Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research [Volume 38] 3031066952, 9783031066955

Published annually since 1985, the Handbook series provides a compendium of thorough and integrative literature reviews

289 89 10MB

English Pages 694 [695] Year 2023

Report DMCA / Copyright

DOWNLOAD PDF FILE

Table of contents :
Preface
Contents
About the Editor
Associate Editors
Reviewers
Contributors
1 Academic Procession: Bringing the History of Higher Education to Life
Introduction
Brief Biography
New England to California
High School and College Prep
From Comic Books to Campus View Books: College Admissions and Images
College Years at Brown University, 1965 to 1969
Going to Graduate School: University of California, Berkeley, 1969 to 1974
From Berkeley to the Blue Grass: Professor at the University of Kentucky, 1974-1977
From Kentucky to California: Gaining Experience in Administration and Public Policy
The College of William and Mary: Professor, 1981-1993
From Indiana University to the University of Kentucky, 1996 to 2022
Going Around in Academic Circles: Research and Development, 1970-2022
The Historical Base
Writing the Big Book: A History of American Higher Education
``Cliometrics´´ and the Colleges: Historical Statistics and Higher Education Research
The Continuing Interest in the Study of Intercollegiate Athletics
Higher Education and the Public Forum
Summary and Conclusion: Coming of Age in Higher Education
The Synergy of Teaching, Research, and Service
References
2 Historical Considerations of Women and Gender in Higher Education
Imagining a Gendered Lens: Three Calls over Forty Years
Gender, Women, and Intersectionality Working in Tandem
Review of the Literature
Femininities
Expectations and Roles: Wide-Angle Studies
Expectations and Roles: Focused Lenses
Southern Higher Education
Other Campus Spaces
Summary
Masculinities
Expectations and Roles: Wide-Angle Studies
Specific Means of Transmission
Gay Identity and Campus Purges
Summary
Intersectional Identities
Racial Considerations
Class Considerations
Religion
Summary
Coeducation
``Corrective´´ Work on Access and Agency
Post-1960s Push for Coeducation: The Influence of Markets
Summary
Professionals and Gender
Deans
Faculty
Philanthropy
Summary
Politics and Policy
Summary
Conclusions and Recommendations for Future Research
Future Directions
References
3 Whiteness Beyond (Just) White People: Exploring the Interconnections Among Dimensions of Whiteness in Higher Education
Introduction
Conceptualizing Whiteness and Critical Whiteness Studies
Why Study Whiteness in Higher Education?
Critical Whiteness Studies
Approaches to Conducting the Literature Search
Reflexivity Statements
Tenisha Tevis
Melvin Whitehead
Zak Foste
Antonio Duran
Review of the Literature
Ideological Dimension of Whiteness and Its Historical Legacies in US Higher Education
Ideological Constructs Used to Analyze Whiteness in US Higher Education
Institutional Dimension of Whiteness in US Higher Education
Institutional Responses to Racist Acts and Speech
Diversity Regimes and Discourse
Racialization of Institutional Spaces
Cocurricular Experiences
Classroom Experiences
Interpersonal Dimension of Whiteness in US Higher Education
Whiteness-at-Work
Racial Performances
Internalized Dimension of Whiteness
Developmental Perspectives on Whiteness and White College Students
White College Students´ Racial Attitudes and Ideologies
White Faculty and Administrators
Trends in the Literature
Approaches to the Work
Applications of the Work
Concluding Thoughts About the Literature
Charting the Future of Critical Analysis of Whiteness in Higher Education
Critical Dimensions of Whiteness Model
The Possibilities and Responsibilities of Studying Whiteness Using CWDM
Implications
Implications for Practice and Policy
Implications for Research
Qualitative Research
Quantitative Studies
Summary/Conclusion
References
4 Academic Freedom as a Professional, Constitutional, and Human Right
The AAUP and the Drive to Establish Academic Freedom and Tenure in US Higher Education
The Pre-Academic Freedom Period
The AAUP´s Role in Establishing Academic Freedom and Tenure as Professional Standards in US Higher Education
AAUP Formation
The 1915 Declaration of Principles on Academic Freedom and Academic Tenure
AAUP´s Formative Years, 1925 and 1940 Statements, and the ``Academic Revolution´´
Tenure as a Special Contractual Arrangement
The Contemporary Status of and Future Challenges to Tenure
Academic Freedom as a Constitutional Concern
A Promising Start to Academic Freedom and First Amendment Gives Way to Disagreement, Ambiguity, and Confusion
Garcetti v. Ceballos and New Questions over First Amendment Academic Freedom for Faculty
Considering Race-Conscious Admissions Cases and Their Implications for Institutional Academic Freedom
Comparative Lens on Academic Freedom
Academic Freedom as a Human Right in International Declarations
Threats to Academic Freedom Around the Globe
Opportunities for Future Research About the Importance of Academic Freedom
Conclusion
References
5 ``Getting to Where We Need to Be´´: (Re)Envisioning Postsecondary Education Through the Equity X Governance Paradigm
Introduction: An Origin Story and the Next Act - Background and Chapter Overview
Chapter Overview
Making the Case for a Paradigm Shift: From Equity and Governance Equity X Governance
Relevant Stakeholders: An Ecosystem Perspective on Equity X Governance
Mapping the Governance Ecosystem to Non-GB Actor´s Equity Work
The Equity X Governance Paradigm´s Nemeses: Naming Ecosystem Bottlenecks
Readying the Theoretical Frameworks
Critical Race Theory Overview
Standpoint Theory Overview
Standpoint Theory in Equity X Governance
Governance to What End?: A CRT Analysis
Taking a Step Back to Take a Leap Forward
Governance as Raceless and Unaware of Power Dynamics
Summary and Conclusions
Equity as the Fulcrum of Governance, But Where and How Do We Apply It: Core Challenges and Opportunities for Boards
What Do We Mean by Core Governance Practices?
Budget Maintenance
Presidential Selection
Upholding and Supporting the Mission, Values, and Purpose
Save the World on Your Own Time: Navigating ``Unchartered´´ Territory in Governance
All Eyes on Boards: Opportunities Before Boards of Higher Education
Diversify Board Demographics as a Genesis Not Completion
Wrap Up: The Future of Governance Practice
(Re)Envisioning Governance and Equity for the Future
The Equity X Governance Model: A (Re)Envisioned Approach for Transformation
Why Do GBs Exist?
What Are GBs For?
Who Are GBs Accountable To?
What Practices and Tools Should GBs Use to Accomplish Their Purpose?
Bringing It All Together
An Equity X Governance Model Counternarrative: The ``Case´´ of Justice University
Implications for Future Research: Defining a Praxis Agenda
Overview
Strengthening the Equity X Governance Paradigm Through Reflective Inquiry
Questions for Future Research Rooted in the Equity X Governance Paradigm
Methodological Advancement: Governance Participatory Action Research
Concluding Thoughts
References
6 Still Striving, and for What? Centering Equity in the Study of Prestige Seeking in Higher Education
Introduction: Purpose and Overview of Chapter
Introducing Prestige Seeking Within the Context of Inequity in Higher Education
Expanding Prestige-Seeking Research into the Future
Chapter Purpose and Guiding Questions
Assumptions About Higher Education Guiding This Work
Defining Prestige Seeking and Equity: An Engagement with Prestige and Equity as Ideology and Practice in Higher Education
Defining Equity for the Sake of Examining Prestige in Higher Education
Frameworks for Examining Equity in Higher Education
Defining Prestige Seeking
Why ``Prestige Seeking´´?
Tangible Aspects of Prestige Seeking
Intangible Aspects of Prestige Seeking
Prestige Seeking Versus Reputation Building in the Context of Equity
Situating Prestige Seeking
Contextualizing Higher Education
Accountability Demands and Levers
State Policy Reform and Additional Funding Mechanisms
A Changing Demographic Landscape
Situating Prestige in This Context
Prestige as Examined in Higher Education
The Academic Snake Monolith
Contributions of Research Within This Area
Moving Beyond the Snake
The Prestige Mosaic: Experiences of Prestige Seeking Within the Institution
What the Mosaic Shows Us
Expanding the Mosaic
Problematizing Prestige Seeking: Centering Implications
How Problematization Expands Our Understanding
Deepening Problematization
The Interplay of Prestige and Other Factors
Contributions of Prestige´s Interactions
What Is Beyond?
Prestige as Examined in Higher Education: Summarizing and Looking Ahead
The Future of Prestige-Seeking Research
Furthering Institutional Lenses
Expanding Theoretical Lenses and Traditions
Multi-Paradigmatic Inquiry
Methodological Expansions to Accommodate These Approaches
Measuring Prestige Outcomes
Capturing the Role of Equity in Prestige Systems
Framework for Centering Equity in Prestige-Seeking Research
Concluding Thoughts
References
7 Ph.D. Pathways to the Professoriate: Affordances and Constraints of Institutional Structures, Individual Agency, and Social ...
Introduction
Guiding Framework
Types of Faculty and Institutions
Nontenure Track Appointments
Tenure Track Positions and Variation by Institution Type
Entering the Modern Era of Graduate Education Research
A Programmatic Effort to Change Doctoral Education: Preparing Future Faculty
Socialization as an Explanatory Framework for US Doctoral Education
Socialization Stages
Current Conceptualizations of Socialization
Mechanisms of Socialization
Cognitive Apprenticeship
Scholarly Writing and Publication
Mentoring Networks
Empirical Challenges to Graduate Socialization Theory
Summary
Evolution of Doctoral Career Pathways
Expanding Our Understanding of Ph.D. Career Pathways
Well-Being, Work-Life Balance, and Considerations of Career Choices
Contextualizing the Growth of Nonacademic Careers
Pathways to Faculty Positions
Mechanisms of Faculty Preparation in Doctoral Education
Understanding of Research Processes
Understanding Approaches to Teaching and Mentoring
Understanding Service and Service-Oriented Engagement
Summary
Systems of Power, Agency, and the Inequity of Faculty Opportunities
Graduate Admissions as a Gatekeeping Mechanism
Student Debt and Generational Wealth Impact Faculty Career Choices
How Doctoral Advisors Uphold Imbalanced Power in Faculty Pathways
Institutional Policies and Benchmark Assessments as Gatekeeping Mechanisms
Institutional Prestige and Productivity
Disciplinary Environments Impact on Faculty Pathways
Summary
Labor Market Issues and Realities
The Academic Capitalist Regime
STEM Fields Valued Over Other Academic Disciplines
Exploitation of Academic Labor
Considering the Future of Ph.D. Labor
Postdoctoral Labor Precarity
Implications of Postdoctoral Trends on Faculty Pathways
Summary
Moving into the Future
Implications for Policy and Practice
Conclusion
References
8 Reimagining Faculty Development: Activating Faculty Learning for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
Defining Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
Higher Education Context
Current Model of Faculty Development
Faculty Advancement
Instructional Development
Guiding Conceptual Framework: Faculty as Learners
Faculty Members´ Funds of Knowledge
Content of Faculty Learning
Conditions of Faculty Learning
Contexts of Faculty Learning
Intersectionality in Learning
DEI Faculty Development
DEI Faculty Advancement
Faculty Search, Recruitment, and Hiring Attentive to DEI
DEI Faculty Onboarding and Socialization
DEI Faculty Retention Efforts: Mentoring, Career, and Research Support Attentive to DEI
Two Approaches to DEI Faculty Advancement
Faculty as Learners in DEI Faculty Advancement
Funds of Knowledge
Content of Learning
Conditions of Learning
Contexts of Learning
DEI Instructional Development
Guiding Principle: Inclusive Teaching
Aims of DEI Instructional Development
Forms of DEI Instructional Development
Faculty as Learners in DEI Instructional Development
Funds of Knowledge
Content of Learning
Conditions of Learning
Contexts of Learning
Moving Forward: Reconceptualizing Faculty Development to be Anchored in DEI
Approach Faculty as Learners
Enact a Holistic Model of Faculty Development
Conceptualize DEI Faculty Development as a Mediator of Institutional Cultural Change
Closing
References
9 A Review of Vertical and Horizontal Transfer Student Transitions and Experiences
Introduction
Transfer as an Undergraduate Student Pathway: An Overview of Terminology, History, and Mission
Exploring How Students Navigate Transfer Pathways to Receiving Institutions
Transfer Choice and Search Process
Demographic Factors Associated with Transfer
Structural Forces Impacting Transfer
Institutional Barriers to Transfer
Exploring Students´ Post-transfer Experiences at the Receiving Institution
Transfer Shock
Students´ Adjustment, Integration, and Engagement
Integrating into a New Environment
Engagement Among Transfer Students
Momentum
Sense of Belonging
Transfer Student Identity
Frameworks Used in Previous Research About Transfer Students´ Experiences
Transfer Student Capital
Validation Theory
Transfer Receptive Culture
Moving Transfer Research and Practice into New Directions
The Need for Recognizing Variations Within Transfer
The Importance of Utilizing Asset-Based Approaches
Conclusion: Next Steps to Consider
References
10 Trigger Warnings: From Sword Fights to Campus Carry in Higher Education
Introduction
The Rhetoric of Armament
Rewriting the Right to Bear (Carry) Arms
Heller and McDonald: SCOTUS Creates Private Right to Bear Arms
Originalism and English Common Law
Weapons in the Medieval University and Colonial Colleges
Mass Murders on College Campuses
The University of Texas
Kent State University
Jackson State College
Cal State-Fullerton
University of Iowa
Virginia Tech University
Northern Illinois University
The California Shootings: Oikos, Santa Monica, and UC-Santa Barbara
Umpqua Community College
Review of the Literature
Surveys of Students, Faculty, and Staff
Other Empirical Approaches
Statistical Analyses
Single-Site Case Studies
Qualitative Methods
Systematic Reviews of the Literature
Reports
Essays
Campus Carry in Court
Foundational Law Reviews
Other Legal Perspectives on Campus Carry
Where Modern Scholarship All Started: The University of Texas at Austin
The Perpetual Cycle: Campus Carry in 2022
The Game Changer: New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. Bruen (2022)
Post-Bruen Realities for Campus Carry
Summary
References
11 Bridging Criminal Justice Scholarship into the Field of Higher Education: Implications for Research, Practice, and Policy
Introduction
K-12 Schooling Disciplining Practices and Their Influences on Entry into the Criminal Justice System
K-12 School Disciplining Patterns
Suspensions and Expulsions as School Discipline Types with Implications for Entry into the Criminal Justice System
Understanding How K-12 Educators Use School Discipline Practices
The Negative Consequences of Suspensions and Expulsion for College Access
Detrimental Effects of School Disciplining Practices on Black and Latinx Students of Color
Girls of Color and Negative Schooling Experiences
Tracking into Continuation or Alternative Schools as Part of the School-to-Prison Nexus
The Provision of Postsecondary Education for Current or Formerly Incarcerated Individuals
Recent Law and Policies Affecting Incarcerated Peoples´ Access to Postsecondary Education
The Benefits of Prison Education Programs for Individuals and Society
Variability in Access to Prison Education Programs
Different Types of Prison Education Programs
Barriers to Accessing Prison Education Programs
Unanticipated or Anticipated Changes in Position or Status Within and Between Prisons
Conflicts Between Incarcerated Individuals´ Work and Schooling Schedules
Limited Access to Student Services to Navigate Program Completion
Barriers to Accessing Postsecondary Education After Release from Prison
Required Self-Disclosure of Criminal Convictions
Navigating the Financial Aid Process
Reentry Program Types That Promote Postsecondary Access for Formerly Incarcerated People
Reentry Programs at the Community College Level
University Level
Community Organizations and Nonprofits´ Role in Reentry Programs
Conclusion
References
12 An Evolving QuantCrit: The Quantitative Research Complex and a Theory of Racialized Quantitative Systems
A Few Caveats
Author Positionality
Critiques of Quantitative Research and Data
Exposing Racial Bias in Numbers
Highlighting the Role of Racial Context
Critiquing the Quantitative Data Use in Policy
The Outer Edges and Expanding the Critique
Critical Systemic and Theoretical Contexts
Neoliberalism
Systemic Racism
The Role of Social Structures in Systems of Oppression
History and Evolution of the Quantitative Research Complex
Rise of Eugenics
Rise of Neoliberalism
Rise of the Quantitative Research Complex
Elements of the Quantitative Research Complex
A Systems Theory of Racialized Quantitative Inquiry
Conclusion
References
Contents of Previous Five Volumes
Index
Recommend Papers

Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research [Volume 38]
 3031066952, 9783031066955

  • 0 0 0
  • Like this paper and download? You can publish your own PDF file online for free in a few minutes! Sign Up
File loading please wait...
Citation preview

Laura W. Perna Editor

Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research Volume 38

Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research Volume 38 Series Editor Laura W. Perna, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Published annually since 1985, the Handbook series provides a compendium of thorough and integrative literature reviews on a diverse array of topics of interest to the higher education scholarly and policy communities. Each chapter provides a comprehensive review of research findings on a selected topic, critiques the research literature in terms of its conceptual and methodological rigor, and sets forth an agenda for future research intended to advance knowledge on the chosen topic. The Handbook focuses on a comprehensive set of central areas of study in higher education that encompasses the salient dimensions of scholarly and policy inquiries undertaken in the international higher education community. Each annual volume contains chapters on such diverse topics as research on college students and faculty, organization and administration, curriculum and instruction, policy, diversity issues, economics and finance, history and philosophy, community colleges, advances in research methodology, and more. The series is fortunate to have attracted annual contributions from distinguished scholars throughout the world.

Laura W. Perna Editor

Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research Volume 38

With 14 Figures and 5 Tables

Editor Laura W. Perna Graduate School of Education University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA, USA

ISSN 0882-4126 ISSN 2215-1664 (electronic) Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research ISBN 978-3-031-06695-5 ISBN 978-3-031-06696-2 (eBook) https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-06696-2 © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2023 This work is subject to copyright. All rights are solely and exclusively licensed by the Publisher, whether the whole or part of the material is concerned, specifically the rights of translation, reprinting, reuse of illustrations, recitation, broadcasting, reproduction on microfilms or in any other physical way, and transmission or information storage and retrieval, electronic adaptation, computer software, or by similar or dissimilar methodology now known or hereafter developed. The use of general descriptive names, registered names, trademarks, service marks, etc. in this publication does not imply, even in the absence of a specific statement, that such names are exempt from the relevant protective laws and regulations and therefore free for general use. The publisher, the authors, and the editors are safe to assume that the advice and information in this book are believed to be true and accurate at the date of publication. Neither the publisher nor the authors or the editors give a warranty, expressed or implied, with respect to the material contained herein or for any errors or omissions that may have been made. The publisher remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. This Springer imprint is published by the registered company Springer Nature Switzerland AG. The registered company address is: Gewerbestrasse 11, 6330 Cham, Switzerland

Preface

Like the preceding volumes in this series, Vol. 38 of Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research offers an invaluable collection of thorough reviews of research on topics that are of central importance to higher education policy, practice, and research. Each of the chapters in this volume represents an important contribution to knowledge. Individually and collectively, the chapters provide in-depth examinations of the state of knowledge on topics that are highly relevant in this current time. Together, these chapters offer important insights into current issues pertaining to: college students; faculty; diversity; organization and administration; community colleges; teaching, learning, and curriculum; economics and finance; policy; history and philosophy; and research methodology. This annual publication would not be possible without the intellectual leadership of an excellent team of Associate Editors. For Vol. 38, these exceptionally talented scholars and research mentors are: Ann Austin, Nicholas Bowman, Pamela Eddy, Nicholas Hillman, Shouping Hu, Adrianna Kezar, Anne-Marie Nuñez, Christine Ogren, Aimee La Pointe Terosky, Marvin Titus, and Marc Van Overbeke. Over the course of a year or more, the Associate Editors and I each work closely with selected authors to develop, produce, and refine the chapters that are included in this published volume. Equity is one strong theme that is present across chapters in this volume. Chapter authors consider issues pertaining to women and gender (Linda Eisenmann), “whiteness beyond (just) white people” (Tenisha Tevis, Melvin Whitehead, Zachary Foste, and Antonio Duran), and critical quantitative methods (Sam Museus). Other authors apply an equity lens to such topics as faculty development (Milagros Castillo-Montoya, Liza Ann Bolitzer, and Sylk Sotto-Santiago), governance (Demetri Morgan, Raquel Ball, and Felecia Commodore), and prestige seeking (Desiree Zerquera). Other chapters consider fundamental principles, like academic freedom (Neal Hutchens and Frank Fernandez) and processes, including criminal justice (Adrian Huerta), transfer (Catherine Hartman), pathways of PhD students to the professoriate (David Feldon, Annie Wofford, and Jennifer Blaney), and campus carry (Patricia Somers, Zach Taylor, and Kelly Soucy). Each chapter offers a comprehensive review of research findings on the selected topic, critiques the research literature in terms of its conceptual and methodological rigor, and offers

v

vi

Preface

an agenda for future research that will further advance knowledge on the particular topic. As in past volumes, this volume also includes an autobiographic essay. In Vol. 38, Professor Emeritus John Thelin, University of Kentucky, reflects on his personal and professional journey in an essay entitled, “Academic procession: Bringing the history of higher education to life.” Professor Thelin offers a candid description of the evolution of his research and scholarship, including the roots of his interests in sports, higher education, and history. He also shares how he has approached teaching, advising, research, and service, as well as his perspectives on the historical development of what is now the field of higher education administration. Volume 38 builds on a long and strong history of outstanding scholarly contributions. The first volume in this series was published in 1985. John C. Smart served as editor of the series through Vol. 26, when Michael B. Paulsen joined him as co-editor. After co-editing Vols. 26 and 27 with John, Mike served as the sole editor through Vol. 33. I am deeply honored that Mike invited me to serve as co-editor with him for Vol. 34 and that I have the privilege of serving as sole editor beginning with Vol. 35. I am grateful for the time, effort, and engagement that the authors and Associate Editors invested in producing these significant scholarly contributions. Because of these efforts, the chapters in this volume will undoubtedly provide the foundation for the next generation of research on these crucial issues. In this volume, Associate Editors were responsible for working with the following chapters and authors: Ann E. Austin, “Ph.D. Pathways to the Professoriate: Affordances and Constraints of Institutional Structures, Individual Agency, and Social Systems,” by David F. Feldon, Annie Wofford, and Jennifer Blaney Nicholas A. Bowman, “Whiteness Beyond (Just) White People: Exploring the Interconnections Among Dimensions of Whiteness in Higher Education,” by Tenisha Tevis, Melvin Whitehead, Zak Foste, and Antonio Duran Pamela Eddy, “A Review of Vertical and Horizontal Transfer Student Transitions and Experiences,” by Catherine Hartman Nicholas Hillman, “An Evolving QuantCrit: The Quantitative Research Complex and a Theory of Racialized Quantitative Systems,” by Samuel Museus Shouping Hu, “Trigger Warnings: From Sword Fights to Campus Carry in Higher Education,” by Patricia Somers, Z.W. Taylor, and Kelly L. Soucy Adrianna Kezar, “Getting to Where We Need to Be: (Re)Envisioning Postsecondary Education through the Equity X Governance Paradigm,” by Demetri Morgan, Raquel Rall, and Felecia Commodore Anne-Marie Nuñez, “Bridging Criminal Justice Scholarship into the Field of Higher Education: Implications for Research, Practice, and Policy,” by Adrian Huerta and colleagues Christine Ogren and Marc Van Overbeke, “Historical Considerations of Women and Gender in Higher Education: A Review of the Literature,” by Linda Eisenmann Aimee La Pointe Terosky, “Reimagining Faculty Development: Activating Faculty Learning for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion,” by Milagros Castillo-Montoya, Liza Ann Bolitzer, and Sylk Sotto-Santiago

Preface

vii

I had the privilege of working with the authors of the following chapters: “Academic Procession: Bringing the History of Higher Education to Life,” by John Thelin “Academic Freedom as a Professional, Constitutional, and Human Right: Contemporary Challenges and Directions for Research,” by Neal Hutchens and Frank Fernandez “Still Striving, and For What? Centering Equity in the Study of Prestige Seeking in Higher Education,” by Desiree Zerquera Sadly, one author, Gabriel R. Serna, Assistant Professor at Michigan State University, passed away in August 2022. Associate Editor Marvin Titus and I had hoped that this volume would have benefited from Dr. Serna’s expertise on higher education economics, finance, and policy. A first-generation, Hispanic college student, Dr. Serna was committed to advancing higher education access and opportunity for students from marginalized groups. This volume is dedicated in memory of Dr. Serna. Philadelphia, USA February 2023

Laura W. Perna

Contents

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Academic Procession: Bringing the History of Higher Education to Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John R. Thelin

1

Historical Considerations of Women and Gender in Higher Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Linda Eisenmann

23

Whiteness Beyond (Just) White People: Exploring the Interconnections Among Dimensions of Whiteness in Higher Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tenisha L. Tevis, Melvin Whitehead, Zak Foste, and Antonio Duran Academic Freedom as a Professional, Constitutional, and Human Right . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Neal H. Hutchens and Frank Fernandez “Getting to Where We Need to Be”: (Re)Envisioning Postsecondary Education Through the Equity X Governance Paradigm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Demetri L. Morgan, Raquel M. Rall, and Felecia Commodore Still Striving, and for What? Centering Equity in the Study of Prestige Seeking in Higher Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Desiree D. Zerquera Ph.D. Pathways to the Professoriate: Affordances and Constraints of Institutional Structures, Individual Agency, and Social Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David F. Feldon, Annie M. Wofford, and Jennifer M. Blaney Reimagining Faculty Development: Activating Faculty Learning for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Milagros Castillo-Montoya, Liza A. Bolitzer, and Sylk Sotto-Santiago

95

149

203

265

325

415

ix

x

Contents

9

10

11

12

A Review of Vertical and Horizontal Transfer Student Transitions and Experiences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Catherine Hartman

483

Trigger Warnings: From Sword Fights to Campus Carry in Higher Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patricia Somers, Z. W. Taylor, and Kelly Soucy

539

Bridging Criminal Justice Scholarship into the Field of Higher Education: Implications for Research, Practice, and Policy . . . . . . Adrian H. Huerta, Edgar F. Lopez, Maritza E. Salazar, Gabriela Torres, and Miranda Y. Munoz

589

An Evolving QuantCrit: The Quantitative Research Complex and a Theory of Racialized Quantitative Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . Samuel D. Museus

631

............................

665

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

669

Contents of Previous Five Volumes

About the Editor

Laura W. Perna is Vice Provost for Faculty, GSE Centennial Presidential Professor of Education, and Executive Director of the Alliance for Higher Education and Democracy (AHEAD) at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn). Her research uses various methodological approaches to identify how social structures, educational practices, and public policies promote and limit college access and success, particularly for groups that are underrepresented in higher education. Recent publications include Improving Research-Based Knowledge of College Promise Programs (with Edward Smith, 2020, AERA), Taking It to the Streets: The Role of Scholarship in Advocacy and Advocacy in scholarship (2018, Johns Hopkins University Press), and The Attainment Agenda: State Policy Leadership for Higher Education (with Joni Finney, 2014, Johns Hopkins University Press). She has served as President of the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Vice President of the Postsecondary Division of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), and Chair of Penn’s Faculty Senate. She is a member of the Board of Directors for the Postsecondary National Policy Institute (PNPI) and previously served as a member of the Gates Commission on the Value of Postsecondary Education and the Board of Directors for the Institute for Higher Education Policy. Among other honors, she has received the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching from the University of Pennsylvania, Faculty Alumni Award of Merit from the University of Pennsylvania Alumni Association, Early Career Achievement Award from ASHE, Excellence in Public Policy in Higher Education Award from ASHE’s Council on xi

xii

About the Editor

Public Policy and Higher Education, Dr. Constance Clayton Education Award from the Philadelphia College Prep Roundtable, and Robert P. Huff Golden Quill Award from the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. She is also a member of the National Academy of Education and a Fellow of AERA.

Associate Editors

Ann E. Austin Michigan State University East Lansing, MI, USA

Nicholas A. Bowman University of Iowa Iowa City, IA, USA

Pamela Eddy William & Mary Williamsburg, VA, USA

xiii

xiv

Associate Editors

Nicholas Hillman University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, WI, USA

Shouping Hu Florida State University Tallahassee, FL, USA

Adrianna Kezar School of Education University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA, USA

Associate Editors

xv

Anne-Marie Núñez University of Texas El Paso El Paso, TX, USA

Christine Ogren Educational Policy and Leadership Studies University of Iowa Iowa City, IA, USA

Marc Van Overbeke University of Illinois-Chicago Chicago, USA

xvi

Associate Editors

Laura W. Perna University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA, USA

Aimee La Pointe Terosky Department of Educational Leadership Saint Joseph’s University Philadelphia, PA, USA

Marvin Titus University of Maryland College Park, MD, USA

Reviewers

Gina Garcia University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, USA Juan Garibay University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA Leslie Gonzalez Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA KerryAnn O’Meara University of Maryland, College Park, USA Jeffrey Sun University of Louisville, Louisville, USA Kelly Wickersham Wisconsin Center for Education Research, Madison, USA

xvii

Contributors

Jennifer M. Blaney Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA Liza A. Bolitzer Kean University, Union, NJ, USA Milagros Castillo-Montoya University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA Felecia Commodore Darden College of Education & Professional Studies, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA Antonio Duran Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA Linda Eisenmann Department of Education, Wheaton College, Norton, MA, USA David F. Feldon Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA Frank Fernandez School of Human Development and Organizational Studies in Education, University of Florida College of Education, Gainesville, FL, USA Zak Foste University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Catherine Hartman National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA Adrian H. Huerta Pullias Center for Higher Education at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Neal H. Hutchens Department of Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation, University of Kentucky College of Education, Lexington, KY, USA Edgar F. Lopez Pullias Center for Higher Education at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Demetri L. Morgan School of Education, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Miranda Y. Munoz Cuyamaca College English Department, El Cajon, CA, USA Samuel D. Museus University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA xix

xx

Contributors

Raquel M. Rall School of Education, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA, USA Maritza E. Salazar Pullias Center for Higher Education at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Patricia Somers The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA Sylk Sotto-Santiago Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA Kelly Soucy The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA Z. W. Taylor University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, USA Tenisha L. Tevis Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA John R. Thelin History of Higher Education & Public Policy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA Gabriela Torres Pullias Center for Higher Education at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Melvin Whitehead Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, USA Annie M. Wofford Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA Desiree D. Zerquera University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA

1

Academic Procession: Bringing the History of Higher Education to Life John R. Thelin

Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brief Biography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England to California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . High School and College Prep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . From Comic Books to Campus View Books: College Admissions and Images . . . . . . . . . . . . College Years at Brown University, 1965 to 1969 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Going to Graduate School: University of California, Berkeley, 1969 to 1974 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . From Berkeley to the Blue Grass: Professor at the University of Kentucky, 1974–1977 . . . From Kentucky to California: Gaining Experience in Administration and Public Policy . . . The College of William and Mary: Professor, 1981–1993 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . From Indiana University to the University of Kentucky, 1996 to 2022 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Going Around in Academic Circles: Research and Development, 1970–2022 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Historical Base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Writing the Big Book: A History of American Higher Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “Cliometrics” and the Colleges: Historical Statistics and Higher Education Research . . . . . The Continuing Interest in the Study of Intercollegiate Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Higher Education and the Public Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Summary and Conclusion: Coming of Age in Higher Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Synergy of Teaching, Research, and Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2 3 3 4 4 6 8 10 10 11 12 14 14 14 16 17 18 18 19 20

Abstract

John R. Thelin’s essay, Academic Procession presents a biography of his experiences as a historian who studies higher education. The thread that runs through this account is his commitment to bringing the history of colleges and universities to life. His aim has been to connect past and present in exploring significant issues about higher education. For each era, he focuses on questions of access and J. R. Thelin (*) History of Higher Education & Public Policy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA e-mail: [email protected] © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2023 L. W. Perna (ed.), Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research, Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research 38, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-06696-2_1

1

2

J. R. Thelin

exclusion, uses of campus architecture as monuments and memorials, historical statistics on institutional budgets, public policies and higher education, college sports, student life and issues of race, gender, religion and diversity. His story goes back to 1960 and covers crucial events facing colleges and universities. He gives great attention to students and the changing experience of “going to college” as part of American life. It also includes an account of how research about higher education developed into a significant academic topic. The academic procession in which he has participated has taken place during an exciting, important era in American higher education. Keywords

History of Higher Education · Higher Education · Higher Education and Public Policy · Colleges and Universities · American social history · American popular culture

Introduction In 1908 Edwin Slosson, Editor of The Independent monthly magazine, concluded his nationwide tour of universities with a visit to the University of Pennsylvania where he exclaimed, “No other university, so far as I have found, has such a complete and convenient collection of materials for the present and future study of the institution.” He praised the archivist for saving copies of student publications, literary magazines, memoirs, posters, photographs, and artifacts of campus activities because he felt that files of catalogs, budget reports, and official records would not “satisfy the needs for future historians and biographers. They must have something more if they are to make theses dry bones live” (Slosson, 1910). Slosson’s claim inspired me. I first read his anthology in 1970 when I was a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley. More than a half century later, his commentary still kindles my passion and commitment. I hope my writing will enthuse readers by animating the history of higher education to “make these dry bones live.” So, to connect the past and present of colleges and universities, I wish to tell the story of how my own experiences and explorations have helped me try to fulfill Slosson’s writing invitation. As an undergraduate at Brown University from 1965 to 1969, I concentrated on European history, with courses in American history and sociology, and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. While reading works that cut across various centuries, nations, and events, I frequently wondered how social, economic, and political trends meshed with colleges and universities. Later, when I entered graduate school at the University of California, Berkeley in fall 1969, I refined that emphasis. Berkeley was a good place to meet, listen to and work with some of the outstanding historians, economists, and sociologists who happened to be studying higher education. I was introduced to them by my adviser, Geraldine Joncich Clifford, who was herself a superb historian of education. I owe a special debt to Harvard sociologists David Riesman and Christopher Jencks for their provocative

1

Academic Procession: Bringing the History of Higher Education to Life

3

1968 work, The Academic Revolution (Jencks & Riesman, 1968). Historian Frederick Rudolph of Williams College also was influential with his classic work, The American College and University: A History (Rudolph, 1962). He later became a mentor and colleague. One characteristic of my approach to the history of higher education was that I persisted in asking questions about how popular culture fit into the story. This included my concerns about the lack of serious attention scholars had given to college sports in shaping American higher education. My faculty advisers shrugged their shoulders, suggesting they did not know a lot nor had much to say about the topic. But they encouraged me to pursue it in my own original research. Since I had been serious about college sports as a varsity wrestler and long-distance runner, this topic percolated – and has been integral to my teaching and scholarship ever since. This preview glosses over the details of my story. In telling about the evolution of my research and scholarship, I will first provide some biographical background as part of the Academic Procession. My subsequent section will deal with research issues and situations that have been recurrent in my writing for more than a half century, cutting across any one of the chronological categories I outline in the biographical narrative.

Brief Biography New England to California I was born just outside Boston, at Newton-Wellesley Hospital. Our family moved from East Coast to West Coast, back and forth several times, because my father was an aerospace engineer who gravitated to new major projects every few years. One memorable move was to Amherst, Massachusetts from 1951 through 1955 where I was able to explore a New England college town. I was the youngest of five siblings, all of whom went to college. Eventually, we settled in Southern California where I went to school from third grade through high school in Whittier. The public schools were great and I thrived in the energy and optimism of Southern California. Los Angeles was an exciting place that was booming and confident. Illustrative of the civic pride was the transformation of The Los Angeles Times from a nondescript daily newspaper into an outstanding model of journalism that included new talents such as Tom Wolfe, sportswriter Jim Murray, columnist Joan Didion, and numerous editors and writers who gained a national following. The newspaper’s coverage of sports for high school, college, and professional teams added to the sense of community energy. Olympic sports, such as swimming, water polo, track and field as well as football, basketball, and baseball attracted participants and spectators. Nowhere did California’s combination of optimism and abundance shine more than in the statewide plans for higher education. The construction of new campuses combined with a policy of zero tuition for state residents placed the state at the forefront of national planning in the 1960s.The state’s commitment spread throughout public elementary and secondary education as well. I recall reading the October l7, 1960 issue of Time magazine whose cover story showcased Clark Kerr, President of the University of California, as American higher education’s “Master Planner.” I

4

J. R. Thelin

filed my copy of the magazine away as I thought this had lasting significance beyond an immediate current event. A decade later, after graduating from college, I retrieved the 1960 Time magazine issue for my own historical research projects about the transformation of American higher education. By chance, this history came to life as I later met and talked with Clark Kerr who earlier had been featured on the 1960 magazine cover. To me, the Time magazine cover stories shaped my role as a researcher whose aim now was to use those media articles as primary sources in writing history in our own time and about our own place.

High School and College Prep Going to college first meant getting ready for college. When I started high school in September 1961 I listened to the advice from my parents, teachers, and from my older brothers and sister that now was the time for me to focus on studies and sports. I did so enthusiastically. I attended Sierra High School, a large, new suburban high school where I was part of a small “college prep” cohort that had excellent teachers and an innovative course of studies. The five “solid” courses I took each semester required continual attention to new fields and topics, including advanced biology, chemistry, physics, four years of French, and four years of math. I figured out that the key to doing well in high school was to keep up with daily homework, assignments, quizzes, and weekly tests in all five courses. It was a different tempo than the term papers and final exams of college that lay ahead. Sports, the second half of the studies and sports combination, were also serious and central. Wrestling, along with track and cross-country, were my interests. Varsity sports in Southern California were excellent as local teams and athletes often won state and national championships. In my senior year, I was captain of the wrestling team, won most of my matches, and qualified for the California Interscholastic Federation tournament. These shaped my decision to be a college wrestler when I considered where to apply for college. In addition to studies and sports, I was involved in student government. I was elected president of our junior class in Fall 1963 and Student Body President for my senior year, 1964–1965. I liked the varied activities among the numerous student groups, leading me to help organize and sponsor school events that recognized their interests. The student body was diverse in terms of social class, and friendships were strong. In serving as student body president, I learned to listen to and then call on fellow students for help.

From Comic Books to Campus View Books: College Admissions and Images I was a serious student who continued to love reading outside books assigned for academic classes. Comic books, movies, television, advertising, and commercial art

1

Academic Procession: Bringing the History of Higher Education to Life

5

persisted as my interests. Their graphics and storylines and energy enticed me at age 17 – just as they had done at age 7. Growing up in Los Angeles was a fertile place for reading, watching, and listening to a vibrant American popular culture. Movies, rock n’ roll, radio stations, spectator sports, pulp fiction, paperback novels, and commercial architecture became my enduring interests. Watching college sports at several different campuses increased my fascination with connections between colleges and the broader American culture. Eventually, the media coverage of popular culture made sense to me as central to as dramatic changes in American social history. In 1964 I was browsing paperback books at our local uptown bookstore. And then I unexpectedly came across historian Daniel J. Boorstin’s new book, The Image: A Guide to Pseudo Events in America (Boorstin, 1964). This was the book that helped me reconcile contemporary life with the historical record. Boorstin, a Pulitzer Prize–winning historian who was a professor at the University of Chicago, gave legitimacy to what he called the “graphics revolution” of advertising, commercial art, public relations, posters, pulp fiction, and movies. He argued these had transformed American life. I found him