompkins, a brother of Governor Tompkins, who built the mansion in 1799, and here was born his son, Warren Tompkins, after-

ment of the country

town,

ward a resident of ing

came

While

Plains.

In 1802 the build-

into the possession of the Rev.

George Don-

first

town-meeting under the new governThe house in the year 17*3.

has been changed very preserves in part It

its

much

of late years, but

original shape

locusts

and

still

and appearance.

stands very near to the road, surrounded by

tall

midst of pleasant lawns, presenting Upon the death of JonaJonathan G. Tompkins, his adopted

in the

a picturesque appearance.

than

Griffin,

son and father of Daniel D. Tompkins,

moved

thither

from his old mansion, which was subsequently torn down, and made it his home until his death, when it

mentioned in connection with the public school. The homestead is now occupied by passed into the hands of the Sedgwick family. Just west of this, and within a stone's throw of it, the venerable Mrs. McCabe, a daughter of the former, together with several of her family, two daughters stands " Maplchurst," the residence of the late Benand a son, John D. McCabe, well known in the town. jamin F. Butler, originally part of Fox Meadow. Mrs. McCabe has lived in the town, always occupying The mansion, formerly known as the Travis house, was built about the year 1840. The original building her present residence, since 1802, and although now was enlarged shortly after it came into the hands of in her eighty-fifth year, is possessed of an excellent memory and relates many events of interest connected Mr. Butler, in 1868, and again in 1878, when a large Mr. McCabe octagonal extension was added. Mr. Butler was one with the early history of the town. has for many years been prominent in the affairs of of the comparatively new residents of the town, having the town, especially in connection with the manage- mad*" it his home in 1807, and the only town office of the school, of which he has for some years held by him was that of member of the committee on ovan, elsewhere



commissioner, besides holding other

offices.

In

the vicinity of this house have been found a

few

relics

of the former Indian proprietors,

—arrow-heads

and the remains of their primitive utensils— as well as some relics of the Revolutionary War. About half a mile to the southeast of the McCabe mansion, and at the top of Fish's Hill, on the Mam-

the

new school

building.

residence on the south Butler, an uncle " Fox Meadows,"

is

Directly adjoining this

the large estate of Charles

of the preceding,

known

as

the

which has so often been mentioned

Mr. Butler first made the town his home in 18o3, purchasing the origiual "Fox Meadows " from the heirs of Caleb Tompkins, and has aroiieck road, stands another building of an even since added largely to its extent by the purchase of earlier date, having been erected prior to the Revoluthe Travis farm on the north and part of the Varian tion. For a short time during this war it was occu- farm on the south. pied by General Sir William Howe as his headquarPrevious to this the Vail house, which stood in the ters, and near by are the graves of several of the midst of a locust grove al>out midway up the hill, Since the war the and celebrated as the birth-place of Governor TompBritish who died at this time. house has been successively occupied by Captain De kins, had been entirely dismantled and nothing but Kay, a Mr. Sherbrooke and the late William H. Fish. the foundations now remain to mark the spot, and The first-named lived here in the early part of the they are almost gone from sight. The old roadway, century, and met with a tragic end at the old mill however, still remains, now all grass-grown, and near near the station. A lover of fishiug, he was accus- it a small clear spring,— the scene of the death of one tomed to pursue the spirt in that neighborhood, and of the old-time school-masters. At the time of the on the day of his death he had wandered to the old purchase of the estate by Mr. Butler the residence of mill, and was sitting upon the dam with his pole, Caleb Tompkins stood on the rising ground, just west when, by some mischance, he fell from his position to of the site of the old Vail house. This mansion was the rocks below, dying shortly thereafter. After him almost entirely remodeled and rebuilt in 1809, and came Mr. Sherbrooke, an eccentric old gentleman, little remains of the original structure. The present whose constant companion in the ancient house was estate of " Fox Meadows" includes nearly four huna fine large dog, who accompanied him everywhere. dred acres, and extends from the post road to the About the year 18>0 the house passed into the hands Bronx, and from the Sedgwick property on the north in

the town's history.

Digitized by

Google

HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.

680 to the

estate

Popham estates on the south. Much of the was swamp and marsh when Mr. Butler made

his purchase, but nearly all has been reclaimed

Varian, who, with their brothers, Richard and Isaac, were actively engaged on the patriot side. When the

and

army moved towards White

British

Plains, in Octo-

Xew

the whole estate laid out and beautified with great

her, 177(5,

There are large lawns surrounded with many stately tree* and for nearly a mile along the bank of the river Bronx stretch many acres of woodland, through which run several small tributary streams, and a beautiful drive is thus afforded entirely within the limits of the estate. The" Fox Meadow Garden "occupies

Varians, hoping to secure some of their possessions from plunder, removed a favorite cow from her stable

taste.

the low lnnd facing the post road and esque, with

its

many

is

—on

esting coincidence that the "

now be occupied by a

Fox Meadows

an

When

for safe-keeping.

the British

in search of plunder effected an en-

trance into the house by hacking at the door with their sabres and afterward in the same way got into

very pictur-

It is

Rochelle, the

a level with the road and under the main roof-

to the cellar

came up, those

the cow-stable, only to find the cow gone. Tradition has it that at this moment the unfortunate cow

long graperies and flower-beds

and well-kept lawns and shrubberies.

from their landing near

inter-

" should

"lowed," thus disclosing

her hiding-place,

but

in

brother of the late Hon. Ben-

point of fact, the cow, and the family Bible, which

jamin F. Butler, Attorney-General of the United States under Presidents Jackson and Van Buren, who was one of Vice-President Tompkins' most intimate and valued friends. Just previous to the purchase of the estate, in 1858, the mansion of Caleb Tompkins was occupied by his son, Jonathan G. Tompkins, graudson of the former J. G. Tompkins, who, like his grandfather, was prominent in the town, occupying the office of supervisor during the years 1847 and Adjoining the "Fox Meadows " on the south 1848.

was likewise hid in the cellar, escaped observation and were preserved for their owners. It is an interest-

is

the " Locusts," for almost a century the residence

of the lato William Sherbrooke Popham and his youngest son, Lewis C. Popham, who now occupies the homestead. The mansion was built in 1784 by William Popham, Sr., who made it his home, with the exception of a few years spent in the city of New York, until 1835, since which date his son and grandson have resided here. The mansion stands a few rods west of the post road, in a small valley surrounded by a grove of locusts, being a few hundred feet south of the Varian tavern. The edifice is one of the most picturesque in appearance and location of any in the town, and, although it has passed its century of existence, still stands almost unchanged, an excellent example of the thorough building of the last century. Both within and without the old mansion is charming in its suggestions of the early days of our national life, and with its near neighbors, the Varian and the Morris homesteads, forms a picture vividly

ing fact that the sabre-marks of the British are to be seen in the

known

as the

After the war the house and estate passed into the hands of Colonel Jonathan Varian, who also brought credit 1812,

is

one of the oldest

in

the town, dating from a period prior to the Revolution, and,

although considerable additions have of late made to it, the old part has changed

years been in

no essential particular.

several

handsome

It

stands in the shade of

trees, close to

the road, at the very

upon the family by his services in the War of and for many years he kept there an inn. Just

south of the house stood a large barn, under which was driven the mail-coach, while the stop was made

on

ils

way

This tavern was the favorite who, with their cattle, made

to the city.

resort of the drovers,

there the last stop on their journey from the Ohio

New York

towns to

Arriving at the Varian

City.

farm, they would turn their droves of several hundred

head of cattle out

to graze

and themselves would

making

at the tavern for several days,

who would

the dealers,

rest

their sales with

drive out from the city and

Then, after this interval of the cattle, much improved after their long march, would be driven directly to their various destinations by their new owners. The pastures of the tavern extended to the north and west of the house, and until of late years the barns, in which were stored large select their purchases. rest,

quantities of fodder for the droves, stood, as of old,

the west of the tavern

The

Wayside Cottage,

still

front-door of

—vivid reminders

of the depredations practiced in the Neutral Ground. ;

remindful of the past.

Adjacent to the Popham estate on the north, and extending north along the old pest road, as far as the southern lineof theTompkins farm, was, in former days, the property of the Varian family. The house, now

woodwork of both the

the house and the door to the stable

New York Errnwf Ptt f>v

following extract from* letter in Hi*

December

to

itself.'

1*79, I* of iutnreet In connection with the Varian family " In the good keeping of Dr. William Varian, of Kingshridg*. irt. About eight years ago this cottage was torn 1'iHn to make way for the large and more pretentious dwelling which occupies a site close by, and is the rwidenee of Green Wright. But a few rods from Hartsdale Station, and just » ithin the town limits, stands a peculiar mansion, which has long been an object of wonder to many, »nd which is. perhaps, the most unique structure in

where,

it

is

rc|>orted,

famous novel, the scene of which



irniind" of the Revolution, of which Searsdale

•h- ill«u*r»tl»*. |.u

turw, of whl.

li

therr ar» MTrrml, »rr •xplaincd In the

is

square in

a square cupola, with

the whole.

The

and supported by large round

front

is

either side of the building the hillside

is

pillars.

front

door.

terraced

Altogether the building

Tuscan style of architecture and presents an appearance of much greater antiquity than really belongs to

Nearly opjweite

'*

it.

Fox Meadow Gardens, " on the

post road, stands the residence of George Burgess, who,

with his family, settled in the town about thirty years

This

an interesting old mansion, built in an rambling style, and surrounded by shade-trees, while to the north and northeast extend the farm lands of the owner. Another interesting mansion is " Rowsley," formerly the property of William B. Lang. This stands on the north side of the road which runs eastward from the j»ost road from "Drake's Corner," surrounded by handsome lawns and shaded by beautiful trees. The house is a long and roomy structure, but of only two stories, the upper of which is in the mansard roof. A wide verandah skirts the mansion on the east, south and part of the west side, and is covered with creeping plants and vines. One room in particular is especially interesting as being an exact counterpart of one of the rooms of the famous Cluny Palace in Frauce. This room has a large tiled fireplace on the north, op|x>site the entrance, while on either side of the room are large windows filled with diamond-shaped panes. The Moors, walls and raftered ceiling are of |iolished oak or similar wood, and, together with the mail-clad figures which stand on either side of the fireplace and the ancient furniture and hangings, they lend to the room a quaint appearance, very suggestive of past ago.

is

old-fashioned,

|

general

stories, nearly

full

which

closely approaches the

Station, at some distance from the road. On the Mamaroneck road, about quarter of a mile

and the wretchedness of the workmanship.

stories

road to tho

and went, and stands among a number of handsome trees, on the north side of the back road to Scaredalc

time the residence of the famous novelist, Jas. Fenimore Cooper, who lived within the township for made it his permanent residence. The above name was given to it by the towns

of two

and an avenue of shade-trees extends from the main

a spacious structure, with turreted tower on the southeast corner and broad verandas on the south

a few years, but never

two

On

is

at i»ne



deeply recessed to form the porch or veranda, which

The mansion

beyond the Fish mansion, stands the residence of Dr. Alexander M. Bruen, built upon the site of what was formerly known as "Cooper's Folly." The latter was

is

plan, with Mat roof, on

residence of the late Kdward Nelson, brother of the is now occupied by Charles I'. Crane, City.

The

stone or brick, stuccoed and whitewashed.

a minaret surmounting

preceding, and

New York

is

The building

A short distance southwest of the Episcopal Church stands a spacious stone mansion, formerly the residence of George Nelson, supervisor of the town in the year 1K67, now occupied by Henry W. Bates. This mansion was built about a quarter of a century ago by the father of the Rev. Dr. Olssen, for many years rector of the parish, and is one of the two stone residences in the town. The only other one is the former

•>f

is sit-

although

N. York,

a lawyer practicing in

The building

uated on the steep hill-side in such a manner that, it presents two stories iu front, behind the

follows: Mil™

This was built for a residence, by the propowder-works before mentioned, about is now occupied in connection with

prietor of the

centuries.

Early Mails and Traveling* Facilitik*— Notei> Il been fuller of

*car»

'

or

ami

lie

made

than of

'

home, or

wonderful

pit a ta>te of

"way"

New York to many years ago

was a full improvement has beeu and the "way" time is now minutes, while the "express" time trains

In former days the service on

the road was very limited, Scarsdale being ranked

merely as a way station; but in 1877, after strong eflbrts on the part of those citizens who did business

dale*,'

-hajie,

my

as

respect,

thirty-six minutes.

is

in

New

for

the nioruing express south and the evening ex-

York, Scarsdale was made a stopping-place

summer

press north, while during tbe

icrccn-tiuiwr, or grapery,

Hud they once

as far

late years a slight

this

in

slightly over fifty

;

-wiliir*

sky-high.

nyloin drapery,

the*.' villa* of

hot

(»r

eighteen miles, and not

is

Of

hour.

Ami the unicorn here, and the li»n. Would have r.»r«I and erected their taiU.

o where thUflne

double-tracked

course through the town slightly

distance by the railroad from

Scarsdale

now hare my eye on,

I

its

the running time of the

renin cuiil.ln'l

frlgntet*

and

;

abut*.—

rebellion,

theae nhorca, which

Plains,

altered.

And b" cried, ' big.' T

James Klin

>,fb,

Jit

lished a public telegraph office.

Although so sparsely visited by several severe

settled, Scarsdale has

been

The

officers for IS80

were the following fv

fire*, which have invariably run their course, the facilities for fighting them being entirely wanting. In 18*!3 the old mill which had stood for more than a century just alwve Scarsdale Station, on the Bronx, was totally destroyed by fire, nothing but the foundations and a few fragments of

M

:

; 1,.. 1

Ali.cn M. Bi ti.e*. Srcrtiary.

Jiau

llLKKIKKB, Jl.

7V»u«(*»r. II.

The club meets

OR OVIIIK

IttTLKM.

every Saturday afternoon, but the grounds are open for the use of members on any week-day. The routine business of the club is entrusted to a governing committee of seven members, for practice

machinery remaining, and no attempts at rebuilding have since been made. In the fall of 1874 the residence of Benjamin Carpenter, on the high ridge to the road, was set on fire by an east of the post incendiary, and in a short time was burned to the ground, together with numerous out-buildings and barns and some live-stock. Some years after this a house of considerable size, which stood close by Scarsdale Station, on the Popham estate, at one time the residence of Robert C. and afterward of his brother, I^ewis C. Popham, was totally destroyed by fire, nothing but the chimneys ami foundations remaining to mark the dwelling once a familiar landmark. The last large conflagration in the town was the burning of the pretty little parish church of St. James the Less, which occurred on the evening of Palm Sunday, 188'2. Although the neighborhood was speedily aroused, all etlbrts to save the building proved un-

Although of very Club now forms a prominent feature in the social life of the town, and the scene at the grounds on a bright Saturday afternoon is charming and full of interest. Amatkitu Newspaper. Scarsdale has never been represented by a newspaper of its own except during r In June of that year a few months of the year 18S. >. appeared the first .number of IJic Srnrmlale (Meaner, a small four-page monthly, devoted to the interests of the town. This was entirely an amateur enterprise,

availing, very little of value being saved of the in-

scription

and soon only the walls and part of the chapel remained of the church which was so

side fittings, little

dear to

all

the inhabitants of the neighboring country.

S8LKY, l>.D.

of the Huguenots at

New

when Rochelle

have been begun as early as the year refugees from the town of La France. This was the year following the

believe*!

to

1686-87, by certain I

belle,

I'm

revocation of the

Edict of Nantes, by which unjust

arid impolitic act fifty

driven from their

them

thousand French families were

homes

to other countries.

Many

of

England, but subsequently found their way to America. Those who came first to New Rochelle were landed, it is thought, by an English vessel at Bonnefoy's Point, now Davenport's Neck. Their exact number is uncertain, but the names of fled tirxt to

some of the early records,

found upon the town

settlers are

between the years

WX, and

1710,

and are as

this

census of 1710 was taken, only six at the These are the Le Counts, Sea-

present time survive. cords,

Badeaus.

Renouds, Ilonnetts and Coutants. rest, forty-eight in number, have all disappeared from the town, either by death or removal, or have been merged by marriage into other family names.''

The

Many

portions of the Huguenot stock came to Rochelle at a later period.

New

There is a distinct and unbroken tradition, dating back much more than a hundred years, and handed down through several separate families, notably the Guions and Coutants, that the first Bcttler* of the town landed at Bonnefoy's Point. The fact is perhaps as well established as ten reeord. exist*,

follows

any other not n matter of writexcavation existed, and perhaps still

An

upon that

which from time immemorial who should know, as the house ever built in New Rochelle.

|>oint,

has been designated by those

Allaire.

t»>lln:i.'tn\ 1'-

b85

l.

Villain.

tMdrta. I..H ll-

'

llii'i'.

iMIIll

liariutnl.

Maiiififl.

bouUlllier.

Hattfar,

Clapp.

Mem (n

dark.

.Vaihiltl.

>'»t|l»IIIH«U.



laillanl. 1

N

1

iifuill*.

1*111001.

oil taut (1),

IViixaii.

Dm

PtackMy.

•Mil.

Hut iK-iiii

Kali Hi' 1.

Bcwmmu

I'laii'Ir-rail.

Sjnanl.

Kourrmilirr.

ThtnwMt.

Uanyunl.

Tliaunrt.

Uuluii.

Thuwi.

(J iron. J.

Vrlkali.

TIIK tilloN I'LACK, lluguoriot Strwit,

All

The Itcv. L J. Coutant, however, in his skeU-hes of Huguenot New Kochelle, assert* that the total numlxT of inhabitants at this time was three that year.*

hundred and twenty-live.

The same gentleman, who, in all that relates to the of this town is peculiarly well-informed, observes that" the two oldest individuals living in the town at that date, Mary Badeau and Frederick Shureman, were each eighty years old. The family early history

name having the greatest number of representatives was that of Schureman. There were eleven

(sixteen)

'»»» i

tli«

irmlDi«.-,w»

f

New

IWIi.llo by

rhapter nn " I'd ham."

-Sea Iloltoti'a Hi-i

vol.

i.

It-*.

Win. Hague at

that

New

KoclicHo.

there arc those

living

now

tl

ltd

known

to assert that the first child born in the town in that house, and was a Guion. In the early division of the town, that part of It

was born

now known as Davenport's Neck Lender's and Count's Neck.

U

is

designated as

It contains about two hundred acres. This neck subsequently became the projiorty ami resilience of the Lespinard family, one of whom came to New Rochelle with the Hugue-

nots in 1689,

The Lespinard Cemetery is situated tin the south of the Neck ami contains several memorials of

sitlc

this

family. In 17*6 this piece of land was purchased by Newbury Davenport, father of the late proprietors, Lawrence ami Newbury Davenport. Bonnefoy's Point, situated on the northeast side of the Neck, has already been mentioned as the landing, place of the Huguenots, about 1C85). A very differ-

ent landing was p. 0"IJ.

is

whose great-grandfathers might have helped to dig thnt cellar. Members of the Guion family have been

In the year 1710 the population of New Rochelle amounted to two hundred and sixty-one persons, including fifty-seven slaves. This enumeration is from a census of the town supposed to have been taken io

we can say

1776.

On

made there on the 22d of October the 18th a huge British lied had landed rein-

HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY. forcemeuts for the army in

New

York. There were,

in

.seventy-two sail, having on hoard four thousand Hessians, six thousand Waldeckers, two companies of chasseurs, two hundred Knglish recruits and two

all,

thousand baggage horses. The most of these German troops were at once ordered to join Howe in his

march to White Plains. The main body of his army had already crossed from ThrogV Neck to Pell's Point, and on the 21st of October was encamped on the Heights, north of the village of

Howe's headquarters being

New

Rochelle.

house on the White Plains road, about one mile from the village. On the 22d General Knyphausen landed with the Second Division of Point.

fet's

at a

German hirelings, on Bonnefoy's or Ban IHe encamped his troops the same day

on the B. K. Collins place (now I>archmont Manor), and from there joined the main body in time for the battle of the 2Hth. The one was a landing of peaceful and persecuted emigrants, seeking in America that religious freedom which was denied them in their native France the other, a disembarkation of ;

German

mercenaries, nearly a century later, to carry

war, plunder and desolatiou to the

j

-.—«.—§

homes ami hearts

ira

ft

running along in a tortuous course, as close to the creek as possible, from the northeastern part of Huguenot Street to the foot of Centre Street, and then to the line of boundary between New Rochelle and Pelharu. This road was the way of approach to Bonnefoy's

Point.

The farms

or lots were narrow and long,

ulil

these retain their original width

and length to the present day, while a few have been subdivided, and have been doubled, two into one. Street, by the way of Pelham boundary line, which it strikes at what wan formerly known as "Newport's Corner," must have been opened at an early

The road leading from North the Coutaut Cemetery to the

period of the settlement of the town, pcrhajw simultaneously with the opening of North Street, as it

would seem of

to

Huguenot

be the only road in those times north Street

by which the town of East This road runs in a direct location of several

Cheater could be reached. westerly course

Huguenot

and

was the

families. 1

ore

Kpiaojnl church with the

of the descendant* of the Huguenots, the pluuderers

and the plundered being of the same religious faith. village of New Rochelle was situated on a level tract of laud, upon the line of the old Boston road,

The

extending from a large pond, now drained, but for years known as the Ice Pond or Crystal Lake,

many

to a point near to

now

where the Presbyterian Church

stands, being about one mile in extent and con-

known as Huguenot Street. road was only roughly marked out at first, hut

stituting

what

The

is

avoid-

ed the steep hill which had to be surmounted by the present Boston turnpike. In a road was opened at right angles to Huguenot Street, known as North Street, the same which now extends to Upper New Rochelle. 'entre Street was the first mad laid out in a direct line from Huguenot Street to the Salt Water, it is believed, and it was on that part of Huguenot Street, between North and Centre, that the Huguenots I

>'.:•:;

(

erected their

and that

first

dwellings.

The

land here

is

dry

and is said to be seventy feet above tideNext to Centre, it is reasonable to suppose street now called "Cwlar Avenue" was opened, the level,

water.

some

in

others, perhaps,

A VIEW OK HVODBKOT KTKEKT, NEW EOCHKLLB, IX Showing the



places nearly, or quite a mile in length, and. for the most part, not more than one field wide. Some of

1798.

district •ahoul-hoiMK'.

The Huguenots " seem to have been an industrious and order-loving people." What their worldly circumstances were, might easily be inferred from the persecutions they had suffered and from the precipimanner

in which most of them had been comabandon their homes and flee to foreign lands. Their means were small, and it was, no doubt, some years before the lands which they acquired were paid for; and even when this was accomplished, by patient toil and frugal management, the problem still remained of how to extract a living from their small farms. That they found this a work of no small difficulty, we may conclude from the following

tate

pelled to

letters,

written shortly

after their

arrival.

On

the

20th of September, 1689, they purchased from John Pell a tract of about six thousand acres, the price for which was not far from one dollar an acre. This was divided into lots on the 20th of November, 1G93, by a surveyor; each occupant paying his just

proportion of the total value.

'Thw

nUtrmeiiU

Ion, from an hy the

iut«> narly localitim

luterc*tinic «k.

Iter. L. J.

|, li

The letters, taken have

of the lint ~

Imn

ltl.

taken,

ni.-nt

l.y

from |«-rnn«

of N'rw Kuclirllr,

Coutaut.

>y

Google

NEW "

Documentary History of the 8tatc of York,'" are as follows " New Kih hlui J»th Oct,

the

ROCHELLE.

New

687

a»r«ioflajidii««x>, freely giTe

which the

and grant

for the

:

lfJ»t.

"Mr the

t.>

I'll, t,

has delivered

01

Humiliation

Amwuik,

>jf


»Tinoo of

liod uTorlaatili|(.

l>t»»ife, for anb la-isler, his heirs awrt|rnee™

ai re,

HIM. N. Y

Uoc. HUt.

N

,

of

v..|.

Y.. vol.

l.itid

ii.

and

..I

hiimlnsl

charge or other molestation whalso-ver. " And the *ald John Poll, and Rachel, bis wife, for Ihetu-elvos

trust,

lively

ami

for their respective heirs,

res|.ei-.

do covenant, promise and grant to war-

rant and defend the al»jve grouted premises wiUi their appurtenances and

every part and parcel thereof, onto the said

Jo.,,1,

and Inwitnisx

l^ialer, his heirs

assignees forever, against the lawful charges and ,b-nian,l>.

whereof, the said John Pell u ml Rachel, his wife, have hereunto set their

hands and seals

the

1st

It

In

New

York, the twentieth day of September, in

year or the reign of our sovereign lord and lady, William aud

Mary, King and queen .d Kngland, Ac., Ac. six hundred and eighty-nine.

in the

year of our I.ord

one thousand

"John

I'EIL.

The Matk of " RvciiKL-R Pki ••

l.

p

ill.

p. y.'t;.

Leislcr purchased the lands from Pell for the llu-

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Google

HISTORY OF WKSTCII ESTER COUNTY.

«8fi

guenots,

t

whom

hand, made her way, as usual, to the dinner-pot suspended over the fire. Hut as she stooped to raise the lid the Scotch-

he released them a* rapidly as pos-

the house, and, with meat-hook in

during the year H!!H), preceding the year in which he wan executed on a charge of high treason. The township wan surveyed and diviilvd into lots or sible

man

materially

one of the purchasers from Leisler, and Captain Bond, who was a surveyor.

when she

Ml i.n a ry H isroit v.—The town of New Kochelle apsomewhat during the Revolu-

some other the

••at«-.t

trouble,

inhabitant,

la.fell tile

Ih- buttle at

aft.-,


', the laittlr-gr.mu.l uf

ami

Scene*

foe.

iiiarke.1 llu-w holll*.*,

..f

i

rii.

probatory

iliwrTei

I.-.I,

lty au-1 hlo.al.ht-. >-\. ursioiii. fr..lu

the Miluilt *otn of

|K.-rwj|)al

lli

-tralinr

fearini; that tln-v

an

iKMehborhouil, they built a but

ami uufre.|uenl(«l

»l

lliua lia.1 .|iiile a wile

Hey.-aii

no wi*er

that, in the

uniiuaU are nonielimee. from their oiii|«'l|.'.l |o take to the w.aala, where, in

men

with other youiij;

otii|>any

like

they Unit.

ami a, may

three year* of

..niiii^

Nim.ke.1 out or burnt out.

m

,

an win. iM.mmotily the

el, »at.s| .uffl. lenlly

mwhiij; uu.ler an.l

After two or

Impuiii"

mi^ht U*

»hl.

,

t.. I lie

of their mintjike an.l

I.j

h

oil Kin

Ill

h.-I bnllilln K

il«>..ry pi. vail.-l,

g.lilltilPl hohie.t.Moli.

ilormltory,

.Mai

.a

ir

.Hm-.,,.-!

I..

flol.ta

»«m|>, ami tri.~.l by onifem the Im nlily of

Tin- In.ji h-. oinliii;. oa

|«Me*l. tircl of thi» -.rl of ihinc,

of

of li«»in s a

111

the

N.va, howi-n'r, wern

U-c.,m.' eoiii ineeil

tuni home.

r.

lwi..i„-t

lie

Failing

II.

men arnw*

Ih.

1

I

the l«rk with th.

llllu In

of » iletw

in

r.1

were «nl*-i«l out

the |»inl of

remler

imlii. e

|.r.|iu--« to

.-ale*t

rajit..!^ ^-.-111 to

allowe.1 Iheiu to

Historical Reminiscences,

to llo

11

to Mii

hr.1 l|„. j.iuiik

»ni|«

.

a *-nni|»ant

man aJvan.

hi> »..n»

Sn*|»x-liui;

|iuiulie.|

him

mar.

ontin-

around In*

-.peti l>y



..iiIaiiL,

iiwimI.hI «t

iriren u|.

Ihey

.

imlii. -

I..

Ih*' lion-.-, .|..«

i»u|ij«*w.l

»»

th. ni

.1.

.

night, iu the

.iiiletly

lluin their father with leyaiil to tin- imai:iuary .le(««il

inMatKctl of 1

ml

y

111..11.


-«i.

)

-iniewher.

rock,

not

.lei

riieaiK of threnti.

iu il.-f.-na" oftheir

lim>-»."

i>l.

"I'-l h.ji.h-

norlh uf

in civili«.-.| warfare.

ami

tri'-|ilelll

h«.l

aaaiinie*! hii iu*|«-.-t .if

lielween the

I.,

were un. tre uK'tiiou.ly burst

tin- .l.-.n*

l>y tli. in

i;iin« at full

what

-.-.!

..utaril

iiiiarrii|>iil..ii>

y-.nl. aii-l

What they

;


oiiro, Tom Palm-, Will Cobbett ha* done well." etc.*

THIlUAK PAINE'H uity,

it is

Rochelle.

in n -C.

one of the most desirable residences io New There are eleven rooms in the main build-

power exerted by the early Methodist Church, especially at I'pper Sew Korhelle ami aloug the entire extent It I* a remarkable fact, ami might lie regarded by some in the light of a «pe« ial pro» iderice, that Immediately •tibsequent to the death ami burial of Paine in thl* neighborhood, and for o»er twenty conie, hut for the counteracting

of North Street.

made

year* afterward*, the powerful apiawls

to the heart*

and conarience*

of the people by the early itinerant preacher* of Methodism,

a* well

membership of that church, were attended with extraordinary result*, producing a ruiuplete change in the religious view* and feelings of the community, and dealing to Infidelity of the Paine type a blow from which It ha* never recovered. Nor was hi* counteracting influence confined to the place where It originated. In the vicinity of the Paine monument, at I'pper New Rochelle, bat It spread to the ailjarvtit towns of Kast 'heater, Mamarotui k and White PI his In a word, so general and ao po|>ular waathU religion* reformation in all the localities above referred to, that, for a time, any man thereabout* who should have openly pit >f eased himself to be a disciple of Thomas I'aine would have Is-en laud ill a few case* actually was) regarded as a sort of a moral RHMMtfT by the general community. Thi> aa the combined effort* of the whole

K'outant's " Reiiiliiiscenrce."

".We

dene

(., Oct. Mh. 1764.

[« Copy "] " M.

«m.

Vallad, Dante) Huiinet. Jubilee dee ltriwwn and other*, head*

New York. mar not Imi able

of the French Church of " Fearing that Mr. Daller

proceed

should

to roach l.»ndou in time to

theme

sail

to Falmouth and take advantage of the packet which from thence for your place on the 13th inM., I think it my

I have remitted to him and Mill yesterday to the Texel in onler that you may be informed of the departure from thla place of my friend Daller, whom I continue to recommend to you a* strongly a* possible. He merit* it In every respect. Meanwhile, I rstiuiin unchangeably and without any restriction whatever, Yours 4c."

duly to communicate to you the preceding, which

"Nov.ftth,

" (i*»tlmm "Since lh* preceding, which tober .Mh, which letter

OLD HfCifEXOT HOUSE, n

Mr. Simeon

The grounds

I/ester's

Sew

Place , North 8tn-et,

•ailed

Rochelle.

adjacent to the house consist of over

twenty-three acres, aud there

upon them one of the

is

springs in the town of clear, cool water, the

finest

depth of which never varies at any season of the Coins issued before the Revolutionary War year. have been found there, while ploughing, hut none of

of

The

New

letters are

Rochelle, and

from Falmouth, Oct.

ler could not take

hail

l:ith,

advantage, but ha* since embarked at London, in the

Chamber*, sailing directly for your city, hoping ardently that yon will have had sailed October .".Mh him in good hoalth before the receipt of thla let which 1 send to Loudon, whence I flatter myself that it will be forby warded in time to go tho Packet, which ought to sail the loth InstThis, Mr. Daller will tell you that he received from Messrs. Chalwnel and Whithoff, iu London, as per hit receipt of October&Id, i

'apt. ;

the pleasure of seeing ter,

£.

».

AO

[the •urn or)

»

Paid besides

which found

it

It

st

u for permits

4

seems

l

T Provisions in

London

12

Chambers pneure

apt.

to

necessary

in his

There were also found a pointed shoe, of ancient make, and a small vial of olive oil, still adhered to the sides and of which drops a few bottom of the glass. One of these papers is a bill against John Pintard for " 7 Reemes of paper, and 1 p" Bukrom;" dated" July 14th 1738 £6: 12: 2."

• :i

sterling

Gli

frj;

own handwriting.

|

Another

is

a

bill

dated

New

" Mr. Louis Plntard to Peter Owlet,

" To

nail*,

statement

and from time."



York, January, 1774,

I>r.

hinges and other hardware, £8

is Iti

no reaped exaggerated.

my own

I'mptilrtuJttd

personal

know ledge

M*M»cript of

I

irt,.,.

negotiating 4s

1-1

which I add the amount I remitted you aud postage on your letters and mine iu I

dun -Hu

e

Mar. h

ifcth,

1

Ti ,4.

im-liiding

from Geneva, Switzerland Ac, Current money of Holland

several

42.T

317.7

/lo|o

here si«"ri/« •/ Ikr

«i

own number,

proval of their

alw.iya

)*->j>l',

since even in

lie

held to repreaeut the

or even the uaoNimoiu ap-

the case

«e

were

more.

number

have l>e

mateiul Morgan.

...

D.D

Wataon

Rev. Cha* F.Canedy,

lfi-ji

17'«>

A.M

A.M Thomaa Wiuthrop, Cirt.

.

ITJ4

Bartow

Rev. Ravaud Kearny,

Rev. John

—nearly thirty

181')

D D

Rev. Pierre Stonpj*?,

Dev.

was constructed of stone; was

He con-

of the Revolution.

that year resigned his charge.

of ministers and rectors of the Episcopal

Her. David IV Honrepa\

llev.

edifice stood a little east of the present

War

tinued to serve the church until

Rev. Ijtwaon Carter,

Kpiscopal Church.

New

this rector, one would think, must have had a lively time and fairly earned his living, as there were then (1722) very few public conveyances if any) between these four towns. For his extra services to the New Rochelle Church during these two years, Mr. Bartow received from the Enfices."

171«.«

new

/our town*; East Chester,

six miles and East Chester four and " does other occasional of-

home ;" The horse of

miles from

Soon after this separation, a new church was built who had seceded from the French Huguenot to the Episcopal Church, in the autumn of the year by those

This

in

Westchester, Yonkers and

out a minister for fourteen years, during the troubles

"J-jhn Coutant, who died in the year |h4x, at the age of T. QonOM I). Abbot B«r. I*. Sny.Ur K«"». Bmuj M»rtjn tenetst .

.

.

.

.

unpainted, uncushioncd,

INN MBS

high-backed against

i*«

rounded by a plain ing, which formed chancel or

WalrM

church

it

for a

new

to

fur-

From

In 1860

was removed,

the

and

church for many years and which I have seen).

ians was built of wood,

room

altar,

surrail-

munion table made of wood of the wild cherry (which survived the old

edifice

erected by the Presbyterin the year 181">.

the

nished with a small com-

(pnwrnt inciiinUni).

first

The desk was

way.

.

IM

The

the face of

wall opposite to the door-

.

llcv. Wltluuii B.

An

!

elevated box pulpit, built

1*41

B-v. (Iw.'Hawlry .... 1*46 1MB B«t. Charlo* E. Eltiri«-a!

:

.

.

.;

i

'

!

.

i

'" tin-

i'

-Hi.

:

..«'t".

>m'W

'l'

1

i

i."

•« •



.

*

f

>•'' 'l

.

'

..

«

..•»!.

I

.

It t|

-We,

'..

•1

i

Hi t!-.
'

*

'

u '•'

It

I

J

•»'

ii

"tr ih

». .•,.».!.(

.

.tini.il,

r

*l/

'•

mil-

J

? JIT -'\-

\ ;:.l

.

r»liiT»..\ til*

iii

'

.

,

w.-

I

i

•«

it

.

«fuiif

n-

I



1

..

i



t.

— 1 7i>ti is thus described by Mr. Coutant:— "The inside of these houses was of the crud>

(

As to the outside, they est and cheajtest finish. were small, un painted thantie*, usually located on some surplus angle of the streets, or rocky land, unlit for cultivation, thus economizing ground, and making these barren spots, where no vegetation could grow, produce

the

The houses were

ceiled

precious

fruits

education.

of

round with unpainted boards, shrunken from their grooves; consequently no mi/ilatort were needed Their fixtures were extremely rude and simple, consisting for the most part of pine boards nailed up to the sides and ends of the room for desks, with sometimes a shelf underneath, on which They were furnished with to keep books and slates. seats of long oaken slabs, with legs driven into auger holes at each end, and all of the fixtures and furniture were curiously notched and carved into many fantastic forms and grotesque images by the busy jack'

!

knives of the mischievous tyros.

'

The school-room

was sometimes warmed by a fire in an open fire-place; but mostly by a small cast-iron stove, set U|h>ii a pile of bricks in the middle of the room." The teachers were stern and severe in their methods of teaching, using the ferrule and birchen rod with In those days flagelgreat frequency and freedom. lation was thought to be a fundamental part of education. Most of these teachers were imported from England and Ireland. They had left their own country in search of a wider field for the exercise of their great powers for stimulating the minds of their

They found

and teachers were the pioneers ofthe extensive and wonderful common-school system of the days in which we live. They were but the

school-houses, schools

stepping-stones, so to

magnificent

of those

sjteak,

temples of science and learning which have Bihce sprung up in almost every part of our favored land.

As

to those

primitive structures in

New

Rochelle,

they have vanished even from the recollection of most

ofthe inhabitants. Every vestige of the two old Huguenot schoolhouses is swept away, and they live only in tradition. The only teacher who taught school in either house, within the recollection of the writer, was Andrew Dean, Esq., some of whose descendants are still living in New Rochelle. In the year 1857 three schoolhouses were built (under the act of 1795), dividing 1

the town into as

many

districts.

The

first

was on the

corner of a lane leading to the old French burying-

on Hugueuot Street, nearly in It was quite front of the present Episcopal Church. for those times, being about school-house a stately eighteen by thirty-two feet on the ground and two Its pre-eminence in size and other constories high. ground.

It

was

siderations procured for

it

the

name

of "

Academy."

This school had quite a wide-spread reputation as a place of learning and some who received the rudiments of education here have subsequently obtained ;

celebrity as

professional

whose parents resided

at

men. Bishop De Lancey, Mamaroneck, came down to

Daily the boy bishop might be seen, to

this school.

wonderment of the other scholars, jogging along on horseback with his dinner-basket dangling the great

at bis elbow, to

dents in the

take his place

High School,

among

at that

his fellow-stu-

time taught by a

carrying out their peculiar meth-

Mr. Fox. Sometime between 1825 and 1*27 this old hive of learning gave place to the school in Me-

ods they only followed the customs of their native

chanics Street, which, in 185o-57, was exchanged for

But their path was not always a flowery one.

the building on Trinity Street, to which David Miller, one of the teachers of the former school, bequeathed by will the sum of eighteen hundred dollars, which was invested in an addition to the Trinity

pupils by external applications. in

America, and

land.

The

in

it

here

application of force to the inculcation of learning

was sometimes attended with disastrous themselves.

From

this

results

to

severity of discipline very

unpleasant affrays took place between

the teacher

and his scholars, ending occasionally in the expulsion of the teacher from the school-room. As to qualifi-

make a good quill pen, ami write with facility a neat and fair hand, ami sohe the sums and repeat the tables in Daboll'* cations, " If the teacher could

arithmetic, he was considered a competent teacher,

Street brick school-house.

Eiutationai. Fa< n.rmx— It is only few years that any decided advance has been made in the public schools of this town at commensurate with the requirements of the age all I'resi-.nt

within the

last

and the wants of the people. The accidental burning (March MO, IKS') 0 f the school-house on Trinity-

and received a certificate entitling the school taught by him to receive its proportion of the public money." The reading-books were "The New Testament," " The Sequel,"" The American Preceptor," and 'The Child's Instructor" for larger and more advanced scholars, and a few primers for small children. The scarcity of

Street, built 1856-57, has led to the erection of a

books rendered

even-

it

necessary that the teachers of these

primitive schools should be well versed

in all the

which they had to teach. But grammar and geography were at that time not commonly taught in the public schools. These ancient English branches

very its site. This building was planned by the school board and erected under the

superior building upon

&

supervision

of Messrs. D.

The grounds

are about three acres.

u|)on

J. Jardine, architects.

Before entering

work, members of the board examined school-house noted for superior advantages

the

within their reach, their aim being to combine and

concentrate the best elements from Tniitanl'a

"

all in

the building

IlrinliiliK-MiCMi."

[le

NEW

ROCIIKLhB.

which they intended should he a model school-house in every respec t. In this they have largely succeeded.

The building is H-shaped, eighty-four feet front, one hundred and fifty feet deep. There are thirteen class -rooms, one library -room, one board-room, one principal's room, one assembly-room, fifty-four by ninety-three, with accommodations for about eight hundred pupils. There is an above-ground cellar, play-rooms

divided into

wet

for

weather, furnace,

The building

heated by steam from a

is

The system

boiler.

'"Gouge," and

working

is

fifty

of ventilation

satisfactorily.

horseis

the

There are

of hose, supplied with water from a tank in

five lines

width,

.

>6"

097 Every attention has been paid to

feet.

drainage and ventilation.

where

The

entire outside surface,

upon the ground, is covered with asphaltum or damp-proof material, and the bottom of the it

reste

excavation for the structure laid

is

covered with asphalt,

upon a bed of cement concrete, and the whole

The

covered with cement. hollow, and every room

which extend

tubes,

Two immense

coal and store-rooms.

power

r

is

walls of the building are

connected with ventilating

to the outside top of the walls.

cisterns

through double Steam-heat is employed passed

supply rain-water, which filters

before

is

being used.

for warming and gas for The style of architecture is that of French The front corners are ornamented

lighting.

military structures.

the top of the building, for the extinguishing of fires.

with two

The teachers are one principal, salary twenty-three

main entrance.

hundred dollars; twelve lady teachers at salaries from lour hundred to seven hundred dollars. There are in the town two other school*—one pri-

balustrade of terra-cotta, surmounted by ornamental

New

mary. West

Kochellc

one school for colored Harrison Street— with one teacher for each

pupils, in

;

school

Library asi.

Gymxasum.— It

is

impossible to

some notice of the libbenefactions of one of our citizens, Mr. Adrian

conclude this sketch without eral

Iselin. for

the public benefit

am

;

more especially

is,

so far as

in

the entire history of the town.'

I

as this

aware, the only instance of the kind

Mr.

Iselin has not

own expense a fine buildiug, conand billiard-room for and amusement of the young people, he has expended many thousands of dollars in

only fitted

up

at his

large towers, through one of

Over the main door

lam [m>.

which

In front of this entrance

is

is

is

the

a heavy

a panel of terra-cotta,

containing a bas-relief representation of 'The

Young

There is a beautiful winding stair, of oak, which conducts from the base of one of the towers to the topmost story of the building. The floor of the entrance is laid in a Roman Mosaic of tiles, black, red and salmon color, three-quarters of nn inch square. The gymnasium proper is a room forty by eighty feet, without a post or pillar resting upon the floor. Light but beautiful trusses, which are self-supj>orting, sustain the heavy roof. The floor is of the choicest verAthletes.'

tical

grain yellow [line;

the walls of butf terra-cotta

the erection of a

brick; ceilings, trusses and window-work of white and yellow pine, finished in their native color; the windows of French plate; the doors of polished oak trimmings and gas-fixtures of solid bronze, and pol-

which,

ished brass,

taining a reading-room, library the instruction but

gymnasium for physical exercise, when complete, will be an ornament to the

town, and ought greatly to

promote the health and This building is en-

enjoyment of the inhabitants.

unique, and has no rival, so far as I know, in country; certainly not outside of the great

tirely tins

have been furnished by Mr. William Le Count, Rochelle, with an elaborate description of the gymnasium, which is here given (in a form slightly I

New

condensed)

from his manuscript

Calabar brick, and trimmed

:— "

It is built of blue stone and

with

The mason-work is of a superior The arches over the windows and doors are

Philadelphia brick. quality.

most attractive feature.

«

view

in

these arches was

Every brick existed to specially chiseled and

shaped on the premises, requiring a great skill

and labor

the building.

The

running track, which is elevated about eight and a feet above the floor of the main room, extends and is suspended from the roof. Behind it (at one end) there is a gallery half

entirely around the building,

accommodation of visitors. Under the floor of is the bowling alley, one hundred by feet. It is on the south side, and is fitted with four alleys, in the most approved modern style.

amount of

the main room

twenty

This room, although below the surface of the ground, is most admirable lighted by a row of windows in amber-colored cathedral glaas, in circular form and

set in lead.

On

the opposite side of the building are

the dressing-rooms, fitted up with

lockers and all modern conveniences. Beyond these are the and fuel-rooms. A handsome iron fence sur-

suitable boiler

make this seemingly small part of rounds the building The roof is covered with red Akron is flagged and curbed

to

which, on the main roof are

and on the towers and turrets corrugated, and ornamented with terra-cotta crestings and tiniuls. The wood-work is of the best yellow ami white pine and oak. The extreme length of the building is 114 feet: extreme

tiles,

expressly for this building.

for the

cities.

of

;

made

flat,

in front.

The

entire sidewalk

in a style equal to that

of the public buildings in the large

cities.

of any

The gym-

nasium occupies a central position at the corner of two of the principal streets of the village. The intention of its founder is to have it a [>erfcct gymnasium.

It

will be furnished with

everything required

make it so, and a competent professor will be appointed to superintend and direct the exercises." On the whole, it may be safely pronounced to be

to 1

Mr. MllU-r-.

'•'•mill

iwt

irifl ,.f

.me

U furgolt'Ti.

il,..,.«t.J

eight huu.ir.-l

.|..|!iir-

f

.r

pHih-Htl..!,

Digitized by

Google

HISTORY OF WKSTC HESTER COUNTY.

698

one of the finest institutions of the kind in the United and it is hoped and believed that it will be practically free for the physical training and education

absence of a clock that strikes the hours upon its tower was an absurd blunder, and it is to be hope* that, at no distant day, the demands of the public

of the people.

will

States,

The donor

of these important gifts

He is

not covet notoriety.

one who does

is

compel the erection of something more ornamental and more suitable to the spirit of the age.

too modest to approve of

any extended eulogy on account of the good he has done,

him, therefore, enjoy the consciousness of

ljel

having tried to benefit his fellow-men and let these two solid and useful structures stand in the midst of our village as the enduring memorials of hi* benev;

olence. Statistics of professions, trades

New

the town of

and occupations

in

Rochelle:

Agent* liiMurniu'v and n*k«r*

rr*\ e«t»tr>

RIOGRAPHY.

!> .

.',

Bank*

1

BUrkiruitlia

4

SIMEON LESTER.

Itartxm Book-atorea

'1

Butcher*

.">

Carriage niakor*

Manter

I

and

carp