The History of Pennsylvania in North America [2]


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:

I'M^

Hiilory o f Peiinfylv ania^

NORTH AMERICA,

t^-

F R

j^,

Ori^al

O M

T H

E

and Settlem^^jtof that Province, under PEN N, Proprietor And Governor in i68i, till atV^^ the Year 1742;

Inflltution

the fir ft

WILLIAM

WITH AN

INTRODUCTION, R E

The

Ijfe «vas real occafion, in fome cafes, to complain of ^^|;^"'6'^-' grk"vaiicc«, which demanded proper attention ajid relief; h\xx.ih^vtordi grievance, was become common, and fo often ufed, that its proper application fccms not always to have been fufficiently attended to ; for it is certain, that by too much indulging a difpofition and habit of complaint, it has fometimes remarkably aflcfted the imaginations of men, and magnified, in appearance, what and there have been in%vas but fmall, in reality ap;ainll

"^'^Jj^'^Jj!'''

;

has lb far prevailed as to induce the mind entirely to miftake one thing for another, and to create a firm belief of the abfolute exiftflances,

wherein

it

cnce of what, in truth, had no being.

There are but few things, for which an apology not be made, and plaufiblc rcafons given ; * and it may reafonably be alledged that the views and intentions of fome of thefe AlTemblies, in thus' carrying their difagreemcnt with the Executive, in fome cafes, to fuch extreme, were good ; and confequently miftake, or excels, in their confor it is nor du(i\, might be the more excufable to be denied that fome good efiA:;£ls to the province, ]3e ill reality, rcfultcd from thefe proceedings.

may

'



:

'

Vo:,.II.

[3]

that

Apology for vhc^ ai*.

^2^J^.

8

;;

The History

1

of P£nnsylvanIx\.

1709. that as it may, it ought Hkewife to be remembered, 'TiT^T^ ^hat no wrono- aftion can juflify the intention nor can any profitable conleqiience alter the nature not to be °^' ?^ unwarrantable dehgn ; and however lauda- V| ^"'!'''jf'" ""'^' ^1^5 or juft, the general views of fbme of thele I Alfemblieii may be ailed ged to have been, who :| carried affairs to fuch extremity, yet it fufficienrly i'|

27

appears, that under the allegation oi grievances^

fome of them too much gratified their animofity; and that, in part of thefe controverfies, at leaft,.

:^^

'I

I

they cannot, in every thing, be fully juflified, notwiihlhuiding certain good confequences may from them have arifen to the province ; which is no certain proof that they might not have been the caufe, or means, of preventing greater advan- % tages from ariilng to it, befides too much endan-j| gering thofe, which they already enjoyed. ^ -.s

.,1

'

They

But wliatevcr were

did

not lufTuid"i the tea-

dency of inch dilputes, &c.

I'j.at.ua.

feem not

their

real

motives,

they

have duly confidered the end, to which ^he uaturc of fuch continued difcontents might finally tend, and the confequcnce of renderiup; ^ r n'^^^ government niore unealy and diJagreeable to the IVoprietary, than was really and abiblutely necellary for the difpofal of it to the crown, to which, as before hinted, he had fuch Rrong and various inducements, at a time, when meafures were in agitation lor reducing all the Proprietary governments to regal ones, would foon have freed him from all his dillicultiea, refpeding the government of the province!^"iind would have effeclually enabled him to difcharge all his debts and incumbrance?, princi]xUiy occafioned on its account from which, fo far as appears, he had too much reai'on to complain, as he did, of his fmall, inadbefides the naequate and difcouraging returns ture of thefe difagreements, and continued endeavours \.o diminith his power and intereft in it, as appeared in the propofcd bill of courts, and the attempts oF the Aifembly to turn his quit-rents ,

to

-'

1

1

1

:

;

to

The History

6p Pennsylvania."

19

of his Deputy,* were further and' great inducements for him to endeavour to dimimore \nl\} his dilhculty and trouble on its account cf|>cdally when it was in his power, in fuch an cafy aikl eifedual manner, to accomphfli it ; to

to' the fupport

;

aha appears, by his private letters, yet own hand writing, he was fometimes lb much dlfpofed, that had he not fludied what he was pcrfuaded was the particular intereft: and real good of the province, before his own precarious gain, and prefent quiet, he would, before for it this time, have put the fame in execution wa.s niofl probable, and he appears to have been which

it

extant in his

:

fully

of opinion,

tliat

the inlrabilants of the pro..

vinre could not have been advantaged, or beticrrd, by fuch a change of government, in thofe time?, but the

underRood

contrary

their

'

;

prefent

provided they rightly

and knew

privileges,

how •

The AiTtmbly,

in their adJref;. to

Governor

Ev.ir.i,

in 6

mo. 1708,

Wc

" know, th.it when the province was granted to the Proprietary, hehifl fKtwer, at his pled"virc to convey any part, or parts thereof; and to nunofM, ttfiX and to ri;f^rvc hkIi rents, culloni;; and I'crviccs, as he fltmtKt think ik

;

in

nuts,

Rtid reXi-rvf J

purfuancc •vvhertcf, he fuM in a

luflicit-nt,

Anil ifurwardi,

Aic (p»rt ••

Vi'hcrf

wc

Rrcut vuhiL-,

in their reply to the

li.n,

or

/jis

&.c.

Governor's anfwer to the ahoTe, &c.) tlicy again fay,

fee in tht nutci before,

the titravaganc c of



heciufc

It it,

rate

which

i.f

to a

l.'.iuls

moJciate way, to mahiiuin

Lunttr.iKt, anfv.cniblc to thuir llatjon,"

fuid, 'I'Jiai

way, to maintjin

We fee

the

what wa mentioned on

this

the rents refcrved are fullkitnt, in a

head

?

mode-

Proprietary cr lis Lieutenant, ailfwerahle to

ftill and what, if wc would l)e content to live upon liis and other profits and perquiCtcj. of goycrnn\ent Ihould be employed for the conimon good, and pul)* ?" &C. Jic fcrvice of tiie government, it would not he without precedent •* V/c are not willing to fuppofe, when the Proprietary was favoured with the royal charter, and by virtue thereof allumed the governnunt of tliia province, and entitled hinifelf to royal mines, cfcheats, lines,

their ftitioB

add, 'ihat rciit»;

?

wc

no caufc

to d( ch'iic fayijig fo

:

defirc the Tioprietary

and that

fines,

forfeitures, efeheats,

and other profits (which, in their nature, are the rights of the crown, and, as fuch, ought to be employed for the coinmon gooil) that he intended to J,\:i lAmfelf, or lis Beauty, luith t!nfe JeiveL, and not hive direded dicni, and other fupjdiei, given for the lupport of government, to he emphtyeil for the good of the public, as revenues of that nature ou'l. to be, but vrc rather conclude, the cdntrary." forrcitiirti,

I

1709. '^-""^"^'^ vu.fo/iea.

The History

-^

^17^

Iioiv to

liberty

But

make a proper ufe of them ; for othcrwife and privilege become pernicious.* ;ibfolute,

beexpefted councils of

may

a

ok Pennsylvania.

in

or unlimited, perfeftion is not to' nature; and if the wifeft

human

men fometimes

err,

young Alfembly of

how much more

honeft, or well meaning, colonics be reafonably fuppofed liable to miftake their own real interefl, under the mod piauhble views of any, in thus contending for what they thought the riglits and privileges of the

people? who, in

a

legi/lative

capacity, had not maturity of judgment, and prudence of aftion, which length of time and experience alone can give ?

yet

arrived

at

that

After having prefented

Houie adjourned the hrft

made them ruroo.

and

tlieir

remonflrance, the

at their

next meeting, on day of the fourth month, the Governor ;

the following /peech, viz.

" The

Qiicen, for the good of her fubjefts of has fitted out an expedition, with for the retaldng of Ne-u,foundbnd, and for the conquefl of Canada, and has entrufled Colonel VeU-b with her Majefly's letters to the re-

^^^^ provinces, fpJch to ,1. Aflcn. great expcnle, ^'J-

Ipedive Governors, and infhuaions to agree on proper meafures, for putting her

Majelly's defif-ns execution. Bojlon, Rhode IJIand and Conncaicut have outdone her Majefty's expeftations and I ; hope we ihall not be wanting in our duty.

m

" The quota for this province is one hundred and men, befides ofhcers, to be vidualled and

hlty

paid, as

thole

'

1"^' '"''

of

"T

the

other

'''"^

governments

; the charge,

Pr:-nc,Te«, or

means of render-

inJ'thTmf.lv: ing thcmklv« h.ppy -un.ler ''I""'" the Proprietmy, by a rrucl.m

n

.

vn

'..n

but. on

an.l pror-er

the contraiy, too great a mis-nfe of th,(c, dthtr by

only be .laj.py or '.aufical in.m

a

propu' ule

oi

tj^o^ii.

Tii2 HisToiiY OF Pennsylvania. charge,

I

fuppofe, will

amount

2:

about four

to

thoulancl pounds.

" Perhaps

'

may fecm

it

dirTicult to

that

raife

country \vhere mofl of the inliabiiants are obHged, by their principles, not to make life of arms ; but, if you will raife, for the fiipport of government, the fum demanded, I do not doubt getting the number of m.en, whofe pruidplcs allow the ufe of tliem, and Commiffjoncrs may be appointed for difpofal of the country's money; that the people may be fatisfied, that the money is applied to no other ufe, than

number of men,

tliis

"

in a

expedition.

umd recommend

you the prefcnt ciryou are not now/i^lfih alarmed; Newcq/Uc feems the only I fmd them place, proper to make any defence ready and willing to do any thing, in their power, for tne good of the country, and look on themand felves as a frontier to you, though a weak one if they perifli, in all probability, your dedrutlioii I

to

cumftar.ces of the three lower counties

;

;

;

%vill

is

not be

your

I'ar

off; therefore, in

interell,

tilings ncceffary to

"

my

opinion,

that they be furnilhed with

it

all

oppofe the enemy.

have only to add, that, as all private affairs ought to be poflponed to her Majefly's immediate fervice, fo it will not confift with my duty to hearken to any propofds, or enter into any bufmefs whh you, till her Majefly's commands be complied with and, therefore, defire you will I

;

give this affair

all pofllble

difpatch."

CHAPTER

1709. ^

22

C

)

CHAPTER

XIX.

Obfcrvaiions en the nature of the Governor's requifitlon

and

;

the defign of fettling Fennfylvania by

who are principled

the S!S'akers ;

The Afjhnblfs conduct a prcfent

fed with

^

the S^ieen.

to

againfi

on the occafwn

and

their offer ;

who

;

— The Governor

war,

to

Spleen

;

to

divers

requcj}

bills.

— — They

they adjourn.

augment the fan.,

and

vote

not fitis-

ceedings of the next meeting of Affanbly.

agree



voted before

Pro-

to

the

the Governor'* s concurrence

— Further

difpute between the Go-

vernor and Afjembly ; with reafons of theformerfor not agreeing

movjlrate

with

to

with the

the Secretary.,

between

the

fames Logan,

Governor,

and

confifing principally of the fame

proceedings againjl

them.

— They are

the



Proceedings

next Jffembly^

Members.

James Logan.

— His

— Their

— The

Secretary goes

to

% 'i

En* % '

gland, b'r.

lyoQ.

.

petition to

difappointed in their defign againfi

him by the Governor.

s^-^,-^^^

%

upon which they re| the Governor^ and are jnuch difpleafed {^ latter ;

-A-T cannot be fuppofcd, but that the nnture of mult have crtated a dilliculty with

this requifilion

people, who, by their rchgious perfuafion, were not permitted to bear arms, nor to be aclively, or immediately, concerned in promoting military ifairs ; and iucli, at this time, were the inhabitants of the province, in gcuerah It may Hkewiic a

be

The History be here obfervcci, that

of Pe NNSYLVANIA. it

23

does not appear reafona

709. of the ^loikers againfl war, '"-^-v-^^ ^^' confcquences arifmg from it, when duly confulcrcd, fhould be an objection, fo pi^r^ainS very

why

ble

and

this principle

,

tijc

evil

'^"'•'-'

feme perfons make it, a"-ainft any or^defcription, of people, in £^ general community, whofe profitable inJuftry, andbeneficent condud, in all other refpeds, render them ^f much the greater utility, and real benefit to im public and common good, even, in this, and every other department ; and that more material, as

"''"'""'

claf.

LtTf

^**

'''^y •'•-

^r

^"""' ^'"

h

m

efpecially

more improved, or refined ages of the world, fmce war is become more a trade, or Umlv of a certain clafs of men only, and more rdlridcd to, and managed by, a part of the gef^t^jj community, appropriated to that purpole, ito tt j!i"i.« formerly, in the more barbarous flate of mank'nd, Nvhen evety one went to war, capathefc latter,

ble of hearing arms, while

now

it

is

experienced

Utai llie far greater part of the people, in all the moft avdi^^ed flatcs, are better, or more prcfera-

biy cinployed, in promoting and procuring the hipport of the whole community,

ncccfhirjr

at

urge: 11 would be a very great impropriety, to blame any one member of the human body, which IS confined, or appointed to one



"

particular olhcc, jor not performing that of another ; for which K li neither qualilial, nor intended, by the Author ot human nature the body poliiic conU\U o{ many parts, or members, as well as the HHUan ; and their offices, in a well regulated are as various : wifdom is no 1 ate, lefs requifite Thicy arc Jliau Itrength ; and the arts of peace, with the "^^ re confiltcMt with labours of the induarious colonift, are, at lead, I'llan.y. :

asnecdfary

make

as tiiole

of war; which would foon

'''- '•-

"""'^•''' but a very forry figure, in any nation, without thole means, which are the eiXttl^ of the forJner. Can any thinking and reflefting mind lo

be unacquainted with the excellency of thofe quahties.

The

24 1709. '

'^

ties,

which

IIis'i'orv of

Pennsylvania.

didinguifli the rational

from the

creation, as not to be fenfible, that

tioiial

irra--

it

is

by wiiUom, or good pohcy, to prevent war^ than by force of arms, and the art mihtary to fupport, or only to fufpend it ? lor it is impofli. ble, that the application of a thing, by which, in reality, that hime thing folely exills, and is kept alive, f]:ould put an end to it," or entirely take better

away its exiftence. War is certainly the greateft puniflmient in the world, that the Almighty hath alligned for the wickcdnefs of the humaji race; and

it

is

interefl,

mankind from their true good alone, which makes it necef-

the departure of

and

real

fary

confequently, as a principle of thinking and ; afting gains ground, or increafes, in the world,

'

which approaches nearefl to the Ilandard of truth, and takes away the caufe of punifhment, in the fame proportion, mufl the neccllity and praQicc of this evil decreafe in Ai.fui'dob-

STthe (^ukcrsof i^.nnfyiva-

But, of

it.

people thofe appear to have the leafl re^^''^n to i^^^^e this objedion a fubjeft of complant againfl the ShuiLn- of FciDifyhania, who, i^^owing thclr^ principle, in this ref])ea:, neverall

tlielcfs, in preference to all the rell of the colonies, and, even, to all the reft of the world, which were before them, equally free for their choice, haye renioved from various dillant parts, and

am.ong them; yet many fuch have been in this province But, which is flill more remarkable, that people profeifedly of a different

fettled

known

.

!

way of

tinnking,

greater

nun\bers, and

in

this

particular, ihould, in

much more

abundantly,

flock into Pcnnjyl'vanla^

from abroad, than into any other of the colonies befides and yet this has been the real cafe here, both in later years, and ;

alio

in

the

more

early times

of the province:

which certainly fhewed a very dilHnguifliing preference, which, in reality, was thereby given to the S'^akjfs a:id their principles, iiotv.'ithffanding the

^

-

'

The History

of

Phnnsylvania.

the high abfiirdily, which any of thofe people, choice,

who have thus made Pennfyivama their may fjricc have exhibited, by declaiming on

againft

cannot be reafonably fuppofcd they were ignorant that this country, and the government of it, could not polfibiy have been granted, at firft, to the ^lakers, on account of ihoT Ji^htin^ principles, or that they lliould clcfind U with arms, by any who properly knew ihcm, notwithllanding they were empowered, or ihcin

I

His

account

crilnidcd, fo to do,

contmry,

if

lor

Icf^i

and

real happinefs '

neceffary

K,

*

it

they chofe

for thofe other

not

mg

:

it

;

on the

but,

qualilications,

at leall,

and

beneiicial, for the fupport of any country, of which the ^ '. ,

,,

,,

govern nu-nt, at ihat time, were fully Sluaken were poileired ; becaufe, in a imkin^ where fufficlent numbers of fighting men arc not wanting, on occafion, and may, at any lime, be liad for money, to defend all parts of its dominions, and where no man, by the laws, is compelled to fight, who pays his equivalent to the fupport of the government, there would be no abfolute necefTity, neicher was it intended, in the grant of the province, and of the powers of governing it, under the crown, to take thefe peaceable people from that proper attention, which was due to i!ie department, in which they were placed, :i!iil

fcnfiblc the

for the general

si^oo^, in their civil

that account, to opprefs any

capacity

;

nor,

on

one part of the com-

munity, for the fake of the

other's

advantage,

unequally.

This appears to have been the principal end and defign of the Britijh government, at (irft, refpetSljng

this province, notwithllanding thofe demands of a imHtary nature, which, either from a miilakcn notion of thereby more eifectually fervinc^ the utility, or from other views, different from the real nature and original delign of the firfl fet-

public

and conllitution of Pcnnfylvanla, Vol. r. [4]

tlen^-nt

^

have fujce

intention of '''''>'""^

andpovcrn-

mcnt of i''-""fyiva"''''

The History

i6

1709. fmce been \^'^r^^ the

Pennsylvania.

op

made from

it

not fufilciently advertlnn-

;

natural, advantageous,

to

and more excellent

confequences, which abfolutely, and of necellity muft always ultimately arife from the principle, pradice, induflry, and virtue of fuch a people, to the general community, in proportion to the Number

of

fmall

number of

thofe,

as the

^iikcrs do

;

v^rilkdy"" ^^'^^1^7' to Lc very

-mit, ^c.

paft,

i^'

^^''^

a

"'^^y

who

hold

this principle,

number, which,

j^i^^ge

ot"

in all prothe future by the

from the nature and effect of fuch a princi}-^gj^| i^y them, whether viev^'ed in a favour-

^g

pi^.^

able,

or unfavourable light,

will

never be very

h-irge.*

The Affembly having confidered the Governor's Members confulted a number of their principal conftituents, and Members fpeech, divers of the

of Council, being J^/akcrs, on the occafion ;t which the Iloufe mentioned, in their addrefs, or anlwer to the Governor in which they declared, *' I'hat were it not, that the raifmg of money to hire men to fight (or kill one another) was matter of confcience to them, and againft their ;

religious principles, they fliould not be wanting,

according to their

dehgns."

They

abilities, to contribute to thofe exprelfed their regard and loyal-

the Queen, and their prayer for the long continuance of her reign, and concluded, " That, though they could not, for confcience fake ^ comply with the furniihing a fupply for fuch a defence, as ty to

the Confident with th; intrir^ an.l jirincipl!: cf this favour, or inJuIgence to thi; ^akt-n of Peiii.fyl:h„iiii, in ^reat nieufurc, and with the ianic deiign, was that afterwards granted by the Britijh government to ilie Ivloiiivin/is ; who have fmce removed into, and fettled in the prov'nce, &c. By the Hat. 32. Geo. 2, C. 2i^- encouragement is given to *

the Monivi.Tis, to fettle in the plantations in Am.iica, by allowing then\ foUmn afnrnw.tlun in lieu of an or.th, and difpenfing with llieir

to take x

not being concerned in

miiit.iry

itj/'.iirs,

on payment of

a rule afllUld.

I The J.Iembers of Council, confulted on this occafion, being all i(^/^,,iA/M, and of the ])rin:ipal m'.n ni the province, were, Edward ^hlppeu, Kaniutl Carpenter, Joleph Orowdoii, Caleb I'ully, iiainuei Prelloii, Jl,..u

Norri^, and J.mie»

i.o^^^ni,

.^'.c.

The History

of Pennsylvania.

27

the Governor propofed, yet, in point of gratitude to tiic C)uct:n, for her great and many favours to tlicy !iad

tlicin,

refolved to raife a prefent of

/fi'^f i^iy vote a

"' the Queen,

hundred pounds;* kc. » f ]]y this

mode of

1709.

ii^AfW ^^^"^

bufinefs they appear to

have

j,^^ ^^^^

m^idc, or intended, a diRinttion between grant- ncmi

ing fuppHes for the fupj3ort of government, in raicral, or, for its mixt purpofes and ufes collec-

*'"^

^°J^J'^

ment.

and that of contributing for the mihtary

rircly,

alone

fup-

;

bcfidei their not being anfwerable for the Being

»apph*ci4tiou

particularly, or for

duty of the

the

executive part of the government whereby it be fuppofcd, tlicy thought they acled confcicntu)Ul1y, according to their religious principles, :

not

f,'ft,^^r^^^^^^^

piicaiionie:ikcr might

me,

to

when (o

j

for railing that

mo-

the others were palled, but, can

it,

in realbn,

bo

expelled, that, wliile you (hew fo unprecedented a.nd unufual dinidencc, on your fide, that you -SkmiH not fo much as let mc fee the bill, but in JiriiV4Jc» HOT al!o\r, that it Ihould, upon any terms,

TheAiTcra-

comiauMicaf ed to the Council, with whom I am biy aiiow J© t«KjlV% (ihough you cannot but be fenfible j that, JJHJ [^"^^ JliOuM i dcfign it^ yet it is not in my power to communimfs a bill into a law, until the Speaker has lign- "^'''^^Vi'*' Council, &c » % t r II r rr ed It) which is ulually done at the time of palling Could it be expeded, I fay, that I ihould it. pafK all that you dcfired of me, and then depend on your prcfenting that bill ? Or, can it be thought rcafonable, or, for the fecurity of the {mblic^ that 1 /hould pals an aft, for railing and atpptving ehht hundred pounds^ for feveral ufes, bcltuOt tholc two hundred pounds, laid to be granted to me, v-athout taking proper advice upon it, of rhofe, whom the difcharge of my duty, as

ib^

t



Well as

.

my

.



1

1

inclinations, obliges

me

to confult, in

have it in my any part of the wliole bill, after it is ? No^ gentlemen, as 1 have no defigns, but what are pkin and honcfl, fo I mult expect a fuitable treatment; and, therefore, I now defire you faithfully to lay before the people, whom you reprefent, and to v/hom you are returning, what I have here faid to you ; alt

public matters

j>owcr to objett

Vol.

11

;

nor that

to,

I lliould

or alter, prefented

[5]

'and.

The History

The Governor refufc, fur-

of Pennsylvania.

and, upon this occafion, affure them from me, that unlefs they take care to grant a requifite fupport, and in fuch a manner, as is tit to be accepted, I

not

all think myfelf concerned to attend of the public, in legiilation and what meafures the Proprietary will find himfelf obliged to take at home, I have formerly fulhciently hinted to you but as I flrall not be wanting, on my fide, to concur in any thing, that is reafonable, fo I hope, the next time I meet the reprefentatives of the people, we ihall have fuch confidence in each other, and they will fo far confider their duty, and take fuch methods, for effefting bufinefs, that all things necelfary may be concluded to our mutual fatisfaftion, for the true advantage and benefit of this province."

at

mikfrhe^s ^^^^ artairs fupported, ^'^'

;

;

^y

The Govcrnor reiiramcJ line any

^^'^^

Affcmbly cution,

plain declaration of the cafily perceived,

Governor, the

to their great mortifi-

by reafon of the Proprietary's

that,

ftrudions, the Governor could not pais any

without

^vithout the advice, or approbation of his

the

Couu-

cil

cii,

c^.c.

i)i!i

which,

;

how

reafonable foevcr

it

inbill,

Coun-

might ap-

was deemed to have no foundation by which the whole power of legiilation was underllood to be veiled in the Governor, and the reprefentatives of the people. This the Iloufe oblcrved in their remondrance to the Governor, the next day, declaring, that had they known he was fo rellrided, they would neither have given hin:i, nor thcmfelves, fo much trouble, as they had done they likewife complained of fome other m.atii rs, tlmt were not rcdrefpear, in

in

itfelf,

the royal charter

;

:

,j.^^.^

sivateft re-

•u-mdi"'

jiimcsLogan, &c.

but their greateli refcntment appears, in this remoullrance, to be againit the Secretary, 'James i-Qg^^^ ; :igainll whom is exhibited, in a very angry manner, a long complaint ; reprefenting him and, a^g ^ii^ grand obfiacle of their proceedings ; that, though they had endeavoured to reduce him' within proper bounds, yet, by reafon of his great fed

:

inlluencc

— 18£9544 The History

of Pennsylvania.

3j

Governor and Proprietary, he

influence with the

was now advanced above

power, obftnufled their public tranfaftions, that did not pleafe a.!l lum, ircdied the Members of the Houfe with infuk and abufc, and, in elFcd, was the chief caufe of tUdr grievances and calamities. their

1709. '

^'"'^

In OOobcr next following, the fame Members of The old A^Ewitblv were moflly re-elected, and David Lloyd ^n^^mbiy

»^^n chofen Speaker: to whom the Governor, "£/'" rpccch, on the 17th, after having mentioned

m hii

diwr«

otlier afiairs, before the

unfiniftictJ,

and further

former AiTembly,

prefled their

making due

prottfion for the fupixjrt of the lieutenancy of the j!^»crnrr.cnr, a duty, which, he faid, was fo in-

without it, no governa being; he thus exprefled him-

CUiRibct^i uji>t>n them', that

aWcol

ccmU

b^

** Gentlemen, you are met for no other end, Part of the iban to fcrvc the country, whom you reprefent ; (Governor'!, I hope, therefore, you will fludy all pofTible 1"^ aiIImeans, that may contribute to the real happinefs i^'yf'f that which, I believe, you will find, may be :

much promoted by improving u good

underilanding !)ctwcen you and me, in our reipeftive fla. t«on*.

" I vould not willingly look back upon fome of the proceedings of the laff Ploufc, only from ihcncc I mull give you a ncceflary caution, to dwell lefs, than has been done, on that general language of evil led ; but, with

me,

that of grievances

or counfellors, generally to ftrike at the coiinfcU believe, without occafion ; or,

counfcl^

ufed, as an artful

method, I

and oppre/JJons, words, by God's blefling, underftood by few, (I find) in this province, who form them not in their own imaginations ; for I allure you, gentlemen, if we are not as happy as the circumftances of the place will admit, it lies much in your power to make us fo ;

The History

^6 J

709.

V'""^''"**^

or Pennsylvania,'

of which I hope'yoii will confider, and ufe your endeavours accordingly, with a full refolution to remove whatever may Hand in the way.

" back

have already

I

that

faid,

I

would not looH Houfe but

to the proceedings of the lail

the Secretary has found himfelf fo

;

much

aggriev-

ed by their remonflrance, that he has prelented, my perufal, a long defence in which I fliall not think, myfelf any further concerned, than to obferve to you, that, to my fiirprife, he has charged the Speaker of that Houfe with fomq proceedings, which, if true, will require your confideration, and fome. further meafurcs to be taken upon them ; for which reafon, I have ordered him to lay a copy of them before you and I mull fay, if that reprefentation be well grounded, I cannot fee that, under this govern-

for

;

;

ment, fuch a perlbn can be accounted flation

into

it,

but, at prefcnt,

;

only

diligence,

your

in

whatever

may concern

and honor of

for that

to you, to proceed with

is

incumbent on you,

this

Govemor,

in

matr

the welfare of the public,

government,

as

now eflablilhed.''

This the Aflembly anfwered the next day

^^^ ^'n^^nUe^ ^^^^S they alfo tht^nc.xt '^='>':

recommend

fit

no further enquire

flaticns, as wpll in this, as in all other

ters, that

Thf Af-

I fball

that,

among

;

teU

other things,

had under confideration the making pro-.. his fupport and, after having mads fome angry reflecUons againit the Secretary, whom

vifion

for

;

they confidered, in great meafure, as the caufe of the mifunderltanding between them and the Governor, they kk\ :- " But, may it pleafe the (^^^''^'riiorj we beg leave to obferve, that the duty incumbent on us, to contribute to this general fupport of the liemenancy, is grounded upon a



oSrlnAver.

condition precedent

;

fo that the people, accordT

\n^ to the fundamental rules of the K'^gHJh go-. vcrninent,

The History

of Pi'-nnsvlvania.

37

tcrnmcut, are not obliged to contribute to the fuppori

that adminillration, ^vhich affords

ot'

no rcdrcb, -when

their rights are violated, their

and their rcprefentative body and abulcd : hence It is, that that branch

liberties infringed,

afifronicd

authority feldom move to give thdr aggrievanccs are redreffed, aiid rquunUion made, lor the imiigmties they meet wtth fn>m the other branch of the fame authority. the

i>f

k-j;iflative

luppliat

"

till

Wc

end of our and we affure the Governor, there fliall be nothing wanting, on our partii^ to promote it, and inij^rove a good unildriiandJnf; be! ween him and us, in our refpedlive mficfiing

arc very fcnfiblc that the to ferve the country

\&

ilwk»K>: b;U

let jooi

;

the language of the repre-

about evil counfellors,-' be irkfo'me to the Governor j for wc /hall not anfwer the true end of oar rotcung, nor difcharge our duty and trufl to thofe, thai fcnt us, if we be fdent, and not infifl upIcsrirMfva jM" UiC .jxjoplc,

l^rin-ixmo

and

opprtJJioiUi

on

rcdrciling thole things, that are amifs, with a rdohition to ufe our endeavours to remove what appears to (land in the way. **

Wc

have, with

all

the application, this

fliort

lime could allow, informed ourfelves of the proCtrding"* of the late Aflemblies, and find no jufl:

grounds for the Governor to fuppofe that their of evil counfd or coimfdlors have been ufcd as methods to llrikc at him; but, we believe, it was their care, as we find it to be ours, that the Governor may not be impofed on, or prevailed with, to adhere to evil coiinfd, and ren-

coni]>lalnts

der his aclings inconfiftent.

We

" fuppofe it needlefs to be more exprefs, than the late Affembly h^ive been, to demonilrate what an enemy the Secretary has been to the welfare of this pi ovijicc \ and hovv abufive he has '

1709.

them ^"^^^^

been

-38

1

709.

V—

The History



>,

^w

of Pennsylvania.

been to the reprefentatives of the people ; fo that' ^yg ^^^ jJq j^q jgl^g ^}-,^j^ repeat the requeft of for. mer AflembHes, to have him removed fron\ the Governor's Council ; which we doubt not will beM a mod elieclual means to improve a good underHanding between thee and us.

"

Governor

If the

look back, and duly

will

confider the complaints and remonilrances of the late AiTemblies, it will appear, ih'dt grievances and

opprejjhm are words, which are formed upon complaints and for which the country wants

juft re-

;

drefs

;

fo

that head,

that is

what the Governor fuppofes, on

not candid towards the reprefentatives

of the people.

" May

it

i

pleafe the

Governor, whatever might-

be the occafion, or defign, of the

lafl

claufe,

in-

thy fpeech, we are of opinion, it was not well timed ; for if the Secretary's charge, againft our Speaker, had any weight, it fliould have been propounded as an objeftion againll the AfTembly's choice of him, for Speaker but, after thou hadll: declared thy approbation of their choice, that thou fliouldft be prevailed upon fo far to patronize the Secretary's infmuation againft the Speaker, as to make it a part of thy fpeech to us, before V e had feen, or heard, the charge, we can do no lefs than reftnt it, as an indignity offered to this Houfe ; for, though we are men, that cannot be much meaner in the Governor's eye, than we are in our own efteem, yet we muff put him in mind, that, fmce the royal charter commits this part of the legillative authority to our care, we ought to have the regard, due to our itations." ;

After in the

this the

Governor went to Newcajile the Aifembly adjourned.

mean time

;

and

On

meeting again, about the beginning of November, the Secretary, James Logan^ intending

their

for

;

T!iE History op Pennsylvania. (or Kn^^bnd, prefcnred to

them

39

a petition,* requeil-

ing that preparalion might be made for his trial, Upon the impeachment of a former Aifembly, in

ihc year

They,

1706.

therefore,

and took into confideration

cafe,

hw charge

upon

fell

tary petitt

^^'^

David

;

and

TU* yttklnn wu



«•

tik •

Ifottfc

Lloyd,

a* followi

of Rcprcfcntativcs of the province of Pamfylvauli;

|