Meinongian Issues in Contemporary Italian Philosophy 9783110333329, 9783110330083


187 77 1MB

English Pages 267 Year 2009

Report DMCA / Copyright

DOWNLOAD PDF FILE

Table of contents :
Relations in the early works of Meinong and Husserl
Frege contra Meinong: a new possible outlook
A Meinongian Solution of McTaggart’s Paradox
Meinongian Theory of Moral Judgments
Meinongs und Benussis Phänomenologie der Wahrnehmung
Der Begriff der Psychologie beim späten Weber
Meinongs Philosophie der Gefühle und ihr Einfluss auf die Grazer Schule
Defekte Gegenstände und andere Aspekte der Ontologie Meinongs
Recommend Papers

Meinongian Issues in Contemporary Italian Philosophy
 9783110333329, 9783110330083

  • 0 0 0
  • Like this paper and download? You can publish your own PDF file online for free in a few minutes! Sign Up
File loading please wait...
Citation preview

MEINONG STUDIES / MEINONG STUDIEN Volume 3

Edited by / herausgegeben von

Forschungsstelle und Dokumentationszentrum für österreichische Philosophie unter der Leitung von Alfred Schramm

Vol. 3 Editorial Board Liliana Albertazzi Mauro Antonelli Ermanno Bencivenga Johannes Brandl Arkadiusz Chrudzimski Evelyn Dölling Kit Fine Jaakko Hintikka Herbert Hochberg Dale Jacquette Wolfgang Künne Winfried Löffler Johann Christian Marek Kevin Mulligan Roberto Poli Matjaz Potrc Venanzio Raspa Maria Reicher Robin Rollinger Edmund Runggaldier Seppo Sajama Peter Simons Barry Smith Erwin Tegtmeier Editorial office Dr. Jutta Valent

Forschungsstelle und Dokumentationszentrum für österreichische Philosophie Alfred Schramm (Ed.)

Meinong Studies Meinong Studien Volume 3

Bibliographic information published by Deutsche Nationalbibliothek The Deutsche Nastionalbibliothek lists this publication in the Deutsche Nationalbibliographie; detailed bibliographic data is available in the Internet at http://dnb.ddb.de

North and South America by Transaction Books Rutgers University Piscataway, NJ 08854-8042 [email protected] United Kingdom, Ireland, Iceland, Turkey, Malta, Portugal by Gazelle Books Services Limited White Cross Mills Hightown LANCASTER, LA1 4XS [email protected]

Livraison pour la France et la Belgique: Librairie Philosophique J.Vrin 6, place de la Sorbonne ; F-75005 PARIS Tel. +33 (0)1 43 54 03 47 ; Fax +33 (0)1 43 54 48 18 www.vrin.fr

2009 ontos verlag P.O. Box 15 41, D-63133 Heusenstamm www.ontosverlag.com ISBN 13: 978-3-86838-043-9 2009 No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, microfilming, recording or otherwise without written permission from the Publisher, with the exception of any material supplied specifically for the purpose of being entered and executed on a computer system, for exclusive use of the purchaser of the work Printed on acid-free paper This hardcover binding meets the International Library standard Printed in Germany by buch bücher dd ag

Contents / Inhalt CARLO IERNA Relations in the early works of Meinong and Husserl

7

LAURA MARI Frege contra Meinong: a new possible outlook

37

VINCENZO FANO A Meinongian Solution of McTaggart’s Paradox

73

MATJAŽ POTRČ and VOJKO STRAHOVNIK Meinongian Theory of Moral Judgments

93

MAURO ANTONELLI, MARINA MANOTTA Meinongs und Benussis Phänomenologie der Wahrnehmung

123

TANJA PIHLAR Der Begriff der Psychologie beim späten Weber

175

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN Meinongs Philosophie der Gefühle und ihr Einfluss auf die Grazer Schule

199

ULF HÖFER Defekte Gegenstände und andere Aspekte der Ontologie Meinongs

241

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL Carlo Ierna

Summary Both Alexius Meinong and Edmund Husserl wrote about relations in their early works, in periods in which they were still influenced by Franz Brentano. However, besides the split between Brentano and Meinong, the latter also accused Husserl of plagiarism with respect to the theory of relations. Examining Meinong’s and Husserl’s early works and the Brentanist framework they were written in, we will try to assess their similarities and differences. As they shared other sources besides Brentano, we will consider very carefully whether we should speak at all of influence or plagiarism. Despite Meinong’s accusations it seems that both he and Husserl took over some elements from Brentano and, partially through him, from John Stuart Mill, who appears to be the most probable source on relations.

Alexius Meinong and Edmund Husserl probably are the two most renowned and influential pupils of Franz Brentano. Both also had a quite complex relationship with their teacher and chose novel and separate paths in philosophy.1 Nevertheless, as Husserl later remarks, they were very much like “zwei Reisende in einem und demselben dunklen Weltteil”2 both describing their findings in their own terminology. For Husserl, one of these “dark regions”, both difficult and untrodden, is the theory of relations.3 Relations were of fundamental importance in the School of 1 2 3

For a good overview see Rollinger (2005) and Rollinger (2004). Husserl (1984, p. 444). See also Rollinger (1999, pp. 207 f.). „dieses sehr dunkle Capitel der beschreibenden Psychologie”. Husserl (1891, pp. 70). Republished in Husserl (1970). English translation in Husserl (2003).

8

CARLO IERNA

Brentano both for the correct understanding of intentionality and for the theory of judgements, with respect to the admissibility of relational, i.e. irreducibly categorical, judgements.4 Both Meinong and Husserl wrote about this in their early works: Meinong in his Hume Studien II: Zur Relationstheorie5 and Husserl in his Habilitationsschrift Über den Begriff der Zahl.6 It is clear that Meinong exerted an influence on Husserl in this respect,7 despite the Brentanist “orthodoxy” of the young Husserl.8 When Brentano distanced himself from his former pupil Meinong, Husserl apparently followed suit. Therefore, when discussing this influence, we will have to address the complex relationship between Brentano, Meinong and Husserl, owing to various accusations of plagiarism. The rift between Brentano and Meinong was partially due to allegations that the latter had taken over material from the former’s lectures without reference. Meinong, in turn, accused Husserl quite explicitly of plagiarism in a letter and later Husserl resented Meinong for apparently taking over themes from his work.9 As Meinong and Husserl shared other sources besides Brentano, we will have to consider very carefully whether we should speak of influence, even plagiarism, or rather say that great minds think alike.

4 5

6 7

8

9

References are always to the original edition, henceforth quoted as PA. Consider Husserl’s observations in Ms. K I 32/18a: “Die Anerkennung oder Verwerfung eines Verhältnisses nennen wir ein kategorisches Urteil. Besser wäre danach der Name Verhältnissurteil.” On judgements, also see Ierna (2008). Meinong (1882). Republished in Meinong (1971). In Husserl’s library, conserved at the Husserl-Archives Leuven, Meinongs Hume Studien I and Hume Studien II are bound together in a single volume, with Signature BQ 309. Husserl (1887). Republished in Husserl (1970, pp. 289 f.). English translation in Husserl (2003). henceforth quoted as ÜBZ. For a comparison of Husserl’s and Meinong’s theories in other respects, see e.g. Rollinger (1993), Rollinger (1999, pp. 155-208), Schermann (1972) and Lindenfeld (1980, Ch. X). “Prior to 1894 Husserl was without a doubt a whole-hearted disciple of Brentano. [...] one cannot emphasize enough what a thoroughly orthodox Brentanist he was.” Rollinger (1999, p. 7). We will not treat this last point extensively. On this matter see e.g. Rollinger (1999, pp. 186 f.).

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL

9

1. Relations in the School of Brentano Like so many other topics and debates in the School of Brentano, also the theory of relations starts with Brentano’s account of intentionality in his Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkte: Jedes psychische Phänomen ist durch das charakterisirt, was die Scholastiker des Mittelalters die intentionale (auch wohl mentale) Inexistenz eines Gegenstandes genannt haben, und was wir, obwohl mit nicht ganz unzweideutigen Ausdrücken, die Beziehung auf einen Inhalt, die Richtung auf ein Objekt (worunter hier nicht eine Realität zu verstehen ist), oder die immanente Gegenständlichkeit nennen würden. Jedes enthält etwas als Objekt in sich, obwohl nicht jedes in gleicher Weise. In der Vorstellung ist etwas vorgestellt, in dem Urtheile ist etwas anerkannt oder verworfen, in der Liebe geleibt, in dem Hasse gehasst, in dem begehren begehrt u.s.w. Diese intentionale Inexistenz ist den psychischen Phänomenen ausschliesslich eigenthümlich. Kein physisches Phänomen zeigt etwas Aehnliches. Und somit können wir die psychischen Phänomene definiren, indem wir sagen, sie seien solche Phänomene, welche intentional einen Gegenstand in sich enthalten. 10 Intentionality and intentional inexistence turned out to be quite complex concepts that have brought about many misunderstandings and misinterpretations among Brentano’s students as well as among later scholars. Such a central concept as that of intentional inexistence was and is often subjected to very different interpretations. While some think that the ‘in-’ of ‘in-existence’ is to be read as locative, rather than negative, and hence that “an intended object [...] exists in or has “in-existence,” existing not externally but in the psychological state”11, others insist that “it does not signify existence, non-existence [...] or any peculiar kind of existence or

10 11

Brentano (1874, p. 115-116). Translated in Brentano (1995, p. 88-89). Henceforth quoted as PES. Jacquette (2004a, p. 102).

10

CARLO IERNA

reality”.12 This shows that this important topic is still in need of research, discussion and, perhaps most of all, publication of primary sources.13 Let us see then if we can clarify this further by appealing directly to Brentano’s lectures: Nemen wir die innere Wahrnehmung, sie zeigt uns z.B. Vorstellungen - das ist etwas Reales; Urteil, Liebe und Haß - alles real. Aber diese sind nicht ohne Korrelate: kein Vorstellen ohne Vorgestelltes, kein Urteilen ohne Geurteiltes. Ja, diese Korrelate sind dasjenige, was eigentlich direkt betrachtet wird bei der inneren Wahrnehmung, während das Vorstellen, Urteilen etc., also das Reale, indirekt betrachtet wird. Wenn wir die beiden Korrelate des Größeren und Kleineren, Vater und Sohn nehmen, so kann ich das eine nicht ohne das andere vorstellen. So geht es bei der inneren Wahrnehmung. Das Vorgestellte wird “in recto”, das Vorstellen “in obliquo” vorgestellt.14 The fundamental mental phenomenon for Brentano was the presentation (Vorstellung).15 Judgements and phenomena of love and hate all contain presentations in them and therefore depend on them. In a judgement I would have a presentation of an object or quality whose existence I would affirm or deny. In a presentation I am directly concerned with the presented, but only indirectly with the presenting activity. The primary phenomenon is the presented object as presented in internal perception, while the presenting activity is secondary. These are inextricably bound together: one cannot be thought without the other. Why is this relevant for

12 13

14

15

Margolis (2004, p. 138). Some steps in this direction have been taken in recent years by Arkadiusz Chrudzimski, by taking into account some fundamental, but hitherto unpublished, manuscripts. Consider e.g. Chrudzimski (2001); Chrudzimski (2002); Chrudzimski (2004). Ms. Y 2, pp. 104 f. This manuscript contains notes from the lectures “Die elementare Logik und die in ihr nötigen Reformen von Dr. Franz Brentano, Wien, Wintersemester 1884/85 Buch I.” Ms Y 3 is “Buch 2”. I would like to thank the director of the Husserl-Archives Leuven, Prof. Ullrich Melle, for the generously conceded permission to quote from these lecture notes and Husserl’s unpublished manuscripts. See also Brentano (1874, p. 104 & 126).

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL

11

the topic of relations? Well, “intentional in-existence”, the intentional reference or direction, is a relation,16 and, as we have seen, the most fundamental one. This comes especially to the fore when we compare Brentano’s passage in the PES with the slightly changed version he gave in his logic lectures, as reported by Chrudzimski: Was bezeichnen die Namen? Der Name bezeichnet [i] in gewisser Weise den Inhalt einer Vorstellung als solche[n], den immanenten Gegenstand; [ii] in gewisser Weise das, was durch Inhalt einer Vorstellung vorgestellt wird. Das Erste ist die Bedeutung des Namens. Das Zweite ist das, was der Name nennt. Von dem sagen wir, es komme der Name ihm zu. Es ist das, was, wenn es existiert, äußerer Gegenstand der Vorstellung ist. Man nennt unter Vermittlung der Bedeutung.17 Brentano here clarifies that the immanent object is the meaning, the external object that which is meant. The intentional relation to the external object is hence mediated by the immanent object. The immanent, intentional object is clearly defined as the content or meaning and is sharply separated from the external object, of which Brentano explicitly says that it may or may not exist.18 Other notes from Brentano’s lectures confirm this position: Alles, was wir so evident innerlich erfahren, zeigt eine Beziehung zu einem immanenten Objekt. Ich erfasse in mir ein Vorstellen; dies ist nicht ohne ein Vorgestelltes, das ist: ohne ein immanentes Objekt da, sei dies nun draußen vorhanden oder nicht.19

16 17 18 19

See also Chrudzimski (2005, p. 31), Chrudzimski (2001, pp. 20 f.), and Chrudzimski (2007, p. 10). Quoted from Chrudzimski (2002, p. 186). Chrudzimski refers to “Brentano EL 80, S. 34 f.” Twardowski will reformulate this thesis as “The content is presented in the act of presentation, the object through the content”. Ms. Q 10. This manuscript is conserved at the Husserl-Archives Leuven and bears the following description on the title page: “Descriptive Psychologie. Vorlesungen von Professor Franz Brentano W.S. 1887/8 Wien. Abschrift des Collegienheftes v. Dr. Hans Schmidkunz 1888.”

12

CARLO IERNA

There is a double relation here: one to the immanent object, and one through the immanent object to the external object, whether it exists or not. However, we can have a proper presentation only of those objects that can be intuitively given to us. If an object does not exist de facto (like a centaur), cannot exist in principle (like square circles), or cannot be exhaustively given to us (like infinity), we also do not or cannot have a proper presentation of it. In these cases, according to Brentano, we can have an improper presentation. Furthermore, Brentano routinely seemed to equate improper, indirect presentations with presentations through relations, as proceeds from Husserl’s later recollections: “Der in der BRENTANO’schen Schule übliche Appell an uneigentliches Vorstellen, Vorstellen durch Relationen”.20 As we saw from the quote of Brentano’s logic lecture, we are related to the external object through the immanent object, which is the content or meaning. If the external object does not exist, we only have the relation intuitively given to us. In the intentional relation, the subject is related to the object through the meaning. However, if the external object does not exist, one of the relata is not given. In this case only the object’s characteristics (Merkmale) are given in the relation, but without intuitive fulfilment. In his Philosophie der Arithmetik, Husserl refers to Brentano’s theory of proper and improper presenting, but adds that his own conception is not the same as his teacher’s and, somewhat surprisingly, in that context he refers to Meinong. We will now compare Meinong’s and Husserl’s theories concerning presentations and relations to assess similarities, differences and possible influences.

2. Comparing Meinong and Husserl A detailed comparison of Husserl’s Habilitationsschrift with Meinong’s Hume Studien II shows indeed that already at this early stage Husserl was well acquainted with Meinong’s works, in particular with his theory of relations. Husserl appears to use Meinongian terminology and 20

Husserl (2002, p. 296). On this matter see also Lohmar (1990, p. 180 & 191).

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL

13

ideas in fundamental passages of his Philosophie der Arithmetik and he even quotes Meinong, though quite indirectly, probably because of the disagreement between Brentano and Meinong. In a letter Meinong expresses his indignation about Husserl’s silent plagiarism and accuses him that in the PA “einige Sorgfalt darauf gewendet scheint, dem Leser von solcher Bekanntschaft [mit Meinongs Theorien] nichts zu verraten”.21 In an earlier draft for this letter, Meinong is even more explicit about Husserl’s alleged plagiarism: Es betrifft das vorliegende Buch zusammen mit der darin aufgenommenen Habilitationsschrift, mit der ich vor nicht langer Zeit bekannt geworden bin. Dass sich einmal wieder jemand eingehend mit Relationsproblemen beschäftigte, erregte natürlich mein lebhaftes Interesse; ebenso lebhaft aber war meine Verwunderung darüber, dass kein Leser ihrer Ausführungen durch diese auch nur entfernt auf die Vermutung geführt werden konnte, auch ich hätte einmal über diese Dinge etwas veröffentlicht, dem nicht gerade aller literarische Erfolg gefehlt hat. Pflichtmässige Bescheidenheit des Autors sollte mir nun sofort klar machen, dass meine Arbeiten eben nicht wichtig genug gewesen sein werden, ich bin aber nicht bescheiden genug, zu glauben, meine “Relationstheorie” hätte nicht mehr Brauchbares enthalten als jene Übersetzung aus J. St. Mill, die Ihnen in der Habilitationsschrift Gelegenheit gab, meiner zu gedenken und die Sie mit richtigem Tact nun durch die Originalstelle ersetzt haben.22 Indeed, as Meinong says, Husserl already refers to the Hume-Studien in ÜBZ.23 There, when Husserl analyses the concept of “relation”, he quotes a footnote by John Stuart Mill in his annotated edition of his father James Mill’s work Analysis of the Phenomena of the Human Mind and also refers to Meinong’s work. However, Husserl quotes Mill in a German translation that corresponds literally with the quote in Meinong:

21 22 23

Meinong to Husserl, 19 June 1891 in Husserl (1994, Vol. I, p. 129). See also Rollinger (1999, p. 158). Meinong (1965, p. 94 f.). Husserl (1887, p. 51 n.).

14

CARLO IERNA

Objecte, physische oder psychische, [...] sind in Relation zu einander vermöge eines complexen Bewusstseinszustandes, in den sie beide eintreten, auch für den Fall, dass der complexe Zuastand in nichts weiter bestünde, als im Denken an beide zusammen. Und sie werden auf einander in so vielen verschiedenen Weisen bezogen, oder mit anderen Worten sie stehen in so vielen distincten Relationen zu einander, als es specifisch verschiedene Bewusstseinszustände gibt, von denen Beide Theile ausmachen.24 That it was evidently taken over from Meinong is confirmed by a small mistake by Husserl. In fact he erroneously refers to page 7 ff. when quoting Mill in ÜBZ, whereas the quote originally comes from p. 10. Meinong refers correctly to page 10 in his quotation of the passage under consideration, but in a previous note he refers to “page 7 ff.” In the PA Husserl will correct this by directly quoting the English original and correctly referring to page 10 (and without mentioning Meinong anymore). The small mistake in ÜBZ confirms that the translation of Mill’s quote is directly copied from Meinong and rules out the possibility that they would both refer to a common source. While translations of J.S. Mill’s works were available at the time, this was not the case with the works of his father. Besides this there are no further direct references to Meinong in the ÜBZ. Indirectly, however, Husserl apparently employs Meinongian ideas and terminology in ÜBZ as well as in the PA.25 Moreover, quite probably John Stuart Mill served as an important source for both of them. Besides Meinong’s and Husserl’s own interest in the British empiricists, also Brentano was quite appreciative about Mill’s work and often referred to him in his lectures.26 Brentano might be credited on a par with Gomperz and Mach for spreading British empiricism in Austrian and German philosophy at the time.27 The entire School of Brentano felt the influence of

24 25 26

27

Meinong (1882, p. 610). See e.g. Rollinger (1999, p. 160). E.g repeatedly in Ms. Y 2, especially to Mill’s logic. Also Stumpf often quotes both James and John Stuart Mill in his lectures on Logic (Q 14) and Psychology (Q 11/I, Q 11/2), which have significantly influenced Husserl’s early works. Smith (1994, p. 16).

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL

15

the British empiricists, Brentano himself first and foremost, and among them most prominently of John Stuart Mill.28 So indeed we can raise considerable doubts over the allegation of plagiarism. As both Meinong and Husserl profited from Brentano’s lectures and both seem to use many common sources, it is very dubious whether it is appropriate to speak of “plagiarism” here. Certainly Meinong felt persecuted by the more orthodox members of the Brentano school after his falling out with the master. The main reason for the rift between Meinong and Brentano indeed concerned the topic of relations quite directly. Where Brentano’s proposed reform of elementary logic would acknowledge only existential judgements, reformulating categorial, i.e. relational judgements into double judgements, Meinong opposed this move. Indeed, Alois Höfler, a pupil of both of them, had written a book on logic (co-authored with Meinong) that was to serve as the basic textbook in schools, containing an account of relational judgements alongside existential ones.29 However, Anton Marty, as an orthodox Brentanist and one of the major figures backing the theory of double judgements, wrote a negative review about it for the Austrian ministry of education.30 This obviously angered Meinong, prompting him to suspect Brentano and his students of conspiring against him, since Marty (and hence indirectly also Brentano) accused him, on the one hand, of having used material from Brentano’s lectures without reference, and, on the other hand, of “deserting the correct doctrine”.31 Indeed, if we look at Meinong and Höflers treatment of the distinction between act, content and object it is quite similar to that of Brentano’s lectures.32 On the other hand, we should remember that Husserl at the time, although already considered a “new star”,33 was still a small fish compared

28 29 30 31 32 33

See especially Baumgartner (1989). Höfler and Meinong (1890), esp. pp. 99, 103 f. See Rollinger (1999, pp. 156-157). See Lindenfeld (1980, p. 66). Consider Höfler and Meinong (1890, p. 7). See Fabian (1986, p. 17), in letter from Ehrenfels to Meinong of 26 - 2 - 1886: “einen neuen Stern auf dem philosophischen Himmel, genannt Dr. Husserl”.

16

CARLO IERNA

to e.g. Carl Stumpf or Anton Marty. So even taking into account the possible “paranoia” of Meinong who was afraid of a damnatio memoriae, it is strange that an established professor,34 well on his way of founding his own school,35 should be so outraged at a newly ordained Privatdozent. However, at the publication of Husserl’s Philosophie der Arithmetik in 1891 the break with Brentano was still quite recent and painful for Meinong. Seeing that Husserl, when introducing the distinction between proper and improper presentations in the PA, implied that Meinong himself had only copied his ideas from their teacher Brentano must have been the cause of the initial retort that it was instead Husserl who copied from Meinong. As this “did not - did too” discussion would not lead anywhere, Meinong wisely rewrote his letter, watering down his accusations.36 Likewise we will now abandon this sterile path and focus more on the content and consequences. Indeed we should ask ourselves “whether this familiarity” that Husserl had with Meinong’s works “involves an actual influence”37 as Husserl rather disagrees with Meinong’s position and then again perceives Meinong’s theories in “Zur Psychologie der Komplexionen und Relationen” to be “against Philosophie der Arithmetik”.38 At the time, and really up to and including the first edition of the Logische Untersuchungen, Husserl was still operating within a Brentanian framework. While criticizing some particular aspects of his masters works and moving beyond them, in the Logische Untersuchungen he was still so much entrenched in Brentanism to prompt accusations from Cornelius in 1906 that “HUSSERL nimmt [...] gelegentlich Begriffe und behauptungen der BRENTANOschen Psychologie ohne vorgängige Prüfung unter seine Voraussetzungen auf”.39 Meinong’s potential influence on Husserl is not so straightforward. 34 35 36 37 38 39

Meinong was at Graz since 1882 and was promoted to professor ordinarius in 1889. For an overview, see Albertazzi et al. (2001). See Husserl (1994, Vol. I, p. 129). Rollinger (1999, p. 160). Meinong (1891, p. 257). Marginal note by Husserl in his own copy, catalogued as SQ 95. Cornelius (1906, p. 408). See Rollinger (1991, p. 46).

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL

17

Let us now look at Husserl’s treatment of improper, indirect presentations and relations in his PA to understand whether and in how far Meinong influenced him in this respect.

3. Relations Husserl defines symbolic presentations in the following way: Eine symbolische oder uneigentliche Vorstellung ist, wie schon der Name besagt, eine Vorstellung durch Zeichen. Ist uns ein Inhalt nicht direct gegeben als das, was er ist, sondern nur indirect durch Zeichen, die ihn eindeutig charakterisieren, dann haben wir von ihm, statt einer eigentlichen, eine symbolische Vorstellung.40 If some content41 cannot be given to us directly and intuitively, but only indirectly through signs or univocal descriptions, we cannot have a proper presentation of it. While this may sound very Brentanian, in a footnote Husserl explicitly tells the reader that his definition is not the same as that of Brentano,42 while profusely thanking him for “das tiefere Verständniss der eminenten Bedeutung des uneigentlichen Vorstellens”43 and the awareness of the importance of the difference between proper and improper presenting. In the same footnote, Husserl also refers to Meinong’s Hume-Studien II, indicating that some of the changes with respect to Brentano’s position might have come from his reading of Meinong’s works.

40 41

42

43

Husserl (1891, p. 215). Italics in the original spaced. In this case Husserl uses “content” as meaning “the object as given”, i.e. the content of our intuition, and not as external object. Likewise, in his early works, Meinong uses “content” (of a concept) as synonym for “immanent object”. See Rollinger (1993, p. 36). According to Schuhmann (2004, p. 277) “Husserl adds to their definition [of symbolic presentations] a requirement that is not in Brentano or Stumpf: signs must not only characterize that which they stand for, they must moreover do so ‘in an unambiguous way’.” Husserl (1891, p. 215 n.).

18

CARLO IERNA

The crucial element is the distinction of physical and psychical relations based on the characteristic of intentional inexistence. Husserl does not use this typical property of the psychical only to distinguish physical from psychical phenomena, but also in the context of the theory of relations to characterise physical (primary) and psychical (secondary) relations. Das Merkmal der intentionalen Inexistenz, welches bei BRENTANO als das erste und durchgreifendste Trennungsmerkmal der psychischen von den physischen Phaenomenen fungirt, [führt] auch bei der Klassification der Relationen auf eine wesentliche Scheidung.44 Physical relations are based on properties that are directly present in the presented objects. Psychical relations, on the contrary, connect presented objects on the basis of properties that they gain only through the act that is directed at them. Husserl adds a quite clear passage about this distinction: Den charakteristischen Unterschied der beiden Klassen von Relationen kann man auch dadurch kennzeichnen, daß die primären Relationen in gewissem Sinne zu dem Vorstellungsinhalte derselben Stufe gehören wie ihre Fundamente, die psychischen jedach nicht, Indem wir die Fundamente vorstellen, ist in dem ersteren Falle die Relation unmittelbar mitgegeben als Moment desselben Vorstellungsinhaltes. In dem zweiten Falle aber, dem der psychischen Relation, bedarf es zur Vorstellung der Relation erst eines auf den beziehenden Akt reflektierendes Vorstellens. Der unmittelbare Inhalt der letzteren ist der die Beziehung stiftende Akt, und erst vermittels dieses geht es auf die Fundamente. Die bezogenen Inhalte und die Relation bilden so gewissermaßen Inhalte verschiedener Stufe.45 The same distinction can be found in Meinong, who points out a class of relations corresponding to Husserl’s psychical relations and then another in which the relation is present in the contents, just like in the case of the physical or primary relations (which Husserl also called contentrelations): 44 45

Husserl (1891, p. 74 n.). Husserl (1891, p. 74).

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL

19

Ist die Relation das Ergebnis einer besonderen psychischen Tätigkeit, so kommt sie den Fundamenten für sich und ohne diese Tätigkeit nicht eigentlich zu; wenn man daher von den Fundamenten als gegebenen ausgeht, so muss man eine solche Relation subjektiv, ideal nennen. Verhält sich [...] das Subjekt der Relation gegenüber nur wahrnehmend, das bereits Vorhandene konstatierend, so muss die Relation den Fundamenten wirklich zukommen, da sie sonst an ihnen nicht wahrgenommen werden könnte; eine solche Relation kann daher mit bezug auf gegebene Fundamente als objektiv oder real bezeichnet werden.46 Husserl marks this passage in his copy with a prominent “N.B.” in the margin and a caption “Ideal – Realrelation”. Furthermore he points out in the margin: Idealrelationen sind alle Vergleichungs- und Verträglichkeitsrelationen. Realrelationen sind die Relationen zwischen Inhalt und Vorstellung, zwischen Relation und Relationsfundamenten, zwischen Momenten einer psychischen Zusammensetzung u.dgl.47 Thus we see that Husserl’s distinction between physical and psychical relations is the same as Meinong’s distinction between real and ideal relations.48 With real or physical relations the relation already lies within the contents themselves and is merely noticed. With ideal or psychical relations an act is needed to establish the relation. Whether Husserl takes over this distinction directly from Meinong or not, it is noteworthy that both Brentano-students make it. This could point in the direction of an original inspiration by Brentano in both cases, but this is not entirely conclusively demonstrable in the sources at our disposition. In any case, there are various other elements that Husserl and Meinong clearly enough do in fact take over from Brentano. For instance, they are both of the opinion that relations need not to be noticed immedi46 47 48

Meinong (1882, p. 720). Italics in the original spaced. Meinong (1882, p. 720). In an earlier version of his theory of relations, in Ms. K I 32/25b, Husserl used the terminology of “reale Relationen” and “nicht reale Relationen”, apparently independently from Meinong.

20

CARLO IERNA

ately when the foundations are presented, e.g. one can present different things (like red and blue), without needing to present them as being different. Meinong: Soll zwischen zwei gegenwärtigen Inhalten eine reine Relation erkannt werden, so ist jene eigenthümliche auf diese Inhalte gerichtete Thätigkeit erforderlich, welche ich eben nicht anders als mit dem Ausdruck ‘in Relation setzen’ bezeichnen kann.49 Note that this does not contradict what has been said above with respect to real and ideal relations: in the case of ideal relations a psychical activity establishes the relation. Here, on the contrary, it is only said that an activity would be necessary to notice the relation. Likewise Husserl writes: Es ist wichtig, dass man auseinanderhalte: “zwei verschiedene Inhalten bemerken” und: “zwei Inhalte als von einander Verschiedene bemerken”. [...] Nur dies ist richtig: wo eine Mehrheit von Gegenständen wahrgenommen wird, da sind wir stets berechtigt, auf Grund der einzelnen Inhalte evidente Urtheile zu fällen, welche besagen, dass ein jeder der Inhalte von jedem anderen verschieden sei; aber unrichtig ist es, dass wir diese Urtheile fällen müssen.50 In this passage Husserl expresses the same idea as Meinong. Relations (such as difference) are not imposed on us, but are to be noticed within a separate act. Thus, when one presents red and blue, their being different is not necessarily automatically presented too. The relation is founded on the contents, but must be noticed for itself in a separate act. This act does not establish the relation, but only brings to the foreground what already lies within the contents. Brentano himself gives perhaps the clearest account:

49

50

Meinong (1882, p. 165). Also this passage is marked “N.B.” in Husserl’s copy. Pure relations are those, that depend only on the nature of the contents, without any experience being required. Cf. Meinong (1882, p. 163). Husserl (1887, p. 44). Italics in the original spaced, quotation marks added for clarity.

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL

21

Der Unterschied von Rot und Blau ist gewiß eine Relation, aber selbst wenn wir beide vorstellen, sind Rot und Blau selbst, jedes von ihnen, keine Relativa, sondern etwas Absolutes, was der Relation als Fundament zugrunde liegt.51 Red and blue are not relativa, but something absolute: in order to think of red, I do not need to think also of blue or of its difference from blue. This implies that the distinction belongs to the foundations, the absolute contents. The relation lies within them, but must be brought to the foreground in a separate act to be noticed in itself.

4. Direct & Indirect presentations In the very same footnote, in which Husserl thanks Brentano for the distinction between proper and improper presentations, he also refers to a passage of Meinong’s Hume Studien II (p. 86-88 of his copy, p. 656-658 of the original edition). In this passage Meinong defines indirect presentations through relative determinations and attributes, saying that: “ihre Function zunächst darin besteht, ein vorher nicht gekanntes Attribut [...] mehr oder weniger genau zu determiniren”.52 This distinction between direct and indirect presentations is the same as the one between proper and improper presentations (directly and indirectly given contents) made by Brentano and Husserl. Husserl gives an example of this, by distinguishing the direct, intuitive presentation of a house from its description in someone’s directions (“The house on the corner of such and such streets and street sides”).53 If we follow the directions (which are a symbolic presentation), we can observe the house directly (which is a proper presentation). The directions are “relative determinations”: which house is meant is determined through an indication of its relation to two streets, revealing the “previously unknown attribute”, i.e. its location. 51 52 53

Brentano in Ms. Y 2, p. 49. Meinong (1882, p. 657). Husserl (1891, p. 215).

22

CARLO IERNA

Meinong defines direct and indirect presentations through relative data: “Gesetzt, Jemand will einen Menschen x beschreiben, mit dem er verkehrt hat, so sagt er etwa: er ist so gross wie ich, hat kastanienbraunes Haar u.s.f.”54 Descriptions like “as tall as …” and “the same colour as …” are relative data. An attribute of the person x is determined through the (equality-) relation of hair-colour to chestnut-colour. Meinong points out: Jedes relative Datum dieser Art kann daher auch als eine Weise charakterisirt werden, Attribute indirect vorzustellen, während im Gegensatze dazu ein Attribut, das als Inhalt einer Empfindung oder eines Phantasmas absolut gegeben ist, als direct vorgestellt zu bezeichnen sein wird.55 Husserl speaks of indirectly presenting through signs, Meinong of indirectly presenting through relations, but what they mean, is the same. Between sign and signified there always is a relation (the sign-relation, or meaning), and each relation can always be expressed through (linguistic) signs.56 As we saw in the discussion of Brentano’s theories, intentionality is the relation of subject to object through meaning. We use the immanent object to aim at the external object, whether it exists or not. Its attributes are not given intuitively, but only in the relation. Husserl and Meinong substantially agree: the attributes are given through signs and relations, which convey the meaning in absence of the intended object. However, when Husserl gives a brief comparison of his own distinction between primary and psychical relations and Meinong’s distinction between real and ideal relations, he denies having been influenced by Meinong, and points instead to Mill: Meine Unterscheidung in der Philosophie der Arithmetik zwischen primären Relationen (oder besser Verknüpfungen, Komplexionen)

54 55

56

Meinong (1882, p. 656). Meinong (1882, p. 657). Italics in the original spaced. Husserl observes in the margin: “Nicht bloß relative Daten: auch abstracte Merkmale, wenn sie als Bestimmungen dienen, sind relativ.” I would like to thank David Ulrichs for helping with the interpretation of Husserl’s shorthand. Compare also § 2.2 in Dölling (2005).

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL

23

und psychischen (intentionalen) Relationen scheint Verwandtschaft zu haben mit Meinongs Unterscheidung zwischen realen und idealen Relationen (und Komplexionen). Zunächst bemerke ich, dass ich in der genannten Jugendschrift das Wort Relation im Sinn Mill’s nehme und demgemäß mit Komplexion identifiziere. Wo immer ein Bewusstseinszustand vorhanden ist, an dem zwei Inhalte beteiligt sind, heißen sie in Relation stehende. Und diesen Bewusstseinszustand selbst nenne ich dort (wenig passend) Relation, und erkläre ausdrücklich, dass er nicht bloß als ein intentionales Erlebnis, als ein Akt zu fassen sei, sondern als gleichwertig mit Phänomen überhaupt. Zwei Inhalte sind in Relation, zwei Inhalte sind Teil eines Phänomens, sagt also dasselbe. Schließlich ist aber nicht einzusehen, warum es nicht heißt, zwei Teile eines Ganzen heißen in Relation stehende, und es gibt soviel Relationen, als es Arten von Ganzen gibt. [...] Gegenwärtig würde ich natürlich zwischen Komplexion und Relation unterscheiden.57 Husserl indicates that he takes “relation” in the sense of Mill,58 but we have seen above that he actually takes the translation of the quote he uses in his Habilitationsschrift from Meinong. In the PA he will quote J.S. Mill’s note to James Mill’s work from the original English edition: Any objects, whether physical or mental, are related, or are in a relation, to one another, in virtue of any complex state of consciousness into which they both enter; even if it be a no more complex state of consciousness than that of merely thinking of them together. And they are related to each other in as many different ways, or in other words, they stand in as many distinct relations to one another, as there are specifically distinct states of consciousness of which they both form parts.59 57

58 59

Ms. K I 19/16a-16b. In Ms. K I 32/6a Husserl remarks: “was Mill Fundament der Relation nennt, das ist nichts als die Relation selbst. Was er aber Relation nennt, das ist das relative Attribut”. I would like to thank Thomas Vongehr for his help with the transcription of Husserl’s shorthand. This is again confirmed in Husserl (2002), p. 416, where Husserl speaks of “[die] von Mill übernommene Terminologie”. Note by John Stuart Mill in James Mill (1878, Vol. II, p. 10). The quoted pas-

24

CARLO IERNA

This is the view that Husserl apparently subscribes to in 1891 in the PA and already held in 1887 in the ÜBZ. According to Husserl the quote from Mill constitutes a “comprehensible and satisfactory answer” to the question of what would be the meaning of “relation”. Meinong seems also at least partially to agree with Mill.60 Indeed, just before the quoted definition from Mill, Meinong remarks: Die Ausführungen über Relationen, die Mill als Anmerkung zu seines Vaters ‘Analysis’ mittheilt [...] wesentlich befiriedigender erscheinen. Sie enthalten auch eine Bestimmung, deren Anwendung auf alle Relationsfälle nichts im Wege steht. 61 Though with some critical nuances, Meinong agrees with Mill that this is at least a presupposition for establishing or noticing a relation. While not taking his definition over “lock, stock and barrel” as Husserl seems to do, Meinong does proceed from Mill’s definition to refine and perfect his own. Meinong’s main point of critique is that Mill’s definition is too broad and not precise enough. Later on, though, Meinong had to expand his definition of relation and came very close again to Mill’s position. A fact that did not go unnoticed by Husserl, who in an annotation to Meinong’s Beiträge zur Theorie der Psychischen Analyse observes that “Meinong [ist] vom Millschen relationsbegriff nicht weit und von dem Standpunkt, den ich in der Philosophie der Arithmetik vertrete”.62 However, distancing himself from Meinong, Husserl later remarks in his “Personal Annotations”: Leider habe ich kein Urteil mehr, in welchem Maße mich Meinongs Relationstheorie beeinflußte. Gelesen habe ich in ihr schon in den Jahren um 90. Doch erst die Korrespondenz mit Meinong 1891 führte zu enem gründlicheren Studium. Es ist mir aber schwer anzunehmen,

60 61 62

sage is set off by pointed brackets in Husserl’s copy (signature BA 1184/2). See Rollinger (1999, p. 171). Meinong (1882, p. 610). See Rollinger (1999, p. 170).

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL

25

daß sie mir außer einigen Gedanken begrenzter Art methodisch etwas geboten hätte.63 Nonetheless, Husserl seems to have taken into account Meinong’s exposition also in his analysis of the concept ‘Something’. In fact, Husserl states that the property of being ‘Something’, does not belong to an object, in the same sense as, following an example of Meinong,64 ‘von Blau verschieden’ is another kind of property than ‘Roth’: Das ‘Etwas’ gehört also nur in jener äusserlichen und uneigentlichen Weise zum Inhalt eines jeden concreten Gegenstandes, wie irgend welche relativen und negativen Attribute (wie z. B. ‘ähnlich dem B’, ‘nicht C’ u.s.f.); ja es ist selbst als eine relative Bestimmung zu bezeichnen.65 Meinong too does not distinguish between relative and negative attributes, i.e. he considers negative attributes to be a kind of relative attributes. The discussion of “relative Attribute” and “relative Bestimmungen” takes place on p. 656 of the Hume Studien II, which is one of the pages Husserl refers to in the Philosophie der Arithmetik, suggesting quite strongly that there is an influence in this case.66 At this stage we have seen significant similarities between Meinong’s and Husserl’s account of relations. Husserl’s distinction between physical and psychical relations is almost exactly the same as Meinong’s distinction between real and ideal relations. Moreover, they both use very similar terminology in the case of “relative attributes”. However, is this terminology really exclusive for them both or can we discern a common pattern due to the influence of Brentano? To see in how far certain terminology and concepts were current in the School of Brentano, we can best

63 64 65 66

Husserl (1984, p. 443). Meinong (1882, p. 656). Husserl (1887, p. 61). In Husserl (1891, p. 86) the examples in brackets are left out. Husserl also underlined these expressions in his copy and marked the passages in the margin with a “NB”.

26

CARLO IERNA

turn to original notes of Brentano’s and Stumpf’s lectures, which constitute one of the more authentic resources for their “orthodox” teachings.

5. The Brentanistic background The comparison between Meinong’s and Husserl’s terminology becomes quite interesting at this point, because it seems that Husserl hardly could have taken over terminology like “attribute” (Attribut) and “relative determination” (relative Bestimmung) from anyone else than Meinong. To assess this we will look at the terminology in use in Brentano’s and Stumpf’s lectures. It turns out that Attribut and relative Bestimmung can be found only rarely in the notes of Brentano’s and Stumpf’s lectures. In Stumpf’s lectures on “Logik und Enzyklopädie der Philosophie” (Ms. Q 14) Attribut is used four times. The first three occurrences are irrelevant, because Stumpf there merely reproduces Descartes’ and Spinoza’s theories, explaining their definitions of the term Attribut. The fourth occurrence is more interesting.67 Here Stumpf is discussing Hamilton and it is not entirely clear whether the expression Attribut (which Stumpf also calls “abstraktes Merkmal,”) just ‘slipped in’ or is taken over from Hamilton. In the other notes that remain of Stumpf’s and Brentano’s lectures68 Attribut is not used at all. On the contrary, Eigenschaft occurs occasionally in notes of Brentano’s lectures as a technical term, defined as metaphysical part, mostly in relation to Substanz. In Stumpf’s lectures Eigenschaft is used more often, both in technical sense and more colloquially, occurring most frequently in combination with Zustände and Substanz. Turning to the second term under consideration, we see that, while Bestimmung does occur fairly often, the expression relative Bestimmung is not used in Stumpf’s lectures and only occurs twice in Brentano’s.69

67 68 69

Q 14, p. 53a. Mainly the manuscript groups Y 2, Y 3, Y 6, Q 10, Q 11/I, and Q 11/II of the Husserl-Archives Leuven. In manuscript Y 2, pp. 76 f.

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL

27

However, Brentano appears to use it in a different sense. Husserl speaks of the concept of ‘Something’ as a relative determination, because the concept is determined by its relation to the act of presentation, whereas Brentano uses it when discussing determinations of place and colour: “Solche relativen Bestimmungen wenden wir oft auch anderwärts an, wo es sich nicht um Relativa handelt, z.B. bei den meisten Farben. Orange bestimmen wir durch Relation zu Rot und Gelb”.70 I doubt that they mean the same thing when using the expression “relative determination”, because Husserl refers to a relative determination obtained by reflection on an act of presentation to obtain an abstract concept (what all ‘Somethings’ have in common is not a positive feature, but the fact that they can be presented), while Brentano uses it when comparing colours (orange results from the mixture of yellow and red). It appears that Brentano shortly used similar terminology in his middle period: Wird das relativ Bezeichnete anerkannt, so wird außer ihm zugleich das anerkannt, in Bezug worauf es bestimmt wird.71 Of course, strong ontological commitments to this would go hand in hand with the kind of enlarged ontology that would nowadays be referred to as “Meinongian”. Considering how the expressions Attribut and relative Bestimmung are used and the frequency of their occurrence, I surmise that at the time both were not really common Brentanistic terminology and Husserl’s use of them in such a specific and technical way as we have seen in the passage above, in my opinion, points to another influence.

6. Brentano and Mill Despite Meinong’s accusations and the similarities we pointed out above, Husserl appears to insist he had taken nothing from Meinong. It seems then that we should rather conclude that both Husserl and Meinong inher70 71

Y 2, p. 77. Brentano EL 80, S. 40, quoted from Chrudzimski 2004, p. 147.

28

CARLO IERNA

ited some elements of their position from Brentano. However, only Meinong speaks of Attribut, while Brentano and Stumpf clearly prefer Eigenschaft or Merkmal (which is used throughout all of Stumpf’s lectures). A possible solution to this conundrum is to look for a common source outside the School of Brentano. Through Brentano’s works and lectures, both Meinong and Husserl were introduced to the theories of John Stuart Mill, who appears to be the most probable source on the topic of relations. Husserl, as we saw above, claims to have taken his definition of relation straight from Mill (although in a translation by Meinong) and indeed in Ms. K I 32 we find Husserl’s sketches of his own theory of relations, heavily based on excerpts from Mill’s works and with no mention at all of Meinong.72 Moreover, in his Habilitationsschrift Husserl certainly took into account Mill’s work, which was highly influential in the philosophy of logic and mathematics of the time, both in England as well as in the rest of Europe.73 Hence, Husserl did not directly take over substantial parts of his theory of relations from Meinong, but developed his own, based on elements from both Brentano and Mill. Meinong used the same basic building blocks and partially the same terminology. Indeed, they often came close to each others standpoint, minus a few terminological differences and slight nuances.74 The similarities in their theories hence seem to point rather in the direction of common sources than to suggest plagiarism in some sense or other. Meinong certainly was an original thinker, but in his early works did still operate mostly within the framework of the school of Brentano. We do not need to hypothesize a conspiracy by Brentano and his loyal students to oppose Meinong, nor do we need to accuse Meinong of flat-out copying and recanting Brentano. The same goes for Husserl, though around 1890/91 Husserl certainly was much closer, both socially and philosophically, to Brentano’s circle than Meinong had ever been. However, both Meinong and Husserl would go on to produce radi72

73

Ms. K I 32 of the Husserl-Archives Leuven bears the title “Sehr alte Blätter (vor der Philosophie der Arithmetik). Über Relation. Noch immer zu beachten und sehr! Relation”. Page 3b of this manuscript contains the excerpted passage from J.S. Mill which we discussed above. On Mill’s widespread influence see e.g. Peckhaus (1999).

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL

29

cally new philosophies, quite different from those of the more orthodox members of School of Brentano, like Marty and Stumpf, while initially building on the foundations laid by their common teachers. Indeed, Mill’s influence is quite clear in both of Meinong’s Hume Studien. Already the Hume Studien I contain long quotations from J. St. Mill’s works, and in many respects Meinong and Mill agree, e.g. Meinong is “ziemlich rückhaltlos einverstanden”75 with Mill’s characterisation of abstraction, which is one of the fundamental topics of the study. Just like Husserl, Meinong even allows Mill to speak in his stead.76 Also the Hume Studien II make frequent references to Mill’s discussion of attributes, relations and their foundations. Moreover, Meinong lectured on Mill in the years 1880-1881, probably while preparing his Hume Studien II, and again in 1884-85.77 Husserl probably discovered Mill at first through Brentano’s lectures and Meinongs works, but then also conducted his own research, as testified i.a. by Ms. K I 32. Brentano’s role as a mediator for British empiricism, on which we already touched briefly, is not to be underestimated in this respect. It was Brentano after all who prompted Meinong to write the Hume Studien, which ultimately led Meinong to the development of his Gegenstandstheorie.78

7. Concluding remarks Unfortunately we will not be able to conduct our research much further here, because of a disheartening lack of resources. In the majority of works on the School of Brentano and its members little attention is devoted to the influence of British empiricism.79 The presence of this influ74 75 76 77 78 79

See e.g. the discussion in Rollinger (1999, pp. 170 f.). Meinong (1882, p. 250) and also see Schermann (1972, p. 109). For Husserl, see Ierna (2005, 2006), for Meinong, see Schermann (1972, p. 110). Dölling (1999, pp. 33 & 234 f.). See also Rollinger (2005, p. 160). E.g. in Jacquette (2004b) Hume is mentioned twice, Mill thrice, Locke and Berkeley not even once.

30

CARLO IERNA

ence is generally acknowledged, but rarely documented or researched in depth. Brentano himself was quite a fan of British philosophy and extended his enthusiasm to his students prompting several of them to write on or translate80 their works. In secondary works on Brentano, Meinong and Husserl there is often just a brief, passing mention of similarities of their theories with those of Hume, Locke, Mill or Berkeley.81 Few fulllength studies of these influences exist. With the possible exception of Husserl and Hume, the relationships are under-documented. Many authors seem just to repeat, often without any reference to primary material, that a similarity or possible influence exists. Such a simple assertion, however, tells us next to nothing. Specifically concerning the theory of relations, there is astonishingly little to be found. While I hope to have shown that we cannot resolve the multiple interdependecies of Brentano’s, Husserl’s and Meinong’s theories by appealing only to their own works, for the time being I can say precious little concerning Mill’s effective influence here. As Spiegelberg indicated the need for more studies of the type “Husserl and …”,82 in our specific case we would need studies concerning “Brentano and Mill”, “Meinong and Mill”, or even better “The School of Brentano and Mill”.83 Carlo Ierna Husserl-Archives Leuven Catholic University of Leuven [email protected]

80 81

82 83

As in the case of Sigmund Freud’s translation of Mill for the Gomperz edition. See Smith (1994, p. 16 ) and Mill (1875, p. 228). Fortunately there a some few exceptions to this, e.g. Chrudzimski (2005) in the previous volume of Meinong Studies, where Meinong’s indebtedness to Brentano and Mill comes clearly to the fore, with abundant references to primary sources. Spiegelberg (1982, p. 149). “British empiricism and the School of Brentano” might be a little too broad.

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL

31

References Albertazzi, Liliana, Jacquette, Dale, and Poli, Roberto, editors (2001), The School of Alexius Meinong, Aldershot: Ashgate. Baumgartner, Wilhelm (1989), ‘Mills und Brentanos Methode der beschreibenden Analyse’, in Brentano-Studien 2, 63–78. Brentano, Franz (1887/88), ‘Ms. Q 10: Descriptive Psychologie’. Brentano, Franz (WS 1884/85), ‘Ms. Y 2: Die elementare Logik und die in ihr nötigen Reformen I’. Brentano, Franz (WS 1884/85), ‘Ms. Y 3: Die elementare Logik und die in ihr nötigen Reformen II’. Brentano, Franz (WS 1885/86), ‘Ms Y 6: Ausgewählte Fragen aus der Psychologie und Ästhetik’. Brentano, Franz (1874), Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkte, Leipzig: Duncker & Humblot. Brentano, Franz (1995), Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint, edited by Linda L. McAlister London: Routledge. Chrudzimski, Arkadiusz (2001), Intentionalitätstheorie beim frühen Brentano, Phaenomenologica 159, Dordrecht: Kluwer. Chrudzimski, Arkadiusz (2002), ‘Von Brentano zu Ingarden. Die Phänomenologische Bedeutungslehre’, in Husserl Studies 18, 185–208. Chrudzimski, Arkadiusz (2004), Die Ontologie Franz Brentanos, Phaenomenologica 172, Dordrecht/Boston/London: Kluwer. Chrudzimski, Arkadiusz (2005), ‘Abstraktion und Relationen beim jungen Meinong’, in: Schramm (2005), vol. 1, 7–62. Chrudzimski, Arkadiusz (2007), Gegenstandstheorie und Theorie der Intentionalität bei Alexius Meinong, Phaenomenologica 181, Dordrecht: Springer. Cornelius, Hans (1906), ‘Psychologische Prinzipienfragen I. Psychologie und Erkenntnistheorie’, in Zeitschrift für Psychologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane 42, 401–413.

32

CARLO IERNA

Dölling, Evelyn (1999), Wahrheit Suchen und Wahrheit Bekennen. Alexius Meinong: Skizze seines Lebens, Amsterdam - Atlanta: Rodopi. Dölling, Evelyn (2005), ‘Eine Semiotische Sicht auf Meinongs Annahmenlehre’, in: Schramm (2005), vol. I, 129–158. Fabian, Reinhard (1986), Leben und Wirken von Christian von Ehrenfels, Amsterdam: Rodopi. Haller, Rudolf, editor (1972), Jenseits von Sein und Nichtsein, Graz: Akademische Druck- und Verlagsanstalt. Höfler, Alois, Meinong, Alexius (1890), Philosophische Propädeutik. Erster Theil: Logik, Vienna: F. Tempsky / G. Freytag. Husserl, Edmund (1887), Über den Begriff der Zahl (Psychologische Analysen), Heynemann’sche Buchdruckerei (F. Beyer). Husserl, Edmund (1891), Philosophie der Arithmetik (Psychologische und Logische Untersuchungen), C.E.M. Pfeffer (Robert Stricker). Husserl, Edmund (1970), Philosophie der Arithmetik, edited by Lothar Eley, Husserliana XII, Den Haag: Nijhoff. Husserl, Edmund (1984), Einleitung in die Logik und Erkenntnistheorie, edited by Ullrich Melle, Husserliana XXIV, Dordrecht/Boston/Lancaster: Nijhoff. Husserl, Edmund (1994), Briefwechsel, edited by Karl Schuhmann and Elisabeth Schuhmann, Husserliana Dokumente III, Dordrecht: Kluwer. Husserl, Edmund (2002), Logische Untersuchungen (Ergänzungsband: Erster Teil), edited by Ullrich Melle, Husserliana XX/1, Dordrecht: Kluwer. Husserl, Edmund (2003), Philosophy of Arithmetic, edited by Dallas Willard, trans. by Dallas Willard, Husserliana Collected Works X, Dordrecht: Kluwer. Ierna, Carlo (2005), ‘The Beginnings of Husserl’s Philosophy. Part 1: From Über den Begriff der Zahl to Philosophie der Arithmetik’, in The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 5.

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL

33

Ierna, Carlo (2006), ‘The Beginnings of Husserl’s Philosophy. Part 2: Philosophical and Mathematical Background’, in The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 6. Ierna, Carlo (2008), “Husserl’s Critique of Double Judgments”, in Filip Mattens, ed., Meaning and Language: Phenomenological Perspectives, Phaenome-nologica 187, Dordrecht/Boston/London: Springer.

Jacquette, Dale (2004a), ‘Brentano’s concept of intentionality’, in: Jacquette (2004b). Jacquette, Dale, editor (2004b), The Cambridge Companion to Brentano, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Leijenhorst, Cees and Steenbakkers, Piet, editors (2004), Karl Schuhmann: Selected Papers on Phenomenology, Dordrecht: Kluwer. Lindenfeld, David F. (1980), oopean Thought, 1880-1920, Berkeley/Los Angeles/London: University of California Press. Lohmar, Dieter (1990), ‘Wo lag der Fehler der kategorialen Repräsentation? Zu Sinn und Reichweite einer Selbstkritik Husserls’, in Husserl Studies 7, 179–197. Margolis, Joseph (2004b), ‘Reflections on intentionality’, in: Jacquette (2004b). Meinong, Alexius (1882), ‘Hume Studien II. Zur Relationstheorie’, in Sitzungsbereiche der phil.-hist. Classe der kais. Akademie der Wissenschaften CI:II, 573–752.

Meinong, Alexius (1891), ‘Zur Psychologie der Komplexionen und Relationen’, in Zeitschrift für Psychologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane II, 245–265. Meinong, Alexius (1965), Philosophenbriefe, edited by Rudolf Kindinger, Graz: Akademische Druck- und Verlagsanstalt. Meinong, Alexius (1971), ‘Hume Studien II: zur Relationstheorie’, in: R. Haller, R. Kindinger and R. Chisholm, editors, Gesamtausgabe, volume II, Graz: Akademische Druck- und Verlagsgesellschaft.

34

CARLO IERNA

Mill, James (1878), Analysis of the Phenomena of the Human Mind, volume II, edited by John Stuart Mill, London: Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, second edition. Mill, John Stuart (1875), Gesammelte Schriften, volume 11-12, edited by Theodor Gomperz, Leipzig: Fues’s Verlag (R. Reisland). Peckhaus, Volker (1999), ‘19th century Logic between Philosophy and Mathematics’, in The Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 5:4, 433–450. Rollinger, Robin (1991), ‘Husserl and Cornelius’, in Husserl Studies 8, 33–56. Rollinger, Robin (1993), Meinong and Husserl on Abstraction and Universals, Studien zur Österreichischen Philosophie XX, Amsterdam – Atlanta: Rodopi. Rollinger, Robin (1999), Husserl’s Position in the School of Brentano, Phaenomenologica 150, Dordrecht: Kluwer. Rollinger, Robin (2004b), ‘Brentano and Husserl’, in: Jacquette (2004b), 255–276. Rollinger, Robin (2005), ‘Meinong and Brentano’, in: Schramm (2005), vol. I, 159–197. Schermann, Hans (1972), ‘Husserls II. logische Untersuchung und Meinongs Hume-Studien I’, in: Haller (1972), 103–116. Schramm, Alfred, editor (2005), Meinong Studies - Meinong Studien, volume I, Ontos Verlag. Schuhmann, Karl (2004), ‘Representation in early Husserl’, in: Leijenhorst and Steenbakkers, 261 – 277. Smith, Barry (1994), Austrian Philosophy (Chicago: Open Court Publishing Company, 1994). Spiegelberg, Herbert (1982), The Phenomenological Movement, Phaenomenologica 5/6, 3rd edition (The Hague/Boston/London: Nijhoff, 1982). Stumpf, Carl (1886/87), ‘Ms. Q 11/I: Vorlesungen über Psychologie’, (Husserl’s notes of lectures by Stumpf, WS 1886/87. Transcription by

RELATIONS IN THE EARLY WORKS OF MEINONG AND HUSSERL

35

E. Schuhmann & K. Schuhmann, based on a partial transcription by R. Rollinger). Stumpf, Carl (1886/87), ‘Ms. Q11/II: Vorlesungen über Psychologie’, (Husserl’s notes of lectures by Stumpf, WS 1886/87. Transcription by E. Schuhmann & K. Schuhmann, based on a partial transcription by R. Rollinger).

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

Laura Mari

Summary In recent years Meinong’s theory of meaning has been compared to Frege’s theory of sense and reference, showing that Meinong did not properly hold a direct theory of reference. The aim of the present paper is to extend this analysis, pointing out that some of the key-notions of Meinong’s Theory of objects can be examined in the light of Frege’s work. Frege’s basic conceptions of (1) language, (2) object, (3) sense and reference, (4) thought and truth, provide new elements to deepen the study of Meinong’s thought.

1. Begriffsschrift vs. Natural language It is well known that the aim of Frege was to give a logical foundation to mathematics. Since his first work of 1879 – Begriffsschrift, eine der arithmetischen nachgebildete Formelsprache des reinen Denkens –, Frege stated his purpose of showing that mathematical statements can be proved only by means of logic. He considered as necessary to define all the basic mathematical concepts adequately, which means in a logical way, and to render mathematical proofs completely deductive, without any intuitive element. For this reason, Frege developed a logical language, through which it could be possible to express in a rigorous way all and only the steps of proofs, to check the correctness of every single step and to avoid mistakes through the proof chain. This is possible because this logical language is deprived of all the vague and equivocal characters of natural language. Ideography, in fact, assigns a univocal reference to each sign and expresses adequately the logical form of statements; in this way,

38

LAURA MARI

every single step of proof chains can be checked and tested in its correctness. As the name suggests, Ideography is not simply a calculus but a language of concepts, directed to the conceptual content of statements. This means that all the signs of this language have a specific content and are names of something, even if this something often remains undetermined1. Ideography is superior to natural language because it has been created for a specific task – science – so that it turns out to be more perspicuous and evident than natural language, which is, thus, completely inadequate for science. But exactly because it has been created depriving natural language of vagueness and ambiguities, natural language constitutes the starting point for this process and has to be carefully analysed. Natural language is the only way we have to acquire the laws of thought, but since syntactic form does not often mirror the real logical one, it has to be regimented to obtain the basic logical structures. Frege has, thus, a two-fold consideration of natural language: from one side it has to be regimented and purified, but from the other one it is necessary to analyse its expressive functions, since they are indispensable to create a useful and working logical language. Further, it has to be pointed out that Ideography regiments only a little part of language, i.e. the scientific part, so that it cannot completely substitute natural language. Frege describes the relation between his Ideography and natural language as the relation between the eye and the microscope: “for its great range of application, for its fast fitting to disparate situations, the eye is much more superior to the microscope. But if we consider it as an optical instrument, it is, instead, very defective, even if this fact usually remains unobserved (…). But as soon as scientific tasks need exactness for reasoning, the eye proves to be absolutely insufficient. The microscope, on the contrary, is completely suitable for these tasks but absolutely inadequate for any other one”2.

1

Frege introduces two kinds of symbols: the first ones can mean different things and so express generality; the others, instead, have a fully determinate content (Frege (1879) § 1). 2 Frege (1879) p. xi.

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

39

Natural language, with the aid of grammar, shows the way to provide the correct analysis of statements but, in general, it stops only at the superficial structure, which is often misleading and very different from the deeper logical one. For this reason, grammar’s suggestions cannot be always followed; rather, we have to move away from them any time they turn out to be misleading: “Instead of following grammar blindly, the logician ought rather to see his task as that of freeing us from the fetters of language. For however true it is that thinking, at least in its higher forms, was only made possible by means of language, we have nevertheless to take great care not to become dependent on language; for very many of the mistakes that occur in reasoning have their source in the logical imperfections of language. Of course if we see the task of logic to be that of describing how men actually think, then we shall naturally have to accord great importance to language. But then the name logic is being used for what is really only a branch of psychology”3. Logical language not only has to move away from grammar any time it is necessary, but it has also to keep the conceptual content completely distinguished from any psychological, subjective or intuitive element. Mathematical statements have an objective content that has not to be taken for all the mental images which occur in the subject during the process of apprehension. Frege strongly distinguishes what is floating, waving and indeterminate – which is psychic and subjective – from what is absolutely determinate and unchanging – which is objective and subject-independent. What depends on the subject is always psychological; what is independent from him is, instead, absolutely not reducible to something mental or psychic. The objects of logic must be objective, that is independent from representations and from mental processes. Moreover, even if they are non-actual [unwirklich], i.e. something which does not occupy a region of space, they cannot be confined into the mental and subjective region, because they can subsist without being grasped or thought by any subject whatsoever. What is non-actual, thus, must be di-

3

Frege (1897) p. 155 [(1979) p. 143].

40

LAURA MARI

vided into what is objective and what is mental and only the first kind of thing is the proper object of logic4. Meinong’s aim, instead, is to analyse our world in its complexity. His starting point for this task is Brentano’s theory of intentional reference, to which Meinong gives a more realistic twist, since he becomes more and more interested in objects, apprehended by psychological experiences. Meinong recognizes the importance of the object as distinguished from psychological phenomena and as (quite) independent from them. Objects, in fact, have reality also in and of themselves and not only because they are mediately apprehended through an experience. Meinong, thus, recognizes knowledge as a two-fold process, characterized by the act of knowing and by what is known: “For, to be precise, the psychological event we call cognition does not constitute the cognitive situation in and of itself: knowledge is, so to speak, a double fact in which what is known confronts the act of knowing as something relatively independent. The act of knowing is not merely directed toward what is known, in the way in which a false judgment may be directed toward its object. In knowing, on the contrary, it is as though what is known were seized or grasped by the psychological act, or however else one might attempt to describe, in an unavoidable pictorial way, something which is indescribable”5. Attention is paid both to the objects, that can be apprehended, and to psychological experiences, which apprehend them. Objects are characterized in a certain way in and of themselves, independently from being grasped. Meinong, thus, develops a science, inclusive enough to get any object of apprehension. This science emerges as different from any traditional one and acquires the features of a science “whose legitimate function is to deal with objects as such or objects in their totality”6.

4

About this, see § 26-27 and §61 of Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik. Meinong (1904) GA II, 485 [(1960) p. 78]. 6 Meinong (1904) GA II, 486 [(1960) p. 79]. 5

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

41

But, as we said, objects become accessible only through psychological experiences. The study of psychic experiences (and the acknowledgment of different kinds of experiences not reducible to each other) is thus fundamental, because they give the way to get objects. Moreover, Meinong finds out language as the complementary way of psychology to get objects. Since Meinong was interested in the world in its totality, he completely disregarded any kind of regimented language and believed grammar to be a valid guide for the comprehension of phenomena: “grammar has done the spadework for a theoretical grasp of objects in a very basic way”7. We can say, following the eye-microscope relation, that Meinong developed the eye, for its greater applicability, finding the microscope completely inadequate to explain the world in all its complexity. Meinong paid attention, at least since his 1899 Über Gegenstände höherer Ordnung, to the functions of language, which are recognized as expression [Ausdruck] and signification [Bedeutung]. His semiotical theory is very simple and can be seen as quite insufficient, but it has to be noticed that it is absolutely fundamental within the Theory of objects’ framework, because it is the medium between experiences and objects. Meinong holds the functions of expression and signification all along his production (we can find his theory unchanged till the second edition of Über Annahmen of 1910), but, as we will see later, he increasingly deepens the side of the object, giving a new structure to the theory in his later works. In his treatise of 1899 he writes: “in virtue of the fact that language is ‘expression’ it reveals the representations of the speaking person. But it not only reveals the having of representations in general but also its content – determinations. But what the speaking person wants to ‘say’, or more precisely, that about which he wants to speak is not that what the words express but is what they denote. And it is not the content but the object of the repre7

Meinong (1904) GA II, 496 [(1960) p. 88].

42

LAURA MARI

sentation which is expressed by the word in question. Before any theoretical endeavor the words are our first means to fixate objects, so to speak”8. As Meinong notes, even if the primary function of language is to express a psychological content, this moves into the background because of the importance of the objectual correlate. This prominence justifies the attention he pays to objects and the creation of a science fully devoted to them: the Theory of objects.

2. Object as individuum vs. Object as summum genus For Meinong, as we have already said, even if the main function of language is expression, psychic phenomena move into the background because objects have the prominent role. For Frege, both sense and reference are essential features for linguistic expressions to be included in our vocabulary, because, even if we need a sense to get the reference, “if words are used in the ordinary way, what one intends to speak of is their reference”9. Both authors, hence, believe that our attention is mostly on reference. Beside this similarity, however, they exhibit two different notions of object. Even if Frege’s main concern is not ontology, he makes some ontological classifications of his domain. The first one is the distinction between complete entities – objects – and unsaturated ones – concepts – which are not reducible to the first kind of entity. Moreover, he considers the object as a substance, to which properties can be ascribed and which is always required to have being. Having being is determined by the fact that every symbol of the language must denote an entity. This requirement

8

Meinong (1899) GA II, 385 [(1978) p. 143]. Translations are slightly modified in using the word “representation” instead of “idea” or “presentation” for Vorstellung. This preference is due to the fact that Meinong uses the word Idee also, as well as Präsentation with specific meanings, different from representation. 9 Frege (1892) p. 28 [(1980) p. 58].

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

43

distinguishes language as used in logic from ordinary language: only in the first case is an entity always required and presupposed to the introduction of a sign, while, in everyday language, sense is often sufficient for our purposes: “in science the purpose of a proper name is to refer to an object determinately; if this purpose is unfulfilled, the proper name has no justification in science. How things may be in ordinary language is no concern of ours here”10. Existence, thus, is an obvious presupposition of how we use words: we cannot introduce a sign without knowing if it refers to an entity. By presupposing an object falling under a concept, we risk to give being to an object, which exhibits incompatible properties, and to introduce, hence, a non-existent object. By introducing a concept, determined by any property whatsoever, instead, we check if an object, characterized by those properties, falls under it or not. An existential statement does not speak of the object’s being or not-being, simply because existence is not a property of objects. From Frege’s point of view, a statement such as “a exists”, where a is a proper name, is a logical nonsense, since we must presuppose that a really designates an object11. If an empty name occurs, it is impossible to assign a truth value to the statement in which it occurs. Thus, existence is not a property of objects but of concepts and it says that under a concept there falls an object, characterized by the properties exhibited by the concept. Logic works only with signs that really denote an entity and this fact guarantees the truth or the falsity of logical statements. The aim of logic is truth and it can be reached only insofar as we work with entities. Within Meinong’s framework, “object” is the most general notion: everything there is, is an object and it can be characterized as what can be apprehended by a psychological experience (representations, judgments, assumptions,...):

10 11

Frege (1906) p. 193 [(1979) pp. 178-179]. See for this analysis of existential statements Dialog mit Pünjer über Existenz in Frege (1969) pp. 60-75 [(1979) pp. 53-67].

44

LAURA MARI

“to define formally what object is, both genus and differentia are lacking, because everything is an object. But the etymology of ‘Gegenstehen [to be in front of]’ offers an indirect characterization of it, since it points to the psychological experiences which apprehend objects. But these experiences have not to be considered as constitutive elements of objects”12. Since the domain of what can be apprehended is not equivalent to the domain of what has being, the notion of object goes beyond the limit of being and is no more a synonym of entity. Thus, the notion of object can be described in two ways: first of all, it is no more determined by its being, but by its possibility of being apprehended. Every set of properties identifies an object and this set is not “in any way external to the object but constitutes its proper essence”13. “Object” is no more a substance, whose properties can be ascribed to, but simply a set of properties, which suffices to single it out. These properties constitute the Sosein of the object, that is the nucleus of properties which enables to determine it and to pick it out. The keystone of Meinong’s philosophy is that this Sosein adheres to its object independently from its being or non-being: “[the principle of the independence of Sosein from Sein] tells us that that which is not in any way external to the object, but constitutes its proper essence, subsist in its Sosein – the Sosein attaching to the object whether the object has being or not”14. But “object” is also the summum genus: “object” is what is simply given. It is, thus, the most general notion of our vocabulary. In this way, the notion of object is no more a classificatory one: if everything is an object, then it is necessary to classify all the different kinds of objects we admit

12

Meinong (1921) GA VII, 14-15. Meinong (1904) GA II, 494 [(1960) p. 86]. 14 Meinong (1904) GA II, 494 [(1960) p. 86]. 13

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

45

within the domain. The first classification is made on the basis of the different kinds of apprehending experiences: “to the four main classes of [apprehending experiences] – representing, thinking, feeling, desiring – four main classes of objects – objecta, objectives, dignitatives, desideratives – correspond. But their peculiarity is not determined only by the peculiarity of the apprehending experiences”15. Even if psychological experiences determine different classes of objects, these are also characterized by their properties, which constitute their Sosein. And it is their nature that allows for further classifications: “the nature of objecta is such that either allows them to exist and to be perceived or prohibits it; so that, if they have being, this cannot be existence but only subsistence”16. Objects, thus, can be divided into real objects – which are the only ones that can exist – and ideal ones – which have a formal kind of being. All these objects follow the law of excluded middle, so that they are determined in all their respects. And it is for this reason that they have being. But within Meinong framework there are not only these kinds of objects – which are defined as complete; there are, in fact, also incomplete objects, that is, objects that have only a finite number of properties. These incomplete objects do not exist nor subsist, nevertheless, they can be perfectly apprehended and understood. And within these objects, it is possible to find also those objects which violate another basic logical law, the law of contradiction, so that their non-being is determined by their having contradictory properties. But even these objects can be included in the domain, because everything is an object, so that “even what does not exist nor subsist, since it is prior to apprehension, has a remnant of positional character – Aussersein – which,

15 16

Meinong (1921) GA VII, 16-17. Meinong (1921) GA VII, 17-18.

46

LAURA MARI

therefore, no object seems to be lacking, with the exception, perhaps, of very special complicated cases”17. It clearly emerges that, within Meinong’s theory, “object” can be no more identified with “individual”, because individuals are only a small part of the domain, constituted by complete objects, and that there are many other objects beside them that are not individuals. Within Frege’s theory, instead, “object” is a synonym of “individual” and it is identified with a substance, which is required to have being. If we look at impossible objects, we can see that Frege admits “round square” into his language as an empty concept – which guarantees the possibility to say that a round square does not exist – but not as an object, otherwise an individual with contradictory properties would have to be admitted into the domain as an entity. For Meinong, instead, even impossibilia are objects, because “object” does not mean “individual” and it is not required to have being. In Über Emotionale Präsentation, Meinong states clearly that this kind of objects is included in the domain only insofar as they are considered as disconcreta; the round square, thus, has Aussersein only as a disconcretum, while it lacks even Aussersein as a concretum, that is as an individual: “for the apprehension of impossible objects one always has available a disconcretum but never a concretum. It is wrong to say that I cannot apprehend the round square at all but that the intuitive apprehension of it is by its very nature excluded. It can also be said that though a round square neither exist nor subsist, the round square has Aussersein as a disconcretum; but it does not and cannot have Aussersein as a concretum”18. It is evident that Meinong does not admit any contradictory individual, but rather, that he allows for contradictory conceptual objects, giving, thus, an ontological fashion to semantical notions. The fundamental notion of object, presented into both frameworks, is thus very different. In Frege’s theory, “object” is a classificatory notion: it 17 18

Meinong (1921) GA VII, 21. Meinong (1917) GA III, 308 [(1972) p. 21].

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

47

is a peculiar kind of entity, the substantial individual, that is a complete entity, distinguished from and not reducible to concept, since their nature is essentially different. Frege only requires that each linguistic expression have a denotation, which is an entity (an object, a concept, a truth value), while he is not interested in distinguishing objects on the basis of modes of being or of apprehending experiences. Frege limits his interests into logic: linguistic expressions, therefore, if used in logic, must always have a reference, that is always an entity. This is the only requirement he is interested in. Meinong, by his side, is interested in the world in its totality and believes that, looking at its complexity, we find out many kinds of objects other than concreta and individuals. From this point of view, then, classifications and distinctions become essential to analyse different phenomena. In his theory, non-existent objects continually come into the enquiry, since the world is a complex structure, essentially based on continuous interconnections between the existent and the non-existent. Pure object, i.e. considered in itself, is indifferent to being as well as to non-being, because determinations of being do not belong to its Sosein. The notion of object is completely detached from presupposing any sort of being and this position is absolutely opposed to Frege’s view, where no object can be included in the domain or have properties unless it has being. In the Theory of objects’ framework pure object precedes being, in Frege’s one being is always presupposed.

3. Meaning vs. Representation 3.1 First elaboration of the Theory of Objects (1899-1910) A basic character of Frege’s theory is his strong anti-psychological character: he believes that it is absolutely necessary to distinguish what is objective from what is strictly mental. Thus, he distinguishes representation [Vorstellung] from sense [Sinn] and this distinction remains unchanged throughout his production. In the introduction of Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik Frege states, as the first of his three fundamental principles that we have:

48

LAURA MARI

“always to separate sharply the psychological from the logical, the subjective from the objective”19. Frege is never interested in the individual process of apprehension, but in the constitutive elements of this process, one of which is sense. Since Frege is never interested in the laws of thinking, i.e. the way we really think, but in the laws of thought, which are independent from actual use, he is strongly convinced that logic, the science that investigates these laws, must not be based on an indeterminate, floating and subjective element as representation is. This anti-psychological character finds its reason in the fact that logic has to be an autonomous and self-subsistent science, which does not need any justification, because its laws are the laws of thought that can be described but not justified. Arithmetic has nothing in common with sensation or with mental images; so psychology cannot help the mathematician in his work, because these representations are completely indifferent to him. Mathematical objects are not mental objects: “if number were a representation, then arithmetic would be psychology. But arithmetic is no more psychology than, say, astronomy is. Astronomy is concerned not with representations of the planets, but with the planets themselves, and by the same token the objects of arithmetic are not representations either. If the number two were a representation, then it would have straight away to be private to me only. (…). We should then have it might be many millions of twos on our hands. We should have to speak of my two and your two, of one two and all twos”20. In his 1892 famous article Über Sinn und Bedeutung, Frege proposes his semantical theory based on the distinction between sense and reference. Proper names have as reference the object of which they are the name of, while their sense is a way in which the object is presented. We can say that sense exhibits at least three aspects, since it is 19

Frege (1884) p. x. After stating his principles he specifies: “in compliance with the first principle, I have used the word ‘representation’ always in the psychological sense, and have distinguished representations from concepts and from objects”. 20 Frege (1884) § 27.

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

a) b) c)

49

a way in which the reference of a term is given; what is grasped during the process of comprehension of terms; the way through which the reference of terms is found.

Given a term, we grasp its sense and through it we get its reference; and this is possible only because the sense of the term constitutes a way in which the reference is given. This means, first of all, that sense is not determined by reference but that it is that element which properly determines reference, i.e. the object, and that it is the objective element grasped during the process of comprehension. This process can exhibit psychological elements but sense has not to be confused with those representations that a subject can have during that process. Sense, thus, is the objective element, grasped in this process and completely distinguished from the subjective element, i.e. representation. We have said that Meinong paid an increasing attention to the objects of apprehension as distinguished from psychological experiences. Meinong’s aim is to not constrain the object within the limits of the mind, but to assure an extra-mental object, that does obtain out of its boundaries. To every representation there corresponds something represented, which is distinguished from the psychological experience, even if its grasping depends on this experience. The acknowledgement of the object, as something out of the limits of mind, strictly depends on the distinction between content and object, introduced in the 1899 treatise and never abandoned by Meinong21. The content is that proper element of psychological phenomena, distinguished from the act but still inside the whole psychic experience, which enables the act to get the object, which is outside the mind. So, having the same kind of act – representation – the variability of the object depends on the variation of a mental component – content – that is different from the act, but that is still one of its components. The content, in fact, comes with the act, but, thanks to its great variability, is

21

Meinong took over the content-object distinction from Twardowski’s 1894 Zur Lehre vom Inhalt und Gegenstand der Vorstellung. It is not my concern here to analyse the genesis of Meinong’s theory and its connections with other authors. For further details, see for example Marek (2001).

50

LAURA MARI

what makes the apprehension of a different object each time possible. In Über Gegenstände höherer Ordnung, Meinong writes: “whether I represent a church tower or a mountain top, a feeling or a desire, a relation of difference or causality, or any other thing whatsoever, I am in each case representing. Irrespective of the unlimited variability of the object all these mental occurrences therefore have one moment in common, exactly that by virtue of which they all are representations, that is the representing or the act of representation. On the other hand, insofar representations are representations of different objects, they cannot be completely equal to each other: in whatever way the relation between the representation and its object is to be conceived the difference of the objects must somehow come down to a difference between the representations in question. Now, that in which representations of different objects differ from each other, irrespective of their agreement in act, is that which claims the designation ‘content of representation’. This exists, is therefore real and present, of course also mental, even if the object which is represented by means of it, so to speak, may be non-existent, non-real, non-present, non-mental”22. We have said that the main function of language is to express psychological experiences, even if attention is mostly paid to objects – i.e. the significations of words. Expression is the necessary element to get the object, because it constitutes a way in which the object is given. More accurately, the content exhibits a property really possessed by the object, so it is determined by the object, but it is only through the content that we can correctly get the object. This exhibits a difference as regards Frege’s analysis, in which sense is meant to be not determined by reference. For Meinong, instead, “what [a word] signifies is the object of the intellectual event in question, in the first instance the object of the representation that makes up this event or at least forms its basis. Thus, a person who utters a word such as ‘sun’ normally gives expression, (…), to the fact that a definite representation is occurring in him (…). As to what represen22

Meinong (1899) GA II, 384 [(1978) p. 143].

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

51

tation this is, that is in the first instance determined by what is represented by means of it, or in other words, determined by its object; and this object is simply that which the word ‘sun’ signifies”23. The fact that expression – and thus the content – is determined by its object reveals, in my opinion, that the content is not completely subjective and dependent on the subject that has it. The content, in fact, shows a property really possessed by the object, which is grasped by the subject through a psychological experience. The content, thus, is strongly dependent on the subject in which it occurs, since it is a proper element of the experience, but it is not completely subjective, since the property it presents is not determined by the subject. The word-object relation, thus, is not completely subjective. In fact, even if content is a proper element of the psychological experience, and so it is within the limits of mind, it determines the way through which the object can be grasped by the subject, since it presents the object. Moreover, Meinong clearly states that: “it must be admitted that when there is a question about the signification of a word, the word one has in mind is not apt to be a certain word uttered just then by a certain individual. It is ‘the word’ in general that one has in mind, and by the signification of a word, therefore, we understand not what this or that person means by it, but what the totality or the majority of speakers mean and, hence, what the individual speaker reasonably ‘should’ mean”24. This quotation shows that Meinong, contrary to Frege, is really interested in how language works in common speech and not in a purified language such as the mathematical one. Meinong wants to analyse communicative usage and to try to understand how meaning can be conveyed and shared25. Frege is not interested in this and, as we saw before, he believes that a well working logical language must have, for every term that is introduced into the language, a determined reference, as well as a univocal sense. Variations of sense are considered by Frege as imperfections of the

23

Meinong (1910) GA IV, 24-25 [(1983) p. 24] emphasis added. Meinong (1910) GA IV, 25 [(1983) p. 24] emphasis added. 25 See for more details on this, Dölling (1998). 24

52

LAURA MARI

language that should be eliminated, because they cause a variation of the thought in which they occur26. In Meinong, instead, content, being within the psychic experience, can reveal different properties in different subjects, but it is not completely subjective, because it shows a property really possessed by the object. The objectual correlate is not merely the object in the representation, but an object independent from the mind, which is presented to it through the content, that component of the psychological phenomenon, through which the object can be correctly intended. So, if we look at the notions of sense and content we can see that the function they play within the two theories are quite the same. Above all, they both share their being a way in which the reference of terms is given (a) and their being the way through which the reference of terms is found (c). Moreover, they both are what is grasped in the process of comprehension of terms (b), but while in Frege sense is considered as totally objective and distinguished from mental occurrences, content is not so, since it strongly depends on the subject that has it. The aspect that cannot be considered alike is, thus, the independence of the intermediate element from the subject in which it occurs, because sense is given independently from its being grasped by any subject, while content conveys what actually emerges into a subject’s mind. For this reason I believe that content, as it is presented in the first elaboration of Meinong’s theory, cannot be completely assimilated to Frege’s notion of sense.

3.2 Later elaboration of the Theory of Objects (1915-1921) With the introduction, in Meinong’s later works, of auxiliary objects, instead, it is possible to compare this new kind of objects with Frege’s notion of sense27, finding in them the intermediate element between mind and world, independent from the mind as well as from the subject in

26 27

See Frege (1892) p. 27 n. [(1980) p. 58 n.]. The starting point for this analysis are Simons (1995) and Sierszulska (2006).

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

53

which they occur. In his last work of 1921, Selbsdarstellung, Meinong briefly states that the psychological content has to be clearly distinguished from “‘contents’ as understood in logic”28 and he refers to his book of 1915 Über Möglichkeit und Wahrscheinlichkeit. My concern here is to explain this distinction, in order to show how Meinong deepens the problem of the sign-object relation. I have said before, that for Meinong a sign is connected with its object only through the psychic element. The function of expression is thus fundamental for a sign to correctly refer to its object. Prima facie, it seems that Meinong simply stated that the meaning of a sign is the object for which it stands. But this is not completely true, because of the function of expression, which through the content works as an intermediary. In Über Annahmen, Meinong gives great importance to the notion of presentation [Präsentation], which is what properly enables the passage from the mind to the objectual correlate. A sign, in fact, expresses a psychological experience, whose proper element is content, which presents [präsentiert] the object to mind. It is only thanks to presentation that a sign can correctly signify the object. As Peter Simons puts it: “in the matter of meaning, it is the relation of presenting that wears the trousers, because it gets us from the private and mental to the public and objective”29. So, even if the content of a mental act belongs to a subject and is inside the mind, it presents an object that is extra-mental and objective. The sign-meaning relation always passes through the psychic dimension, but reference is not limited to the mind: it is objective and goes beyond the singular subject. In Über Annahmen, Meinong speaks of intending by way of being [Seinsmeinen] and of intending by way of so-being [Soseinsmeinen], i.e. by means of properties. If we look at the so-being objective “something that is black”, we can see that in different times it is possible to apprehend different objects by the same content. By “something that is black”, we 28 29

Meinong (1921) GA VII, 23. Simons (1995) p. 173.

54

LAURA MARI

can each time intend a pen, a blackboard and so on, which means, in logical terms, an element of the extension of “being black”. Since our point of view is object-theoretical, we can go beyond the extension given by actual objects or even subsistent objects; therefore, “besides the factual objective ‘Pitch is black’, there are (in the sense of Aussersein) also objectives such as ‘Milk is black’. If one assumes such an objective, then naturally by ‘something black’ even milk can be intended”30. This means that the black-content presents something-that-is-black, in a mediate way, through the objective content “that something is black”. In this way, to the same content may correspond a potentially infinite number of objects, whereas an object can be intended by different contents, since the object may be characterized in different ways by different properties. Meinong distinguishes intending a property from intending an object, that bears that property, because to the same object can be ascribed many properties, that can’t be predicated of the property itself. Meinong writes that this holds for all the things apprehended by means of words and their meaning, because “what differentiates these word-meanings is primarily the relevant properties; these latter must be referred to the thing that they are supposed to characterize, and this referral cannot take place otherwise than through intending by way of so-being”31. Properties characterize objects and they are what makes the individuation of an object possible, as well as its distinction from other objects. In different times, it is possible to ascribe different properties to the same object; thus, the same object can be intended by different intending of sobeing. In this way, it emerges that, when an object is intended by a determined property, it is closed to further determinations, until through the

30 31

Meinong (1910) GA IV, 277 [(1983) pp. 199-200]. Meinong (1910) GA IV, 271 [(1983) p. 195].

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

55

objective of so-being an object, to which other properties can be ascribed, is intended. Thus, “through mere intending by way of so-being the intended object is, as it were, closed to further possible determinations. If in the intending of an object supplementary details are contemplated, even though it be just indeterminately, then and only then does the object appear as an open one, so to speak. So, in the light of that, we might speak of objects intended open and intended closed, or more briefly, of open and closed objects”32. The intending of an object, thus, depends primarily on whose determinations are chosen to characterize the object itself. Objects, in fact, “are not made by us, but can only be chosen out of the infinite abundance of Aussersein”33. That means that we “specify the objective of so-being by means of which one fastens upon the object”34. In this way, Meinong distinguishes the psychological content from the logical one. Mere representation is not sufficient alone to really get an object: it is completely passive so it needs an integrating factor that makes the apprehension of an object possible. Meinong deepens the analysis of intentionality and believes that it is based on intending [Meinen]. An object of representation is intended because it is grasped by means of an objective. Representation, in fact, grasps its object only incompletely and so it needs a mediate grasping through an objective. The representational content, thus, is what identifies the object but, since representation alone is insufficient, it needs an objective to really get the object. Thus, even if content is inside the mind of a particular subject, the process of intending an object is not completely subjective, because the object is intended mediately through an objective. By an intending of so-being, thus, we deter32

Meinong (1910) GA IV, 271 [(1983) pp. 195-196]. Meinong (1910) GA IV, 274 [(1983) p. 197]. 34 Meinong (1910) GA IV, 274 [(1983) p. 197]. 33

56

LAURA MARI

mine a particular property, chosen to characterize the object and this intending is no more completely subject-dependent. Like Fregean sense, the objective of so-being determines a way in which the object is described and it is the way through which the denotation is found, because it expresses a property really possessed by the object, which we grasp during the process of apprehension. This analysis is deepened and developed in his 1915 Über Möglichkeit und Wahrscheinlichkeit, with the introduction of auxiliary [Hilfsgegenstand] and target [Zielgegenstand] object and the distinction between complete [vollständiger] and incomplete [unvollständiger] object. By complete object, Meinong means an object determined in all its properties; hence, real objects are complete, while incomplete objects do not exist nor subsist. It is important to note that an object is complete logically and ontologically, but not epistemically, since it is not possible to know all the infinitely many properties of an object. In the process of apprehension, thus, we cannot apprehend all the infinitely many properties of an object, but we can intend it correctly by means of certain properties, chosen to characterize it. These determinations constitute an incomplete object, which is what content really presents to the mind and what enables us to get the object, which becomes the target object. As Meinong briefly states in Selbstdarstellung: “since complete objects have infinitely many determinations, the presenting content, or quasi-content, which is the basic element of intending, immediately refers only to an incomplete object as proximate [nächster] object”35. Auxiliary objects, thus, are incomplete objects, which are presented through the content to the mind and which enable us to refer correctly to the target object, which can be complete or still incomplete but more determined. Incomplete objects, then, do not exist nor subsist but they can be embedded [implektiert] into complete or still incomplete but more determined objects. This, I believe, is the way Meinong developed his anal-

35

Meinong (1921) GA VII, 25.

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

57

ysis of intending by the way of so-being of 191036. The auxiliary object, in fact, fixes only some of the object’s properties through which we can grasp the object; and since the target object can be characterized in many other ways, the auxiliary object is embedded into the target object, which is much more determined. The smallest nucleus of properties, which constitutes the incomplete object’s nature, in fact, can be completed by all the properties, which can be referred to the object. This way, Meinong believes to explain that different objects may correspond to the same content: by “something that is black”, thus, we can refer to many different objects, some of them real, others subsistent, others ausserseiende. Even if content is still the expression of signs and belongs to a particular subject, it does no more present the object directly, because now it presents an incomplete object – the auxiliary object – which is embedded into the target object, i.e. the referent. By qualifying it as an object, Meinong goes a step further than his analysis of 1910, because, doing so, he makes it independent from the mind and able to go beyond the private and subjective dimension. The auxiliary object, in fact, is not a mental element as the content is: it is an object and so it is extra-mental, independent from a particular subject and able to be grasped by anybody. The auxiliary object, just like the content, gives a way in which the denotation of a term is given, but, unlike the content, it is not a private element, rather, a set of the object properties, which can be used by different subjects. From Frege’s point of view, content has still to be included in the realm of representations – since it strongly depends on the subject in which it occurs – while auxiliary objects can’t be considered in the same manner, since they are extra-mental and objective. Frege introduces the notion of sense as an objective element, completely independent from any subject that can grasp it and Meinong’s auxiliary objects are the same. Moreover, auxiliary objects have been introduced to make the apprehension of complete objects possible, since, for their infinite complexity, they

36

When Meinong, in Selbstdarstellung states the distinction between the logical content and the psychological one, he refers to a note of Über Möglichkeit und Wahrscheinlichkeit (Meinong (1915) GA V, 163 n. 3), which refers back to §45 of Über Annahmen, exactly where Meinong explains intending of so-being.

58

LAURA MARI

could not be otherwise known. The auxiliary object can thus be seen as a subset of the set of properties of the target object; and it is this subset of properties that makes the apprehension of the target object possible. Since the auxiliary object is a) a way in which the target object is given; b) a way through which the target object can be apprehended (the presenting experience, in fact, has only a finite complexity, so the presenting content fixes only some of the properties of the object); c) a way through which the target object is found it plays the role of semantic intermediary between a sign and its referent, like fregean sense.

4. Thought [Gedanke] vs. Objective [Objectiv] In the introduction of Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik, Frege states two more principles – next to the one that tells us to distinguish what is psychological from what is logical37. One reminds us to maintain the distinction between concept and object, because their nature is intrinsically different: concept is unsaturated while object is determined. The other principle tells us “never to ask for the sense of a word in isolation, but only in the context of a proposition”38. This principle guarantees the refutation of representations as the denotations of words, that are inadequate to work as reference not only because they are subjective and mental but also because there are objects – for example numbers – of which we cannot have any representation. Words have a reference not on account of the possibility for their object to be represented, but for their being in a proposition:

37 38

See above section 3.1. Frege (1884) p. x.

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

59

“we ought always to keep before our eyes a complete proposition. Only in a proposition have the words really a reference. It may be that mental pictures float before us all the while, but these need not correspond to the logical elements in the judgment. It is enough if the proposition taken as a whole has a sense; it is this that confers on its parts also their content”39. To analyse propositions correctly it is necessary to cut all mental images out and to put the attention on the objective content, contained in every statement. This is a thought, described by Frege as “[what] is capable of being the common property of several thinkers”40. The other basic principle within Frege’s theory is the Principle of Compositionality, which says that the reference of a statement depends on the reference of its constituent parts. The thought, thus, cannot be the reference of the statement, because by changing one of its elements with a coreferent one, we change the thought expressed by the statement itself. The thought constitutes the sense of the statement, while reference strictly depends on the reference of its elements, which, for this reason cannot lack it: “one could be satisfied with the sense, if one wanted to go no further than the thought. If it were a question only of the sense of the sentence, the thought, it would be unnecessary to bother with the reference of a part of the sentence; only the sense, not the reference, of the part is relevant to the sense of the whole sentence. […]. The fact that we concern ourselves at all about the reference of a part of the sentence indicates that we generally recognize and expect a reference for the sentence itself. The thought loses value for us as soon as we recognize that the reference of one of its parts is missing. We are therefore justified in not being satisfied with the sense of a sentence and in inquiring also as to its reference. But now why do we want every proper name to have not only a sense, but also a reference? Why is

39 40

Frege (1884) § 60. Frege (1892) p. 32 n. [(1980) p. 62 n.].

60

LAURA MARI

the thought not enough for us? Because and to the extent that we are concerned with its truth value”41. The thought gives the way to get the reference of statements, which is found in their truth value, since this is what remains unchanged, when the sense changes, and what we are primarily interested in. Statements become, thus, proper names of two objects: True and False. Moreover, as Frege declares, regarding reference, statements lose any individual and peculiar character so that our interest is addressed not only to their truth value or to their sense alone, but to them both. The circumstance that a statement is true or false is its reference but its sense is necessary to convey its objective content. And since reference depends on the references of its constituents, in every judgment, i.e. a statement admitted to be true, “the step from the level of thoughts to the level of reference (the objective) has already been taken”42. From this fact, many aspects follow: first of all, truth emerges as a fundamental notion. Properly, truth is logic’s leading notion, since logic’s task is to find out the laws of what is true. These laws are independent from effective thinking and completely autonomous from being grasped. These characters of independence from mind are transposed to thoughts, which are what properly truth can be applied to and what is expressed by means of declarative sentences. Just by asserting a declarative sentence, we commit ourselves to the truth of what we asserted. A true thought is true independently from being really recognized as true or from being grasped or thought by a subject whatsoever, but it reveals itself as true by means of judgments. Thoughts are not created by us but simply made out as true or false. Logic’s proper objects are thus true thoughts (and the refusal of false ones). Secondarily, statements in which empty names occur, can be apprehended and understood only because these names also have a sense, but since one of their parts lacks reference, they fail to have a truth value, because 41 42

Frege (1892) p. 33 [(1980) pp. 62-63]. Frege (1892) p. 34 [(1980) p. 64].

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

61

“it is of the reference of the name that the predicate is affirmed or denied. Whoever does not admit the name has reference can neither apply nor withhold the predicate”43. Statements in which empty names occur, lack in truth value because the object – which is what we are interested in and what we want to speak of – is in them missing; but they can be however understood because they have a sense: “let us now look at the sentence ‘Etna is larger than Vesuvio’. A part of a thought corresponds to the word ‘Etna’, namely the sense of this word. But is the mountain itself with its rocks and lava part of the thought? Obviously not, for one can see Etna, but one cannot see the thought that Etna is higher than Vesuvio. But what are we making a statement about? Obviously about Etna itself. And when we say ‘Scylla has 6 heads’, what are we making a statement about? In this case nothing whatsoever; for the word ‘Scylla’ refers to nothing. Nevertheless we can find a thought expressed by the sentence, and concede a sense to the word ‘Scylla’”44. These statements also, thus, express a thought. Therefore, truth cannot be explained in terms of the correspondence with something which occurs. It is instead what is properly expressed by declarative sentences, independently from the occurrence of the word “true” in them. The adherence to what obtains is due to the constituent parts having a reference, which is an object, i.e. an entity. Thoughts reveal themselves as what can be said to be true: “when we call a sentence true we really mean its sense is. From which it follows that it is for the sense of a sentence that the question of truth arises in general”45, and they become accessible through the linguistic utterance because:

43

Frege (1892) p. 33 [(1980) p. 62]. Frege (1914) p. 243 [(1979) p. 225]. 45 Frege (1918) p. 60 [(1956) p. 292]. 44

62

LAURA MARI

“the thought, in itself immaterial, clothes itself in the material garment of a sentence and thereby becomes comprehensible to us”46. Thoughts are not something material – so they cannot belong to the external world – nor representations – since they always need a bearer – but they belong to a third realm, in which they stand timelessly. This means that anyone who thinks a thought, does not produce it but he grasps it – by thinking it –, he recognizes its truth – by judging it – and he manifests this judgment – by asserting it47. In Meinong’s later elaboration, his semiotical theory is much more complex than the one presented in Über Annahmen, thanks to the introduction of auxiliary and target objects. But this theory does not replace the first one, because it has a narrower scope of application. The analysis introduced in 1915, in fact, can be applied only to names, but not to propositions, so it is valid only for objecta but not also for objectives. In his later production, thus, Meinong still holds that a statement expresses a thought (a judgment or an assumption) and signifies an objective. And it does seem that an objective is directly designated, without any intermediary. But as many recent contributions have shown48, the objective plays both the role of semantical intermediary – proposition – and of objectual correlate, melting together a logical and an ontological nature. Regarding judgments, Meinong introduces objectives – which are built on one or more objecta – as the object to which this kind of experience addresses. Even if the attention is mostly on these objecta, they are what is judged about, which has to be distinguished from what is judged, which is judgment’s proper object: “the judgment apprehends the objectum through the objective; so that in the objective we have the true judgmental object, despite the objectum’s obviously commanding position in our interests”49.

46

Frege (1918) p. 61 [(1956) p. 292]. Frege (1918) p. 62 [(1956) p. 294]. 48 See about this Lenoci (1998), Manotta (1998), Simons (1995). 49 Meinong (1910) GA IV, 46 [(1983) p. 40]. 47

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

63

Meinong, thus, distinguishes objecta from the state of affair50 in which they occur, and despite objecta’s prominent role, they can be apprehended only by means of the objective: “as something apprehended by the judgment, the objectum always stands in an objective. It forms a kind of integral part of the objective”51. The circumstance described by a statement can be, thus, well distinguished from the objects that constitute that circumstance. It is this distinction that determines the different mode of being of objectives – which can at most subsist – from the one of objecta, which are what can exist (if they are reducible to sensation). Moreover, by giving to the objective the role of judgments’ signification, Meinong goes beyond an internalistic theory of denotation, since the objective is not an object that belongs to the psychic experience of a particular subject, but is an extra-mental object, presented to the mind by a psychic experience. Being a kind of object, the objective becomes accessible through a psychic experience but it is not created by the subject that apprehends it. Even in the case of judgments, Meinong considers as fundamental the content-object distinction, which at the same time distinguishes and keeps the connection between mind and world: the objective is presented by a content, which is that element which allows the psychic experience to correctly address an object, which is extra-mental and independent from the mind. The study of psychic experiences brings Meinong to consider knowledge not simply as the acknowledgment of objecta, but also of more complex structures – objectives – built on them and strictly dependent on them. Objectives, thus, are objects of higher order, which have one or more objecta as fundamenta. The objective is a higher order object that can only subsist, while objecta, on which the objective is based, can exist. Objecta are what we want to speak of and what, for the principle of obli-

50

I use the term “state of affair” as a temporary solution, since it does not properly correspond to Meinong’s view. 51 Meinong (1910) GA IV, 47 [(1983) p. 40].

64

LAURA MARI

gatory infima, must be given in order to have a correct apprehension. Infima are the basic level of apprehension, they are what is simply given, on which it is possible to build levels of increasing complexity52. Therefore, this means that the objective is not something that actually occurs in the world, but something through which what is real (but not only that) is apprehended. Meinong’s theory reveals that our experience has always a structure, and that cases of apprehension of what is absolutely simple hardly occur. The analysis of negative objects offers a striking example: negation always exceeds mere representation. On the level of objecta no antithesis between positive and negative takes place, because objecta are what is simply posited. This antithesis only occurs on the level of judgments (and assumptions): positive or negative is only what is judged (or assumed) – i.e. the objective – and not objecta, which are the constitutive elements of objectives. This explains Meinong’s assertion that objecta are beyond being and non-being: any determination of their being (or non being) is an objective, which subsists or not. Negative objects show that experience needs to be organized into a structure adequate enough for its complexity. This structure is found in subsistent objectives which are called facts53. Factuality is an intrinsic property of objectives, which does not depend on its acknowledgment by the subject that thinks it: “an objective must bear factuality in itself; and as far as I can see, its factuality is a basic property for which there is no definition and, at least for the time being, also no description”54. A fact subsists because the circumstance that it describes has an ontological value that makes it hold. This value does not necessarily concern existent objects or something real, but any circumstance with positive charac52

Also objectives can be what is judged about, so that we can have a series of higher order objectives, which must, nonetheless, have some objecta as their basis, otherwise it would be a defective case of apprehension. See about this, Über Annahmen (1910) GA IV, 63 [(1983) p. 51]. 53 Meinong (1910) GA IV, 69 [(1983) p. 55]: “an objective that subsist is also called a fact”. 54 Meinong (1910) GA IV, 70 [(1983) p. 56].

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

65

ter which makes it valid55. In this way, subsistence does not depend on the being of the objecta that constitute the objective, otherwise we would fall back into the prejudice in favor of the actual. Thus, since the objective is a kind of object, it is given in the domain as a higher order object, and since it is ideal, it is a structure that makes the apprehension of being and non-being possible. Objecta are only those things that can be apprehended mediately in an objective, that is an adequate structure for their correct apprehension. But objectives are also what is apprehended by means of language. Language, in fact, expresses psychic experiences that have objectives as their object56. Even if Meinong recognizes the possibility for words also to signify objectives, he believes that sentences are the proper linguistic expression for objectives. Words, in fact, do not have a determinate affirmative or negative character, which, instead, sentences have. Thus, the objective is what the sentence speaks of, what the psychic experience is addressed to: it plays the role, thus, of proposition. But Meinong does not want to constrain the objective into the level of language: the objective is an ontological structure that finds its proper expression in sentences but it cannot be narrowed down to the linguistic level of proposition. The distinction of these two levels is essential for Meinong and that is why Meinong does not want to use the term “proposition” for his “objective”. The term “proposition”, in fact: “has customarily been used with reference to linguistic matters. This usage has been so unequivocal that a reinterpretation of this expres-

55 56

That’s why the notion of “state of affair” does not properly correspond to Meinong’s conception of facts. Language has the primary role of expressing psychic experiences and there are some kinds of experiences that have objectives as their object: “[…] objectives are never experiences. […] The objective has close as well as solid relations to language; yet these relations can nowise be based on language’s expressing the objective. […]. But language may express an experience that has one of these things as its object, and in that sense any of these things can figure in language” (Meinong (1910) GA IV, 53 [(1983) pp. 44-45]).

66

LAURA MARI

sion in a ‘sense’ independent of speech as well as of thought would have to soon lead to subjectivization of this sense”57. Meinong wants to guarantee the objective as independent from being thought, grasped or known by a particular subject. The objective has an intrinsic value, it obtains in and of itself, because of its being an object of the domain. The proper essence of objectives is independent from the subjective dimension of thinking and knowledge but also of language, which can only reveal it and convey it. Thus, for Meinong, “a ‘proposition’ is an objective that is apprehended and perhaps also expressed; it is at least present and formulated in words”58. And it is in this distinction between the objective as apprehended and as an object in and of itself, that emerges the different characterization of it as true and as factual: factuality is an intrinsic property of the objective, it does not depend on anything external to it but on what it really is: an object of higher order that structures what is given. Truth, instead, is the acknowledgement of this factuality by a subject that expresses it in a sentence: “while the reference to an apprehending judgment only appears to play a role in the case of ‘factual’, this reference has an essential meaning in the case of ‘true’. […] [truth and falsity] seem to appear where the objective presents itself as the real or fictive view or assertion of a definite or indefinite individual or group, so that it can then be subjected to a type of criticism. But if these are the circumstances under which one might employ the epithet ‘truth’, what does it mean? It would be in close accordance with common sense as well as with time-honored tradition to answer this way: what one asserts is true when it agrees with what is – or with what is factual. So in its essentials, the situation is one in which an objective somehow presupposed as pseudo-existing is confronted with the pure objective, as it were, on the strength of the latter’s factuality”59.

57

Meinong (1910) GA IV, 100 [(1983) p. 75], emphasis added. Meinong (1910) GA IV, 100 [(1983) p. 75]. 59 Meinong (1910) GA IV, 93-94 [(1983) p. 71]. 58

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

67

This passage shows that a proposition, i.e. an objective asserted in a sentence, must conform to a fact – i.e. to a subsistent objective – in order to be true. Thus, the arrangement given by objectives is ontological – since they organize experiences into an adequate structure – as well as linguistic – since they are also the intermediary element between mind and world, between the private psychic dimension and what is described by the objective itself. Moreover, since facts cannot be identified with something that actually occurs out in the world, Meinong can adequately explain negative true statements, because their truth is not determined by the existence of the objects they speak of, but by the subsistence of the corresponding objective. Therefore, in virtue of the detachment of the notion of object from actuality and from being, an object can be non-existent or nonsubsistent and be nevertheless included in the domain. The objective of a false statement turns out to be non-subsistent, but Aussersein guarantees a semantic presence – as the lowest grade of Give-ness – that makes this kind of objects also available for reference and predication. Thanks to this lowest level of semantical presence, which expels them from the subjective sphere, a subject can grasp these objects, speak of them and convey them to other subjects.

5. A possible evaluation This analysis shows that the mind-world relation is guaranteed as objective in both theories by qualifying thoughts resp. objectives as extramental independent entities. But the different notion of object that has been analysed, determines a deep and considerable difference between the two conceptions. First of all, we can see that in Frege’s theory false thoughts have the same ontological status as true ones: they both belong to the third realm and have the same intrinsic character. They both are objective entities, completely independent from being actually thought or believed as true or false by a subject. We do not produce or create thoughts, but we grasp them, getting something that existed even before, independently from our effective grasp. False thoughts, thus, belong to the third realm just as true

68

LAURA MARI

thoughts do, and this guarantees them to be grasped, apprehended and understood. In Meinong’s theory, on the contrary, true objectives have a different ontological status than false ones: only true objectives are facts and have being, while false ones do not even subsist. This shows that for Frege the acknowledgement of thoughts as entities is the necessary condition for our possibility of getting them, while for Meinong the necessary condition is no more being but to recognize objectives as objects. Only after this first step, can we acknowledge them as true or false. Secondly, we have seen that statements contain a thought and that this results from the composition of the senses of its constituent parts. Thoughts are the level of sense, so that their objective content only depends on their parts having a sense and not also a reference. But the reference of the parts is the necessary condition for statements to have a reference – i.e. a truth value. We can say that the constituents-sentence relation is like the part-whole relation: both the sense and the reference of sentences depend on the sense and reference of their elements: the senses of the parts determine the objective content of thoughts; their references determine the truth value of the whole. The references of the parts are thus indispensable. For Meinong, conversely, the necessary condition for reference and predication is no more being, but the Given-ness of objects, that level of semantical presence, which allows even non-being entities to be referred to and to have properties truly predicated of them. We saw that for Meinong objectives are higher order objects, built on their constitutive elements – objecta. As Meinong himself recognizes, the object-objective relation is similar to the part-whole relation, but it cannot be based on being. If the object-objective relation had to be interpreted as presupposing the being of the constituents in order to get the being of the whole, it would be impossible to refer to non-being objects and to make true predications of them. Meinong states that this presupposition is based on the analogy with the part-whole relation: “an objective is thereby treated as a complex of some kind and the object belonging to it as a kind of component. (...). Thus, instead of deriving the being of an object from the being of an objective, even on the basis of a questionable analogy where the objective is an objective of non-being, it would be better to conclude from the facts

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

69

with which we are concerned that this analogy does not apply to the objective of non-being – i.e., that the being of the objective is not by any means universally dependent upon the being of its object”60. As we said before, pure object is what is simply posited, and it is indifferent to being and non-being. Anything we want to speak of must be posited before we concern about its ontic status. Thus, even if the object-objective relation resembles the part-whole one, this relation does not depend on being, but on the intrinsic connection of a higher order objects with its fundamenta. We can conclude that in Frege’s theory truth plays a basic role: language, through reference, hooks words to reality and guarantees our adherence to the world and to what is objective; in this way, statements can have a truth value, since they speak of something that really obtains (in the external world as well as in the third realm). Meinong, instead, believes that the truth of our statements does not depend on the being of objects. His Theory of objects has the aim of explaining how everything that is accessible to the mind is also expressible and understandable. His theory of judgment does not require any constraint on the characterization of objects, on which objectives are built: neither actuality nor noncontradiction determine the limits of objectivity. Any object becomes, in this way, accessible to mind, because “object” is now absolutely ontic neutral. Laura Mari Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa [email protected]

60

Meinong (1904) GA II, 493 [(1960) p. 85].

70

LAURA MARI

References Albertazzi, Liliana, Jacquette, Dale & Poli, Roberto [eds.] (2001), The School of Alexius Meinong, Aldershot/Burlington USA/Singapore/ Sydney: Ashgate. Dölling, Evelyn (1998), “On Alexius Meinong’s Theory of Signs”, in Roberto Poli (ed.), The Brentano Puzzle, Aldershot/Brookfield USA/Singapore/Sidney: Ashgate, pp. 199-215. Frege, Gottlob (1879), Begriffsschrift, eine der arithmetischen nachgebildete Formelsprache des reinen Denkens, Halle. Frege, Gottlob (1883?), „Dialog mit Pünjer über Existenz“, in Nachgelassene Schriften. English translation: “Dialogue with Pünjer on Existence”, in Posthumous Writings, pp. 53-67. Frege, Gottlob (1884), Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik. Eine logischmathematische Untersuchung über den Begriff der Zahl, Breslau. English translation: The Foundations of Arithmetic. A logicmathematical Enquiry into the Concept of Number, by J. L. Austin, Oxford: Blackwell, 1953. Frege, Gottlob (1892), „Über Sinn und Bedeutung“, in Zeitschrift für Philosophie und philosophische Kritik, 100, pp. 25-50. English translation: “On Sense and Reference”, by M. Black, in Translations from the Philosophical Writings of Gottlob Frege, edited and translated by Geach P, and Black M., Oxford: Blackwell, 1980. Frege, Gottlob (1897), „Logik“, in Nachgelassene Schriften. English translation: “Logic”, in Posthumous Writings, pp. 126-151. Frege, Gottlob (1906), „Über Schoenflies: Die logischen Paradoxien der Mengenlehre“, in Nachgelassene Schriften. English translation: “On Schoenflies, the logical Paradoxes of Set Theory”, in Posthumous Writings, pp. 176-183. Frege, Gottlob (1914), „Logik in der Mathematik“, in Nachgelassene Schriften. English translation: “Logic in Mathematics”, in Posthumous Writings, pp. 203-250.

FREGE CONTRA MEINONG: A NEW POSSIBLE OUTLOOK

71

Frege, Gottlob (1918), „Der Gedanke. Eine logische Untersuchung“, in Beitrage zur Philosophie des deutschen Idealismus, I pp. 58-77. English translation: “The Thought: a logical Enquiry”, by Quinton A. and Quinton M., Mind 65, pp. 289-311, 1956. Frege, Gottlob (1969), Nachgelassene Schriften, Hermes H., Kambartel F. and Kaulbach F. (eds.), Hamburg: Felix Meiner. English translation: Posthumous Writings, by P. Long and R. White, Chicago: U. of Chicago Press, 1979. Lenoci, Michele (1997), “La concezione dell’obiettivo in Alexius Meinong”, Discipline Filosofiche VII 2, pp. 259-279. Manotta Marina (1997), “L’obiettivo di Meinong fra proposizione e stato di cose”, Discipline Filosofiche VII 2, pp. 211-237. Marek, Johann C. (2001), “Meinong on Psychological Content”, in Albertazzi L., Jaquette D., Poli R. (eds.) The School of Alexius Meinong, Aldershot/Burlington USA/Singapore/Sidney: Ashgate, pp. 261-287. Meinong Alexius (1968-1978), Meinong Gesamtausgabe, 7 Bände und ein Ergänzungsband, ed. by R.M. Chisholm, R. Haller, R. Kindinger, Graz: Akademische Druck- und Verlagsanstalt. Meinong, Alexius (1899), „Über Gegenstände höherer Ordnung und deren Verhältnis zur inneren Wahrnehmung“. Nachdruck in GA II, 377-471. English translation: “On Objects of higher Order and their Relationship to internal Perception”, by M.-L. Schubert Kalsi, in On Objects of higher Order and Husserl’s Phenomenology, The Hague/Boston/London: M. Nijhoff, 1978. Meinong, Alexius (1904), „Über Gegenstandstheorie“. Nachdruck in GA II, 481-530. English translation: “The Theory of Objects”, in Realism and the Background of Phenomenology, ed. by R. M. Chisholm, Glencoe (Ill.): Free Press, 1960. Meinong, Alexius (1910), Über Annahmen. Nachdruck in GA IV, 1-389, 517-535. English translation: On Assumptions, by J. Heanue, Berkley/Los Angeles/London: University of California Press, 1983.

72

LAURA MARI

Meinong, Alexius (1915), Über Möglichkeit und Wahrscheinlichkeit. Beiträge zur Gegenstandstheorie und Erkenntnistheorie. Nachdruck in GA VI, 1-728, 777-808. Meinong, Alexius (1917), Über Emotionale Präsentation. Nachdruck in GA III, 283-476. English translation: On Emotional Presentation, by M.-L. Schubert Kalsi, Evanston (Ill.): Northwestern University Press, 1972. Meinong, Alexius (1921), „Selbstdarstellung“. Nachdruck in GA VII, 162. Poli, Roberto [eds.] (1998), The Brentano Puzzle, Aldershot/Brookfield USA/Singapore/Sidney: Ashgate. Sierszulska Anna, (2006), Meinong on Meaning and Truth, Frankfurt/Paris/Ebikol/Lancaster/New Brunswick: Ontos Verlag. Simons, Peter (1995), “Meinong’s Theory of Sense and Reference”, Grazer Philosophische Studien 50, pp. 171-186. Twardowski, Kazimierz (1894), Zur Lehre vom Inhalt und Gegenstand der Vorstellung, Wien: Hölder.

A MEINONGIAN SOLUTION OF MCTAGGART’S PARADOX Vincenzo Fano

Summary In the present paper, I discuss Meinong’s distinction between representation’s and object’s time as it is presented in the 1899’s paper on objects of higher order. Thereafter I propose a possible Meinongian solution of McTaggart’s paradox against the reality of time.

Introduction The present paper is divided in two parts1. In the first part we will propose Meinong’s theory of time outlined in 1899 interpreted in such a way that the subtlety of his argumentation is emphasised. In the second, we will discuss different solutions for the celebrated McTaggart’s paradox, reaching the conclusion that a theory of time suggested by the reflections of the Austrian Philosopher seems to be the most adequate perspective for tackling this problem2. Meinong is concerned with time above all in his essays of 1894 and 1899; thereafter he deals again with the topic only in a cursory manner. 1

2

The present essay is a re-writing of a conference I gave in Paris on June 2006. I thank Domenico Mancuso, Marina Manotta, Elisa Paganini, Venanzio Raspa and Bruno Vicario for their valuable suggestions. In a very interesting paper, Van Cleve (1996) clearly grasps that there is a Meinongian solution of McTaggart’s paradox, but he seems unwilling to accept the concept of subsistence. Moreover he does not refer explicitly to Meinong’s theory of time.

74

VINCENZO FANO

Certainly the best of his reflections on the subject is the Third Section of the 1899 essay, and thus we will concern ourselves almost exclusively with this3. Let us emphasise that time is not a Meinong’s topic, but briefly in the central part of his thinking, i.e. during the passage from his first psychological-descriptive works – influenced by his teacher Brentano – to the theoretical-objective period, stimulated firstly by the reading of Twardowski and Bolzano4. In spite of this we have the feeling that in this short writing the Austrian philosopher outlines a theory of time which ante litteram opens a possible solution of the paradoxes connected with the flux of time, like McTaggart’s. We have to admire the remarkable subtlety of his psychological analysis, accompanied by a clear awareness of the objectivity of time; the latter helps him to avoid the psychologistic drift of Bergson’s perspective, the former to stay away from the scientistic point of view more and more in fashion in connection with modern physics5.

Objects of higher order First we must place the pages on time in the context of the 1899 essay. In this work, Meinong for the first time clearly introduces the notion of “object of higher order” or superius. As is evident from the title, the essay aims to defend the latter concept in front of the fore of inner perception, against Schumann’s (1898) objections. In the First Section he outlines his theory of objects of higher order; in the Second one he shows that if one keeps to an exceedingly restrictive notion of inner perception, not only objects of higher order, but also many other psychical phenomena, whose

3

4 5

To my knowledge the best available interpretation of these pages is that by Manotta (2005) pp. 77-90, which aims above all to enlighten the progressive involution of Meinong’s thinking in the direction of an excessively rationalistic perspective. Instead we intend to concern ourselves exclusively with these pages, exploiting them to the full from a theoretical point of view. It is noteworthy that Findlay, 1963 does not deal with this topic. See the valuable work of Raspa (2002). We have already attempted to show the value of this essay in Fano (1996), pp. 187-194.

A MEINONGIAN SOLUTION OF McTAGGART’S PARADOX

75

existence is already received, would be eliminated. Therefore it is necessary to keep in mind the “perceptual fugacity” of many entities. Thus objects of higher order are not easily caught, because of their fugacity. Eventually, since Schumann’s paper is on time, in the Third Section, Meinong proves that the notion of object of higher order helps to solve the famous problem of melody – to which we return below – and he defends his conception against an over-estimation of the immediacy of the selfevidence of inner perception in this particular case. Before dealing with the issue of time, let us provide a brief description of Meinong’s ontology, as presented in the First Section. We bypass the distinction between object and content, which in our opinion is not sound; but here we cannot present the reasons supporting our position6. Then we move from intentionality, i.e. that each psychical phenomenon has an object7. Moreover some of these objects could be perceived independently (inferiora), whereas others could be grasped only together with certain other objects (superiora)8. A superius depends one-sidedly9 on its inferiora, that is it is possible to perceive the latter without grasping the former, but not vice versa10. Moreover it is possible to capture a relation among inferiora, such as, for instance, two coloured spots – one white and the other black – which are different. Therefore relations, like diversity, are superiora. On the other hand, besides relations, there are superiora, which are constituted essentially not only by a relation, but also by the relata, that is there are superiora which comprehend their inferiora as an essential part of them, such as a melody for instance11. Meinong calls the latter kind of superiora “complexions”. Hence between complexions and relations the principle “where complexion, there relation and vice 6 7 8 9 10 11

On the topic see Fano (1992/93). Meinong (1899), p. 381. Ibidem, p. 386. On the contrary two objects as a colour and the extension occupied are in a twosided dependence. Ibidem, p. 387. Therefore this notion is different from the recent concept of supervenience, in which the inferiora determine the superius. Ibidem, p. 390. This is not the only Meinongian definition of the notion of relation, but the more perspicuous one.

76

VINCENZO FANO

versa” holds 12; for each complexion presupposes a relation and each relation could originate a complexion. We ask now what the existential status of these entities is. Meinong endorses a concept of reality similar to the Kantian one, since he maintains that all that could be perceived is real13. Together with reality, which exists in space and time, he defines the notion of subsistence; what subsists is not real, but ideal. This means that what subsists is not in space and time, but if one manages to perceive it, one always grasps it in a given manner. For instance, the diversity between two coloured spots – one white and the other black – is not real14, but if one moves from the perception of these two inferiora to the grasping of that superius, we surely manage to perceive the diversity between the two spots15. Ideality subsists, even if it does not exist. On the other hand not all relations are ideal; some are real exactly like the inferiora, which found it, such as for instance the fusion between sounds discovered by Stumpf16. A more important further distinction – obscured by Meinong because of his fluctuations and confusions17 – is the one between relations and complexions, which could be “found” (vorfindlich), and relations and complexions, which could be “produced” (erzeugbar). The former are those imposed by the perceptive structure of the inferiora, whereas the latter are those the subject builds with a true intellectual act. It is clear, for instance, that a melody is a found complexion18, since it is determined by the single sounds of which it is composed, while the set whose members are the Mount Everest and the Eiffel Tower and has two elements is a produced complexion. 12 13 14 15 16 17

18

Ibidem, p. 389. Ibidem, p. 397. On the contrary the spots are real. Ibidem, pp. 398-99. Ibidem, p. 395. Ibidem, pp. 399-400. See Manotta (2005), pp. 33ff., who enlightens the fluctuations of the Austrian philosopher concerning the distinction between found and produced superiora. Even on this topic Meinong is not completely clear, because of his strong intellectualist bias; see once more Manotta (2005), pp. 77ff.

A MEINONGIAN SOLUTION OF McTAGGART’S PARADOX

77

The melody paradox At least since Brentano19, the investigation about time in German psychological philosophy in the late nineteenth century often moved from the phenomenon of the listening to a melody. Meinong20 expounds the problem in the following way: 1. 2. 3. 4.

A melody is a superius. Superiora could be grasped only together with the inferiora, on which they depend. On the other hand we perceive one sound at a time; hence we cannot capture a melody. But melody is actually listened to, not only fancifully.

It is clear that there is a contradiction between points 3. and 4. Meinong compares himself above all with Stern’s (1897) solution to this problem, according to which the psychical present is not a mathematical point, but has a certain extension, inside which the different sounds of the melody can plays together. It is not that Meinong is not persuaded that this is the correct solution, but he want show that there is another one, based on the objects of higher order, which, even if they are not easily caught by inner perception, they are nonetheless not to be eliminated, against Schumann’s objections. However in our opinion we find the principal objection to this perspective at the end of the essay21, where the Austrian philosopher underlines that Stern’s solution restricts the perception of a melody to the set of elements, which could stay inside the time of presence, whereas listening to a melody could be based on an unlimited number of sounds. Moreover he contends the clear-cut distinction between primary and secondary memory22 – the former refers to what occurs inside the time of presence, 19 20 21 22

Brentano (1874), p. 190. Meinong (1899), p. 440. Ibidem, p. 462. Recovered by Husserl in the distinction between retention and recollection, Husserl (1956), p. 35.

78

VINCENZO FANO

whereas the latter concerns objects now completely in the past – emphasising that the former fades gradually into the latter. Against Stern’s proposal one can add two further arguments, which are not present in Meinong’s essay. Firstly, it is not clear what is meant by the psychical present having a certain extension, since one cannot understand with respect to which time its length may be measured. The obvious answer should be: “With respect to physical time”; therefore before establishing the extended character of the presence time, one should determine the nature of the physical time; as we will see, Meinong’s approach allows an adequate understanding of the latter. Secondly, it is experimentally23 proved that the length of presence time with respect to physical time depends on the nature of the perceived phenomenon; thus presence time seems not to be a container of what occurs in our perception, but instead an object founded on our perceptions. We will see below that this empirical fact also favours Meinong’s point of view. We believe that Meinong’s solution of the melody paradox can be summarised as follows: 1.

When we perceive successively a set of inferiora which constitute a certain perceptual unity, not only a superius, but also a new temporality will be founded, which in the same instant of the representation time could have a certain extension, which depends on the nature of the constituted superius. We emphasise that such superius and its temporality are not produced, but found, because the perceptive unity of the inferiora.

2.

Therefore together with representation time, i.e. the one in which we experience concretely listening to the single sounds, we have to suppose an object time, whose structure depends essentially on the nature of the superius, which is the result of the successive perception of the inferiora in the representation time.

3.

It follows that in a certain instant of the representation time we grasp part or even the whole superius in the object time.

23

Vicario (2005), pp. 83-91. Stern (1897), pp. 340ff., himself is aware of this empirical fact.

A MEINONGIAN SOLUTION OF McTAGGART’S PARADOX

4.

79

When one states that, for instance, the listening of a melody consists of grasping simultaneously the single sounds of the melody but as not contemporaneous, the term “simultaneously” must be referred to the representation time and the term “not contemporaneous” to the object time.

Let us observe that, from Meinong’s point of view, representation time is real; even a past instant is real, because what could be perceived is real and in principle it is not impossible to grasp what is happened24. On the contrary object time is ideal, because it entails the capturing of temporal relation. That is, inside the object time one can ask whether an event either precedes or follows another; for instance consider the temporal relations between the sounds of a melody. These relations could not be real, because none could be in different instants of representation time. In spite of this they are not subjective in the sense that they subsist ideally. That is, they could be captured in the same way by everyone who is in the adequate psychological situation. Moreover let us observe that Meinong does not deny the extension of the presence time in the sense of Stern25, but, if our interpretation is correct, its extension could be grasped only on the basis of a particular object time, that is, the one uniform and linear of physical processes. Furthermore the amplitude of presence time will depend on the nature of the phenomena we are perceiving in the Now, and its extension will always be ideal, since it is referred to an ideal time, whereas, from the point of view of representation time, it will be always unitary and not divisible26.

24 25 26

Meinong (1899), p. 457. Ibidem, p. 461. As correctly emphasized by Manotta (2005), pp. 79-83, the 1899 analysis does not adequately pick up the problem of the connection between the different instants of representation time – which, on the contrary, was partially discussed in the 1894 essay and will find a more suitable discussion in Husserl, 1956, pp. 27ff.

80

VINCENZO FANO

A formulation of McTaggart’s paradox The nucleus of McTaggart’s argument (McTaggart, 1927, chap. 33) against the reality of time is considered valid even today (Mellor, 1985, Horwich, 1987, Mancuso, 2004). Here is a formulation of it27. There are two kinds of temporal characteristics: those we can call of type A, which are properties, as “present”, “past” and “future”, and the relations, which one can call of type B, that is “it is before”, “it is contemporaneous” and “it is after”. Both kinds refer either to events, such as for instance, “the arrival of Caesar to the Rubicon”28, or to instants. If there are properties of kind A, then all three incompatible facts, concerning each event a, subsist in the universe: The event a is present The event a is past The event a is future.

(1)

In (1) the verb “to be” is intended in a tenseless sense. This is possible, because events are universals. If they were particulars, then they would have an intrinsic temporal determination, that is, they would be facts; in this case the copula could not be tenseless. Before going on, it is necessary to emphasise the analogy between this paradox and that of the melody. In a certain sense, one could say that the problem expressed by (1) lies at the root of the question discussed by Meinong. Indeed the listening of a melody seems to entail that one and the same sound is present and at the same time past or future. Present because we have to listen it, past or future because it must have its place into the melody; i.e. sounds must be listened to simultaneously, but as non

27

28

In a very clever book, Paganini (2000), pp. 3ff. showed that McTaggart’s formulation is not really paradoxical. Below we refer to the new formulation of the argument. Keeping in mind special and general relativity, we can maintain that our world is constituted by “facts” and not by “events”. The former, but not the latter, are endowed with an intrinsic temporal characteristic. It follows that events are universals.

A MEINONGIAN SOLUTION OF McTAGGART’S PARADOX

81

contemporaneous. For this reason, as we will see, Meinong’s perspective could be useful in dealing with McTaggart’s paradox. One could imagine resolving the contradiction by maintaining that: event a is present in the present event a is past in the future event a is future in the past.

(2)

If, according to Mellor (1985, pp. 92ss), “Na”, “Pa” and “Fa” symbolise respectively “a is present”, “a is past” and “a is future”, then one can write (2) in the following manner: NNa, FPa, PFa

(2’),

which are all three compatible facts. On the other hand, if facts with a double temporal determination were possible, then there would be the following facts as well: NNa, NFa, NPa

(3),

Which again are all overtly incompatible29. One could attempt to avoid the contradiction introducing triple temporal modalities, but the incompatibility would appear again through the same procedure. Therefore an infinite regress would result.

The tensional solution Prior (1967, p. 6) emphasises that the verb “to be”, which appears in the description of facts (1), cannot have tenseless nature. This would be possible only if one considers temporal relations of kind B, since statements such as “a is before b” are tenseless. But the same does not hold for temporal properties of kind A. Therefore he maintains that McTaggart’s problem descends from the attempt to describe A modalities in terms of B mo-

29

The point was emphasized clearly by Dummett (1960).

82

VINCENZO FANO

dalities. Indeed if the copula in (1) is tensional, then the three facts all become compatible30. If one keeps in mind the ontological consequences of relativistic theories, Prior’s analysis has a partial justification. For we know that one cannot consider the time parameter as external to what happens physically, since gravitational forces and velocities influence its magnitude. That is, it is reasonable to believe that the world is not constituted by temporal events, which one can place in the time, but that it is formed by facts, which have an intrinsic temporality. In a more ontologically oriented language, one can state that temporality and events are two inseparable parts of a whole; hence only their union could be a particular, while, taken separately, each one of them is a universal. Moreover, in the field of perception the same occurs: temporality is influenced by what happens, both from a metrical and from a topological point of view (Vicario, 2005). That is, both the temporal order and the lengths of temporal lapses also depend on the perceived contents. On the other hand, as emphasised by Mellor (1986, pp. 96-98), the problem under investigation is establishing whether the A-series could exist. Indeed any ontological discourse endowed with scientific character must allow the use of tenseless copula, even if one believes that nothing exists independently of time. For the stability and constancy of what happens suggests the constitution of universal tenseless events, to which one can apply a tenseless copula abstractly. Then our question becomes: do Atemporal modalities exist? One has to investigate such a question in a tenseless perspective, even if one believes that in the world nothing exists out of time. Therefore we can and must use the tenseless copula.

The intervention of the B-series The argument discussed above shows that a universe endowed only with A temporal modalities would be impossible.

30

Van Cleve (1996) maintains something similar.

A MEINONGIAN SOLUTION OF McTAGGART’S PARADOX

83

On the other side, in the universe B-modalities might also exist. One could also suppose that the further relation “it is before” is antisymmetric and transitive31. Therefore, if the number of events is infinite and denumerable, one can establish a many-to-one correspondence between events and natural numbers – that is a correspondence such that to each event corresponds only one natural number32. Let us call tn the correspondent number to the event n. The correspondence must be such that: If a is before b, then ta is smaller than tb If a is after b, then ta is bigger than tb If a is contemporaneous with b, then ta is equal to tb. It follows that one can reformulate the three facts (1): If the event b is present and ta is equal to tb, then a is present If the event b is present and ta is smaller than tb, then a is past If the event b is present and ta is bigger than tb, then a is future.

(4)

The three facts (4) are all compatible. On the other side, the new event b entails a new ontological incompatibility of the same kind then (1): The event b is present The event b is past The event b is future,

(1’)

which could be resolved in analogy with (4) through the introduction of another event c: If the event c is present and tb is equal to tc, then b is present If the event c is present and tb is smaller than tc, then b is past If the event c is present and tb is bigger than tc, then b is future.

31 32

(4’)

We do not consider relativistic phenomena and the dislocation of the psychological time. The correspondence is not injective, because the same natural number could be the image of two different events.

84

VINCENZO FANO

In other terms, the new event c implies a new contradiction and so on and so on. Again, as in the case of A-modalities, one meets an infinite regress. To solve the problem, one could choose a suitable instant ti and reformulate the (4) in the following manner: If ta is equal to ti, then a is present If ta is bigger than ti, then a is future If ta is smaller than ti, then a is past.

(5)

The three facts (5) are all compatible and do not imply any infinite regress. But, as emphasised by Horwich (1987, p. 22), (5) eliminate the temporal modalities A. Indeed one can consider (5) as true definitions of the properties “present”, “past” and “future” in terms of the temporal relations B. On the contrary, (4) are not definitions, since the expression “present” appears in the definiens. At the most one could state that the second and the third in (4) are definitions of “past” and “future” in terms of the notion of “present” together with the aid of the B temporal relations. If one would ascribe again the A character to (5), one have to place the instant ti in the series present-past-future (McTaggart, 1927, §§ 331-332), but then the paradox would once again emerge; that is, one would meets the following three new incompatible facts: ti is present ti is past ti is future,

(1’’)

which again bring about an infinite regress. However (5) are not a solution of McTaggart’s paradox, because, although they eliminate the contradiction, they also reduce the A-series to the B-series33. Then it is necessary to look for other ways out from the paradox.

33

It seems to me that the proposal of J. Cargile (1999) of considering “to be present” a property that must be ascribed to a moment of the B-series is a reduction of A-modalities to B-modalities as well.

A MEINONGIAN SOLUTION OF McTAGGART’S PARADOX

85

Is the infinite regress vicious? Quentin Smith (1994) maintains that McTaggart’s infinite regress is not vicious. He builds the following series: Each event is present, past and future34. Each event (is)35 present at a present moment, past at a future moment and future at a past moment. 3. Each moment is past, present and future. 4. Each moment (is) present at a higher-level present moment, past at a higher-level future moment and future at a higher-level past moment. 5. Each of these higher-level moments is present, past and future. And so on, ad infinitum. 1. 2.

Smith underlines that 1., 3. and 5. remain contradictory until one introduces the temporalities of higher-order. Therefore, if one allows an infinite series of temporalities, each pair level is not contradictory in itself. That is, if one stops at level 2., there is no contradiction and the same holds for levels 4., 6. etc. His formulation of the regress could be interpreted in two different ways: either one assimilates the level 2. to (5), that is to an elimination of A-modalities by means of B-modalities, or to (2)36, that is to a reiteration of A-modalities. In the first case, as already said, one cannot stop at level 2. and 4., because the A-series would be reduced to the B-series. If one wants true A-modalities, one must stop at levels 1., 3. and 5., which, on the contrary, are contradictory. On the other hand, in the second case, each level is contradictory, because, if double A-modalities are allowed, then beside facts (2) there are facts (3) as well, which are all incompatible. Hence, in both senses McTaggart’s regress is vicious.

34 35 36

We eliminate the term “simultaneously”, because the copula is used in a tenseless way. The copula with parentheses is tensional. The latter seems to be Smith’s intention.

86

VINCENZO FANO

In his seminal essay on McTaggart’s paradox, Michael Dummett (1960) explores another possibility. He maintains that, in the argument, the presupposition that, at least in principle, there exists a complete description of reality is implicit. The description of the A-series is necessarily token-reflexive, that is, it uses expressions, whose meaning changes in accordance with the position in the B-series, in which they are enunciated. Although this description is contradictory, this does not mean that the reality of the A-series is contradictory. Indeed the latter issue is not reasonable; hence it could be that the description of the A-series is contradictory, only because a complete description of reality does not exist. Thus only the description of the A-series is contradictory, not the reality of it. To sum up, it seems that there are only two ways out from McTaggart’s paradox: to deny either the reality of A-modalities, or the possibility of describing them consistently.

Does time have two dimensions? Now let us investigate another possible solution of McTaggart’s paradox (Schlesinger, 1994)37. Let us suppose that the A-temporal determination “present” is located not only with respect to one B-series – let us call it t – but expands itself in a further super-temporal B-series, called T. In such super-time the present of the t-series extends itself indefinitely. We move again from the three incompatible facts (1): The event a is present The event a is past The event a is future.

(1)

To solve the contradiction we use the t series:

37

For a more complete and delicate analysis of the whole reflection of Schlesinger on his two-dimension theory see Paganini (2000), who also investigates the roots of this theory in the works of Broad.

A MEINONGIAN SOLUTION OF McTAGGART’S PARADOX

87

If the event b is t-present and ta is equal to tb, then a is t-present If the event b is t-present and ta is smaller than tb, then a is t-past (6) If the event b is t-present and ta is bigger than tb, then a is t-future. But, as we have already seen, the event b entails a new contradiction: The event b is t-present The event b is t-past The event b is t-future.

(1’)

The new contradiction could be avoided by means of the new B-series, in other words T: If the event c is T-present and tb is equal to tc, then b is t-present If the event c is T-present and tb is smaller than tc, then b is t-past (4’) If the event c is T-present and tb is bigger than tc, then b is t-future. One could ask what would happen to the A-series, which runs along the Tseries. For if T did not have an A-series, the (4’) would be a reduction to B-modalities and not a solution of McTaggart’s paradox preserving the Aseries. The answer is that there is an A- series for T-Temporality as well and that McTaggart’s paradox for the T-series could be avoided by means of the t-series, following a procedure analogous to the one just expounded, in order to eliminate the paradox in the t-series. Such a proposal is very elegant, but not only does the introduction of the super-time T seem ad hoc, but it also produces new paradoxes. According to Oaklander (1994), if the event a is both Ti-present and tipresent – for a given i – then since the fact38 “a is ti-past” is ti-present, it belongs to the A-t-series, therefore it is unreal from the point of view of ti, and to avoid the paradox it must belong to the B-T-series, therefore it is real from the point of view of Ti. A similar ontological asymmetry holds for other A-modalities: “a is ti-future”, which is Ti-real and ti-unreal, “a is Ti-past”, which is Ti-unreal and ti-real, “a is Ti-future”, which is Ti-unreal and ti-real. These consequences seem unacceptable. 38

One can say that “a is past” is, as it were, a quasi-fact, because its temporality is not completely determined.

88

VINCENZO FANO

Representation-time and object-time Although it is not acceptable, Schlesinger’s proposal stimulates other reflections. From the epistemic point of view, first we capture the Amodalities, but we know that – as Aristotle often emphasises (Phys. 184a 15) – what is first for us is not necessarily first by nature. Indeed the possibility of measuring a temporal order physically and of successfully using the notion of time in the mechanical and electromagnetic description of the world favours the supposition – at least at the dimension of daily life – of the reality of a transtemporal B-temporal series, which orders events. On the other hand, it becomes quite natural to persuade oneself that A-modalities are a mere illusion, all the more so as they are contradictory. We move from the assumption that the analysis of time cannot be only conceptual, in other words it must keep in mind the results of empirical sciences, particularly of physics, psychology and biology. Nonetheless, in the present paper, we attempt only to propose a possible theoretical solution of McTaggart’s paradox, which neither eliminates Amodalities completely, nor renounces to their description, as in Dummett’s point of view. On another occasion we will investigate the empirical justification of our hypothesis39. The following reflections move from Meinong’s theory of time, as presented in the first part of the paper. It could be that not all A-modalities are illusory. Let us eliminate the past and the future, and conserve the present. Nevertheless, from a psychological point of view, the present is not a mathematical instant; i.e. with respect to the B-series it has duration, though small, which depends on the perceived contents. For a moment let us leave aside B-temporal series and let us suppose that our primary access to the present would be objective, that is in the world, i.e. independently of the B-series the present had in itself a certain reality. Thus such a present has no duration, i.e. it is a sort of atom of movement, whose description is one of the best results of the Husserlian description of inner consciousness of time

39

The investigation of Friedman (1990) seems particularly significant.

A MEINONGIAN SOLUTION OF McTAGGART’S PARADOX

89

(Husserl, 1956, pp. 388ff.). Indeed, according to the German philosopher, time is characterised by a retentional and a protentional halo, which refer to what has just occurred and what is going to occur. Perhaps the Aristotelian definition of movement, as act of a potentiality, in as much it is potential (Phys. 201a 10) is more suitable for capturing such a structure of experience. In other words, the psychological present is not a movement in the Russellian sense of the word (Russell, 1903, § 442), that is being in different states in successive instant of time, but a modal notion, in the sense that if one perceives something, it is also perceived how it was, and how it is going to be. The vagueness of our analysis is partially justified by the fact that the present is probably a concept that cannot further be described in rational terms40. In other words, according to this perspective, the present does not run along a B-temporal series, but ontologically precedes the latter. That is, our primary epistemological access to the present is not illusory, as maintained by many scholars, but real. To each present, one has to ascribe a Bseries, but present does not run along another B-series, as occurs in Schlesinger’s solution. That is, the set of presents does not constitute a Bseries41. But we should make our analysis of time more precise. Let us define an infinite non-denumerable set of points Tr (representation-time), which is neither ordered, nor endowed with a metric. Each point of Tr represents a possible present. Let us ascribe to each member i of Tr a B-temporal series called Toi (object-time). It follows that each present is not located on a B-series, because there is no order on the set Tr of possible presents. On the other hand, given a possible present i, within the B-series connected to it, it is possible to determine an order, which projects at least a part of the members of Tr on instants of Toi. Thus the ifuture and the i-past constitute itself relatively to a given present. In other 40 41

In this context Dummett’s issue, according to which a complete description of reality is difficult or even impossible, seems more reasonable. Note that this perspective solves what Paganini (2000), p. 35ff., calls the paradox of Smart and Williams, according to which, if the moving now is in any sense objective, one could ask at what velocity it runs. Here this question is devoid of sense, because the series of presents has no metric in itself, therefore it does not allow the definition of a concept of velocity.

90

VINCENZO FANO

words, these A-modalities are completely reduced to the B-series associated to a given present. Therefore McTaggart’s paradox cannot be triggered. In spite of this, not all A-modalities are eliminated, since the present retains a certain ontological consistency. Moreover, it is possible to define the transtemporal time of the B-series as an invariant structure on the set of all possible To. The latter will be the time of physics. Vincenzo Fano Istituto di Filosofia Università di Urbino [email protected]

A MEINONGIAN SOLUTION OF McTAGGART’S PARADOX

91

References Brentano, F. (1874), Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkt, Hamburg: Meiner 1973. Cargile, J. (1999), “Propositions and tense”, Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic, 40, pp. 250-257. Dummett, M. (1960), “A Defense of McTaggart’s Proof of the Unreality of Time”, The Philosophical Review, 69, pp. 497-504. Fano, V. (1992/93), “The Categories of Consciousness: Brentano's Epistemology”, Brentano Studien, 4, pp. 101-30. Fano, V. (1996), Matematica ed esperienza nella fisica moderna, Cesena, Il Ponte Vecchio. Findlay, J.N. (1963), Meinong’s theory of objects and values, Oxford, Clarendon Press. Friedman, W.J. (1990), About Time: Inventing the fourth dimension, Cambridge Mass., MIT Press. Horwich, P. (1987), Asymmetries in Time, Cambridge Mass., MIT Press. Husserl, E. (1956), Zur Phänomenologie des inneren Zeitbewusstseins (1893-1917), ed. By R. Boehm, Husserliana, X, The Hague, Martinus Nijhoff. Mancuso, D. (2004), “Dai futuri contingenti all’irrealtà del tempo”, Isonomia, http://www.uniurb.it/Filosofia/isonomia/epistemologica1.htm. Manetta, M. (2005), La fondazione dell’oggettività. Studio su Alexius Meinong, Macerata, Quodlibet. Mellor, D.H. (1985), Real Time, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. McTaggart, J.McT.E. (1927), The Nature of Existence, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Meinong, A. (1894), “Beiträge zur Theorie der psychischen Analyse“, Gesamtausgabe, I, Graz, Akademische Druck- und Verlagsanstalt, 1969, pp. 305-388.

92

VINCENZO FANO

Meinong, A. (1899), “Über Gegenstände höherer Ordnung und deren Verhältnis zur inneren Wahrnehmung“, Gesamtausgabe, II, Graz, Akademische Druck- und Verlagsanstalt, 1971, pp. 377-471. Oaklander, L.N. (1994), “McTaggart, Schlesinger and the TwoDimensional Time Hypothesis”, in Oaklander and Smith, 1994, pp. 221-28. Oaklander, L.N. and Smith, Q. [ed.] (1994), The New Theory of Time, New Haven, Yale University Press. Prior, A. (1967), Past, Present and Future, Oxford, Clarendon Press. Paganini, E. (2000), La realtà del tempo, Milano, CUEM. Raspa, V., [ed.] 2002, Alexius Meinong. Teoria dell’oggetto, Trieste, Parnaso. Russell, B. (1903), Principles of Mathematics, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Schlesinger, G. (1994), “Temporal Becoming”, in Oaklander and Smith, 1994, pp. 214-220. Schumann, F. (1898), “Zur Psychologie der Zeitanschauung”, Zeitschrift für Psychologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane, 17, pp. 106-148. Smith, Q. (1994), “The Infinite Regress of Temporal Attribution”, in Oaklander and Smith, 1994, pp. 180-194. Stern, W.L. (1897), “Psychische Präsenzzeit“, Zeitschrift für psychologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane, 13, pp. 325-349. Van Cleve, J. (1996), “If Meinong is wrong, is McTaggart right?“, Philosophical Topics, 24, pp. 231-254. Vicario, G.B. (2005), Il tempo. Saggio di psicologia sperimentale, Bologna, Il Mulino.

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGMENTS Matjaž Potrþ and Vojko Strahovnik

Abstract Meinong held it that there exist genuine ought-beliefs underpinning moral judgment. A neo-Meinongian theory of moral judgment based upon oughtbeliefs is presented first. Moral judgments are held to be genuine beliefs possessing constitutive moral phenomenology. The phenomenology of intentionality thesis underlies this approach. It is thereby opposed to treating intentionality and phenomenology in a separate manner. The very possibility of oughtbeliefs as a special kind conflicts with beliefs’ restriction to their just descriptive role. This allows for an interesting metaethical combination of cognitivism and expressivism. Meinongian ought-beliefs come naturally as a separate kind in the Brentanian sequence of psychological phenomena. Their independent position is underlined by Meinong’s introduction of their correlated objects. But the dependency conception needs to have its cognitive plausibility straightened out. The role of ought-beliefs in the work of Meinong’s pupil Veber is reviewed.

0. Meinongian Ought-Beliefs Meinong had a plausible sounding approach to moral judgment. In his view, moral judgment comes entwined with ought-commitments and ought-beliefs, autonomous in respect to other kinds of beliefs. Phenomenology of beliefs and specifically of moral beliefs is an integral part of such an approach. One might wonder how a moral judgment (judgment that something is or ought to be the case) could fail to be a belief or express some sort of commitment. Moral judgment is the kind of judgment linked to a moral object or resulting from the thinking activity related to

94

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

moral matters. Such a judgment is a sort of commitment, irrespective to whether it is (wholly or in part) a state of belief. Meinong is famous for having introduced value-judgments (Werturteile), based upon objective oughts (Sollen) as an autonomous kind of judgments. 1 Initially Meinong did not think that strivings as psychological basis of value judgments have their own object and that their objects similarly as objects of desires are values. But under the influence of his pupil Veber he then introduced oughts as special, proper objects of strivings. In the following, we will start by laying out the basics of a neoMeinongian approach to the moral judgment, whose main characteristics is in appropriating ought-commitments and ought-beliefs, together with their constitutive phenomenology, as a genuine independent kind of beliefs. The independence is to be understood here in the sense that we may speak about moral beliefs as special kinds of beliefs based upon the value strivings. In this sense moral beliefs are autonomous, i.e. in their case we do not deal with psychological beliefs, with beliefs concerning utility or similar. The neo-Meinongian approach to moral judgment does not only help to get rid of false descriptivism and separatism presuppositions, but

1

Meinong’s positive view that interests us here may be read out from passages in his GA III (15-26; 234-237; 258f; 262f; 280f; 290-294). The first level may be found in GA III (Werthaltung und Wert, § 1), 248 f: "Der Wert eines Objectes... als dessen Fähigkeit...wertgehalten zu werden", especially in respect to the "Wertgroesse" of the object. (Compare p. 260). The second level seems to be: "Sicher kann nur existirendem Wert zukommen; aber ebenso gewiss ist die Bedeutung des Wertgedankens nicht zum Geringsten darin begründet, dass sich derselbe concipiren und anwenden lässt, ehe die Existenzfrage beantwortet ist." Further: A priori kinds of attribution, “emancipirt” (263) from the actually existent, are sufficient for the hypothetical (theoretical) conception of valuing. A third level is given in the 'Bologna-Artikel' (277): "obige Wertdefinition in der Form auszugestalten: Der Wert eines O besteht in der Tatsache, dass ein S am O Interesse nimmt, nehmen könnte oder doch vernünftiger Weise nehmen S O L LT E… die psychologische Wertbetrachtung [ist damit] durchbrochen." We are endowed to Wilhelm Baumgartner about this point. We also thank Mark Timmons for his extensive comments and Terry Horgan for his valuable help.

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGEMENT

95

also of the weird and funny names under which the currently existing views in this area announce themselves.

1. Neo-Meinongian Ought-Beliefs It seems an appropriate approach to our topics of Meinongian oughtbeliefs that we start with a currently proposed neo-Meinongian account. This will help us both to see what a Meinongian approach to ought-beliefs and to moral judgment actually is, and in positioning it on the landscape of current discussions in moral theory. Here are the basic statements of the neo-Meinongian approach to ought-beliefs and to moral judgment: (B) Moral judgments consist of genuine moral beliefs. 2 (P) Moral judgments feature a specific and constitutive moral phenomenology. (PI) Ought-beliefs come intertwined with moral phenomenology, and so there is phenomenology of the intentional. 3 A position appropriating the above theses has recently emerged upon the scene. We call it the neo-Meinongian approach to ought-beliefs and to moral judgment. This is a straight and open talk, in opposition to the confusing denominations under which it announces itself, such as cognitivist expressivism (Horgan and Timmons 2006), nondescriptive cognitivism or affirmatory nondescriptivism. We pause for a moment and ask ourselves: Where do these weird and funny sounding names come from? The answer 2

3

Supposing that ‘judgment’ is not simply synonymous with ‘belief’, one may ask whether the claim is here that moral judgment exhaustively consist of moral beliefs. Or is the claim weaker, thus allowing that moral judgments may include something in addition to belief? We think that embracing this last weaker claim is appropriate here. By saying that ought-beliefs come intertwined with moral phenomenology, we mean that qualitative phenomenological dimension is not just something accompanying ought-beliefs, but that it is constitutive for them.

96

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

is that they originate in an all embracing tradition that shows utter disrespect for the above theses, and thereby in our view to the real nature of moral judgments that gets recognized by the Meinongian appropriation of autonomous ought-beliefs. The neo-Meinongian view of ought-beliefs is currently just a tiny position at the landscape. But we are confident that its importance will increase, for the simple reason that in counter distinction to other positions it is true to the nature of moral judgment. Which views dominate the scene? They are called cognitivism and expressivism. Those positions profile themselves in respect to the question whether they do appropriate belief as figuring in moral judgment. Cognitivism holds it that moral judgments are just beliefs or that they are based upon moral 4 beliefs, whereas expressivism thinks that moral judgments are rather an expression of moral appreciation or indignation that do not include any beliefs. 5 It may seem curious at first sight to think that cognitivism and expressivism are opposed to the neo-Meinongian view. Is it not the case that cognitivism exactly buys beliefs, as the thesis (B) proposes? And is it not the case that expressivism bets on phenomenology, as it is suggested by (P) of the above neo-Meinongian take on things? So, one would perhaps just need to bring cognitivism and expressivism together, and this would result in the neo-Meinongian theory of moral judgment. To some extent yes. But here is trouble. First, cognitivism and expressivism are forthcoming as opposed and as not to be integrated positions. And second, their embracing of neo-Meinongian theses (B) and (P) is not full hearted. Yes, cognitivism recognizes the importance of beliefs in moral judgment. But it actually does not recognize (B) because it does

4

5

Moral beliefs and not just beliefs are crucial here. Non-cognitivists like Stevenson would namely happily admit that moral judgments are based on beliefs – non-evaluative/normative factual beliefs. We omit the discussion of other non-cognitivism types such as prescriptivism. But again, we should be careful here. Stevenson's account of one type of moral judgment (one 'pattern' as he called it) did include a belief – a non-moral belief about one's own psychological state at the time of the judgment. Thus, pattern 1: 'X is wrong' = (roughly) 'I disapprove of X, do so as well!'

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGEMENT

97

not recognize genuine moral beliefs. 6 “How is this possible?” may one ask, “Aren’t cognitivism’s beliefs operating in the area of moral judgment, exactly?” 7 Similarly, it can be argued for expressivism that it lacks the constitutive side of moral phenomenology. Thereby we mean those features of moral phenomenology that point to the experienced authority of moral judgment as something external to ourselves, independent from our desires and strivings, objective and directed at ourselves. 8 But, isn’t the expressivist approach just overwhelmingly appropriating phenomenology, exactly? These are concerns that should be addressed. And as already noticed, cognitivism and expressivism are opposed between themselves in appropriating (B) and (P), contrary to the neo-Meinongian approach that integrates those. Last but not least, they also do not buy the thesis (PI) 9 which also figures as an integral part of the neo-Meinongian position. But the neo-Meinongian position features the autonomous ought-belief. And here is the main catch. Both cognitivism and expressivism are opposed to it in that they embrace a thesis excluding recognition

6

7

8 9

Genuine moral beliefs, as we use the phrase here, are necessarily motivating. Some cognitivists such as Schafer-Landau or Dancy would allow for ‘intrinsically’ motivating moral beliefs, or they would oppose Humean moral psychology and allow for beliefs to be internally motivating just by themselves. Cognitivism accepts moral judgments as genuine judgments, but it does not accept them as genuine kind of judgments. From this, there follow other difficulties proper to cognitivism. Because it only accepts descriptive nature of moral judgments it is committed to moral realism, a not too attractive position that is often criticized in the contemporary metaethics. For a closer description concerning phenomenology of moral beliefs see a section dedicated to this issue further on in this paper. It seems that they standardly ‘don’t buy’ it only in the sense that they are silent on the issue. Of course, if the intertwining claim is to the effect that moral judgments can have both directions of fit and still be a unified psychological state, then we suppose that they tacitly reject PI. It is also worth pointing out that both Ross and (the early) Ewing held that moral judgments, though thoroughly cognitive in content, also typically function to express a non-cognitive attitude in addition to the cognitive attitude that goes along with belief. Interestingly, in making this point in Foundations of Ethics, pp. 254-5, Ross introduces this double function by quoting one of Meinong’s British expositors, Findlay.

98

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

of autonomous ought-belief by restricting beliefs to their descriptive role only: (D) Beliefs describe reality (or all beliefs aim to describe or represent the world). The thesis (D) is to be understood in the sense that beliefs have just the role of describing reality, and that there is no other role to be recognized for beliefs, such as allowing for beliefs with not just descriptive content, e.g. ought-beliefs. By the very fact that cognitivism and expressivism come as opposed to each other, it is also already clear that they embrace the following thesis: (S) Phenomenology is separated from the intentional, i. e. from the cognitive. Theses (D) and (S) are very powerful presuppositions underlying views of cognitivism and expressivism. So they are not explicitly thematized by them, despite that they guide their basic standpoints. It goes without saying that the neo-Meinongian ought-beliefs approach opposes both (D) and (S). Ought-beliefs do not (in the most direct sense) describe reality, and phenomenology is really constitutive and not separated from them if we appropriate the (PI) thesis. The main point is that (D) and (S) just do not allow for the recognition of autonomous ought-beliefs.

1.1 Cognitivist Expressivism as a Neo-Meinongian Position Now that we have spelled out the neo-Meinongian standpoint with its plausible and fresh air feeling in respect to other recently dominating views, it is on time to take a closer look at arguments supporting this stance in present-day metaethics. Cognitivism and expressivism, as already noticed, are overwhelming positions in current moral philosophy. Yet there is the following view that

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGEMENT

99

recently came upon the stage, called cognitivist expressivism 10 , which is a version of the (B)-(P) stance. It accordingly rejects tacit theses (D) and (S) guiding the current metaethical debate. Instead of treating cognitivism and expressivism as two exclusive choices, it tries to reconcile them in an overall positive approach. 11 But if this is true, then it turns out that cognitivist expressivism is a species of neo-Meinongian approach to the moral judgment. We claimed that there is an important presupposition to both cognitivism and expressivism in the contemporary debate about moral judgment, which is embraced but not explicitly thematized by them. Cognitivist expressivism, in counter distinction to the just mentioned positions, tries to bring the seemingly incompatible theories of cognitivism and expressivism together: it is a species of expressivism, and yet it allows for moral judgments as beliefs to be its integral part. How is this possible? The answer is provided by cognitivist expressivism’s denial of presupposition (D). Horgan and Timmons (2006) e.g. speak about the following semantic assumption that has to be rejected. “All cognitive content (i.e., belief-eligible, assertible, truth-apt content) is descriptive content. Thus, all genuine beliefs and all genuine assertions purport to represent or describe the world.” (Horgan and Timmons 2006: 256) One can also express this by denying that the content of all noncognitive attitudes is nondescriptive (Bruno and Kriegel, forthcoming). But this just repeats a well-known Meinongian claim that content and act as proper parts of experience are independent of each other. Meinongian position 10

11

Cognitivist expressivism is defended by Horgan and Timmons (2006) and Timmons 1999, while Bruno and Kriegel (forthcoming) defend a position called descriptivist noncognitivism. An overall methodological approach about how to reconcile the often forthcoming opposed views (proceeding from exclusive disjunction) affirms inclusive disjunction (Potrþ forthcoming a, forthcoming b). For the area of epistemology, the inclusive disjunction approach proposes evidentalist reliabilism (Henderson, Horgan and Potrþ 2007). Intuitionist particularism (Potrþ, forthcoming c) includes both generalities and particular patterns in an overall approach.

100

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

therefore explicitly rejects the presupposition grounding the modern metaethical cognitivism/expressivism divide. Denying (D) has as a consequence recognizing the existence of beliefs that are not descriptive. Consequently this opens space for a version of cognitivism that accepts moral irrealism and does not succumb to an error theory like that of Mackie (1977). Cognitivist expressivism thus occupies a middle ground between both positions of cognitivism and expressivism. It does so by breaking traditional cognitivism into two theses. The first is the semantic thesis that (C1) moral judgments/statements have a descriptive role (they express propositions and can be true or false) and the psychological thesis that (C2) moral judgments/statements typically are or express beliefs. C1 and C2 were held to be cornerstones of cognitivism. On the other hand traditional non-cognitivism or expressivism denies both of these theses. But if one accepts the above distinction two new positions arise. The first is moral fictionalism, which accepts C1, but denies C2. According to moral fictionalism (Kalderon 2005) moral judgments have a descriptive role and they can be evaluated as true or false, but the acceptance of these judgments does not mean that we have genuine corresponding beliefs; they merely allow us to convey some other noncognitive attitudes. We regard these judgments as fictions or quasi-statements. The second position and the one that mainly interests us here is cognitivist expressivism that accepts C2 and denies C1. So the newly established map of positions looks like this: emotivism prescriptivism norm expressivism quasi-realism fictionalism

cognitivist expressivism

non-cognitivism non-descriptivism

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGEMENT

101

Argumentation behind this novel position that combines (psychological) cognitivism with non-descriptivism, finishes with a defense of moral irrealism. Psychological cognitivism is defended by the usage of moral phenomenology and of phenomenological argument. Moral judgments share with beliefs their fundamental generic, phenomenological and functional features, thus they must be accepted as beliefs. (More on that in the next section) (Strahovnik 2007) As we said and as we intend to demonstrate, Meinong defends a position close to cognitivist expressivism. 12 The latter introduces two different, sui generis belief types: (i) is-commitment beliefs (ii) ought-commitment beliefs. Beliefs are understood as a certain kind of affirmatory commitment state towards the core descriptive content. With respect to the core descriptive, way the world might be content, one can be is-committed which is expressed in English by the sentence, “Hillary is president”, but that same content can be the core of an oughtcommitment, expressed in English as “Hillary ought to be president”. The novelty is now that we can also have belief’s ought-commitment to the core content. We have introduced ought-commitment beliefs besides the

12

But it is interesting that he also dedicated a study to fictionalism, the position that accepts C1 and denies C2. This is his theory of presumptive beliefs or of the Annahmen, adopting a description that can be true or false (C1) without expressing genuine beliefs (denial of (C2)). Such is the situation with fictional characters in the framework of a story. We accept that a certain fable describes Little Red Riding Hood (while another one describes Three Little Pigs), and we accept the truth of the statement that Little Red Riding Hood has red cap, and the falsity of a statement that she wears a blue cap. One can say that we have beliefs in respect to these statements, and so this would not yet put C2 into question. But once as we realize that the acceptance of truth and falsity of description happens in the framework of a fable, we have to further specify rejection of the thesis C2: in the fable we do not express genuine beliefs.

102

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

is-commitment beliefs, and thereby we have repudiated the proposition (D) that implicitly restricted beliefs to just descriptive is-commitment species. Now we have ought-commitment beliefs that also include moral judgments. (cf. Horgan and Timmons 2006: 270-1) “An ought-commitment is not a mental state whose overall content is descriptive, representing a way the world might be; hence it is not a state of mentally affirming that the world is such in a descriptivelyrepresented way. To construe moral beliefs in this manner is to mistakenly assimilate them to descriptive beliefs, i.e., to is-commitments. Rather, an ought-commitment is a distinct kind of mental affirmation vis-à-vis a core descriptive content. /…/ Ought-commitment is a sui generis type of mental state, while also being an irreducible species of belief. Although the overall content of ought-commitments is nondescriptive, nevertheless these states exhibit the key generic features that qualify them as beliefs.” This is what makes cognitivist expressivism a viable option at the landscape of possibilities, which have earlier excluded it because of tacitly appropriating the presupposition (D), allowing just for the descriptive role of beliefs. 13 The motivation behind this move is twofold. The first motive features theoretical, metaethical advantages of moral irrealism over moral realism. The second motive is that such a position accords better with our ordinary moral thought and with moral phenomenology. A closer look re-

13

Another important issue is the semantic assessability of moral judgments. Despite denying a descriptive role of moral judgments we can still talk about truth ascriptions to statements with moral content as “morally engaged semantic appraisals”. Such a solution follows contextualism and an approach to truth called truth as indirect correspondence. In the strict sense moral judgments are neither true nor false (this is in contradistinction to the error theory that in important respects is close to the cognitivist expressivism, but holds that all moral judgments are false), despite that we can semantically assess them within a morally engaged context. (Horgan and Timmons 2006: 275-7). Such assessment is made possible with a notion of truth as semantic correctness given the contextually variable semantic standards. Strict semantic standards dictate the use of truth as direct correspondence and less strict standards allow for amalgamation of semantic and normative appraisals.

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGEMENT

103

veals that moral phenomenology supports only the acceptance of the thesis C2, i.e. that moral judgments are genuine beliefs and it does not support the rejection of their descriptive role. The latter move is supported by the “old” ontological, semantical and epistemological metaethical arguments against moral realism. We now turn to the phenomenology of beliefs and specifically to ought-beliefs. We will try to outline what makes moral judgments or ought-beliefs genuine beliefs, and further what makes them unique.

1.2 Phenomenology of Moral Judgment We now present the phenomenology of moral judgment, according to the thesis (P). (B) and (P) are then integrated in the thesis featuring the phenomenology of the intentional (PI). The thesis (P) says: (P) Moral beliefs in moral judgments feature a specific and constitutive moral phenomenology. Accepting the thesis that moral beliefs are specific ought-beliefs, as based upon an ought-commitment in respect to the core content that they involve (B), and thus not as equivalent to the exclusively descriptive role of beliefs (denial of (D) and of (C1)), has the specific moral phenomenology of such beliefs as its constitutive part. We will now first take a look at the phenomenology of belief, and then further at the specific phenomenology of moral belief. Notice that even the first step, the phenomenology of belief, was not considered by either cognitivism or expressivism. Thus neither of these positions accepts (P). But this is actually rooted in both these positions also tacitly refusing to accept thesis (PI) and by their tacitly appropriating presupposition (S). This means that cognitivism and expressivism first tacitly accept the thesis that phenomenology is separated from the intentional. And then it is natural not to be concerned with the issue of moral phenomenology. This is countered by cognitivist expressivism’s adoption of (P). As promised, we will first take a look at the phenomenology of belief, following the presentation in (Horgan Timmons 2006:263–5). At the first

104

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

stage we will take a look at the phenomenology of beliefs as such, and additionally we will also fulfill the assignment of taking a look at the phenomenology of ought-beliefs, as these are more directly involved into our inquiry. This will prepare the ground for our assessment of the more specific what-it’s-likeness features proper to moral beliefs. Let us start. (1) Following my observation of the night sky I come down to my occurrent belief that the object which I observe is a satellite and not a star. And as I glimpse at the surrounding of my house I come down to my belief that a cat is approaching my house over the lawn. There is also the experience of psychologically coming down at some issue as related to ought-beliefs. Say that I am not decided yet what opinion I should take in respect to some issue, such as whether caring for the environment is important. Once I eventually decide though that this is the way to go, I phenomenologically come down at the issue in question. In fact, many of our moral judgments present cases of automatically coming down at some issue in one’s experience of moral judgment, such as is the case with the known example of glimpsing at hoodlums setting a cat on fire just for their fun, and immediately occurrently coming down with the ought-belief in respect to the wrongness of such an act. (2) The phenomenological experiencing of beliefs as categorizing some object is another characterization of beliefs. In the area of ought-beliefs and moral judgments, one similarly phenomenologically experiences one’s coming down in categorizing a certain issue as being right or wrong. (3) The experience of beliefs’ categorization shows the characteristics of involuntariness. As I look through the window I involuntarily form a belief that we have a rainy day today. This involuntariness of beliefs’ categorization also characterizes the moral rightness assessment of my oughtbelief in respect to settling of the environmentalist issues, and the wrongness assessment of the hoodlums act. (4) The phenomenological felt involuntariness of beliefs’ categorizing involves their experiencing as the ones that have rational authority in that this categorization is grounded in reasons. My perceptual experience of touching the keys and feeling their smooth texture together with the ap-

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGEMENT

105

propriate response to my tactile pushes at the time that I type this text is automatically experienced by myself as a sufficient reason for holding my occurrent belief that there is the keyboard now in my lap. And the experience of categorizing some issue as being morally correct or wrong is also forthcoming with moral authority, felt as quite independent from my subjective deliberative concerns. The external authoritative phenomenological feel of such experiences is thus coming in the shape of external moral authority, similarly as the factual beliefs’ experience also shows its external authority in respect to my eventual subjective reasons. (5) Finally, the occurrent belief is phenomenologically experienced as being apt for assertion by a sentence in the declarative mode. This is also in value for ought-beliefs and for moral beliefs. There are thus several phenomenological features that distinguish beliefs from other types of mental states. As these features are also shared by ought-beliefs and moral beliefs, we can conclude that moral judgments are genuine beliefs. Thereby, we have laid out a case for the phenomenology of moral judgments. But we have not yet come to endorse the thesis (B) claiming that moral judgments consist of genuine moral beliefs. In order to endorse such a possibility we have to lay down some distinctive features of oughtbeliefs, underlying the specific moral judgments. This we will do by again following the exposition in (Horgan and Timmons 2006) who themselves quote as their guide (Mandelbaum 1955). Direct ought-beliefs, specific for moral judgments, include judgments about one’s own moral experiences, while remote ought-beliefs include judgments about someone else’s moral experiences. 14 What is characteristic for their phenomenology? 14

According to Mandelbaum, direct moral judgments are judgments about what one ought or ought not do in the circumstances one is presently facing. Removed moral judgments are of two sorts. Removed moral ought-judgments are either about one’s past self or about someone else. All value judgments (goodness and badness) are about character traits or overall character and are removed. Mandelbaum may be read as giv-

106

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

Direct moral ought-beliefs show phenomenology of felt demand, itself consisting from experiences of origin and direction. As I confront some moral issue and as I form an ought-belief in respect to it, I experience the obligation as coming to me in an objective manner (felt demand), from certain circumstances in which I find myself (origin), and as directed towards myself (direction). Authority and objectivity is an integral part of the phenomenology coming along with this. This is why such a felt demand is experienced as motivationally hot, through an oughtcommitment. These are not the characteristics of is-beliefs with their iscommitments. From these phenomenological remarks we can see why the modern divide between cognitivism and expressivism cannot accommodate moral phenomenology. The belief-like phenomenological aspects of moral judgments support cognitivism, while motivational phenomenological aspects support expressivism. The neo-Meinongian position that searches for the middle ground has a better chance of accommodating phenomenology. But as a crucial step, we can point to the justification offered for the introduction of ought-beliefs. In search for this we now turn to the Meinongian tradition.

2. Meinongian Ought-Beliefs We now present the Meinongian conception of ought-beliefs, with some critical scrutiny on the menu. First, we take a look at the autonomy of ought-beliefs in the sequence of mental phenomena. Then we suggest that the dependency principle guiding this sequence should be straightened up by adopting morphological rationalism in the area of moral judgment, thereby providing cognitive plausibility in support relations. The Meinongian theory of objects also sustains autonomy of ought-beliefs. We finally take a look at Meinongian ought-beliefs in Veber’s work.

ing four seemingly different (though not necessarily incompatible) descriptions of the direct/removed distinction. See Mandelbaum: pp. 45, 95, and esp 127.

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGEMENT

107

2.1 Autonomy of Meinongian Ought-Beliefs in the Sequence of Mental Phenomena Meinongian ought-beliefs come naturally as an autonomous kind in the Brentanian sequence of mental phenomena. The Brentanian school of which Meinong is a part adopted the following sequence of mental phenomena: presentations o thoughts o desires There are many variations and elaborations of the above schema. But the main idea is that there are three kinds of basic mental phenomena. Of these two, thoughts and desires offer complex mental phenomena, whereas presentations are simple and elementary. Presentation of a cat is passive, while a cat directed thought is psychologically active and more complex. It is natural to conceive of thoughts as beliefs, coming in judgments. They may be described as beliefs that such-and-such is the case, thus as is-beliefs. This means that they have an is-commitment to the core content. If the core content figures the sentence “Hillary is president”, then the is-commitment supports an is-belief in respect to this core content. Desires may be conceived to have beliefs as their constitutive part. But they come about as involving an ought-commitment to the core content. This then produces ought-beliefs, such as my belief that it ought to be the case that Hillary is the president. By the way, the discussed case involves presentations of Hillary and of being a president. This shows that the above sequence of mental phenomena introduces the autonomous status of ought-beliefs in a quite natural manner. Notice that the sequence has presentations in its basis, these being integrated into the factual structure of the core content. Now, there may be different commitments in the judgment to the ensuing facts, such as iscommitment and ought-commitment. The schema clearly supports the independence of each of these and it thereby supports the autonomy of the

108

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

adjoined ought-beliefs 15 forthcoming in the moral judgment. Is- or oughtcommitment succeeds in respect to the fact, say Hillary is president, and not in respect to the presentation. Yet the presentation is in the basis and while is-commitment is to the fact, the-ought commitment is to the valuebelief related to the fact. The value belief is a kind of belief with the help of which we assign positive or negative value to phenomena. So moral judgment as ought-beliefs attuned judgment is different from what we may call the factual judgment or the is-beliefs attuned judgment. Quite clearly, the above sequence supports the existence of two independent and autonomous kinds of beliefs: the first ones involved in thoughts and the second ones in desires. So the overall Brentanian sequence of mental phenomena supports the autonomy of ought-beliefs.

2.2 Providing Cognitive Plausibility to Ought-Beliefs Now let us take another look at the Brentanian sequence of mental phenomena such as depicted above. There are arrows in it that merit some comment. We have already said that beliefs are complex mental phenomena, involving presentations coming as building blocks into their structure. This sounds plausible and it explains the first arrow. The second arrow points from cognitive beliefs to desires. In our interpretation this would mean that is-beliefs would come as buildingblocks into ought-beliefs. But this does not seem to be so easily interpreted as in the former case, for it would be strange to claim that several is-beliefs form the structure of ought-beliefs. Dependency is the principle guiding structure of the sequence featuring mental phenomena. Here it goes. There may be a creature which has presentations only. But if there is a creature which has thoughts, necessarily it should be first able to possess presentations entering into these. So, thoughts are in relation of dependency in respect to presentations. Similarly, desires are in relation of

15

The autonomy of ought-beliefs here refers to their independent and genuine status in respect to is-beliefs.

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGEMENT

109

dependency in respect to thoughts. There is a possible creature entertaining thoughts only, but not desires. Whereas each creature that entertains desires (ought-beliefs) also needs to have ability of previously entertaining thoughts (is-beliefs). 16 The dependency principle has contributed to the recognition of the autonomous status of ought-beliefs. But as already stated it is questionable that is-beliefs would build the structure of ought-beliefs. All that autonomy requires is just that those two kinds come as independent from each other. The dependency principle also lacks cognitive plausibility. It namely invites a picture according to which there are levels of dependency involved into each judgment, moral judgment being more dependent on such assortment of levels as the factual judgment. But this seems to be in opposition to the statement of simple autonomy accorded to the oughtbeliefs and to their related moral judgments. There seem to be two sorts of implausibility associated with the levels of dependency picture. First, moral ought-judgments being dependent seems to compromise the idea that they are autonomous. Second, there is the psychologically implausible suggestion that in order to make an ought-judgment, one must somehow represent (either consciously or unconsciously) the presentations and factual is-beliefs that ‘influence’ ought-judgments. It seems cognitively implausible that moral judgment and oughtbelief would retrace all the rows of underlying presentations and factual beliefs at the time they get produced. In order to counter this, we propose first to take a look at ought-beliefs again. In the area of morality oughtbeliefs have to do with principles and with acknowledging what is morally right or wrong. So moral principles seem to be involved into moral judgment. Now, some people have opposed this, under the presupposition that the involvement of principles would require their explicit appearance. And in our case this would require explicitly retracing steps at the founding levels in the one-sided detachability sequence. But a more plausible proposal seems to go like this. Presentations and even thoughts may be

16

This statement should be restricted with the claim that this is not in value for very simple desires that are only based upon presentations.

110

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

involved in desires, as we would grant to the dependency approach. Ought-beliefs, i.e. generalities do not appear out of thin air, they are sustained by the underlying stuff. But this does not succeed in a direct way and rather it happens in an indirect procedural manner, with the support from the cognitive background. Such an approach to generalities (here ought-beliefs) was proposed under the name of morphological rationalism (Horgan and Timmons 2007), according to which generalities (oughtbeliefs) have their efficacy (rationalism), supported by the morphological multi-dimensional dynamical background of the cognitive system. Oughtbeliefs are thus not supported level-like and in a tractable manner, as it is supposed by the dependency principle. They are rather supported dynamically and form the cognitive background as this is proposed by morphological rationalism.

2.3 Theory of Objects and The Autonomy of Meinongian Ought-Beliefs Meinong's theory of objects provides another pillar in support of oughtbeliefs’ autonomy. Meinong is best known for his theory of objects. We believe that his theory of objects that distinguishes him from other members of the Brentanian school also contributes to the recognition of autonomous ought-beliefs. Exactly how it does it is the question at which we will take a closer look in the next section as we present Meinongian ought-beliefs as elaborated by Meinong's pupil France Veber. It should be sufficient right now just to mention that Meinong's Slovene pupils Mally, Schwarz and Veber developed a theory of ought-beliefs both in the inferential and in the metaphysical sense. But here we propose to take a quick look at the beginning of the theory of objects, asking then what their nature may tell us in support of autonomous ought-beliefs. Veber reports (Veber 1921, Potrþ and Vospernik 1996) that the theory of objects was first proposed by Meinong in his booklet (1896) dealing with the law of the psychophysicist Weber (no relation to France Veber). Weber's law states a correlation between the increase in a physical stimulus (increase of illumination, of weight, in loudness as a physical vari-

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGEMENT

111

able) and its sensed impact. Variations in the physical stimulus are correlated by sensing of just noticeable differences. The differences (Verschiedenheiten) as adjoined to these are perceived by subjects not as something subjective, but as objective, quite independent from their own will. These differences are the first discussed case of Meinongian objects. Notice their felt independence in one's psychological approach to them. Meinong elaborated his idea of the existence of objects later on. First, objects figure in his solution of the intentional directedness question. Meinong decided for objects and not for contents to be correlates of intentional acts. He later developed the idea of independently existing objects as correlates to each of psychological phenomena figuring in the Brentanian sequence. Let us just say that also ought-beliefs are directed at their correlated objects. Those are matters the intentional act is directed at, but it is directed at them as at something objective. It seems to us that this objectivity of correlated objects underlies the autonomy of ought-beliefs, and that in this sense they support the autonomy of moral judgment. This accords well with the phenomenology of moral judgments as described above.

2.4 Meinongian Ought-Beliefs in Veber's Work The role of ought-beliefs in the work of Meinong's pupil Veber is reviewed. We conclude by pointing out how it was not a coincidence that Meinong's pupils Mally and Veber developed deontic logic and moral judgment approaches based upon the Meinongian insight into the autonomy of ought-beliefs. Let us come back to the Brentanian tripartite schema of psychological experiences leading from presentations to thoughts and then to desires. Both presentations and thoughts are on the cognitive side of mental phenomena, and one of their relations features passivity of presentations as opposed to the active role of thoughts in respect to them. On the right, emotive side of the schema however, we only have desires. Where are the active counterparts to these on the emotive side? These are now proposed

112

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

as strivings. But let us start with the distinction between emotions according to their content. Veber's Ethics 17 distinguishes four basic types of emotions: hedonic, aesthetic, logical and axiological (or evaluative). The first two are based on presentations, whereas the last two also involve thoughts or beliefs. The axiological positive or negative emotion (for example enjoyment and sorrow, or respect and disrespect) is also called evaluation and nonevaluation or dis-evaluation. Intentional objects of axiological emotions are values and disvalues in a narrow sense. In the narrow sense means here that we do not deal with aesthetic, logical or hedonic value but with the moral value. Ethical or moral emotions are a sub-set of axiological emotions. (Strahovnik 2005) A moral agent may respect or disrespect a person according to his or her beliefs about this person, involving the beliefs that this person is such and such, and that he or she did this act or failed to do some other act. Such emotive experiences ascribe ethical value or disvalue (goodness or badness) to objects of the corresponding thought foundations. Because axiological emotion is based on thoughts, a directly appropriated object of axiological emotions may only be facts. A joyful experience by an agent in virtue of her possession of money directly aims at the fact concerning this possession of money, and only indirectly at the presentation of the money. In respect to quantity of thoughts as psychological fundaments one can distinguish between valuing and disvaluing in the strict sense on the one side and hopes and fears on the other side. This latter distinction aims at the difference between thoughts that are genuine beliefs or judgments and between assumptions or neutral thoughts. For example, joy or sorrow may be experienced only on the basis of genuine judgments, while on the other hand if our thought is neutral, one can experience only hope

17

Veber's ethics as a logic of instinctive reason may be briefly characterized as the ethics of moral conscience. Conscience is defined as the disposition for material and formal correctness of our emotions and strives, especially evaluative or axiological emotions and strives in a narrow sense. Correct axiological emotions and strivings are the final end of our moral and ethical lives. Immorality is therefore incorrectness of axiological instinctive reason.

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGEMENT

113

or fear. As already mentioned two fundamental ethical emotions are respect and disrespect, which do not aim at physical or irreal phenomena, but at psychological phenomena, especially persons or facts about persons. Objectual-foundations of emotions are values. The objects of axiological emotions are values in the narrower sense. While investigating the relation between the two Veber begins with a psychological conception of value and of values. Valuable or invaluable is everything which stands or is able to stand as an object of axiological emotion. Consequently, anything that is an object or may be an object of respect and disrespect is psychologically ethically valuable. The correctness of axiological emotion thus depends on factuality of those emotions. Veber approaches apsychological value through the analysis of the meaning proper to evaluative judgments and to moral judgments. Evaluations such as "This is a good car" or "This is a kind and good person" have a meaning different form the meaning that is attained through ascription of some non-valuable feature to the object in question or again that is different to what pertains to our experience of that object (such as experience of joy or respect). These judgments ascribe to objects in question a value that is independent from our experience. Value in the apsychological sense is thus "an independent quality as the object of axiological emotion" (Veber 1923: 233) and it is not to be confused neither with the axiological emotion itself nor with the possibility of such an emotion. Axiological striving fundamentally depends upon emotions. Hence one can only strive towards or reject what one values or disvalues. Strivings, according to Veber, are active in respect to desires on the emotional side, in the same sense as thoughts are active in respect to presentations on the cognitive side of psychological experiences. Veber considered this as the basis for an important extension of the theory of objects in relation to moral judgments. The appropriated objects of striving can only be the facts which were already previously determined in their value; consequently the objects of ethical or moral striving can only be those facts that are determined in their ethical or moral value. The structure of striving is very similar to the one of emotion; one can distinguish between strivings for physical, psychological and irreal phenomena, between striving for the

114

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

thing itself or for the thing in relation to another thing, between hedonic, aesthetic, logical and axiological strivings. (256-265) Proper objects of striving are oughts that may be positive or negative. An ought is a special quality of the phenomena, for which "everybody without axiological striving is in principle blind". That is clear from the ordinary cases of ought-beliefs such as "You ought to do this", or "You ought not to lie", or "You ought to love your nation". These are evidently based upon the axiological striving presupposing (e)valuation. (Veber 1923: 268-272) The difference between the psychological and the apsychological conception of oughts is crucial for axiological strivings and also for axiological oughts. According to the psychological conception, an axiological ought is everything that may become an object of axiological striving. A phenomenon has an axiological ought in the psychological sense in the case as one experiences positive or negative axiological striving towards it. An ought-belief or striving for something to happen does not mean simply that somebody strives towards this. It also aims at the object itself. In the same way as the apsychological value, the apsychological ought of a certain phenomenon is an independent objectual quality, not to be mistaken for the positive or negative striving; it is a direct object of that striving. According to Veber every duty is an ought. In psychological sense it is related to the positive or to the negative ethical striving. In the apsychological sense a duty and the so-called judgments of duty aim their attention towards objects of striving. A duty to perform or to abstain from certain acts is a positive or negative apsychological ought of these acts, which presupposes their moral or ethical value. (Veber 1923: 310)18 “Do we find among our judgments and beliefs also such judgments and beliefs that we experience just on the basis of the parallel value

18

Veber adopted his theory about moral status of acts from Meinong and he distinguishes between: (i) virtuous or honorable acts; (ii) correct or acceptable acts; (iii) permissible acts; and (iv) impermissible acts. Beside to these we may also speak about morally neutral acts. See Strahovnik 2005.

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGEMENT

115

striving towards phenomena or on the basis of phenomena’s rejection that again come with their own specific senses, not to be found with other judgments and beliefs? Everyday experiences confirm again that we also actually possess such specific beliefs, corresponding in value striving to the once described value beliefs in the value emotions. Here belong all of those beliefs that we express in given cases by the sentences: This should happen! This should not happen! ... You should not do this! You should not leave from here! And so on. Here again we face interesting exclamations whose direct psychological background is built in the lucky case by special beliefs, yet beliefs that differ from the former mentioned value beliefs in that they require for their necessary and direct psychological basis the corresponding strivings that something should happen, that someone should stay in his actual place, shouldn’t do such and such … and that by those and similar beliefs we again ascribe to the mentioned and similar facts a special property, which now however is not identical to their ‘value’ or ‘nonvalue’, but to that special side that we express by the usage of the word ‘ought’, which is actually targeted by all other imperative and optative linguistic forms belonging here, that may now be named in a general and precise way not by ‘value’ and ‘nonvalue’, but again as the positive and the negative ‘ought’ (Sollen) of all those phenomena that are there as mediate appropriated objects of the value striving or rejection.” (Veber 1923: 268-9)

2.5 The Nature of Moral Judgment according to the Meinongian Approach and according to the Current Moral Theory A concluding remark is due in order to mark some differences between the Meinongian approach to moral judgment and between the current strands pertaining to moral theory, such as cognitivism and expressivism. The Meinongian approach by Franc Veber stresses strivings as the basis of moral judgment or of duties. These are phenomenologically different from thoughts. Thus, duties are oughts, and duty-judgments are ought-judgments. According to the dependency principle one cannot have ought-strivings without having the correlated thoughts. What are these

116

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

thoughts? They are ought-beliefs. You have to have the belief about something so that this belief can then be the basis of your striving. Emotion is phenomenologically fuller than thought, but it is not motivational or action-directing. This is the characteristics of strivings though. Brentano, Meinong and Veber knew that in moral judgments there are not just beliefs and thoughts. Moral judgments are phenomenologically different from the usual is-beliefs that are there in descriptive judgments. Cognitivism and expressivism do not provide an answer to the following question. If moral judgments are beliefs, why are they phenomenologically different from ordinary beliefs? My belief about my duty will motivate me, whereas the belief that there is a pen here will not necessarily motivate me, and certainly not in the manner in which the former belief will. What would Brentano, Meinong and Veber endorse in the cognitivism/expressivism dispute? Their talk about moral desires and about moral prima facie duties justifies one to regard them as belonging to the expressivist camp. But what about ought-beliefs? The expressivist treats the core content with the emotional coming-down (»Boo!« for stealing, »Hurray!« for helping an older lady). Meinongians may be at first expected to have this as well. But they do not. They have instead: »I ought to evade stealing«, »I ought to help elders«. For Meinongians moral judgments are beliefs. Specifically they are not only those beliefs that would report some inner non-cognitive moral attitude e.g. striving. One sign that moral judgments are beliefs comes from the fact that Meinongians also talk about the logical correctness and incorrectness of such beliefs. But what about the categorization once as we take into account the new understanding of moral cognitivism, where the content and the attitude of moral judgment are taken to be independent from each other? Here again one would be tempted to say that the attitude in question for Meinongians is simply some noncognitive attitude, e.g. desire or striving and that the content is related to an ought as a property of the object the moral judgment is about. But again this would be too hasty. Moral judgments are oughtbeliefs in the sense that they are beliefs that require as their experiential basis the presence of some evaluative desire or moral striving. This also explains their being motivationally hot. The content of the judgment can

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGEMENT

117

be interpreted as non-descriptive, since it is about what ought to be the case. The map of the positions looks like this. content (Inhalt)

attitude (Akt)

traditional cognitivism

descriptive

belief

traditional noncognitivism/expressivism

nondescriptive

desire or some other noncognitive attitude

nondescriptive cognitivism

nondescriptive

belief

descriptive noncognitivism/fictionalism

descriptive

desire or some other noncognitive attitude/supposition

Meinong/Veber

nondescriptive

ought-belief

Cognitivism has just beliefs, whereas Meinongians have strivings, coming along with motivations. Veber and Meinong, it is true, do not use much of the what-it's-like phenomenology talk, and they rather mention kinds of experiences. But they knew that moral judgment should not be restricted to the descriptive belief and that it rather involves specific beliefs backed up with desires and strivings. One may ask how Veber and Meinong approach fits with others. The chart involves the content and psychological attitudes constitutive of ought-judgments. On the side of the content Meinong and Veber would opt for nondescriptive content aiming at an ought as the intentional object of striving. On the side of the attitude we have an active ought-belief.

3. Summary We have shown in which way the phenomenology of moral judgment is central to the Meinongian approach to moral judgment. The crucial point is rejection of the presupposition (D) and introduction of genuine oughtcommitment moral beliefs. These moral beliefs are recognized in their

118

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

specificity by their constitutive moral phenomenology, not forthcoming in the case of is-commitment beliefs. Meinongian moral phenomenology recognizes the independent existence of a moral realm of objects, paralleled by the psychological underlying descriptive area. It also adopts the constitutive role of phenomenology, from the very start, by appropriating the overall Brentanian theses featuring the phenomenology of intentionality and the intentionality of phenomenology (Horgan and Tienson 2002, Potrþ 2002). The dependency principle however is a genetic and therefore not an essential part of the Meinongian story. This may be straightened by embracing the genuine autonomy of moral judgment related oughtcommitment beliefs, as proposed by cognitive expressivism. Matjaž Potrþ and Vojko Strahovnik University of Ljubljana [email protected] [email protected]

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGEMENT

119

Literature Baumgartner, Wilhelm (1995), “Wertpräsentation”, Grazer philosophische Studien, 50, pp. 537-548. Baumgartner, Wilhelm (1996), “Brentano’s Logical Criterion for Ethics”. In: Elisabeth Baumgartner (ed.), Phenomenology and Cognitive Science. Dettelbach: Röll, pp. 71-79. Brentano, Franz (1911), Von der Klassifikation der psychischen Phänomene, Leipzig: Duncker & Humblot. Brentano, Franz (1969a), The Origin of our Knowledge of Right and Wrong, London: Routledge. Brentano, Franz (1969b), Vom Ursprung sittlicher Erkenntnis, Hamburg: Meiner. Brentano, Franz (1973), The Foundation and Construction of Ethics, London: Routledge. Brentano, Franz (1978), Grundlegung und Aufbau der Ethik, Hamburg: Meiner. Brentano, Franz (1996), Descriptive Psychology, London: Routledge. Bruno, Michael George & Kriegel, Uriah (Forthcoming), “Divorcing Content and Attitude: New Directions in Moral Psychology”. Dancy, Jonathan (1993), Moral Reasons, Oxford: Blackwell. Henderson, David, Horgan, Terry & Potrþ, Matjaž (2007), “Transglobal Evidentialism-Reliabilism”, Acta Analytica, XXII, pp. 281-300. Horgan, Terry & Potrþ, Matjaž (2000), “Blobjectivism and Indirect Correspondence”, Facta Philosophica, 2, pp. 249-270. Horgan, Terry and Potrþ, Matjaž (2006), “Abundant Truth in an Austere World”. In: Patrick Greenough and Michael Lynch (eds.) Truth and Realism Oxford: Clarendon, pp. 137-161. Horgan, Terry and Timmons, Mark (2005), “Moral Phenomenology and Moral Theory”, Philosophical Issues, 15, pp. 56-77.

120

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

Horgan, Terry & Timmons, Mark (2006), “Cognitivist Expressivism”. In: Terry Horgan & Mark Timmons (eds.), Metaethics after Moore, Oxford: Clarendon, pp. 255-298. Horgan, Terry & Timmons, Mark (2007), “Morphological Rationalism and the Psychology of Moral Judgement”, Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, X, pp. 279-295. Horgan, Terry & Tienson, John (2002), “The Intentionality of Phenomenology and the Phenomenology of Intentionality”. In: David J. Chalmers (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 520533. Jacquette, Dale (1991), “The Origins of Gegenstandstheorie: Immanent and Transcendent Intentional Objects in Brentano, Twardowski and Meinong”, Brentano Studien 3, pp. 177-202. Kalderon, Mark Eli (2005), Moral Fictionalism, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Kriegel, Uriah (Forthcoming a), “Moral Phenomenology: Foundational Issues”. Kriegel, Uriah (Forthcoming b). “The Dispensability of (Merely) Intentional Objects”. Lance, Mark, Potrþ, Matjaž & Strahovnik, Vojko [eds.] (2008), Challenging Moral Particularism, New York: Routledge. Mackie, L. John (1977), Ethics: Inventing Right and Wrong, New York: Penguin. Mandelbaum, Maurice (1955), The Phenomenology of Moral Experience, Glencoe, IL: The Free Press. Mally, Ernst (1926), Grundgesetze des Sollens: Elemente der Logik des Willens, Graz: Leuschner & Lubensky; repr. in Logische Schriften. Grosses Logikfragment - Grundgesetze des Sollens, Dordrecht: Reidel, 1971. Meinong, Alexius (1896), Über die Bedeutung des Weber’schen Gesetzes. Beiträge zur Psychologie des Vergleichens und Messens, Sonder-

MEINONGIAN THEORY OF MORAL JUDGEMENT

121

Abdruck aus: Zeitschrift für Psychologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane, Bd. XI, Hamburg und Leipzig, Verlag von Leopold Voss. Meinong, Alexius (1899), “Über Gegenstände höherer Ordnung und deren Verhältniss zur inneren Wahrnehmung”, Zeitschrift für Psychologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane, XXI, pp. 181-272. Meinong, Alexius [ed.] (1904), Untersuchungen zur Gegenstandstheorie und Psychologie. Leipzig: Barth. Meinong, Alexius (1977), Über Annahmen. Graz: Akademische Druck- u. Verlagsanstalt. Meinong, Alexius (1968-78), Meinong Gesamtausgabe (GA), ed. by R. Haller, R.M. Chisholm & R. Kindiger, Graz: Ak. Druck- und Verlaganstalt. Potrþ, Matjaž (2001), “France Veber (1890-1975)”. In: Liliana Albertazzi, D. Jacquette and R. Poli (eds.), The School of Alexius Meinong, Aldershot: Ashgate, pp. 209-24. Potrþ, Matjaž (2005), “The Subjective and the Objective in Veber’s Ethics and in Moral Particularism”, Anthropos, XXXVII, pp. 33-44. Potrþ, Matjaž (Forthcoming a), “Simple Inclusivism”. Potrþ, Matjaž (Forthcoming b), “Things Proceed from Two”. Potrþ, Matjaž (Forthcoming c), “Intuitionist Particularism”. Potrþ, Matjaž (2002), “Intentionality of Phenomenology in Brentano”, In: Terry Horgan, Matjaž Potrþ & John Tienson (eds.), Origins: The Common Sources of the Analytic and Phenomenological Traditions. The Southern Journal of Philosophy Supplement, pp. 231-67. Potrþ, Matjaž & Vospernik, Miklavž (1996), “Meinong on Psychophysical Measurement”, Axiomathes, VII, pp. 187-202. Potrþ, Matjaž & Strahovnik, Vojko (2004), Practical Contexts, Frankfurt: Ontos Verlag. Potrþ, Matjaž & Strahovnik, Vojko (2005), “Meinongian Scorekeeping”, Meinong Studies I, pp. 309-330.

122

MATJAŽ POTRý AND VOJKO STRAHOVNIK

Sajama, Seppo, Kamppinen, Matti & Vihjanen, Simo (1994), Misel in smisel, Ljubljana: ZPS. Schwarz, Ernst (1934), Über den Wert, das Soll und das richtige Werthalten (Meinong-Studien II), Graz: Leykam. Strahovnik, Vojko (2005), “Veber's ethics”, Anthropos, XXXVII, pp. 105116. Strahovnik, Vojko (2007), “Moralna fenomenologija in fenomenološki argumenti”, Analiza, XI, pp. 73-95. Timmons, Mark (1999), Morality Without Foundations, New York: Oxford University Press. Veber, France (1921), Sistem filozofije. Prva knjiga: O Bistvu Predmeta, Ljubljana: Kleinmayr & Bamberg. Veber, France (1923), Etika - Prvi poizkus eksaktne logike nagonske pameti, Ljubljana: Uþiteljska tiskarna.

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG Mauro Antonelli Marina Manotta

Zusammenfassung Alexius Meinongs und Vittorio Benussis Wahrnehmungsanalysen stellen im psychologischen Panorama der Jahrhundertwende durchaus bemerkenswerte Erneuerungsansätze dar, die die so genannte Grazer Schule der Psychologie entscheidend prägen. Die vorliegende Arbeit rekonstruiert beide Ansätze und stellt hierbei deren gemeinsame Voraussetzungen und divergierende Lösungen heraus. Denn bei Meinong wird das Wahrnehmungsphänomen zunehmend durch die philosophische Linse der Gegenstandstheorie untersucht, so daß seine Wahrnehmungsanalyse eher erklärend als phänomenologisch-deskriptiv orientiert ist. Benussi distanziert sich allmählich von den Grundthesen seines Lehrers, indem er das durchaus eigenständige Projekt einer „genetischen Experimentalphänomenologie“ entwickelt, das ihn in die Nähe der Husserl’schen Phänomenologie bringt und zu einer kritischen Auseinandersetzung mit der Berliner Gestalttheorie führt.

1. Einleitendes. Meinongs Wege zur Psychologie In Meinongs psychologischer Forschung finden sich beide grundlegenden Ansätze, die die Psychologie des ausgehenden 19. Jahrhunderts charakterisieren. Auf der einen Seite steht die naturwissenschaftlich orientierte Psychologie, die sich auf Experiment und Messung stützt und sich zugleich als „Psychologie der Elemente“ versteht, da sie mit den „Atomen“ des psychischen Lebens operiert und die gefundenen Elemente zu synthetisieren versucht. Auf der anderen Seite sind Bemühungen erkennbar, die in die entgegengesetzte Richtung zu gehen scheinen, indem sie die Erklä-

124

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

rung des psychischen Lebens durch Rückführung auf einfache Elemente ablehnen und den Zweck verfolgen, die Bewußtseinsphänomene, wie sie ursprünglich und unmittelbar erscheinen, zu beschreiben. 1 Meinongs Psychologie kann zugleich als Vertreterin der klassischen Elementar- und Assoziationspsychologie und als Vorläuferin der modernen deskriptivphänomenologischen Psychologie betrachtet werden. Meinong interessierte sich sehr früh für experimentelle Psychologie. Schon während seiner Tätigkeit als Privatdozent an der Universität Wien hatte er ein psychologisches Kolleg mit „Demonstrationsversuchen“ abgehalten. Nach seiner Berufung nach Graz begann er im Herbst 1886 „aus eigenen Mitteln“ die ersten experimentalpsychologischen Übungen in Österreich abzuhalten (vgl. Meinong, 1921, 7). Über alle finanziellen und räumlichen Hindernisse hinweg setzte er im Jahr 1894 die Errichtung eines „Psychologischen Laboratoriums“ durch, die er zu den „wichtigsten Ergebnissen“ seiner akademischen Tätigkeit rechnete. In einer Zeit, in der die Ausdifferenzierung von Psychologie, Philosophie und Logik noch nicht abgeschlossen war, hatte Meinong damit der Wissenschaftsdisziplin der Psychologie zum ersten Mal in Österreich eine institutionelle Basis gegeben. Nach dem Meinong’schen Grazer Laboratorium wurde in Innsbruck dank den Bemühungen Franz Hillebrands das zweite psychologische Institut Österreichs gegründet und war die Gründung psychologischer Institute an anderen österreichischen Universitäten in Vorbereitung (vgl. Benetka, 1990, 55-68). So konnte Meinong im Vorwort zu den Untersuchungen zur Gegenstandstheorie und Psychologie, der Festschrift zum zehnjährigen Bestehen des psychologischen Laboratoriums, mit Recht behaupten: die experimentelle Psychologie scheint auf dem Wege, eine populäre Wissenschaft zu werden [...]. Darf an solchem Wandel der Dinge das Grazer psychologische Laboratorium sich jenen Anteil beimessen, der einerseits der Beschaffenheit der aus diesem Institute hervorgegangen Arbeiten, andererseits der sonst wohlbegründeten Präsumtion zugunsten des Einflusses eines Präzedens gemäß ist, dann werden die zehn

1

Es versteht sich von selbst, daß beide Ansätze eine Vielzahl sowohl in methodischer als auch gegenständlicher Hinsicht verschiedener Positionen umfassen.

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG125

erste und sicherlich in mehr als einer Hinsicht schwierigsten Arbeitsjahre, die das Grazer Institut nun demnächst hinter sich hat, keine erfolglosen gewesen sein (Meinong, 1904, Vf.). Trotzdem zog sich Meinong nach 1900 von der experimentellen Forschung immer mehr zurück; die Leitung des psychologischen Instituts wurde im Laufe der Jahre mehr und mehr in die Hände seiner Schüler Stephan Witasek und Vittorio Benussi gelegt. Als Ursache davon ist nicht nur die Entwicklung eines Augenleidens zu erwähnen, das ihn in den letzten Lebensjahren völlig erblinden ließ, sondern auch die zunehmende Konzentration auf die philosophischen Grundfragen, die in den Bereich der Ontologie, Erkenntnistheorie und Werttheorie fallen. 2 Daß Meinong sich vom experimental-psychologischen Betrieb entfernte, bedeutet natürlich nicht, daß er sich mit Psychologie nicht mehr befaßte. Sein Interesse für die „außerexperimentelle Psychologie“, das in den Wiener Studienjahren unter dem Einfluß Brentanos entstanden war, blieb unverändert. Wie bekannt, sollte die Wiener Lehrtätigkeit Brentanos nicht ohne Folgen für Meinongs Denken bleiben. Die Bestimmung der Psychologie als reine Erfahrungswissenschaft, die Brentano in der Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkt festlegt, ist als der Boden zu betrachten, von dem alle Meinong’schen psychologischen Untersuchungen ausgehen. 3 Brentanos Psychologie ist zwar „empirisch“, aber nicht „experimentell“. Ihr empirischer Charakter liegt zwar darin, daß sie sich auf die innere Wahrnehmung als den einzigen, untrüglichen Zugang zu ihrem Gegenstandsbereich stützt, aber nicht darin, daß sie auf die Ergebnisse der experimentellen Erforschung angewiesen ist. Brentanos Psychologie ist deskriptiv orientiert, d. h. ihre Aufgabe ist die Beschreibung und Analyse des menschlichen Bewußtseins, genauer von all dem, was der Mensch in innerer Erfahrung erfaßt. Meinong versuchte jedoch in einigen Fällen, experimentelle und rein deskriptive Untersuchungen zusammen durchzufüh-

2

3

Eine historische Rekonstruktion der Herausbildung, Institutionalisierung und praktischen Anwendung der Psychologie an der Universität Graz seit der zweiten Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts findet sich in Mittenecker, Seybold, 1994, 1-40. Vgl. Brentano, 1874, 1: „Mein Standpunkt in der Psychologie ist der empirische: die Erfahrung allein gilt mir als Lehrmeisterin“.

126

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

ren. Denn er läßt an verschiedenen Stellen seiner gewissermaßen phänomenologischen oder deskriptiv-psychologischen Analysen […] nicht nur Korrekturen aufgrund experimenteller Ergebnisse zu, sondern führt solche auch selbst ein, wobei insbesondere an seine Untersuchungen zum Weberschen Gesetz und dessen allgemeiner Anwendung in der Meßbarkeit des Psychischen zu denken ist (Haller, 1995/96, 33). Meinong versuchte aber in noch höherem Maße, sich an die deskriptive Ebene zu halten, auf welcher sich Brentano schon bewegte. In seiner Forschung wurde er stets von einer hohen Achtung vor den Tatsachen geleitet, wie sie sich dem Bewußtsein darbieten. Man kann nicht – so Meinong – die Gegebenheitsweise der Gegenstände unterschätzen und sie als bloßen „subjektiven Schein“ betrachten; das Aussehen der Gegenstände ist ganz und gar etwas Tatsächliches. In diesem Respekt vor den Gegenständen, wie sie unmittelbar erscheinen, kann man deutlich einen Ansatz zur phänomenologischen Einstellung erblicken. Man vergleiche Meinongs Äußerungen über die psychische Erscheinung als Gegenstand der Psychologie: Es fragt sich vor allem, was ist mit „Erscheinung“ gemeint und ist es hier acceptierbar? Daß mir etwas erscheine, sage ich, wenn mir so zu Mute ist, als ob ich etwas wahrnähme [...]. Das „als ob“ ist ganz neutral gemeint, also nicht etwa mit dem Nebengedanken, daß mir blosz zu Mute ist, die Wirklichkeit aber dem nicht entspricht. (Meinong Nachlaß, Karton XIII/a, 1896/97) Die Erscheinung – so Meinong – kann der Wirklichkeit gemäß sein, wie es im Normalfall der Wahrnehmung geschieht, oder überhaupt nicht gemäß, wie es im Traum oder bei einer Halluzination der Fall ist; sie kann schließlich der Wirklichkeit nur teilweise entsprechen, wie bei einem Gegenstand, der durch farbiges Glas oder perspektivisch gesehen wird. In all diesen Fällen erscheint uns etwas, das keiner naturwissenschaftlichen Erklärung (z. B. durch Rückführung auf physiologische Zustände) zur Legitimation bedarf; es muß lediglich als solches akzeptiert werden. Die rein deskriptiven Untersuchungen Meinongs gehen bis in die Jahrhundertwende hinein. Im Laufe der Zeit bewegte sich die Behandlung

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG127

der psychologischen Fragestellungen immer mehr in den Bahnen der Gegenstandstheorie, der neuen besonderen philosophischen Wissenschaft, um deren Grundlegung sich Meinong bemühte. Die Gegenstandstheorie sollte ab 1904 den psychologischen Untersuchungen den theoretischen Rahmen geben. Die Psychologie wird systematisch hinsichtlich der Konzeption des Gegenstandes und der Voraussetzungen der Gegenstandstheorie bearbeitet. Meinong hat tatsächlich keinen Zweifel daran, „daß gegenstandstheoretisches Wissen und Können auch psychologischer Forschung gar wohl zu statten kommen mag“ (Meinong, 1904, 526). Im Folgenden wird nahezu ausschließlich Meinongs außerexperimentelle Psychologie in Betracht gezogen. Genauer wird das Problem der Wahrnehmung in deskriptiv-phänomenologischer Hinsicht (§§ 2-5) und dann in gegenstandstheoretischer Hinsicht (§ 6) dargestellt, das den Ausgangspunkt für Benussis spätere wahrnehmungspsychologische Forschung darstellt.

2. Die Entstehung der Erfahrung Anknüpfend an die Tradition des Empirismus nimmt Meinong die Wahrnehmung als die Quelle unseres Wissens an. Sinnesdaten, Empfindungen, Vorstellungen bilden die Grundlage dafür, daß uns etwas sinnvoll und geordnet erscheint. In den Hume Studien (Meinong, 1882) sowie in den psychologischen Arbeiten der 80er Jahre und in den Vorlesungen derselben Periode versucht Meinong, die Momente und die Umstände festzustellen, welche die Entstehung und den Verlauf der unmittelbaren Erfahrungsdaten erklären können (vgl. Meinong, 1882, 167). Die Betrachtung ist also zunächst eine genetische und wird durch die Prinzipien der Beobachtung und der Analyse geführt, wobei Letztere im Sinne einer Gliederung der psychischen Tatsachen in ihre Bestandstücke verstanden wird. Die Erfahrung entsteht nach Meinong durch Verbindung von elementaren Inhalten, d. h. von Empfindungen. Die Verbindungen sind von zweifacher Art: ideale, subjektive, erzeugbare Verbindungen einerseits und reale, objektive, vorgefundene Verbindungen andererseits. Die idealen Verbindungen sind das Ergebnis einer psychischen Tätigkeit auf Grund ge-

128

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

wisser Vorstellungsinhalte, die „Fundamente“ genannt werden (vgl. Meinong, 1882, 128). Zu diesen Verbindungen sind die Relationen der Gleichheit, Verschiedenheit, Verträglichkeit sowie jene komplexe Inhalte zu zählen, die Meinong „Kollektiva“ nennt. 4 Der Begriff der idealen Verbindung impliziert, daß die Glieder einer Relation und die Bestandstücke eines Komplexes getrennt bleiben, und daß eine Vorstellungstätigkeit von dem einen Glied zum anderen hinübergeht. Aus einer solchen Tätigkeit entsteht die Vorstellung einer Ähnlichkeit oder einer Verschiedenheit zwischen Inhalten sowie die Vorstellung einer Gruppe, eines Paars oder eines Dinges mit mehreren Eigenschaften. Die Erfahrung ergibt sich daher als Inbegriff von elementaren, zusammenhangslosen Inhalten: Ist die Relation das Ergebnis einer besonderen psychischen Tätigkeit, so kommt sie den Fundamenten für sich und ohne diese Tätigkeit nicht eigentlich zu; wenn man daher von den Fundamenten als gegebenen ausgeht, so muß man eine solche Relation subjektiv, ideal nennen (Meinong, 1882, 142). Es ist also eine psychische Aktivität, die auf diesen Fundamenten operiert und die Vorstellung von Relationen und Komplexen erzeugt. Die sinnliche Wahrnehmung steht aber nicht ganz unter der Herrschaft der subjektiven Tätigkeit. Meinong fragt sich, ob es objektive Faktoren gibt, die unseren Geist von einer Vorstellung zu einer anderen hinleiten können, oder ob das vereinigende Prinzip nur in unserem Geist liegt. Mit anderen Worten: Gibt es in der Erfahrung Anlässe, die die Verbindung der Inhalte bedingen können? In den Vorlesungen des Sommersemesters 1888 zur „Psychologie der Komplexionen“ betont Meinong, daß es Prinzipien gibt, die die subjektive, willkürliche Tätigkeit des „InBeziehung-Setzens“ leiten. So Meinong: Obwohl es keinen Inhalt gibt, der sich zusammenfassender Tätigkeit für immer entzieht, auch kaum ein Verhältnis gibt, durch das zwei Inhalte unfehlbar von der Möglichkeit ausgeschlossen wären, je zu-

4

Unter „Kollektiv“ versteht Meinong eine bloße Summe, die er „das sowohl als auch“ oder „das bloße Zusammengedachte“ nennt: vgl. Meinong, 1891, 291f.; Meinong, 1894, 319.

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG129

sammengefaßt aufzutreten, so sind doch Gründe oder Motive der Zusammenfassung auf dem Gebiet der psychologischen Erfahrung unverkennbar. Leicht der Erfahrung zu entnehmen, wenn man an beliebigen Beispielen untersucht, warum man eine gewisse Menge von Inhaltsdaten etwa zur Vorstellung dieses oder jenes Gegenstandes, dieser oder jener Klasse vereinigt. Bevorzugt erweisen sich da: 1. Räumlich oder zeitlich Nahestehendes; 2. Kontinuierlich ineinander Übergehendes; 3. Ähnliches; 4. Demselben Zweck Zugehöriges (Meinong Nachlaß, Karton XIII/d, 1888). Eine gewisse Ähnlichkeit solcher „Gründe“ mit den so genannten „Gestaltgesetzen“, die nach den Gestalttheoretikern das Wahrnehmungsfeld organisieren (Wertheimer, 1923), kann wohl nicht verkannt werden. Am wichtigsten ist aber die daraus folgende These, daß nicht jede Relation subjektiv, ideal ist. Denn es gibt in der Erfahrung auch Relationen, die nicht aus der psychischen Tätigkeit des Verbindens entstehen, sondern von objektiven Prinzipien bzw. Gesetzen abhängen. Das Subjekt verhält sich diesen Relationen gegenüber nur wahrnehmend, nur das bereits Vorhandene konstatierend. In solchen Fällen muß die Relation den Fundamenten wirklich zukommen, sonst könnte sie an ihnen nicht wahrgenommen werden (vgl. Meinong, 1882, 142). Diese Relation heißt also „real“ oder „objektiv“, und die daraus folgenden Komplexe „vorfindlich“. Als vorfindliche Komplexionen, bei denen sich das Subjekt rein rezeptiv verhält, sind folgende zu nennen: die innige Verbindung zwischen Farbe und Ausdehnung, die zeitliche Bestimmtheit der psychischen und physischen Inhalte, die örtliche Bestimmtheit der physischen Inhalte, die Verbindung der verschiedenen Stellen im subjektiven Zeitkontinuum und Ortkontinuum. 5 Zu diesen Verbindungen kann das Subjekt nichts beitragen, es findet sie vor und es nimmt sie wahr; es fühlt sich sozusagen wider seinen Willen gezwungen, das zu tun:

5

Vgl. Meinong, 1889, 207-208. Beispiele von vorfindlichen Komplexionen finden sich auch in Meinong, 1899, 395: „Farbe, taktile Qualitäten, Temperaturen treten stets mehr oder minder deutlich lokalisiert auf, und diese Verbindung mit Ortbestimmungen ist augenscheinlich mehr als das bloße Zusammentreffen im Sinne der Gleichzeitigkeit“. Ab 1891 bezeichnet aber Meinong die „vorfindlichen“ Komplexionen besser als „wirklich“ oder „real“.

130

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

Ich kann mir kein Existierendes anders als zu irgendeiner Zeit existierend, kein physisches Ding anders als an einem Orte, keine Zeit, keinen Ort ohne zeitliche resp. örtliche Umgebung vorstellen u. dgl. (Meinong, 1889, 208). Es handelt sich um Komplexe, deren Bestandstücke am natürlichsten zusammengehören und in ihrer Einzelheit gar nicht vorstellbar sind. Meinong behauptet nämlich, „daß keine Farbe, keine Gestalt anders in die Wahrnehmung oder Einbildung tritt, denn als Bestandstück einer gewissen vorfindlichen Komplexion“ (Meinong, 1889, 209). Damit stellt er ein wichtiges, erfolgreiches Erfahrungsprinzip auf: Die Komplexionen sind die unmittelbaren, ursprünglichen Erfahrungsdaten, ihre einfache Bestandstücke jedoch, d. h. die reinen Empfindungen, sind als solche nicht gegeben, sondern nur durch Abstraktion feststellbar. Es steht für ihn außer Zweifel, „daß ‚reine Empfindungen‘ in ihrer Losgelöstheit empirisch nicht anzutreffen sind“. 6 Mit seiner Anerkennung von realen Relationen und vorfindlichen Komplexionen, bei denen das Subjekt nicht tätig ist, 7 verläßt Meinong das herkömmliche Bild der Erfahrung als bloßer Inbegriff von einfachen Inhalten, das in der assoziationstheoretischen Tradition vorherrschte. Die Erfahrung weist eine eigene Gesetzmäßigkeit und eigene Regeln auf. Das bedeutet überdies die Überwindung des Kant’schen Begriffs der Erfahrung, nach welchem die Sinnlichkeit nur das Material bietet, aber keine Verknüpfung dieses Materials. Während für Kant die Sinnesdaten nur mit Hilfe von Verstandesbegriffen zusammengefaßt und zu einer Einheit gebracht werden, entspringen für Meinong die unmittelbaren Verbindungen der Erfahrung aus keiner Verstandeshandlung, keiner aktiven Tätigkeit des Subjektes:

6

7

Meinong, 1888, 134. Vgl. auch S. 143: „Die Erfahrung kennt hier wie dort nur Komplexe“. Die subjektive Tätigkeit ist also Unterscheidungsmerkmal: vgl. Meinong, Nachlaß, Karton XIII/d: „Hier sogleich auffallend, daß bei manchen dieser Komplexionen das betreffende Individuum tätig eingreift, bei anderen nur das Vorhandensein konstatieren kann. Daher Einteilung in erzeugbare und vorfindliche Komplexionen“. Weiter hinten präzisiert Meinong: „vorfindlich sind alle Fälle, wo es keine Produktion gibt“.

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG131

Jedes Mal sind aber diese Komplexionen und Relationen nicht erst durch eine reflektierende Intelligenz in die inhaltlich bestimmten Vorstellungen hineingetragen; sie sind vielmehr ein Stück Wirklichkeit, über das man sich eben nur durch die Wirklichkeit kann belehren lassen. 8

3. Die Voraussetzungen für die Produktionstheorie Die Entdeckung der realen Relationen und vorfindlichen Komplexionen beinhaltet nach Meinong, daß die sinnliche Erfahrung eine, wenn auch sehr einfache Gliederung aufweist, daß die sinnlichen Inhalte bestimmte, wenn auch äußerst elementare Regeln befolgen. Die Frage ist nun: Wie sieht die Erfahrung in ihrem Entwicklungsgang aus? Was ändert sich in Meinongs Bild von der Erfahrung mit dem Auftreten von komplizierteren Strukturen? Der Begriff der „Gestaltqualität“, den Ehrenfels 1890 in die psychologische Forschung einführte, sollte diese Frage beantworten. Unter „Gestaltqualitäten“ versteht Ehrenfels bekanntlich jene positiven Bewußtseinsinhalte, die keine bloße Zusammenfassung oder Summe von Elementen, keine „Kollektiva“ sind, sondern etwas diesen gegenüber Neues. Eine Raumgestalt oder eine Melodie sind z. B. von der Summe der Ortbestimmtheiten und von der Summe der Töne wohl unterscheidbar, sie lassen sich nicht auf die Beschaffenheit ihrer Teile reduzieren (vgl. Ehrenfels, 1890, 262f.). Meinongs Zustimmung zu den Ehrenfels’schen Vorstellungsgebilden hängt bekanntlich mit der Ersetzung des Namens „Gestaltqualität“ durch den Ausdruck „fundierter Inhalt“ zusammen; demgemäß werden die Elemente, an die solche Vorstellungsgebilde gebunden sind,

8

Meinong, 1894, 320. Man kann die enge Beziehung von Meinongs Erfahrungsanalyse mit den gleichzeitigen psychologischen Analysen von Carl Stumpf und Edmund Husserl nicht verkennen. Beide waren in der Schule Brentanos erzogen worden, und beide bemühten sich um die Überwindung der herkömmlichen Psychologie durch die Lehre der selbständigen Inhalte und Teilinhalte (Stumpf) sowie durch die Lehre der primären und psychischen Relationen (Husserl). Vgl. dazu Stumpf, 1873, und Husserl, 1891.

132

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

„fundierende Inhalte“ genannt. 9 Diese Ersetzung ist nicht belanglos: Denn diese Wendungen beinhalten, daß solche Vorstellungsgebilde nicht „neben“ den einfachen, elementaren Empfindungsvorstellungen, sondern „über“ ihnen stehen, d. h. von ihnen abhängig sind. Der Grund dafür ist einleuchtend: Es kann keine Verschiedenheit geben, ohne etwas, das verschieden ist, es kann keine Melodie geben, ohne die Töne, die sie ausmachen. Diese Vorstellungsgebilde, die sowohl Relationen als auch Komplexionen umfassen, sind ihren Elementen gegenüber nicht selbständig: Sie sind, weil auf die sie fundierenden Grundlagen als Voraussetzungen angewiesen, diesen gegenüber unselbständig; nicht-fundierte Vorstellungen können ihnen daher auch als „selbständige“ zur Seite gestellt werden, so daß fundierte und selbständige Vorstellungen im eben präzisierten Sinne eine vollständige Disjunktion ausmachen (Meinong, 1891, 288). Vom genetischen Standpunkt aus stellt sich nun die Frage, wie wir dazu kommen, diese Vorstellungsgebilde aufzufassen. Mit Meinongs Worten: Sind die fundierten Inhalte „vorfindlich“ oder „erzeugbar“, real oder ideal? Auf Grund der vorherigen Analysen wäre es zu erwarten, daß sich die vorfindlichen Komplexionen eigenständig gestalten, d. h daß sie dank denselben autochtonen, erfahrungsimmanenten Gesetzen eine kompliziertere Form annehmen. Sie sollten nämlich zu „fundierten Inhalten“ werden, ohne eine subjektive Tätigkeit zu erfordern. Meinong urteilt aber anders. Er betrachtet diese Vorstellungsgebilde als etwas, das eine besondere psychische Beteiligung seitens des Subjektes beansprucht. Während für Ehrenfels die Gestaltqualität ohne eine speziell auf sie gerichtete Tätigkeit mit der Grundlage zugleich gegeben ist, ist für Meinong der fundierte Inhalt nicht mit den fundierenden gegeben. Vorgefunden sind für ihn nur die Elemente, nur die Bestandstücke des fundierten Inhaltes, d. h. der Relation oder Komplexion. Der fundierte Inhalt ist das Ergebnis einer besonderen psychischen Arbeit, die das Subjekt an den Gliedern des Komplexes 9

Das Wort „Inhalt“ bezeichnet hier ausschließlich, was uns gegeben ist, was wir in der Vorstellung vor uns haben, kurz das Bewußtseinsdatum oder die Erscheinung. Es handelt sich also nicht um jenen Inhalt, der ab 1899 als vom Gegenstand verschieden postuliert wird.

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG133

ausübt; er ist etwas Erzeugtes und nicht etwas, das schon fertig vorgegeben ist. Diesbezüglich besteht für Meinong allerdings ein Unterschied zwischen Relationen und Komplexionen. Zur Vorstellung einer Relation muß das Subjekt mehr beitragen als zur Vorstellung einer Raumgestalt oder einer Melodie, weil die Elemente der Raumgestalt oder der Melodie miteinander inniger verbunden sind als die Glieder einer Relation. So Meinong: Augenfällig wäre dann, daß beim Vergleichen das Subjekt beträchtlich mehr hinzutun muß als beim Wahrnehmen von Gestalt oder Melodie; indes dürfte auch hier den fundierenden Inhalten nicht alles zu überlassen sein. 10 Auch die Vorstellung der Komplexionen bedarf in der Tat einer, wenn auch nicht so großen, psychischen Arbeit, bedarf einer psychischen „Anstrengung“, um die Töne oder die räumlichen Teile zusammenzuhalten. Man kann also schließen, daß zur Auffassung der Gestalten sowie der Relationen unter allen Umständen eine subjektive Tätigkeit nötig ist. Fundierte Inhalte sind somit ohne weiteres als „ideal“ zu betrachten und das bedeutet, daß sie stricto sensu nicht wahrnehmbar sind. Hier liegt der Kern der so genannten Theorie der „Vorstellungsproduktion“, die Meinong allerdings nie genau formuliert hat; vielmehr hat er für diese die Voraussetzungen geschaffen. 11 Diese Theorie setzt einen du10

11

Meinong, 1891, 296. Im Karton IV/b des Nachlasses (1895/96) bemerkt Meinong: „Daß auch hier Tätigkeit erforderlich, zeigt Möglichkeit, Melodien nicht zu ,verstehen‘, ebenso Gestalten nicht zu perzipieren.“ Die Theorie der Vorstellungsproduktion wurde ausführlich von Rudolf Ameseder und Stephan Witasek weiterentwickelt. Ameseder legte eine Skizze der Produktionstheorie in „Über Vorstellungsproduktion“ (Ameseder, 1904) vor. Witasek befasste sich intensiv mit der psychischen Produktion vor allem in seinen Grundlinien der Psychologie (Witasek, 1908). Ausgangspunkt beider Analysen ist die Unterscheidung zwischen fundierenden und fundierten Inhalten sowie die Auffassung der Vorstellungen der fundierenden Inhalte als „Elementarvorstellungen“. Beiden Analysen ist außerdem die Überzeugung gemein, daß das Fundierungsverhältnis, in dem die Inhalte bzw. Gegenstände stehen, auf das Vorstellungsgebiet nicht übertragbar ist. Wenn die fundierten Inhalte gegenüber den fundierenden unselbständig sind, so sind die Vorstellungen der ersteren gegenüber den Vorstellungen der letzteren gleichfalls unselbständig. Sie sind jedoch

134

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

alistischen Standpunkt voraus: Die Erfahrung setzt sich aus zwei Stufen zusammen, d. h. aus der Auffassung der elementaren Inhalte einerseits und aus der Verarbeitung derselben zu Gestalten bzw. zu fundierten Inhalten andererseits. Man kann daher in dieser Theorie zwischen Wahrnehmung und Produktion, zwischen einem „niederen“ Psychismus und einem „höheren“ Psychismus unterscheiden, wobei Letzteres als Synthese von elementaren Bausteinen zu sehen ist. Dies scheint in gewissem Grade auf das Kant’sche Erfahrungsmodell zurückzuführen, d. h. auf ein intellektualistisches Modell, in dem die Verbindung des sinnlichen Materials vom Verstand abhängig gemacht wird. 12 In Meinongs Entwurf der Produktionstheorie werden also die Gestalten neben den fundierenden Inhalten erhalten. Er will in der Tat den Begriff des Bestandstückes durch den der Gestalt nicht ersetzen, sondern nur ergänzen. Dazu wird die Wahrnehmbarkeit der Bestandstücke einerseits und das Bedürfnis einer subjektiven Tätigkeit zur Gestaltvorstellung an-

12

durch Elementarvorstellungen nicht fundiert, sondern „produziert“. Zum Zustandekommen einer Gestaltvorstellung oder einer Melodievorstellung sind mit anderen Worten nicht nur Elementarvorstellungen erforderlich, sondern es muß auch ein psychischer Prozeß eingreifen, der „Produktion“ genannt wird. Dieser Produktionsprozeß betrifft jedoch lediglich die Vorstellungen, nicht die Inhalte (bzw. Gegenstände). Es ist völlig unzulässig, vom Produzieren einer Gestalt, einer Melodie oder einer Relation zu sprechen; solche Inhalte werden lediglich durch Produktion vorgestellt: „Der Terminus Produzieren steht somit nicht auf gleicher Stufe wie Vorstellen, Annehmen, Urteilen. Denn man stellt eine Farbe vor, – man nimmt an, oder man urteilt, daß etwas ist oder nicht ist usw.: dagegen produziert man nicht eine Verschiedenheit, sondern die Vorstellung einer solchen; die Verschiedenheit erfaßt man durch Produktion“ (Ameseder, 1904, 488). Witasek hebt wiederholt den grundlegenden Beitrag des Subjektes an der psychischen Produktion hervor. Für ihn ist eine Gestalt- oder Melodievorstellung nicht nur von Elementarvorstellungen abhängig, sondern entscheidend auch vom Subjekt selbst, von dessen Übung und dessen Dispositionen. Auch das Gedächtnis sowie jede kreative Tätigkeit (z. B. die schöpferische Tätigkeit des Künstlers) können nach Witasek zu einer produzierten Vorstellung bestimmend beitragen (Witasek, 1908, 224 ff.). Über die Ähnlichkeiten zwischen der Produktionstheorie und den Kant’schen Thesen vgl. Metzger, 1941, 97.

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG135

dererseits behauptet. 13

4. Die Wahrnehmung des zeitlich Ausgedehnten Das dualistische Modell der Produktionstheorie hat eine entscheidende Auswirkung auf das Problem der Zeitwahrnehmung, die Meinong als Sonderfall der Wahrnehmung von fundierten Inhalten betrachtet. Wie Ehrenfels in seiner Abhandlung zwischen zeitlichen und unzeitlichen Gestaltqualitäten unterschieden hat, so unterscheidet Meinong zwischen zeitlich distribuierten und zeitlich nicht distribuierten Inhalten. Beide Klassen von Inhalten sind wohl in der Zeit, aber sie erfüllen die Zeit unterschiedlich, sie sind in der Zeit anders verteilt. Es gibt für Meinong Vorstellungsgegenstände, die ihrer Natur nach einer Zeitstrecke bedürfen, um sich zu entfalten (eine Melodie, ein bewegter oder ruhender Gegenstand), und die darum „distribuiert“ genannt werden, und solche, die sozusagen in einem einzigen Zeitpunkt zusammengedrängt sind (etwa eine Farbe oder ein Ton) (Meinong, 1899, 443). Wie werden diese Gegenstände wahrgenommen? Während die ersten keine Schwierigkeit bereiten, da sie uns sozusagen in einem einzigen Blick gegeben sind, erwächst bei den Letzteren folgendes Problem. Melodie und Bewegung sind für Meinong fundierte Inhalte: Eine Melodie ist kein bloßes Kollektiv von Tönen, sondern auf diesen aufgebaut; die Töne, die in bestimmter zeitlicher Abfolge gegeben sind, „fundieren“ die Melodie. Infolgedessen „kann die Melodie nicht vorgestellt werden, ehe sämtliche sie ausmachenden Töne gegeben sind“ (Meinong 1899, 440). Mit anderen Worten: Wir können die Melodie nur wahrnehmen, wenn alle Töne wahrgenommen sind. Wie erfolgt aber diese Wahrnehmung? Kann dem Nacheinander des Gegenstandes ein Nacheinander der

13

Unter „Bestandstücken“, d. h. unter fundierenden Inhalten, kann man nicht die einfachen, elementaren Empfindungen verstehen. Wie schon gesagt, sind für Meinong die reinen Empfindungen nie in der Erfahrung gegeben. Die ursprüngliche Erfahrungsdaten, die als fundierende Inhalte gelten können, sind nur die vorfindlichen Komplexionen. Meinong verwendet nie den Ausdruck „einfach“ oder „elementar“ in Bezug auf die fundierenden Inhalte.

136

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

Vorstellung entsprechen? Kann die Wahrnehmung eines einheitlichen, aus sukzessiven Teilen bestehenden Gegenstandes durch sukzessives Vorstellen dieser Teile erfolgen, so daß jedem Moment des Gegenstandes ein Moment der Vorstellung entspricht? Die Antwort lautet für Meinong ganz negativ: Würde ein zeitlich verteilter Gegenstand durch eine ebenso verteilte Vorstellung wahrgenommen werden, so wäre in jedem Punkt der Vorstellungszeit ein Punkt des vorgestellten Gegenstandes wahrgenommen; somit wäre aber am Ende höchstens ein Kollektiv von Tönen vorgestellt, aber keine Melodie. Diese ist als fundierter Inhalt mehr als die Summe ihrer Teile; dementsprechend ist die Wahrnehmung eines Ganzen von der Wahrnehmung einer Ansammlung von Stücken ganz verschieden. Daraus schließt Meinong, daß ein distribuierter Gegenstand durch keine distribuierte Vorstellung erfaßt werden kann. Mit anderen Worten: Gegenstandszeit und Vorstellungszeit können nicht zusammenfallen, können nicht parallel ablaufen. Die in zeitlicher Abfolge gegebenen Töne einer Melodie müssen durch einen nicht distribuierten Vorstellungsakt zum Bewußtsein kommen. Meinong kommt somit zur Unterscheidung zwischen Gegenstandsund Vorstellungszeit. Die Vorstellung eines zeitlich ausgedehnten Gegenstandes ist ein zeitlich unausgedehnter, nicht distribuierter Akt: Es ist für Meinong einleuchtend, daß „wer die Melodie vorstellen will, zugleich die sämtlichen Töne vorstellen muß, die sie ausmachen“ (Meinong, 1899, 463). Zur Wahrnehmung einer Melodie ist aber erforderlich, daß die zugleich vorgestellten Töne nicht als gleichzeitig, sondern in ihrer zeitlichen Abfolge vorgestellt werden. Sie müssen nämlich zugleich erscheinen, aber verschiedenzeitig; ansonsten hätte man keine Melodie, sondern nur ein Gemenge von Tönen. Wie ist nun dieses gleichzeitiges Vorstellen von dem, was nicht gleichzeitig ist, zu verstehen? Meinong trifft hier auf dasselbe Problem, das schon William Stern beschäftigt hatte (Stern, 1897). Er weist aber die Stern’sche These einer „psychischen Präsenzzeit“ als einer Zeitstrecke zurück, über welche sich ein einheitlicher psychischer Bewußtseinsakt zu erstrecken vermag (Stern, 1897, 327). Er versteht vielmehr die gleichzeitige Vorstellung eines zeitlich distribuierten Gegenstandes als einen Momentanakt, d. h. als einen Akt, der in einem Zeitpunkt erfolgt. Jeder psy-

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG137

chische Akt ist in der Tat für Meinong unteilbar, weshalb er „auf einmal“ das erfassen muß, was zeitverteilt ist. Infolgedessen müssen die sukzessiven Töne der Melodie in einem unteilbaren Zeitpunkt durch eine unteilbare Tat zusammengefaßt werden. Meinong stellt somit die so genannte „Simultaneitätsthese“ auf, die sich auf das Produktionsmodell beruft: In einem Momentanakt werden alle Töne zugleich mit ihren verschiedenen Zeitstellen vorgestellt, wobei aus ihnen die Vorstellung der Melodie entsteht bzw. „produziert“ wird. Durch eine unteilbare Tat wird eine Mehrheit von fundierenden Inhalten gleichzeitig vorgestellt, ohne daß die zeitliche Differenz der einzelnen Inhalte dadurch aufgehoben wird; daraus wird die Vorstellung des fundierten, zeitlich distribuierten Gegenstandes gewonnen. Dies ist im Wesentlichen Meinongs Zeitanalyse. 14 In seiner Argumentation stützt er sich nicht auf empirische Beobachtungen, sondern auf den Begriff des fundierten Inhalts und auf das so genannte „Dogma“ der Momentaneität jedes Bewußtseinsaktes (Husserl, 1928). Die These vom gleichzeitigen Vorstellen eines zeitlich Erstreckten ist aber eine apriorische These, die weder introspektiv noch experimentell bestätigt werden kann. Sie steht weder mit den experimentellen Ergebnissen noch mit dem phänomenologischen Befund im Einklang und stützt sich lediglich auf den logischen Beweis der Unmöglichkeit der gegenteiligen Auffassung.

5. Die Wahrnehmungsflüchtigkeit Trotz des Ansatzes zu einer erklärenden Psychologie, wie er sich in der Produktionstheorie zeigt, verläßt Meinong nicht die deskriptive Ebene. Die Annahme der Gestalten oder der fundierten Inhalte hätte keine empirische Basis, wenn die innere Wahrnehmung das Vorhandensein derselben nicht bezeugen könnte. In denselben Jahren, in denen Meinong eine produktive Vorstellungstätigkeit zur Gestaltauffassung postuliert, stellt er die Frage, wie die Gestalten der inneren Beobachtung erscheinen. Seine Un-

14

Ausführlicheres über Zeitwahrnehmung bei Meinong findet sich in Schermann, 1970, 236ff., Antonelli, 2003, 23ff., Manotta, 2005, 77ff.

138

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

tersuchungen hierzu können als eine, wenn auch rudimentäre, Vorwegnahme des Prinzips der Gestaltmehrdeutigkeit angesehen werden, das später Vittorio Benussi ausführlich entwickeln wird. 15 Gestalten und fundierte Inhalte sind der Introspektion schwerer zugänglich als die Elemente oder die fundierenden Inhalte. Meinong führt dazu das Beispiel der Verschiedenheit zwischen einem roten und einem blauen Papier an: Die innere Wahrnehmung bestätigt ohne Schwierigkeit das Vorhandensein der Rotvorstellung und der Blauvorstellung; sie ist dennoch unfähig, neben Rot und Blau noch ein Drittes zu finden; es fehlt jede Spur von der Verschiedenheitsvorstellung (vgl. Meinong, 1899, 402). Ebenso weist die räumliche Gestalt gegenüber den Ortbestimmtheiten, auf denen sie sich aufbaut, eine gewisse Unbeständigkeit auf: Versucht man freilich eine direkte Verifikation an der Empirie in der Weise, daß man sich etwa bemüht, den Inhalt der Vorstellung „Gestalt“ der Gesamtheit der sie ausmachenden Ortbestimmungen gegenüberzustellen, so ist das Ergebnis nicht sofort günstig: mir war beim Experiment zuerst zumute, als ob es evident wäre, daß die Gestalt in die Gesamtheit der Ortbestimmungen restlos aufgehen müßte (Meinong, 1891, 286). Die Gestalt scheint in der Tat dem inneren Blick auszuweichen. Wenn wir etwa im Gedanken oder selbst mit dem Auge die Konturen eines Ornamentes verfolgen, so können wir das leicht so einrichten, daß dabei keine Stelle unberührt bleibt; indem wir so gleichsam das ganze Ornament nach seiner Gestalt absuchen, treffen wir aber diese an keiner einzigen Stelle

15

Meinong versteht die innere Wahrnehmung gegen Brentanos Ansicht als „Selbstbeobachtung“. Wie bekannt, besteht die innere Wahrnehmung für Brentano in einer „sekündären“ Bewusstseinsbeziehung, die in jedem psychischen Akt mitgegeben ist: Sie vermittelt uns die unmittelbar evidente Erkenntnis des psychischen Aktes, zu dem sie gehört; aus diesem Grund kann sie nicht zur inneren Beobachtung werden. Im Gegensatz dazu ist innere Wahrnehmung für Meinong ein sukzessiver Akt, der sich auf einen anderen, schon gegebenen Akt richtet: „ein psychisches Erlebnis in mir wird, allerdings durch ein psychisches Erlebnis, das gleichfalls in mir ist, aber eben durch ein anderes psychisches Erlebnis erkannt [...]. Es gibt also innere Beobachtung“ (Meinong Nachlass, Karton XIII/a).

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG139

an. Wir treffen vielmehr allenthalben Ortbestimmungen an, und nichts anderes als diese. Wir haben den Eindruck, daß sich der fundierte Inhalt in die Elemente, d. h. in die fundierenden Inhalte, auflöst, aus welchen er besteht. Meinong führt noch ein weiteres Beispiel an. Jeder Anfänger bemüht sich gewöhnlich, eine einfache Melodie, die im Klavierauszug steht, einen Ton nach dem anderen auf das Klavier zu übertragen. Am Ende der anstrengenden Arbeit kann er jedoch keine Ahnung von der Melodie haben, sondern nur von einer Folge von Tönen (vgl. Meinong, 1891, 287). Aus diesen Feststellungen könnte man wohl schließen, daß die fundierten Inhalte unwahrnehmbar sind, so daß nichts anderes als die fundierenden Inhalte der inneren Beobachtung zugänglich bleiben. Dies stimmt jedoch nach Meinong nicht ganz zu. Der Grund für die vermutliche Unwahrnehmbarkeit des fundierten Inhaltes liegt nach ihm in der Einstellung des Subjektes. Es hängt davon ab, ob sich die Aufmerksamkeit des Subjektes auf die Gestalt als Ganzes oder auf die Elemente, die sie ausmachen, richtet. In den zwei Fällen sieht das Beobachtete anders aus. Wenn das Subjekt sich durch analytische Einstellung auf die Bestandstücke richtet, kann es nicht den fundierten Inhalt als Ganzes wahrnehmen: „Indem sich die Analyse den fundierenden Inhalten zuwendet, entschlüpft ihr gleichsam, was sie gerade sucht“ (Meinong, 1891, 295). Es ist also falsch zu behaupten, daß die fundierten Inhalte innerlich nicht wahrnehmbar sind. Es handelt sich bloß um einen Schein von Unwahrnehmbarkeit, deren Ursache auf die analytische Vorgehensweise zurückzuführen ist: Gibt es aber im Psychischen Tatsächlichkeiten, die gleichsam über den Elementen oder Scheinelementen stehen, auf welche die Analyse führt, dann werden diese Tatsächlichkeiten entweder durch die Analyse zerstört oder sie bleiben mindestens, weil analytischer Behandlung in gewöhnlichen Sinne selbst nicht zugänglich, unbeachtet (Meinong, 1899, 467). Das Verhältnis der fundierten Inhalte zur Wahrnehmung kann nicht als „Unwahrnehmbarkeit“ bezeichnet werden, sondern als „Wahrnehmungs-

140

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

flüchtigkeit“. Die fundierten Inhalte sind wahrnehmungsflüchtig in dem Sinne, daß sie dem inneren Wahrnehmen gegenüber eine gewisse Unbeständigkeit zeigen, weil sie keine Fähigkeit besitzen, sich dem Wahrnehmen und Beachten gegenüber sozusagen zu behaupten. Wir wissen um das Vorhandensein solcher Inhalte, aber wir können sie nicht festhalten, wie es für eine theoretische Beschreibung notwendig wäre. Sie verschwinden, sobald wir versuchen, sie zu beschreiben, d. h. sie über eine gewisse Zeitlang aufmerksam zu betrachten. So Meinong: Ich kann nicht wohl daran zweifeln, daß hier Wahrnehmungsflüchtigkeit vorliegt [...]. Wer an Verschiedenheit denkt, denkt ohne Zweifel an „etwas“; indem man nun aber der Natur dieses „etwas“ nachzugehen versucht, begegnet es leicht genug, daß gerade das Gesuchte entschlüpft und nichts übrig bleibt als die beiden Gegenstände Rot und Grün. Ähnliches kann man am Gedanken der Melodie, der Summe, der Unmöglichkeit, des Zusammenhanges erleben usf. (Meinong, 1899, 438). Mit dem Begriff der Wahrnehmungsflüchtigkeit kommt Meinong bewußt zum Bruch mit der Tradition, welche die innere Wahrnehmung als etwas Starres, Unveränderliches betrachtet. Vom deskriptiven Standpunkt aus stehen die psychischen Inhalte nicht gleich starr und unveränderlich der inneren Wahrnehmung gegenüber: Die Bestandstücke, Grundlagen oder „fundierenden Inhalte“ befinden sich in einer eindeutigen Vorzugsstellung im Vergleich zum fundierten Inhalt. 16

16

Es ist wichtig, die Wahrnehmungsflüchtigkeit der fundierten Inhalte mit der so genannten „Pseudo-Wahrnehmung“ nicht zu verwechseln: Während Erstere ein rein deskriptiver Begriff ist, der uns sagt, wie sich die Inhalte dem Bewußtsein darbieten, ist Letztere ein gegenstandstheoretischer Begriff, der sich auf die Seinsweise der Gegenstände bezieht. Vgl. Meinong, 1899, 415ff.

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG141

6. Wahrnehmung als Existentialurteil Ab 1899 interessiert sich Meinong nicht nur dafür, wie uns die Welt erscheint, sondern auch, wie es um die Welt bestellt ist. Die Beziehung auf die Wirklichkeit, die in seinen psychologischen Forschungen im Hintergrund geblieben war, tritt nun deutlich hervor. Zunächst werden die psychologischen Bestimmungen auf die ontologische Ebene überführt. Die Unterscheidung von fundierenden und fundierten Inhalten führt auf der Gegenstandsseite zur Abgrenzung von Gegenständen niederer Ordnung und Gegenständen höherer Ordnung, die auch „Inferiora“ und „Superiora“ genannt werden. Während Erstere (z. B. die Töne) absolut und selbständig sind und sozusagen das Substrat der Welt bilden, sind Letztere (z. B. die Melodie) auf ihnen als unerläßlichen Voraussetzungen aufgebaut und daher ihnen gegenüber unselbständig. Die Unterscheidung zweier Gegebenheitsweisen führt somit auf der Gegenstandsseite zum Auseinanderhalten zweier Seinsweisen: Existenz und Bestand. Den Inferiora kommt Existenz zu, da sie vorfindlich, wahrnehmbar sind: Sie können als „real“ bezeichnet werden. Die Superiora hingegen können nicht existieren, sondern nur bestehen, da sie durch einen psychischen Produktionsakt erfaßt werden können: Sie sind also als „ideal“ zu bezeichnen: Bezeichnet man daher das Reale als etwas, das seiner Natur nach das Wahrgenommenwerden gestattet, kurz als das seiner Natur nach Wahrnehmbare, so kann das so lange als eine recht nichtssagende Bestimmung erscheinen, bis man darauf aufmerksam wird, daß es eine ganze Klasse von Gegenständen gibt, denen diese Wahrnehmbarkeit wieder ihrer Natur nach verschlossen ist, nämlich eben die idealen Gegenstände (Meinong, 1899, 397). Was Blau oder Grün ist, erfahren wir; auch vier Nüsse in unserem Gesichtsfeld erfahren wir; die Ähnlichkeit zwischen diesen zwei Farben oder die Vierheit der Nüsse können wir hingegen nicht mit den Augen sehen oder mit den Ohren hören. Wir können sie nur durch einen Produktionsakt auf der Basis der Vorstellungen des Blauen, des Grünen und der einzelnen Nüsse erfassen. Auf der ontologischen Ebene bedeutet dies Folgendes:

142

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

Die Ähnlichkeit existiert nicht, aber sie besteht [...]. In gleicher Weise ist es klar, daß im obigen Beispiele von den vier Nüssen die Vierheit nicht sozusagen noch als ein besonders Stück Wirklichkeit neben den Nüssen existieren kann, indes ihr, falls richtig gezählt wurde, unter den gegebenen Umständen der Bestand nicht abzusprechen ist (Meinong, 1899, 395). Die Beschäftigung mit der Seinsweise der Gegenstände bringt eine nähere Bestimmung des Wahrnehmungsbegriffs mit sich. Wahrnehmbar, so Meinong, sind nur die existierenden Gegenstände. Aber die Existenz solcher Gegenstände, falls sie uns bewußt sein soll, erfordert einen weiteren psychischen Akt, der zur reinen Vorstellung hinzutritt. In einer bloßen Vorstellung erscheint uns etwas, etwas ist uns gegenwärtig, aber die Wirklichkeitsfrage kommt dabei nicht in Betracht, da sich die Vorstellung ebenso gut auf einen existierenden wie auch auf einen geträumten oder halluzinierten Gegenstand richten kann. Eine echte Wahrnehmung kann aber die Wirklichkeitsfrage nicht außer Acht lassen. Bei den echten Wahrnehmungen ist ein Glaube an die Existenz des Gegenstandes, d. h. eine unmittelbare Überzeugung von der Wirklichkeit des Wahrgenommenen, festzustellen. Man muß also annehmen, daß das Urteil als besondere Beziehungsweise zum Objekt, dessen Existenz es behauptet, ein unerläßliches Moment im Wahrnehmungstatbestand ist. Die These vom Urteilscharakter des Wahrnehmungsprozeß ist ein gemeinsames Gedankengut der Brentano-Schule. Nach Brentano deckt sich der Begriff Empfindung nicht mit dem der Wahrnehmung. 17 Denn die Wahrnehmung ist eine Form von Urteil, ein – wenn auch nicht evidentes – „Für-Wahr-Halten“, das das Wahrgenommene als etwas Wirkliches und Existierendes erfaßt. Mit dem Ausdruck „Empfindung“ bezeichnet Brentano hingegen ein reines Vorstellungsphänomen, das allerdings im konkreten psychischen Leben nicht unabhängig vom Urteilsakt vorkommt, der es zur eigentlichen Wahrnehmung macht. Brentanos idiogenetischer Urteilsauffassung gemäß heißt einen Gegenstand wahrzunehmen nicht eine chaotische Empfindungsmasse zur Einheit zu bringen, sondern das

17

Brentano, 1887-1901, 84-88. Diese Unterscheidung wird schon in Brentano, 1874, vorweggenommen.

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG143

anzuerkennen, was uns die Empfindung als schon gebildete und strukturierte Einheit anbietet. Meinongs Stellungnahme hierzu erscheint ebenso entschieden. Die Auffassung der Wahrnehmung als Urteil, die Meinong von Brentano übernimmt, hatte er schon in seinen frühen Schriften formuliert, 18 sie spielt aber erst ab 1899 eine wesentliche Rolle. Meinong kritisiert nun nachdrücklich die Tendenz, die Rolle des Urteils innerhalb des Wahrnehmungsprozesses zu unterschätzen und aus ihm eine „unbekannte Größe“ zu machen. Gegen die Gleichsetzung von Vorstellungs- und Urteilsebene betont Meinong die unmißverständlich psychologische Relevanz des Urteilsmoments – gegen jeglichen Widerstand, der durch den horror psychologiae entstehen kann: „Alle Wahrnehmung ist zwar auch Vorstellung, doch jedenfalls vor allem Urteil: etwas Wahrnehmen, die Existenz des Wahrgenommenen aber in suspenso lassen, ist ein Unding“ (Meinong 1899, 411f.). Der Übergang von der reinen Vorstellung zur Wahrnehmung erfolgt daher unter Hinzuziehung eines Urteils, in dem der Urteilende ausdrückt, daß er von der Existenz des vorgestellten Gegenstandes überzeugt ist. Die Wahrnehmung wird somit explizit als Erkenntnisakt, als „Gedanke“ betrachtet, der als solcher die Wahrheitsbedingung erfüllen, d. h. der Wirklichkeit entsprechen soll: „Nur dann wird etwas für wahrgenommen gelten dürfen, wenn seine Existenz unmittelbar [...] erkannt wird“ (Meinong, 1899, 408). Die Wahrnehmung soll daher den Gedanken der Existenz, der realen Wirklichkeit des Wahrgenommenen, mit einschließen. Diente das Wahrnehmen bis dahin zur Bezeichnung des direkten Gegenwärtighabens von etwas durch die Sinne, so bedeutet es nun wesentlich eine Erkenntnisleistung, obwohl das, was uns unmittelbar gegeben ist, eine solche durchaus nicht aufweist. Alles Wahrnehmen ist also Urteilen, weil die Wahrnehmungsvorstellung allein keine Erkenntnisleistung bietet: „Es gibt kein Erkennen und kann keines geben, das nur Vorstellen und nicht auch oder 18

Siehe Meinong, 1888, 118: „jede Wahrnehmung aber ist ihrem Wesen nach ein Urteil, näher ein Existenzurteil, dessen Inhalt mit dem Inhalt der dem Wahrnehmungsakte zugrunde liegenden Vorstellung zusammenfällt“; siehe auch Meinong, 1889, 231: „Wahrnehmung ist sonach ihrem Wesen nach Vorstellung und Urteil.“

144

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

vielmehr zunächst Urteilen wäre“ (Meinong, 1906, 386). Mit der Ausbildung der Gegenstandstheorie bekommt die Wahrnehmung eine weitere Bestimmung. Unter den Voraussetzungen der Gegenstandstheorie steht bekanntlich die Zuordnung jeder Erlebnisklasse zu einer Gegenständlichkeit. Deshalb hat nicht nur das Vorstellen einen Eigengegenstand – ein „Objekt“ –, sondern auch das Urteilen und ebenso das Fühlen und das Begehren. Dem Urteil sind nun die Seinsweisen der Existenz und des Bestandes sowie ihre Komplemente als Eigengegenstände zugeordnet, die „Objektive“ genannt werden. 19 Das Eigentümliche der Objektive liegt in ihrer Struktur: Sie sind stets unbedingt auf einen Vorstellungsgegenstand angewiesen, dessen Sein sie ausmachen. Existenz und Bestand weisen daher unbedingt auf einen Vorstellungsgegenstand hin, der eben existiert oder besteht. Sie sind also Gegenstände höherer Ordnung und als solche ideale, unselbständige Gegenstände, wie z. B. „die Existenz des Baumes“ oder „das Bestehen der Zahl vier“. Diese These zieht weit reichende Konsequenzen nach sich: Die Wahrnehmung als Urteil aufzufassen heißt nicht nur, sie unter den „Gedanken“, d. h. den höheren psychischen Funktionen einzureihen, sondern auch, ihr eine ganz bestimmte Gegenständlichkeit zuzuordnen: das Objektiv. Etwas wahrzunehmen heißt also nicht, einen realen Gegenstand (ein „Objekt“), wie etwa einen Baum, zu erfassen, sondern eine irreale und bloß bestehende Entität zu ergreifen, nämlich das Objektiv (die Tatsache), „daß ein Baum existiert“. Die Wahrnehmung beschränkt sich mit anderen Worten nicht darauf, einen Gegenstand dem Bewußtsein zu präsentieren,

19

Meinongs These wird innerhalb des klassifikatorischen Modells der psychischen Phänomene der Grazer Schule bedenkenlos übernommen. Diese unterscheidet vier Grundklassen psychischer Phänomene: Den zwei Klassen der Vorstellungen und Gedanken, die das Gebiet des Geisteslebens bilden, stellt sie jene der Gefühle und der Begehrungen, die das Gemütsleben ausmachen, gegenüber. Wahrnehmungen sind hierbei keine einfachen Vorstellungen, sondern Gedanken. Vgl. dazu Witasek, 1908, 288: „Denn zweifellos enthält die Wahrnehmung nicht nur Farben-, Ton- usw. Qualitäten, sondern auch ein Moment des Glaubens, des Überzeugtseins; wer etwas wahrnimmt, der erlebt in diesem Akte unmittelbar und eingeschlossen den Glauben an die Existenz des Wahrgenommenen, er denkt den Gegenstand der Wahrnehmungsvorstellung ganz von selbst als einen existierenden“.

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG145

sondern führt zu dessen Auffassung innerhalb eines Sachverhaltes. Die erkenntnistheoretische Leistung der Wahrnehmung als Urteil liegt genau im Erfassen eines Existenzobjektivs: Die Wahrnehmung geht auf das Ding in seinem Dasein, sie bedeutet lediglich nur die Erfassung der Tatsächlichkeit des Objektivs, „daß solch ein Ding existiert“: Was erkenne ich, indem die Fichte vor mir wahrnehme? Offenbar, daß sie da ist, oder kürzer: ich erkenne das Dasein, die Existenz der Fichte [...]. Alle Wahrnehmungen haben Existenz zum Objektiv; sie sind Existenzurteile (Meinong, 1906, 387f.). Die Schwierigkeit dieser Wahrnehmungsauffassung liegt aber nun auf der Hand: Daß sich die Wahrnehmung auf Gegenstände höherer Ordnung, d. h. ideale Gegenstände bezieht, steht im Widerspruch zu der gewöhnlichen Auffassung, nach der die Wahrnehmung nur mit „realen“, empirischen Gegenständen zu tun hat. Demzufolge wird Wahrnehmung bei Meinong zu einem Denkerlebnis. Überdies stößt man auf eine andere Schwierigkeit. Ist unter Wahrnehmung nur das Erfassen des gegenwärtigen Existierens eines Dinges zu verstehen, so muß man zugeben, daß ein reiner Wahrnehmungsfall praktisch nie vorkommt. Denn unser Wahrnehmungsurteil betrifft normalerweise nicht nur das Dasein seines Objektes, sondern auch dessen Eigenschaften, ja das Erfassen des Daseins eines Dinges ist stets von der Feststellung der Qualitäten bzw. Zustände dieses Dinges verdeckt. In der Tat: Wir sehen, daß das Gras grün und der Himmel blau ist; wir hören, wie der Vogel singt und wie das Wasser rauscht, aber von einem Existentialurteil wie „Das Gras existiert“ oder „Der Himmel ist da“ finden wir keine Spur. Kürzer formuliert: Unsere Urteile betreffen in der Tat nicht nur das Dasein, sondern vor allem die Beschaffenheit oder das Sosein eines Dinges. Hinsichtlich solcher Urteile behauptet Meinong: So viele sind ihrer und so wenig drängen Wahrnehmungsurteile mit Existentialobjektiven sich der Aufmerksamkeit auf, daß man eher Neigung haben könnte, alle Wahrnehmungen für Soseinsurteile zu halten (Meinong, 1906, 388). Soseinsurteile sind aber keine Erfahrungsurteile: Sie sind apriorischer Na-

146

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

tur und gehören deshalb der gegenstandstheoretischen Wissenschaft an. Bekannterweise beschäftigt sich die Gegenstandstheorie mit dem Gegenstand ganz ohne Rücksicht auf dessen Existenz oder Bestand, indem sie nur auf die Erkenntnis seines Soseins bedacht ist (vgl. Meinong, 1904, 519). Meinong sucht unbedingt einen Ausweg, um das Prinzip, daß die Existenz eines Dinges den eigentlichen Kern des Wahrnehmungserlebnisses bildet, zu bewahren (vgl. dazu Kindinger, 1956, 44): Er macht für das Zurücktreten der Existenzurteile im Wahrnehmungserlebnis die Sprache verantwortlich. Es ist für ihn davon Kenntnis zu nehmen, wie leicht eine Wahrnehmung, obwohl sie von Natur ein Seinsurteil ist, in einer Soseinsaussage zutage tritt [...]. Muß man sonach allen Wahrnehmungen den Charakter der Existenzurteile zuerkennen, obwohl man darin seitens des Sprachgebrauchs in kaum nennenswerter Weise unterstützt wird (Meinong, 1906, 390, 392). Er sucht überdies zu beweisen, daß sich die Wahrnehmung im Erfassen der Existenz des Wahrgenommen nicht erschöpft. Sie bestehe indes im Erfassen eines Soseinsobjektivs durch ein Seinsobjektiv. Die eigentliche Leistung der Wahrnehmung wird für Meinong das Erfassen der Existenz eines Dinges in seinem Sosein 20 – ein sehr kompliziertes, zusammengesetztes Urteil, das mit der Tatsache, daß uns etwas unmittelbar erscheint, nichts mehr zu tun hat. Man sieht somit, wie sich Meinong in der Wahrnehmungsfrage immer mehr in Schwierigkeiten verstrickt. Mit dem erkenntnistheoretischen Begriff der Wahrnehmung hat er Denkelemente im Wahrnehmen annehmen müssen. In der Überzeugung, daß in jeder Wahrnehmung Urteile enthalten sind, hat er den Boden der Erfahrung verlassen und infolgedessen versucht, den Wahrnehmungsprozeß im Rahmen der Gegenstandstheorie zu erklären. So ist Wahrnehmung zu einem Denkerlebnis geworden, auf das die Erfahrung keinen Anspruch mehr erheben kann. 21

20

21

Vgl. Meinong, 1906, 390-392. Vgl. darüber Weinhandl,1952, 136ff.; Rollinger, 1995, 448ff. Sehr kritische Bemerkungen zum erkenntnistheoretischen Wahrnehmungsbegriff Meinongs finden sich in Dürr, 1908, 14-20.

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG147

7. Von Meinong zu Benussi: außersinnliche Vorstellungen und Wahrnehmung als Präsenz Die in der Meinong’schen Theorie implizierten Schwierigkeiten werden scharf von Vittorio Benussi herausgestellt, der sich bald von der Produktionstheorie entfernt und allmählich ein eigenes begriffliches und terminologisches Gerüst entwickelt, das nur zum Teil demjenigen seines Lehrers verpflichtet bleibt. Benussi hebt einerseits die Schwierigkeit hervor, den Produktionsprozeß adäquat darzulegen, denn es handelt sich um einen hypothetischen Vorgang, über den die innere Wahrnehmung keinerlei Aufschluß liefert. Außerdem erweist sich eine gegenstandstheoretische Charakterisierung der zwei Vorstellungsklassen als „schwer zugänglich und leicht mißverständlich“ (Benussi, 1914a, 344f.). Sieht man vom ontologischen Status der entsprechenden Gegenstände ab und bleibt auf rein deskriptiver Ebene, so ist zwischen Elementar- und Produktionsvorstellungen kein Unterschied festzustellen. Denn von einer phänomenologischdeskriptiven Betrachtungsweise aus wird ein melodisches Intervall oder eine Raumgestalt genauso unmittelbar und anschaulich erfaßt wie ein Ton oder eine Farbe (Benussi, 1911, 290). Meinongs Trennung von Elementar- und Produktionsvorstellungen ersetzt Benussi somit schon 1905 durch seine eigene Unterscheidung von Vorstellungen sinnlicher und außersinnlicher Provenienz (Benussi, 1905a; 1906, 154f.; 1906/07, 213-215; 1910, 91-101). Die terminologische Veränderung geht mit einer Variation der Problemstellung einher (Benussi, 1914a, 344f.): Während bei Vorstellungen sinnlicher Provenienz eine konstante Reizlage eine konstante Wahrnehmungsleistung bedingt, gilt dies für Vorstellungen außersinnlicher Provenienz nicht. Wesentliches Merkmal der Vorstellungen außersinnlicher Provenienz ist ihre Mehrdeutigkeit: Die Wahrnehmungserscheinung variiert, obwohl der Reizzustand unverändert bleibt. Hiernach ist, streng gesehen, jede Vorstellung außersinnlicher Provenienz reizlos. Gerade ihre Unabhängigkeit vom Sinnesreiz erklärt ihre Gestaltmehrdeutigkeit und die hierauf folgende Inadäquatheit. Ein Paradebeispiel stellen die so genannten Vexierbilder dar.

148

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

Figur 1 Mäander: Ein weißes, fortlaufendes Muster auf schwarzem Grund oder schwarze, ineinander greifende Haken auf weißem Grund?

Benussi entwickelt sein Prinzip der Gestaltmehrdeutigkeit ausgehend von jener Klasse von Gestaltphänomenen, die herkömmlich als „geometrischoptische Täuschungen“ bekannt sind.

Figur 2 Zöllnersche Täuschung Müller-Lyersche Täuschung

Diese Bezeichnung weist Benussi allerdings ganz entschieden zurück, da man gewöhnlich unter „Täuschung“ einen Fehler in der Einschätzung, also eine Urteilstäuschung, meint. Durch diese Charakterisierung werden die Täuschungsfälle jedoch nicht adäquat bestimmt, denn: Wird der Ursprung der Täuschung auf eine Anomalie des Urteilsaktes zurückgeführt, so sollte die getäuschte Person, nachdem sie sich des objektiven Sachverhaltes bewußt geworden ist, keiner Täuschung mehr unterliegen. Doch das Bewußtsein des „Fehlers“ kann die Wahrnehmungsleistung nicht ver-

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG149

ändern. Der Ursprung der „Täuschung“ kann demnach nicht auf die Ebene des Urteils, sondern muß auf die Ebene der dem Urteil unterliegenden Vorstellung zurückgeführt werden (Benussi, 1904, 80, 85ff.). Benussi ersetzt deshalb den Ausdruck „Täuschung“ durch den der „Vorstellungsinadäquatheit“: Aufgrund der Inadäquatheit der Vorstellung wird das auf die Vorstellung aufbauende – wenn auch psychologisch korrekt gebildete – Wahrnehmungsurteil für die Erkenntnis unbrauchbar. Das Ersetzen des Ausdrucks „Täuschung“ durch „Inadäquatheit“ bzw. „Vorstellungsinadäquatheit“ ist keine rein terminologische Angelegenheit; Benussi wählt vielmehr einen ganz bestimmten theoretischen Standpunkt, den er bewußt in Abweichung von der Lehrmeinung der Grazer Schule einnimmt. Spricht Benussi von „Inadäquatheit“, so klammert er bei der Analyse des Wahrnehmungsprozesses jegliche erkenntnistheoretische Betrachtungsweise bewußt aus. Das Korrespondenzproblem von „Wahrheit“ bzw. „Existenz“ des Wahrgenommenen spielt hierbei keine Rolle. Der Gegenstand kann zwar „physisch“ abwesend sein, aber trotzdem kann er sich uns mit seiner Wahrnehmungspräsenz zwingend aufdrängen. Auch von der Brentano-Meinong’schen Auffassung der Wahrnehmung als Urteil und ihren weit reichenden Konsequenzen nimmt Benussi bald Abstand. Bestreitet er die Möglichkeit, die Täuschungsphänomene als Urteilstäuschungen zu deuten, so ist seine Abweichung von den Meinong’schen Thesen unbestreitbar. 22 Denn für Benussi sind Wahrnehmungen nicht notwendig von einer Urteils- bzw. Überzeugungseinstellung be23 gleitet. Für ihn zeichnet sich die Wahrnehmung durch eine spezifische, nicht weiter analysierbare Gegenständlichkeit aus: die Präsenz. In der Wahrnehmungspräsenz ist der Gegenstand unmittelbar und anschaulich „da“, „vor uns“. Gegenüber dieser Präsenz stellt die Glaubens- bzw. Überzeugungseinstellung eine unwesentliche Variable dar. Durch eine geeignete Versuchsanordnung gelang es Benussi zu zei22

23

„Von Täuschung zu reden hat nur dann einen Sinn, wenn eine Behauptung, welche auf die Konstatierung von Objektiven, von Sachverhältnissen ausgeht, im Spiele ist. Da jede Behauptung Ausdruck einer Überzeugung, eines Urteiles ist, so hat es nur gegenüber Urteilen einen Sinn, von Täuschungen zu reden: Jede Täuschung ist eine Urteilstäuschung (Benussi, 1914a, 346f.). Benussi, 1904, 87; 1905b, 149f. Vgl. 1914a, 346f. und 1906/07, 156, Fn. 5.

150

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

gen, inwieweit die subjektive Einstellung der Versuchsperson die Täuschungs- bzw. Inadäquatheitswerte beeinflussen kann, d. h. inwiefern die Variation auf bestimmte innere Verhaltensweisen oder Bewußtseinseinstellungen zurückzuführen ist. Denn es steht in unserer Macht, hinsichtlich eines Reizkomplexes unterschiedlich zu reagieren und dadurch das Vorherrschen der einen oder anderen Wahrnehmungsleistung zu begünstigen. Es gibt zwei gegensätzliche und komplementäre Einstellungen, die die Versuchsperson annehmen kann: eine analytische oder eine synthetische. Die analytische Einstellung zeichnet sich dadurch aus, daß die Elemente, aus denen eine Figur besteht, isoliert bzw. unabhängig voneinander betrachtet werden: Z. B. werden die Querstriche der Zöllnerschen Figur unabhängig von den Vertikalen, die Winkelfiguren der Müller-Lyerschen Figur unabhängig von der Horizontalen aufgefaßt. Die synthetische oder „gestalterfassende“ Haltung besteht darin, all diese Elemente als Teile einer einheitlichen Figur – eines Ganzen – aufzufassen. Unter Voraussetzung einer synthetischen Verhaltensweise entsteht die Täuschung; die Annahme einer analytischen Reaktion hingegen führt zur Verminderung der Inadäquatheit, im Grenzfall sogar zu ihrer Aufhebung. Beide Reaktionsarten unterliegen dem Einfluß von Übung und Ermüdung (Benussi, 1904, 5ff.). Sowohl die analytische wie auch die synthetische Verhaltensweise kann unbewußt bzw. unwillkürlich gesteuert werden, nämlich indem der Beobachter spontan (S-Reaktion) zu einer dieser Auffassungsweisen neigt (Benussi, 1904, 8); sie kann jedoch auch, aufgrund einer bestimmten Aufgabe oder Instruktion, bewußt bzw. willkürlich zum Ausdruck kommen. So fordert Benussi seine Versuchspersonen auf, eine bestimmte Verhaltensweise anzunehmen, um festzustellen, inwieweit die hierdurch erzielte Modifikation der Einstellung eine Rückwirkung auf die gegenständliche Seite mit sich bringt, d. h. inwiefern unterschiedlich produktiv vollzogene Akte auf entsprechend unterschiedliche Gegenstände intentional gerichtet sind. Dies betrifft natürlich nicht nur die „Täuschungen“, sondern auch all jene Wahrnehmungsphänomene, bei denen die Annahme einer analytischen bzw. synthetischen Einstellung die Gestaltstruktur modifizieren kann, wie es zum Beispiel bei der Zeit- und Bewegungswahrnehmung (auf visueller, akustischer oder haptischer Grundlage) geschieht.

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG151

8. Benussis Phänomenologie der Wahrnehmung Zwischen 1910 und 1915 hat Benussi zur Erklärung der Wahrnehmungsphänomene eine ausgereifte Lehre entwickelt. In seinem Aufsatz „Gesetze der inadäquaten Gestaltauffassung“ aus dem Jahre 1914 faßt er die Ergebnisse seiner nunmehr zwölfjährigen Forschungen über inadäquate Gestaltauffassung zusammen und formuliert die Kriterien, durch die man die sinnliche bzw. außersinnliche Provenienz einer Vorstellung feststellen kann (Benussi, 1914a, 349ff.). 24 Für die Vorstellungen sinnlicher Provenienz gilt: 1. Sie sind bloß an Reizbedingungen gebunden, so daß sie nur durch Reizveränderung modifiziert oder aufgehoben werden können. 2. Sie sind weder dem Übungsnoch dem Ermüdungseffekt unterworfen, d. h. die Wahrnehmungsleistung ist von einer Wiederholung der Wahrnehmung unabhängig. 3. Werden sie mit Aufmerksamkeit erwartet, so können die ihnen zugeordneten Gegenstände nicht unbeachtet oder unbemerkt bleiben. 4. Sie sind lediglich einem einzigen Sinnesorgan zugeordnet. Für die Vorstellungen außersinnlicher Provenienz gelten entgegengesetzte Kriterien. 1. Sie sind nur an innere Bedingungen gebunden. 2. Sie sind dem Übungs- bzw. dem Ermüdungseffekt unterworfen. 3. Die ihnen zugeordneten Gegenstände, selbst wenn man sie mit Aufmerksamkeit erwartet, können unerfaßt bleiben. 4. Sie sind keinem bestimmten Sinnesorgan zugeordnet. Nach Benussi ist Letzteres das grundlegende Kriterium: die Tatsache, daß die Gestaltphänomene auf eine andere sensorielle Basis übertragbar sind. So gelang es Benussi, den Müller-Lyerschen Effekt auf die Zeitebene zu transponieren (Benussi, 1913, 181ff., 334ff.) sowie die Wahrnehmung von anfangs auf optischer Basis untersuchten Scheinbewegungen auf taktiler Basis zu reproduzieren (Benussi, 1917). Benussi sieht im Auftreten derselben Formen, derselben Strukturen innerhalb verschiedener Sinnesgebiete das entscheidende Argument für

24

Vgl. dazu „Psychologie der inadäquaten Auffassung“ (1913), FBD, 9.6. Eine frühe Formulierung ist schon in Benussi, 1904, 81ff., und Benussi, 1905, 143f., zu finden.

152

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

den außersinnlichen Ursprung der Gestaltwahrnehmung. Dieser Charakter weist für Benussi auf eine nicht spezifische, intermodale bzw. amodale Wahrnehmungsfunktion hin, die den modalen Funktionen logisch vorgeordnet ist. Es handelt sich um jene unanschauliche intentionale Funktion, die die formlose Masse der Empfindungen strukturiert und diese in abgeschlossene, selbständige Gestalteinheiten organisiert. Die Parallelität zur Husserl’schen Wahrnehmungsanalyse – so wie diese in der V. Logischen Untersuchung (Husserl, 1900-1901) entwickelt wird – ist somit nicht zufällig. Beide Standpunkte verbindet die Analyse der auffassenden Akte, durch die die chaotische Mannigfaltigkeit der atomaren Elementarempfindungen sinnhaft strukturiert wird. Für Benussi nicht anders als für Husserl ist der Wahrnehmungsakt ein Auffassungsakt, durch den das Bewußtsein die sinnlich vermittelten Daten gegenständlich aufnimmt. Dieser läßt sich somit nicht auf der Basis von rein physiologisch bedingten Aufnahme-, Weiterleitungs- und Transformationsprozessen des sensoriellen Inputs erklären, sondern geht streng genommen auf außersinnliche Faktoren zurück, die die sinnlich vermittelten Daten organisieren und strukturieren. Gerade die Rolle nichtsinnlicher Akte, die Bedeutung der Konstitution und der Parallelismus von Akt- und Gegenstandsseite sind die Kernpunkte, die die Benussi’sche Wahrnehmungsanalyse in die Nähe der Husserl’schen bringen. In dieser neuen Perspektive, aus der Benussi das Bewußtsein und seine Modi thematisiert, erlangt der Brentano-Meinong’sche Intentionalitätsbegriff eine neue Tragweite, die im Wesentlichen dem Husserl’schen Begriff entspricht. Denn das Brentano-Meinong’sche Intentionalitätsprinzip ist ein rein deskriptives Kriterium, das sich lediglich darauf beschränkt, eine Morphologie der psychischen Phänomene und der ihnen zugeordneten Gegenstände zu geben. Benussi entwickelt den Brentano-Meinong’schen Intentionalitätsbegriff von einem rein klassifikatorischen Kriterium zu einem leistungsfähigen Prinzip des Bewußtseins, dessen Charakter sich als produktiv erweist. Somit liegt der Schwerpunkt weder auf der Akt- noch auf der Gegenstandsseite, sondern auf deren Korrelation. Demzufolge kommt man von der zweidimensionalen Ebene der Fundierungsverhältnisse – seien diese auf die subjektive oder auf die objektive Seite bezogen – zu einer dreidimensionalen Ebene: Die Forschungsperspektive erweitert

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG153

sich zu einer Analyse der in jedem Wahrnehmungsakt impliziten Leistung, zu einer Analyse des leistungsfähigen Konnexes, in dem sich das Objekt als Objekt für ein Subjekt konstituiert. Der Intentionalitätsgedanke bekommt hierdurch eine weitere Funktion. Neben einer primären bzw. expliziten Intentionalität zeigt sich eine sekundäre bzw. latente Intentionalität, die durch einen geringeren Grad an Deutlichkeit gekennzeichnet ist. Es handelt sich hierbei um jene Intentionalität, die jede unter- bzw. unbewußt konstituierende Bewußtseinsleistung charakterisiert.

8.1 Von der statischen zur genetischen Phänomenologie Benussi läßt somit, genau wie Husserl, die statisch-deskriptive Analyse mit der genetischen einhergehen: Er entwickelt eine genetische Experimentalphänomenologie, eine Phänomenologie, die die diachronischen Entwicklungsgesetze der Wahrnehmungserscheinungen bestimmt, ihren sich in der Zeit schichtenden Sinn untersucht. 25 Denn jene Wahrnehmungspräsenz, die in deskriptiver Hinsicht als in selbständige Einheiten kristallisiert erscheint, die eine eigene Konsistenz und Beständigkeit besitzen, erweist sich in genetischer Hinsicht als geschichtet, d. h., man kann an ihr verschiedene Ebenen unterscheiden, die aufeinander fundiert sind. So ist für Benussi das Entstehen einer „Realrelation“ zwischen den Sinnesdaten, durch die sich die sinnlichen Inhalte gemäß der eigenen Beschaffenheit gegenseitig beeinflussen, notwendige Vorbedingung einer solchen außersinnlichen Auffassung (Benussi 1904, 394ff.). Man hat es hier mit einem Konnex zu tun, der nicht auf produzierende psychische

25

Natürlich besteht zwischen dem Husserl’schen und dem Benussi’schen Vorhaben, trotz der so oft überraschenden Ähnlichkeiten, ein tief greifender Unterschied: Während Husserls genetische Phänomenologie sich programmatisch als eidetische Untersuchung versteht, die auf die Hervorhebung der notwendigen Etappen zielt, durch die sich das intentionale Erlebnis und sein noematisches Korrelat konstituiert, entwickelt Benussi eine experimentelle Untersuchung über die empirisch feststellbaren Phasen, durch die sich unser Gegenstandsbewußtsein in der Zeit festmacht.

154

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

Tätigkeiten zurückgeht, zu dem sich also das Subjekt rein rezeptiv verhält. 26 Innerhalb dieser fundierenden Schicht der Wahrnehmungserfahrung erfolgt die Gliederung des Wahrnehmungsfeldes automatisch aufgrund der Realrelation der Ähnlichkeit und Verschiedenheit zwischen den Sinnesinhalten: Jeder Sinneseindruck übt auf alle anderen Sinnesdaten Einfluß aus und wird seinerseits durch alle anderen Sinnesdaten beeinflußt, wobei es zu einer Gruppierung der ähnlichen und zu einer Isolierung der verschiedenen Elemente kommt („Auffälligkeit“, 1905, FBD, 1.10). Der daraus erfolgende Wahrnehmungskontrast führt zum Phänomen der Wahrnehmungsauffälligkeit, in das das ursprünglich rein latent vorhandene Subjekt involviert wird. Denn die Auffälligkeit ist keine absolute Eigenschaft, die einem Perzept in gleicher Weise zukommt wie z. B. Farbigkeit oder Helligkeit. Die Auffälligkeit ist eine relationale Eigenschaft, die nur in dem Kontext thematisiert werden kann, in dem die Gegenstände sowohl untereinander als auch in ihrer Beziehung zu einem Subjekt stehen (ebda.). Das Entstehen eines Auffälligkeitsverhältnisses innerhalb des Wahrnehmungsfeldes markiert den Übergang – um die heutige Terminologie zu verwenden – von der präattentiven zur attentiven Ebene: Indem das Subjekt in das Auffälligkeitsverhältnis involviert wird, wendet es sich zugleich aufmerksam dem zu, was es trifft (Benussi 1909, 229ff.). Die Miteinbeziehung des Subjektes bringt eine radikale Wandlung mit sich: Aus einer Situation, in der die Strukturierungsmomente der Wahrnehmungserfahrung auf Seiten der phänomenologischen Inhalte liegen und das Subjekt bloß latent vorhanden ist, erfolgt eine subjektive Umzentrierung des ganzen Wahrnehmungsfeldes. Vom passiven Zuschauer, der der automatischen Selbststrukturierung der Wahrnehmungsinhalte beiwohnt, wird das Subjekt zum lebendigen, aufmerksamen Zentrum, von dem aus sich die 26

Somit weitet Benussi den Umfang der Meinong’schen „vorfindlichen Komplexionen“ bzw. „Realrelationen“ aus und dehnt auf das ganze Wahrnehmungsfeld jene den sinnlichen Daten immanente Gesetzmäßigkeit aus, die Meinong in nur beschränktem Maße zuerkennen konnte. Somit rückt Benussi ganz in die Nähe der Berliner Gestalttheorie, von der er sich allerdings in sämtlichen anderen Hinsichten, wie wir sehen werden, entfernt.

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG155

den Wahrnehmungsprozeß belebenden Tendenzen entwickeln – besonders die Tendenzen zur Analyse und Synthese der Elemente, von denen die innere Gliederung des Wahrnehmungsfeldes abhängt (Benussi 1909; 1914a). Das Ich bemüht sich dabei um eine aktive Verdeutlichung der aus der Selbstgliederung des Feldes automatisch entstandenen Verbindungen und nimmt sozusagen die Verantwortung auf sich für das, was sich unabhängig von seiner Leistung konstituiert hat. Der Auffassungsakt produziert also nicht die Struktur, sondern beschränkt sich darauf, sie auf einer höheren Ebene zu explizieren. Ja selbst wenn derselbe Komplex von Sinnesdaten unterschiedlich aufgefaßt werden kann, wie es bei gestaltmehrdeutigen Komplexen der Fall ist, geschieht dies aufgrund schon – wenn auch latent – vorhandener Selbststrukturierungen, die „dann“ so oder so aufgefaßt werden können (vgl. Linke 1918, 252-257). In diesem Lichte sind Benussis experimentelle Anordnungen zu verstehen, die von einer konstanten Reizgrundlage ausgehend zeigen, wie eine systematische Variation des Aktcharakters, der Auffassungsweise des Subjektes, eine Neuverteilung der Auffälligkeitsverhältnisse im Wahrnehmungsfeld und somit eine Rückwirkung auf das gegenständliche Korrelat zeitigt. Benussis Untersuchungen über die Gestaltmehrdeutigkeit figuraler Komplexe thematisieren somit den relationalen Kontext, der die Erfahrungsgegenstände sowohl untereinander als auch mit der subjektiven Quelle ihres Entstehens verbindet, mit jener dynamischen, leistungsfähigen Quelle, die durch verschiedene Grade an Deutlichkeit gekennzeichnet ist und die Erfahrungsgegebenheiten zu Objekten für ein Subjekt konstituiert (Antonelli, 1994). Das immer aktivere Eingreifen des Subjektes beinhaltet einen allmählichen Übergang vom unbestimmt fließenden Wahrnehmungsfeld zur Beständigkeit und Identität des Gegenstandes, denn es handelt sich dabei um einen wesentlich zeitlichen Prozeß. Die Wahrnehmung erweist sich als ein Verlauf zeitlicher Phasen, die sich zum gegenwärtigen Gegenstandsbewußtsein zusammenschließen.

156

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

8.2 Die Zeit Die These, nach der die Auffassung als subjektiver, ichhafter Bewußtseinsakt, der die sinnlich vermittelten Daten deutet, in einer vorbewußten Ebene wurzelt, die einer den sinnlichen Daten selbst immanenten Gesetzmäßigkeit gehorcht, führt Benussi, wie Husserl (Husserl, 1928; 1966), einerseits zu einer phänomenologischen Analyse des inneren Zeitbewußtseins, andererseits zu einer kritischen Auseinandersetzung mit dem Assimilationsbegriff, d. h. mit der Frage nach der Rolle der Erfahrung im Konstitutionsprozeß der Wahrnehmung. Der Gedanke eines sich zeitlich entwickelnden Wahrnehmungsaktes durchdringt das Gesamtwerk Benussis und kommt vor allem in seiner Psychologie der Zeitauffassung (Benussi 1913) zur Geltung. Im Mittelpunkt steht hier die phänomenologische Analyse des inneren Zeitbewußtseins, der Struktur der zeitlichen Dauer und ihrer inneren Beziehungen sowie der dynamischen Bedingungen, die sie der Konstitution der Wahrnehmungsgegenstände stellt. Die Zeit stellt eine unserer Wahrnehmung eigene Dimension dar – eine Dimension, die zwar aufgrund des vorwiegend stabilen Charakters der Erfahrungsgegenstände meist verborgen bleibt, jedoch nicht aufgehoben werden kann. Alle physikalischen und physiologischen Tatsachen, die unserer Wahrnehmung vorausgehen, sind eigentlich keine Dinge, sondern Prozesse, die sich in der Zeit abspielen; ebenso sind wir vom phänomenologischen Standpunkt aus mit Perzepten konfrontiert, die streng genommen keine Gegenstände sind, sondern mehr oder weniger unveränderliche phänomenale Ereignisse. Zwischen diesen beiden Ebenen besteht keine direkte Korrespondenz, denn das Subjekt greift mit seiner psychischen Tätigkeit ein und formt hierbei das Physikalische ins Phänomenologische um. Es besteht somit einerseits die longitudinale Serie der kausal bestimmten physikalisch-physiologischen Ereignisse, die sich durch eine ununterbrochene Sequenz von objektiv festgelegten Zeitpunkten „nach vorn“ bewegen; andererseits gibt es ein Subjekt, das durch seinen eigenen Zeithorizont den Augenblick bzw. das „Jetzt“ in die Gegenwart umformt, d. h. die Zeit um den Mittelpunkt der erlebten Gegenwart strukturiert und organisiert. Die Einheiten der subjektiven Zeit erweisen sich nämlich als

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG157

intensive, unselbständige Teile, die als solche keine eindeutige Beziehung zu den extensiven Teilen bzw. objektiven Einheiten der mechanischen Zeit haben (Benussi, 1913, 7-12). Die Untersuchung geht von den so genannten absoluten Zeiten aus, d. h. von solchen, die das Subjekt unabhängig von jedem Vergleich unmittelbar und anschaulich erfassen kann. Benussi unterscheidet fünf Typen von absoluten Zeiten: sehr kurze (von 90 ms bis 234-252 ms), kurze (von 234-252 ms bis 585-630 ms), unbestimmte (von 585-630 ms bis 10801170 ms), lange (von 1080-1170 ms bis 2070 ms) und sehr lange (über 2070 ms) (Benussi, 1913, 17ff). Diese absoluten, anschaulichen Zeiten markieren den Umfang der „psychischen Präsenzzeit“ (Stern, 1897), d. h. jenes ursprünglichen Zeitfeldes, das sich dadurch auszeichnet, daß es einen „nahezu sinnfälligen Charakter“ aufweist, so „daß uns kein Teil der jeweils erfaßten Zeitstrecke als erinnert, keiner als der Vergangenheit angehörig erscheint“; es läßt „sich daraufhin kollektiv als ‚Gegenwart‘ bezeichnen“ (Benussi, 1913, 14). Unterhalb der zeitlichen Sukzessionsschwelle (ca. 90 ms) erscheinen zwei aufeinander folgende Reize als simultan; sie ergeben ein augenblickliches Ereignis, dessen Anfang und Ende nicht zu unterscheiden sind. Erst jenseits dieser Reizschwelle kann man von Zeitbewußtsein sprechen; hierbei sind die verschiedenen Zeiten (sehr kurz, kurz, lang usw.) nicht quantitativ, sondern qualitativ bestimmt, wobei der Qualitätsunterschied nicht auf die Beschaffenheit der Gegenstände zurückzuführen ist, sondern auf die der sie erfassenden Akte: Bei kurzen Intervallen nehmen wir nicht die Zeitstrecke als solche wahr, sondern die Abfolge der sie begrenzenden Geräusche; bei langen Intervallen entsteht die Schwierigkeit, die Geräusche als umfassende Grenzen der Zeitstrecke zu erfassen; dort drängt sich ein synthetisierendes Verhalten auf, hier ein analytisches. Nur bei den so genannten unbestimmten Zeiten (600-1100 ms) ist eine Ausgewogenheit zwischen den beiden Verhaltensweisen und der davon abhängigen Auffälligkeitsverteilung gegeben. Im engeren Sinne kann man nur hier von wirklich anschaulicher Zeitauffassung sprechen: Die so genannten unbestimmten Zeiten stellen den Kern der Präsenzzeit – die Gegenwart

158

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

schlechthin – dar. 27 Die psychische Präsenzzeit stellt sozusagen die Bühne dar, auf der sich jegliche Erfahrung abspielt: Sie ist die notwendige Bedingung jeglicher Erfahrung, die Bedingung für die Konstitution der Einheit und Identität unserer Erfahrungsgegenstände. Denn die Einheit des Gegenstandes, seine Auffassung als identischer, in der Zeit andauernder Pol, geht auf die Dauer des Auffassungsaktes zurück, auf seine Präsenzzeit, durch die die vergangenen Momente retentional noch festgehalten werden und somit eine Identifikationssynthese ergeben. Diese Synthese erlaubt es, den Gegenstand als Träger einer gestaltlichen Identität zu erfassen, und bringt jene phänomenale Spaltung hervor, die die Dauer des Gegenstandes vom passiven Zeitfluß unterscheiden läßt. Zwischen beiden besteht eine inverse Beziehung: Je mehr die Präsenzzeit gegenständlich ausgefüllt ist, desto weniger wird der Zeitfluß erlebt; je mehr die Zeit unausgefüllt ist, desto mehr wird der Zeitfluß quasi gegenständlich aufgefaßt und somit in den Vordergrund gestellt (Benussi, 1913, 327ff.). Die Wahrnehmungswelt, selbst dort, wo sie bei deskriptiver Analyse aus festen und unbeweglichen Gegenständen zu bestehen scheint, setzt sich aus flüchtigen Ereignissen zusammen, die durch Entschwinden allmählich ineinander übergehen. Doch innerhalb dieses Chaos an punktuellen Ereignissen bilden sich in der psychischen Präsenzzeit weitere dynamische Strukturen, die die einzelnen flüchtigen Ereignisse als unselbständige Teile in sich einschließen. Die psychische Präsenzzeit ist Vereinheitlichung und Identifizierung einer zeitlich verteilten Mannigfaltigkeit, jene synthetische Form, die eine Mehrheit sukzessiver Teil- bzw. Vorgestalten zu einer dynamischen Gestalt höherer Ordnung zusammenschließt. Die Wahrnehmungserfahrung besteht aus aufeinander folgenden, 27

Hier setzen Benussis Untersuchungen über die Gestaltzeit an (Benussi 1914b; vgl. „Die Gestaltzeit“, 1912, FBD, 4.2; 4.3; 4.4; 4.6; 4.7), d. h. über die dem Auffassungsakt erforderliche Zeit, um die Sinnesdaten zu (relativ) stabilen Perzepten zu gestalten. Er verwendet hierfür Täuschungsfiguren und durch tachistoskopische Darbietung einzelner Figurenkomponenten (z. B. der Querstriche einer Müller-Lyerschen Figur) mit unterschiedlichen (kurzen, langen, unbestimmten) Expositionszeiten stellt er die zur Entstehung des maximalen Täu-

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG159

doch mitanwesenden Szenen. Diese mitanwesende Aufeinanderfolge spiegelt nicht die objektive Reizsequenz wieder, wie die von Benussi untersuchten Zeitverschiebungen bezeugen: Die Präsenzzeit beinhaltet einen Bereich, innerhalb dessen die eintretenden Ereignisse neu geordnet werden können, in der sich also die funktionalen Beziehungen zwischen Ereignissen nach vorne oder nach hinten bewegen können; die wahrgenommene Aufeinanderfolge wird nämlich nicht durch die zeitliche Nähe allein bestimmt, sondern auch durch ihre Beziehung zu anderen Einheitsfaktoren, wie etwa die qualitative Ähnlichkeit (Ton vs. Geräusch) oder die Wahrnehmungsauffälligkeit (die bei verschiedenen Farben oder Tönen unterschiedlich ausfallen kann). Dies geschieht innerhalb jenes Kernes der Präsenzzeit, die Benussi Gegenwartszeit nennt (deren Dauer etwa 100 ms beträgt). Somit erweist sich die Gegenwartszeit als Kernpunkt der Präsenzzeit, die sich in einem „Zeithof“ (Husserl) bis zu den Grenzen der Anschaulichkeit entfaltet. Sie stellt den ursprünglichen Zeitrahmen dar, innerhalb dessen sich die gegenwärtige Zeitwahrnehmung verwirklicht, so daß sie nicht augenblicklich, wie es bei Meinong noch der Fall war, sondern in ihrer Dauer innerlich gegliedert ist (Benussi 1907/08; 1913, 199-246). So gibt es eine Gestaltzeitschwelle, d. h. eine kleinste bzw. größte Zeit, die erst eine einheitliche Auffassung von mannigfachen, aufeinander folgenden Sinnesreizen und -eindrücken ermöglicht. Der Auffassungsakt wirkt synthetisch, indem er die zeitlich aufeinander folgenden sinnlichen Inhalte in einen produzierten, nicht verteilten Inhalt zusammenfaßt. Der Wahrnehmungsakt selbst kann niemals auf einen Augenblick reduziert werden, da er eine zeitliche Ausdehnung besitzt, die sich vom Kernpunkt der Gegenwart über das gerade Vergangene und das unmittelbar Bevorstehende erstreckt. Der Wahrnehmungsprozeß entwickelt sich somit innerhalb eines dynamischen Feldes, wobei das jeweils im Brennpunkt der Aufmerksamkeit sich Befindende eine Spur hinter sich läßt, die einen neuen, in die psychische Präsenzzeit eintretenden Inhalt umgibt und schließlich nach und

schungseffektes nötige Zeit fest, die wiederum von der vollständigen Aktualisierung einer synthetischen Einstellung abhängt.

160

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

nach entschwindet. Daraufhin kann es weiter dem Bewußtsein präsent bleiben oder diesem wieder erscheinen, doch nicht mehr als wahrnehmungspräsent, sondern lediglich als vorstellungspräsent. Natürlich gehen auch hier die Grenzen zwischen Wahrnehmungspräsenz und Vorstellungspräsenz ineinander über (Benussi 1922/23). Obwohl also in deskriptiver Hinsicht ein klarer Unterschied zwischen Wahrnehmungs- und Vorstellungspräsenz besteht, sind sie in genetischer Hinsicht als Pole eines Kontinuums anzusehen. Dies erklärt, warum sich durch ein Verschmelzungsschema Vorstellungselemente aufgrund assimilativer Prozesse mit wahrnehmungspräsenten Elementen integrieren können. Durch ihr Eingreifen wird die aktuelle Wahrnehmungsgrundlage zu einem vollständigen Wahrnehmungsgegenstand ergänzt, obwohl die objektiven Wahrnehmungsbedingungen (Reizbedingungen) nicht bzw. nur unvollständig gegeben sind (Benussi 1922/23, 90). Ein Beispiel hierfür stellt die Scheinkörperlichkeit bestimmter Zeichnungen dar, etwa die des Neckerschen Würfels (Fig. 3).

Figur 3

Es greifen dabei nicht nur ergänzende, sondern auch antizipierende Funktionen ein, die nicht bloß die aktuelle Kohärenz der Wahrnehmungsentfaltung und ihrer internen Verhältnisse, sondern die ganze „Vorgeschichte“ des Wahrnehmenden betreffen (Wahrnehmungsassimilation). Ebenso assimilativen Faktoren zuzuschreiben sind die Kategorisierungs-, Erkennungs-, Bedeutungsverleihungs- und Benennungsprozesse (kategoriale

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG161

Assimilation), die natürlich schon formierte, d. h. durch bestimmte räumliche, chromatische, dimensionale und topologische Verhältnisse charakterisierte Perzepte voraussetzen. Der Einfluß solcher Faktoren auf die Wahrnehmung ist offensichtlich, doch es handelt sich eben nur um einen Einfluß: Von Einfluß zu sprechen hat nur dort einen Sinn, wo schon etwas vorhanden ist, das beeinflußt werden kann. Die notwendige Grundlage für die Wirkung der assimilativen Faktoren stellen nämlich für Benussi die Gestaltfaktoren dar, die deren Wirkungsgrad bestimmen; denn die Gestaltfaktoren beeinflussen – fördernd oder auch hemmend – die assimilativen Prozesse. Dies bezeugen die Untersuchungen Benussis über das Entstehen bestimmter Scheinkörperlichkeitseindrücke anhand von perspektivischen Zeichnungen, die er schon im Jahre 1911 anstellte (Benussi, 1911).

Figur 4

Dreht man den in Figur 3 dargestellten Neckerschen Würfel in verschiedene Richtungen (Fig. 4), so entsteht für jede Orientierung eine bestimmte Scheinkörperlichkeit: Benussi konnte durch eine tachistoskopische Versuchsanordnung nachweisen, wieviel Zeit – je nach Orientierung – eine Person für das Erfassen der entsprechenden Scheinkörperlichkeit benötigt. Die unterschiedlichen Orientierungen der Figur – die als verschiedene Gestalten aufgefaßt werden – begünstigen ganz unterschiedlich das Entstehen assimilativer Prozesse, die die (zweidimensionale) Gestalt zu einem Körper ergänzen. Innerhalb des Wahrnehmungsaktes entwickelt sich somit ein dynamischer Konnex: Die assimilativen Faktoren entfalten und organisieren sich auf der Basis des durch die Gestaltfaktoren gegebenen relationalen Systems; diese Gestaltprozesse werden wiederum –

162

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

durch Rückwirkung der assimilativen Faktoren – einer Umbildung unterworfen, und zwar indem sie in ein gefestigtes Erfahrungssystem eingebunden werden (Benussi 1922/23). Somit hebt Benussis experimentelle Forschung sämtliche aufeinander fundierte Schichten im Wahrnehmungsakt und in dessen Wahrnehmungszeit hervor: diejenige der grundlegenden Sinnlichkeit, die präattentiv einer Dynamik unterworfen ist, die dem Ich nur latent zugänglich ist; diejenige der Wahrnehmungsauffassung, durch die sich das Gegenstandsbewußtsein konstituiert, wobei eine schon vorhandene Struktur aktiv expliziert bzw. umgestaltet wird; und schließlich diejenige der Identifikation und Kategorisierung der Perzepte, die aus einer assimilativen Bereicherung des gestalteten Gegenstandes besteht. Somit nimmt Benussi schon die späteren Forschungen vorweg, die er während seiner Zeit in Padua, ausgehend von seinen Untersuchungen über Suggestion und Hypnose, entwickeln wird. Sie zielen darauf ab, eine „Realanalyse“ des Psychischen und der in ihm mitbeteiligten Prozesse zu liefern, die nicht als Alternative zur traditionellen introspektiven Methode, sondern als deren entscheidende Verstärkung angesehen werden kann (Benussi 1925). Nicht zufällig zielt solch eine Realanalyse, die die psychischen Prozesse aus ihrer globalen, funktionalen Einheit – nicht im begrifflichen bzw. metaphorischen, sondern eben realen Sinne – herauslösen will, nicht nur auf die „Zerlegung“, „Sensibilisierung“ bzw. „Aufhebung“ psychischer Funktionen und ihrer Teile, sondern auch auf deren Verlangsamung bzw. Immobilisierung, um die Entwicklungsphasen eines bestimmten Prozesses hervorzuheben, die ansonsten durch ihre Labilität und Flüchtigkeit unbemerkt blieben.

9. Benussi und die Gestalttheorie Es verwundert somit nicht, daß Benussis genetische Phänomenologie mit der Gestalttheorie der Berliner Schule schließlich in Konflikt geriet. 28

28

Im Jahre 1915 publizierte Kurt Koffka eine umfangreiche Arbeit, in der er das Gesamtwerk Benussis kritisch analysierte (Koffka, 1915). Diese polemische

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG163

Denn der phänomenologische Zugang der Gestalttheorie läßt zum einen keine Hierarchien innerhalb des Gegenstandsbereichs zu: Es gibt keine fundierenden und fundierten, realen und irrealen, möglichen und unmöglichen Gegenstände, die nach bestimmten Fundierungsverhältnissen strukturiert sind, sondern nur eine innere Gliederung des Wahrnehmungsfeldes, in dem sich die Abhängigkeitsbeziehungen in mehrere Richtungen entwickeln. Elemente und Strukturen stehen in einem Teil-Ganzes-Verhältnis, in dem eher die umfassenderen Gebilde – wenn auch nicht absolut – die einzelnen Teile bestimmen. Die Gestalttheoretiker haben hiervon ausgehend ein Feldmodell vorgeschlagen, gemäß dem die Wahrnehmungsgegebenheiten mit ihren Farb-, Größen-, Form-, Bewegungs- und Ausdrucksbestimmungen durch dynamische Selbstverteilung der Kräfte entstehen, die durch den sensoriellen Input induziert werden. Ihre empirische Forschung hat sich auf die Entdeckung der Gesetze gerichtet, denen diese Selbstregulierung untersteht (Wertheimer 1921; 1923), nämlich der Nähe, Homogenität, Geschlossenheit, Richtungskontinuität, dem gemeinsamen Schicksal etc. – Gesetze, die als Sonderfälle einer allgemeinen Tendenz betrachtet werden können, nämlich der Tendenz zur Bildung des „besseren“, „sinnvolleren“, in einem Wort prägnanteren Gebildes. Die Wahrnehmung ist mit anderen Worten einem Ökonomieprinzip unterworfen, das das Wahrnehmungsfeld spontan zum maximalen Ausgleich im Kräftespiel und somit zur maximalen Stabilität und Widerstandsfähigkeit führt (Wertheimer 1923). Diese Annahme fußt schließlich auf einer ganz bestimmten Gehirntheorie, nach der die Hirnprozesse derart funktionieren, daß sie die maximale Homogenität herstellen, die mit den peripheren Reizbedingungen vereinbar ist (Wertheimer 1912; Köhler 1920). Außerdem betrachtet das Feldmodell der Gestalttheorie selbst das Subjekt als Segment oder als innere Gliederung des Gesamtfeldes; und

Schrift verfolgt ein ganz bestimmtes Ziel: Benussis Theorien zur Gestaltwahrnehmung, die „unter der Leitung einer ganz bestimmten, aber von der Wertheimerschen verschiedenen Theorie, der in der Grazer Schule ausgebildeten Produktionstheorie, angestellt worden“ sind (Koffka, 1915, 14), niederzuschlagen. Koffkas Auseinandersetzung mit Benussi erweist sich als Episode jener weitgreifenden Polemik, mit der die Berliner Schule den Bruch mit der Tradition der klassischen Psychologie vollzog.

164

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

zwar als reichhaltigeres, bevorzugteres Segment, das jedoch derselben Ebene angehört wie die es umgebenden Gegenstände. Die Gliederung des Subjekts ist den gleichen Gesetzen unterworfen wie die Gliederung des Feldes. Das intentionale Bewußtseinsmodell rückt somit deutlich in den Hintergrund. Es verschwindet jedoch nicht ganz, da die Gestalttheorie, zumindest annähernd, eine relationale Auffassung des Bewußtseinsfeldes beibehält. Nach dieser Auffassung ist das Wahrnehmungsfeld ein komplexes Ganzes, das sich in zwei Unterklassen gliedert, die jeweils das phänomenale Umfeld und das phänomenale Ich betreffen. Die beiden Unterklassen stehen miteinander in einer Beziehung funktionaler, gegenseitiger Abhängigkeit. Zwar herrscht bei den Gestalttheoretikern die Tendenz vor, Phänomene durch Phänomene zu erklären, d. h. eine Reihe von funktionalen Verhältnissen zwischen den verschiedenen Erscheinungsmomenten herzustellen, auf die das Mitwirken der subjektiven bzw. „außersinnlichen“ Faktoren reduziert wird, doch innerhalb der so konzipierten Erklärungsmodelle ist es immer möglich, den – wenn auch verdeckten – Anteil des Subjektes zu beleuchten, dem sich jene Momente absolut zwingend aufdrängen. Außerdem ist es in den gestalttheoretischen Erklärungsmodellen ebenso möglich, die dominierende Stellung von bestimmten Erscheinungsmomenten aufzuzeigen, denen die Rolle zukommt, andere Momente zu „erzeugen“ bzw. zu „fundieren“ – selbst wenn das allgemeine Prinzip bestehen bleibt, nach dem die Eigenschaften des Ganzen diejenigen der Teile bestimmen. 29 29

Betrachtet man konkret die experimentellen Untersuchungen der Gestalttheoretiker, bekommt man den Eindruck, die Sachlage sei eine ganz andere. Die Wirkung der subjektiven Faktoren scheint ganz ausgeklammert zu sein, und zwar zugunsten einer ausschließlichen Hervorhebung der so genannten strukturellen bzw. autochthonen Faktoren. Diese Haltung hängt zumindest teilweise von der anfänglichen Strategie der Gestalttheoretiker ab, die darauf zielte, sich deutlich von der Tradition abzuheben, die ja in den subjektiven Faktoren, wenn nicht die einzigen, so doch die wichtigsten Determinanten der Wahrnehmungsorganisation sah. Doch eigentlich haben die Gestalttheoretiker sich eher darauf beschränkt, die Tragweite dieser Faktoren zu verringern, als ihre – nicht zu bestreitende – Wirkung zu negieren. Wendet man sich der Frage nach der Wertigkeit der Gegenstände zu, d. h. der Frage nach ihrer Eigenart, sich dem Subjekt ,,aufzudrängen“ oder ,,darzubieten“, also nach ihrer Auffälligkeit (vgl. Metzger, 1941, 188ff.), dann kann der vermeintliche Objektivismus gewissermaßen um-

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG165

Doch der Hauptunterschied zwischen Benussi und den Gestalttheoretikern besteht darin, daß die Gestalttheorie eine statische Phänomenologie entwickelt, die darauf zielt, die Kovarianzgesetze zwischen Erscheinungsmomenten des Wahrnehmungsfeldes aufzustellen, während Benussi programmatisch für eine genetische Phänomenologie plädiert, die die diachronischen Entwicklungsgesetze der Wahrnehmungserscheinungen bestimmt, ihren sich in der Zeit schichtenden Sinn aufzeigt und somit die zeitliche Dimension des Wahrnehmungsprozesses hervorhebt. Dies betrifft nicht die – Benussi fälschlich zugeschriebene – These einer Strukturierung in zwei (sinnliche und außersinnliche) Phasen des Wahrnehmungsprozesses, sondern bedeutet, daß diese eine eigene Entwicklungsbzw. „Gestaltzeit“ benötigt, damit die Gestaltfaktoren die Sinnesdaten allmählich zu (relativ) stabilen Perzepten formen können. Gerade dies wird von den Gestalttheoretikern ignoriert, die ihr Augenmerk lediglich auf die stabile Struktur der schon formierten Perzepte lenken. Dies macht die ganze theoretische Divergenz zwischen Benussi und den Gestalttheoretikern aus, die eine Wahrnehmungsanalyse nach Phasen bzw. Stadien prinzipiell verurteilen (vgl. z. B. Kanisza, 1952). Denn für die Gestalttheoretiker impliziert jegliche diachronische Untersuchung des Wahrnehmungsprozesses einen konstruktivistischen Ansatz in der Wahrnehmungsanalyse und somit die Wiedereinführung der von ihnen verdammten alten Unterscheidung zwischen Empfindung und Wahrnehmung und des damit verbundenen psychophysischen Prinzips: der Konstanzannahme.

10. Meinong und Benussi in der Psychologiegeschichte Meinongs Stellung in der Psychologiegeschichte ist hauptsächlich mit der Gründung der ersten psychologischen Laboratoriums in Österreich und der Grazer Schule der Psychologie verknüpft. Meinongs psychologische

gekehrt werden: Nimmt das Subjekt die richtige Einstellung an, so ,,drängen“ sich die Dinge unmittelbar auf, sie „bieten“ sich dem Subjekt dar (vgl. Galli, 1987, 59-63).

166

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

Forschungen werden jedoch selten diskutiert. Obwohl seine Wahrnehmungspsychologie eine Überwindung der alten, klassischen Wahrnehmungsauffassung darstellt, ist sie heute nahezu in Vergessenheit geraten. Der Grund hierfür ist leicht verständlich: Meinongs wahrnehmungspsychologische Beiträge haben in ihrer reifen Version eine ganz bestimmte philosophische Theorie zur Voraussetzung und werden nur innerhalb dieser Theorie begreiflich. Schon Alois Höfler hatte den „instrumentalen“ Charakter von Meinongs psychologischen Arbeiten anerkannt: Er war der Überzeugung, „daß Meinongs psychologische Forschung von Anfang an zum überwiegenden Teil erkenntnistheoretischen Interessen diente“ (Höfler, 1921, 368). Infolgedessen zeigt Meinongs psychologische Forschung keine direkte Nachwirkung auf den Problembereich der heutigen Psychologie. Trotzdem enthalten Meinongs Analysen sämtliche bedeutende Ansätze, die als erste erkennbare Anzeichen einer phänomenologischen sowie experimentellen Wahrnehmungpsychologie betrachtet werden können (vgl. Bozzi, 1992; 1996). Ganz andere Relevanz hat für die heutige Forschung Benussis psychologisches Werk. Trotz – ja, vielleicht sogar dank – seiner historischen Niederlage zeigt das Benussi’sche Projekt einer genetischen Experimentalphänomenologie seine ganze Kraft und erstaunliche Bedeutsamkeit für die Gegenwart, da es das experimentalphänomenologische Modell mit dem heute in der kognitiven Psychologie und Kognitionswissenschaft geläufigen in Dialog bringen kann. Es ist in der heutigen kognitiven Psychologie allgemein bekannt, daß die Zeitschwelle der Gegenstandswahrnehmung – d. h. die Zeit, die notwendig ist, damit die Gegenstände in ihren wichtigsten Details erfaßt werden können – proportional zur Komplexität des Gegenstandes wächst. Ebenso verbreitet ist die These, daß der Verarbeitungs- und Bildungsprozeß des sensoriellen Inputs zeitlich strukturiert ist. Die zeitliche Struktur der Wahrnehmung geht eng mit ihrem konstruktiven Charakter einher. Denn zweifelsohne ist die Wahrnehmung keine passive Aufnahme des distalen Reizes, sondern ein konstruktiver Prozeß, in dem der unstrukturierte sensorielle Input einem Selektions- und Verarbeitungsprozeß unterzogen und zu stabilen, geordneten Perzepten umgewandelt wird. Die Wahrnehmung ist ein weitgehend subjektgesteuerter Prozeß, der aus dem je-

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG167

weils zugänglichen Reizangebot bestimmte Informationen auswählt, verarbeitet und sie dabei anreichert. Die Wahrnehmung als sich zeitlich entwickelnder Prozeß setzt die Erfahrung des Wahrnehmenden voraus bzw. hängt von bereits existierenden Strukturen – um mit Ulric Neisser zu reden – von „Schemata“ ab. Der Wahrnehmende wählt aus dem verfügbaren Reizangebot die für ihn relevanten Aspekte aus und verarbeitet sie anhand von Schemata, die nicht nur eine ergänzende, sondern auch antizipierende Funktion ausüben. Denn die Schemata stellen den Wahrnehmenden darauf ein, bestimmte Informationen auszuwählen bzw. seine Aufmerksamkeit derart zu steuern, daß er sich bestimmten Teilen des Wahrnehmungsfeldes zuwenden bzw. Informationen aus verschiedenen Sinnesmodalitäten vergleichen und integrieren kann. Solche Schemata üben also eine zugleich „gestaltliche“ und „assimilative“ Funktion aus, besitzen somit eine dynamische, zyklische Struktur: Das jeweils aktivierte Schema wird durch jede neue Erfahrung bestätigt, oder aber ergänzt bzw. modifiziert. Gerade deshalb können die Schemata unvollständige oder mehrdeutige Reizgrundlagen in eine bestimmte Richtung deuten bzw. dazu verleiten, die Konstellation der Sinnesdaten „inadäquat“ aufzufassen. Diese von Neisser eingeführte Begrifflichkeit (Neisser, 1976), die in der heutigen kognitiven Psychologie und Kognitionswissenschaft geläufig ist, hat Vittorio Benussi schon vor einem Jahrhundert antizipiert. Die enorme Menge an experimentellen Ergebnissen, die die heutige kognitive Psychologie gesammelt hat, für die aber noch kein einheitlicher theoretischer Rahmen vorhanden ist, kann zur Grundlage einer neuen genetischen Experimentalphänomenologie werden, einer Phänomenologie, die Brentano entwarf, Husserl weiterführte und für die dann Benussi eine erste empirische und experimentelle Basis schuf. Mauro Antonelli Università di Milano – Bicocca [email protected]

Marina Manotta Università di Bologna [email protected]

168

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

Literatur Ameseder, Rudolf (1904), „Über Vorstellungsproduktion“, in A. Meinong (Hg.), Untersuchungen zur Gegenstandstheorie und Psychologie, Leipzig, S. 481-508. Antonelli, Mauro (1994), Die experimentelle Analyse des Bewußtseins bei Vittorio Benussi, Amsterdam-Atlanta. Antonelli, Mauro (2003), Il tempo come soggetto – il soggetto come tempo. La temporalità nell’orizzonte fenomenologico, Bologna. Benetka, Gerhard (1990), Zur Geschichte der Institutionalisierung der Psychologie in Österreich. Die Errichtung des Wiener psychologischen Instituts, Wien-Salzburg. Benussi, Vittorio (2002), Psychologische Schriften. Textkritische Ausgabe in 2 Bänden. Band I. Psychologische Aufsätze (1904-1914). Band II. Psychologie der Zeitauffassung (1913). Hrsg. von Mauro Antonelli. Amsterdam-New York (PS). Benussi, Vittorio (1904), „Zur Psychologie des Gestalterfassens (Die Müller-Lyersche Figur)“, in PS, Bd. I, S. 3-138. Benussi, Vittorio (1905a), “La natura delle cosidette illusioni otticogeometriche”. Dt. Übers. in PS, Bd. I, S. 139-146. Benussi, Vittorio (1905b), “Gli atteggiamenti intellettivi elementari ed i loro oggetti”. Dt. Übers. in PS, Bd. I, S. 147-153. Benussi, Vittorio (1906), „Die Psychologie in Italien”, Archiv für die gesamte Psychologie 7, Literaturbericht, S. 141-180. Benussi, Vittorio (1906/07), „Experimentelles über Vorstellungsinadäquatheit. I. Das Erfassen gestaltmehrdeutiger Komplexe. II. Gestaltmehrdeutigkeit und Inadäquatheitsumkehrung“, in PS, Bd. I, S. 155228. Benussi, Vittorio (1907/08), „Zur experimentellen Analyse des Zeitvergleichs. I. Zeitgröße und Betonungsgestalt. II. Erwartungszeit und subjektive Zeitgröße“, Archiv für die gesamte Psychologie 9, S. 366449; 13, S. 71-139.

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG169

Benussi, Vittorio (1909), „Über ‚Aufmerksamkeitsrichtung‘ beim Raumund Zeitvergleich“, in PS, Bd. I, S. 226-261. Benussi, Vittorio (1910), „Über die Grundlagen des Gewichtseindruckes (Beiträge zur Psychologie des Vergleichens)”, Archiv für die gesamte Psychologie 17, S. 1-185. Benussi, Vittorio (1911), „Über die Motive der Scheinkörperlichkeit bei umkehrbaren Zeichnungen“, in PS, Bd. I, S. 263-295. Benussi, Vittorio (1913), Psychologie der Zeitauffassung, in PS, Bd. II. Benussi, Vittorio (1914a), „Gesetze der inadäquaten Gestaltauffassung (Die Ergebnisse meiner bisherigen experimentellen Arbeiten zur Analyse der sogen. geometrisch-optischen Täuschungen [Vorstellungen außersinnlicher Provenienz])“, in PS, Bd. I, S. 341-364. Benussi, Vittorio (1914b), „Versuche zur Bestimmung der Gestaltzeit“, in F. Schumann (Hg.), Bericht über den VI. Kongreß für experimentelle Psychologie in Göttingen 1914, Leipzig, S. 71-73. Benussi, Vittorio (1917), „Versuche zur Analyse taktil erweckter Scheinbewegungen (kinematohaptische Erscheinungen) nach ihren äußeren Bedingungen und ihren Beziehungen zu den parallelen optischen Phänomenen”, Archiv für die gesamte Psychologie 36, Literaturbericht, S. 59-135. Benussi, Vittorio (1922/23), Introduzione alla psicologia sperimentale. Lezioni tenute nell’anno 1922-23 dal Prof. V. Benussi e raccolte dal Dott. C. L. Musatti, Typoskript (FBP, 5). Benussi, Vittorio (1925), La suggestione e l’ipnosi come mezzi di analisi psichica reale, Bologna. Bozzi, Paolo (1992), „Alexius von Meinong: attualità ed errori fecondi di una distinzione tra ordine inferiore e ordine superiore degli oggetti“, Rivista di psicologia 1, S. 35-48. Bozzi, Paolo (1996), „Higher-Order Objects“, in E. Baumgartner, W. Baumgartner, B. Borstner et. al. (eds.), Phenomenology and Cognitive Science, Dettelbach, S. 105-114. Fondo, Benussi (www: http://www.biblio.unimib.it/benussi/)

170

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

FBD, 1.10, „Auffälligkeit“ (1905). FBD, 4.2; 4.3; 4.4; 4.6; 4.7, „Die Gestaltzeit“ (1912). FBD, 9.6, „Psychologie der inadäquaten Auffassung“ (1913). Brentano, Franz (1874), Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkt, 2 Bde., Leipzig. 2. Aufl., hrsg. v. O. Kraus, 3 Bde., Leipzig 19241928. Brentano, Franz (1887-1901), Deskriptive Psychologie, hrsg. v. R. M. Chisholm u. W. Baumgartner. Hamburg 1982. Dürr, Ernst (1908), „Erkenntnispsychologisches in der erkenntnistheoretischen Literatur der letzten Jahre“, Archiv für die gesamte Psychologie 13, S. 1-42. Ehrenfels, Christian von (1890), „Über Gestaltqualitäten“, Vierteljahrsschrift für wissenschaftliche Philosophie 14, S. 242-292. Galli, Giuseppe (1987), “La psicologia relazionale (bipolare) di Brentano e la Gestalttheorie”, in G. Mucciarelli (a cura di), Vittorio Benussi nella storia della psicologia italiana, Bologna 1987, S. 59-63. Haller, Rudolf (1995/96), „Psychologische Grundlagen der Gegenstandstheorie Meinongs“, Brentano Studien 6, S. 31-41. Höfler, Alois (1921), „Meinongs Psychologie“, Zeitschrift für Psychologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane 86, S. 368-374. Husserl, Edmund (1891), Philosophie der Arithmetik, Halle. Husserl, Edmund (1900-1901), Logische Untersuchungen. I Band: Prolegomena zur reinen Logik. II Band: Untersuchungen zur Phänomenologie und Theorie der Erkenntnis, Halle a. S. (= Husserliana XVIII, XIX/1, XIX/2). Husserl, Edmund (1928), Vorlesungen zur Phänomenologie des inneren Zeitbewußtseins, hrsg. v. M. Heidegger, Jahrbuch für Philosophie und phänomenologische Forschung 9, S. 367-498 (= Husserliana X, Zur Phänomenologie des inneren Zeitbewußtseins (1893-1917), hrsg. v. R. Boehm, 1966).

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG171

Husserl, Edmund (1966), Analysen zur passiven Synthesis. Aus Vorlesungs- und Forschungsmanuskripten (1918-1926) (= Husserliana XI, hrsg. v. M. Fleischer, 1966). Kanizsa, Gaetano (1952), “Legittimità di una analisi del processo percettivo fondata su una distinzione in ‘fasi’ o ‘stadi’”, Archivio di Psicologia, Neurologia e Psichiatria 13, S. 292-322. Kindinger, Rudolf (1952), Das Problem der unvollkommenen Erkenntnisleistung in der Meinongschen Wahrnehmungslehre, in K. Radakovic, A. Silva Tarouca, F. Weinhandl (Hg.), Meinong Gedenkschrift, Graz, S. 41-66. Köhler, Wolfgang (1920), Die physischen Gestalten in Ruhe und stationärem Zustand, Braunschweig. Koffka, Kurt (1915), „Beiträge zur Psychologie der Gestalt- und Bewegungserlebnisse. III. Zur Grundlegung der Wahrnehmungspsychologie. Eine Auseinandersetzung mit V. Benussi“, Zeitschrift für Psychologie 73, S. 11-90. Linke, Paul Ferdinand (1918), Grundfragen der Wahrnehmungslehre. Untersuchungen über die Bedeutung der Gegenstandstheorie und Phänomenologie für die experimentelle Psychologie, München. Manotta, Marina (2005), La fondazione dell’oggettività. Studio su Alexius Meinong, Macerata. Meinong, Alexius (1968-1978), Meinong Gesamtausgabe, 7 Bände und ein Ergänzungsband, hrsg. von R. M. Chisholm, R. Haller, R. Kindinger, Graz (GA). Meinong, Alexius (1882), Hume Studien II. Zur Relationstheorie, in GA, Bd. II, S. 1-183. Meinong, Alexius (1888), Über Begriff und Eigenschaften der Empfindung, in GA, Bd. I, S. 109-185. Meinong, Alexius (1889), Phantasievorstellung und Phantasie, in GA, Bd. I, S. 193-271. Meinong, Alexius (1891), Zur Psychologie der Komplexionen und Relationen, in GA, Bd. I, S. 279-300.

172

MAURO ANTONELLI – MARINA MANOTTA

Meinong, Alexius (1894), Beiträge zur Theorie der psychischen Analyse, in GA, Bd. I, S. 305-388. Meinong, Alexius (1899), Über Gegenstände höherer Ordnung und deren Verhältnis zur inneren Wahrnehmung, in GA, Bd. II, S. 377-480. Meinong, Alexius (1904), Über Gegenstandstheorie, 1904, in GA, Bd. II, S. 481-535. Meinong, Alexius (1906), Über die Erfahrungsgrundlagen unseres Wissens, 1906, in GA, Bd. V, S. 367-481. Meinong, Alexius (1921), Selbstdarstellung, 1921, in GA, Bd. VII, S. 162. Meinong-Nachlaß: Karton XIII/d, „Psychologie der Komplexionen“ (Sommersemester 1888). Karton IV/b, „Über Erkenntnistheorie“ (Wintersemester 1895-96). Karton XIII/a, „Kolleg über Psychologie“ (Wintersemester 1896-97). Metzger, Wolfgang (1941), Psychologie: Die Entwicklung ihrer Grundannahmen seit der Einführung des Experiments, Darmstadt. Mittenecker, Erich; Seybold, Irmtraut (1994), „Die Entwicklung der Psychologie an der Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz“, in E. Mittenecker, G. Schulter (Hg.), 100 Jahre Psychologie an der Universität Graz, Graz, S. 1-40. Neisser, Ulric (1976), Cognition and reality. Principles and implications of cognitive psychology, San Francisco, CA. Dt. Übers. Kognition und Wirklichkeit, Stuttgart 1979. Rollinger, Robin (1995), „Meinong on Perception: Two Question Concerning Propositional Seeing“, Grazer philosophische Studien 50, S. 445-455. Schermann, Hans (1970), Meinong und Husserl. Eine vergleichende Studie, Louvain.

MEINONGS UND BENUSSIS PHÄNOMENOLOGIE DER WAHRNEHMUNG173

Stern, William (1897), „Psychische Präsenzzeit“, Zeitschrift für Psychologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane 13, S. 325-349. Stumpf, Carl (1873), Über den psychologischen Ursprung der Raumvorstellung, Leipzig. Weinhandl, Ferdinand (1952), „Das Außenweltproblem bei A. Meinong“, in K. Radakovic, A. Silva Tarouca, F. Weinhandl (Hg.), Meinong Gedenkschrift, Graz, S. 127-156. Wertheimer, Max (1912), „Experimentelle Studien über das Sehen von Bewegung“, Zeitschrift für Psychologie 61, S. 161-265. Wertheimer, Max (1922), „Untersuchungen zur Lehre von der Gestalt. I. Prinzipielle Bemerkungen“, Psychologische Forschung 1, S. 47-58. Wertheimer, Max (1923), „Untersuchungen zur Lehre von der Gestalt. II.“, Psychologische Forschung 4, S. 301-350. Witasek, Stephan (1908), Grundlinien der Psychologie, Leipzig.

DER BEGRIFF DER PSYCHOLOGIE BEIM SPÄTEN WEBER Tanja Pihlar

Zusammenfassung Im vorliegenden Beitrag wird die Auffassung der Psychologie im Spätwerk des slowenischen Philosophen France Weber, speziell in Vprašanje stvarnosti [Die Frage der Wirklichkeit] (1939), näher erörtert. Er stellte darin die analytischdeskriptive Psychologie der genetisch-dynamischen gegenüber. Diese unterscheiden sich durch ihre Methode sowie durch ihren Gegenstand: Während Selbstbeobachtung und Analyse als grundlegende Methoden der deskriptivanalytischen Psychologie anzusehen sind, liegt die Methode der genetischdynamischen Psychologie in der inneren sowie in der äußeren Beobachtung, wobei sich letztere auf die uns umgebende Außenwelt bzw. auf das Leben im weitesten Sinn (Pflanzen, Tiere und Menschen) richtet. Außerdem befaßt sich die analytisch-deskriptive Psychologie mit bloßen psychischen Phänomenen; dagegen ist der Gegenstand der genetisch-dynamischen Psychologie vor allem die innere oder psychologische Wirklichkeit, welcher wirkliche Dynamik zukommt. Es wird gezeigt, in welchem Maße sich Weber in seiner Auffassung der Psychologie letztlich von der Brentano-Tradition entfernt hat.

Im vorliegenden Beitrag soll der Begriff der Psychologie bei dem slowenischen Philosophen und Meinong-Schüler France Weber 1 (1890-1975) erörtert werden, den er in seinem Spätwerk Vprašanje stvarnosti [Die Frage der Wirklichkeit] (1939) entwickelt hat.

1

In der Taufurkunde steht „Franciscus Weber“. In seinen Publikationen in slowenischer Sprache, die in der Zeit zwischen den beiden Weltkriegen veröffentlicht wurden, verwendete er die Namensform „France Veber“.

176

TANJA PIHLAR

Webers wissenschaftliches Interesse galt ausschließlich der allgemeinen theoretischen und nicht der experimentellen Psychologie. Er beschäftigte sich in erster Linie mit der deskriptiven Psychologie im Sinne Brentanos, die er einer genetischen bzw. erklärenden Psychologie gegenüberstellte. In seinen Frühwerken bemüht er sich, die Psychologie als selbstständige empirische Wissenschaft zu begründen sowie ihren Gegenstand und ihre Methode zu beschreiben. In Anlehnung an die BrentanoTradition behauptet Weber, daß als Gegenstand der Psychologie das Psychische anzusehen ist, das durch die Gerichtetheit auf einen Gegenstand charakterisiert werden kann: Alle Erlebnisse sind stets auf etwas gerichtet, sie haben etwas zum Gegenstand. Die Aufgabe der Psychologie sieht Weber in der Beschreibung psychischer Phänomene, in der Analyse der komplexen psychischen Tatsachen sowie in deren Erklärung. 2 Als Hauptmethode der Psychologie wird bei Weber die Selbstbeobachtung genannt, bei der sich unsere Aufmerksamkeit auf unsere eigenen Erlebnisse richtet. Diese Differenzierung zwischen deskriptiver und erklärender Psychologie hat Weber auch in seinem oben genannten Werk Die Frage der Wirklichkeit beibehalten, obwohl darin einige wesentliche Modifizierungen zu konstatieren sind. Er verwendet nun die Begriffe „analytischdeskriptive“ und „genetisch-dynamische“ Psychologie. Er hat hierbei seine Auffassung von der analytisch-deskriptiven Psychologie nicht wesentlich revidiert; das Neue stellt die Einführung der sogenannten genetischdynamischen Psychologie dar, welche nicht mit der herkömmlichen genetischen Psychologie gleichzusetzen ist – sie unterscheidet sich von dieser sowohl durch ihren Gegenstand als auch durch ihre Methode. Diese Neuerung ist mit Webers „Wende zur Wirklichkeit“ (Terstenjak) verbunden, welche in seinen Werken in der zweiten Hälfte der Dreißigerjahre festgestellt werden kann. Weber beschäftigt sich nunmehr mit der Frage, wie man unmittelbar zur Wirklichkeit gelangen kann und entwickelt zu diesem Zweck seinen sogenannten „Treffgedanken“. Wie wir sehen werden, differenziert Weber in seinem Buch aus dem Jahr 1939 zwischen äußerer und innerer Beobachtung, welche sich – allgemein gesprochen – auf die äußere bzw. auf die innere Wirklichkeit richtet. Er gibt nun der äußeren 2

Vgl. Brentano 1982, S. 1ff.

DER BEGRIFF DER PSYCHOLOGIE BEIM SPÄTEN WEBER

177

Beobachtung den Vorrang: Sie ist als primär anzusehen und bildet die unerläßliche psychologische Voraussetzung alles Beobachtens schlechthin. Gemäß Weber ist sie auch als Methode der genetisch-dynamischen Psychologie zu betrachten, welche nach seiner jetzigen Meinung sowohl in der äußeren als auch in der inneren Erfahrung gründen soll. Er meint weiterhin, daß sich eine derartige Psychologie nicht nur mit unserem eigenen Erleben zu befassen hat, sondern auch mit dem Leben im weitesten Sinne, zu welchem vegetatives, animalisches und geistiges Leben gehören. Hier soll gezeigt werden, daß sich Weber in seiner Auffassung der Psychologie nicht nur von Brentanos Ansichten, wie sie uns in seiner Deskriptiven Psychologie begegnen, entfernt hat, sondern, daß er sich auch mit seinen eigenen, früheren Lehrmeinungen kritisch auseinandergesetzt hat. Bevor auf diese Änderungen näher eingegangen wird, soll zunächst Webers Auffassung der Psychologie in seinen frühen Schriften kurz erörtert werden.

1. Der frühe Weber: deskriptive vs. erklärende Psychologie Im Weiteren werde ich mich auf Webers Ausführungen in seinen Psychologieschriften, nämlich auf seine Bücher Oþrt psihologije [Grundriß der Psychologie] 3 und Analitiþna psihologija [Analytische Psychologie] 4 , konzentrieren, welche beide im Jahr 1924 erschienen sind. In den erwähnten Schriften bemüht sich Weber vor allem darum, die Psychologie als selbstständige Wissenschaft zu begründen. Für ihn ist eine Wissenschaft als selbstständig anzusehen, wenn sie einen eigenen Gegenstand hat, den keine andere Wissenschaft systematisch erforschen kann. In seinen Ausführungen läßt sich Brentanos Einfluß deutlich erkennen, obwohl Weber nirgendwo explizit auf ihn Bezug nimmt. Weber geht von Brentanos Idee aus, daß die Psychologie auf innerer Erfahrung gründet, und schreibt ihr empirischen Charakter zu: Psychologie ist eine Erfahrungswissenschaft, die sich bemüht „nicht-empirische 3 4

Hier abgekürzt als OP. Hier abgekürzt als AP.

178

TANJA PIHLAR

analytische Gesetzmäßigkeiten unseres Seelenlebens“ zu vermitteln, welche „außerhalb jeder empirisch-induktiven Untersuchung liegen, aber von […] prinzipieller Bedeutung für alles empirisch-psychologische Geschehen sind […]“ (AP, S. 4). Wie Brentano, verwirft auch Weber jede metaphysische Voraussetzung (siehe AP, S. 5): 5 Er meint, daß der Ausgangspunkt der Psychologie nicht in einer besonderen metaphysischen Substanz zu sehen ist, die „hinter“ den psychischen Zuständen liegen würde und unserer Erfahrung durchweg unzugänglich wäre. Ein Psychologe, der bei der Beschreibung der psychischen Tatsachen die innere Erfahrung nicht berücksichtigen würde, würde „auf einem Feld unfruchtbarer Spekulation“ (AP, S. 7) stecken bleiben; deshalb muß er vielmehr von jenen realen psychischen Tatsachen ausgehen, die uns in der inneren Erfahrung mit Gewißheit gegeben sind. Infolgedessen definiert Weber die Psychologie als die Wissenschaft von den Erlebnissen resp. von den psychischen Phänomenen 6 – im Unterschied zu den Naturwissenschaften, welche physische Phänomene untersuchen: „Die Psychologie ist die Wissenschaft von den Gegenständen der inneren Erfahrung“ (AP, S. 8). Er meint allerdings darüber hinaus, daß zum Gegenstandsbereich der Psychologie auch Subjekte als besondere Realitäten zu zählen sind, da jedes Erlebnis unumgänglich als Erlebnis eines bestimmten Subjekts zu betrachten ist (siehe OP, S. 17f). 7 Im Weiteren unterscheidet Weber – in Anknüpfung an Brentano – zwischen deskriptiver bzw. analytischer Psychologie einerseits und erklärender bzw. genetischer Psychologie andrerseits (siehe OP, S. 20ff; AP, S. 5 6 7

Vgl. Brentano 21924, S. 13ff. Weber verwendet hier diese beiden Ausdrücke synonym. Es sei angemerkt, daß sich Weber nicht prinzipiell gegen jedwede Annahme eines Subjektes stellt (siehe Veber 1921a, S. 57ff). Er lehnt ausdrücklich nur dessen metaphysische Deutung ab, nach welcher ein vom Erleben vollkommen unabhängiges Subjekt zu postulieren sei. Im Gegensatz dazu behauptet Weber, daß uns die innere Erfahrung von einem Subjekt als einer besonderen Realität Zeugnis ablegt. Das Subjekt ist genau genommen als Washeit (quidditas) aufzufassen, welcher Erlebnisse als ihre Qualitäten zukommen, wobei gilt, daß es kein Erleben ohne zugeordnetes Subjekt gibt, sowie daß kein Subjekt ohne jegliches Erlebnis möglich ist – beide stehen im Verhältnis der gegenseitigen Abhängigkeit.

DER BEGRIFF DER PSYCHOLOGIE BEIM SPÄTEN WEBER

179

31ff). Die analytische Psychologie befaßt sich mit der Beschreibung und Analyse psychischer Phänomene und bemüht sich, die komplexen Erlebnisse in ihre Bestandteile zu zergliedern, um die primären und elementarsten Erlebnisse (die stets und jederzeit bei allen Subjekten qualitativ gleich sind) feststellen zu können. Damit sollte sie zu einer Klassifikation und Charakterisierung des gesamten Erlebens gelangen. Die erklärende Psychologie dagegen untersucht die Ursachen psychischer Phänomene bzw. deren empirische Genese. Die Methode der Psychologie sieht Weber sowohl in der Beobachtung der eigenen psychischen Tatsachen als auch im Experiment. Im Gegensatz zu Brentano, für welchen innere Beobachtung überhaupt nicht möglich ist, erklärt Weber die Introspektion zugleich zur Hauptmethode der Psychologie (sowie der Philosophie schlechthin). 8 Beobachtung und Experiment finden auch in den Naturwissenschaften Anwendung: Geht es um die Beschreibung gewisser Tatsachen, wird deren methodischsystematische Beobachtung betrieben; handelt es sich aber um ihre möglichst genaue Erklärung, setzt man auf Experimente (siehe OP, S. 20ff; AP, S. 14ff). Mittels Beobachtung werden Beschaffenheiten der Dinge entdeckt, 9 wohingegen die Erklärung von Tatsachen verlangt, deren Ursa-

8

9

Brentano meint hingegen, daß die Psychologie ihre Erkenntnisse aus der inneren Wahrnehmung psychischer Phänomene schöpfen sollte, die unmittelbar evident ist. Unter der inneren Wahrnehmung ist der psychische Akt zu verstehen, der sich auf ein Objekt sowie synchron auf sich selbst richtet (siehe Brentano 21924, S. 179ff). Ein Beispiel: Sehen einer Farbe – Wahrnehmen des Sehens. Es geht also um ein begleitendes psychisches Phänomen, das mit jedem psychischen Phänomen zugleich gegeben ist und von welchem es nur begrifflich unterscheidbar ist. Darüber hinaus ist die innere Wahrnehmung als Urteil zu klassifizieren. Nach Brentano kann aber die innere Wahrnehmung nie innere Beobachtung werden, da durch diese ihr Gegenstand modifiziert und deformiert wird (siehe Brentano 21924, S. 40ff). Wenn z.B. jemand – um sein bekanntes Beispiel zu nennen – versucht, seinen Zorn zu beobachten, wird dieses Erlebnis dadurch verändert und verschwindet. Man kann lediglich seine früher erlebten psychischen Phänomene im Gedächtnis betrachten, welches aber nicht untrüglich ist und keinen evidenten Charakter besitzt. Vgl. Antonelli 2001, S. 350ff. Natürlich besteht nach Weber zwischen der Beobachtung des Physischen und der Beobachtung des Psychischen ein Unterschied (siehe OP, S. 21f). Physische Phänomene sind uns nur mittelbar (also durch die psychischen) gegeben, sie

180

TANJA PIHLAR

chen zu untersuchen. In der Psychologie gibt Weber der introspektiven Methode den Vorrang: Sie ist für ihn die psychologische Methode „par excellence […], die grundlegende Methode der deskriptiv-analytischen Psychologie sowie die unerläßliche Nebenmethode der experimentellen Psychologie.“ (AP, S. 35) Daher kann Psychologie nicht ohne Beobachtung auskommen; 10 denn auch Experimente setzen Beobachtung voraus, da sie auf dem Material basieren, das die Introspektion liefert, und ohne sie „völlig erfolglos“ (AP, S. 31) bleiben würden. Ein Experiment zeigt auf, unter welchen Bedingungen einzelne Erlebnisse entstehen, vergehen und sich verändern. Jedenfalls können wir allein auf Grund eines Experimentes nicht wissen, „daß wir derlei psychische Elemente haben, welche diese psychischen Elemente sind, worin sie sich voneinander unterscheiden, kurz: Kein Experiment allein kann uns eine genaue Beschreibung dieser und anderer Elemente liefern“ (AP, S. 34). Das Experiment allein genügt also nicht, vielmehr muß man hierbei Selbstbeobachtung voraussetzen: Um gewisse psychische Tatsachen erklären zu können, sind Erkenntnisse erforderlich, die man nur mit Hilfe von Introspektion gewinnt. Somit ist klar, daß die erklärende Psychologie notwendigerweise auf Ergebnissen und Daten der analytischen Psychologie zu gründen hat. Allerdings meint Weber, daß mit einer Beschreibung der Erlebnisse oftmals schon ihre Erklärung gegeben ist (siehe OP, S. 23f). Ein Experiment ist vor allem in dem Fall erforderlich, wenn wir es mit einem Erlebnis zu tun haben, das reiner Beobachtung nicht oder nur schwer zugänglich ist, weil es selten vorkommt oder weil es nur sehr kurz dauert. Es sei angemerkt, daß nicht immer klar ist, wie in Webers Schriften Introspektion und innere Wahrnehmung voneinander zu unterscheiden sind. Im Grundriß der Psychologie behauptet er, daß Selbstbeobachtung nicht lediglich auf unser gegenwärtiges Erleben beschränkt ist, sondern daß man auch seine vergangenen Erlebnisse, die in der Erinnerung vor-

10

können gleichzeitig von mehreren Personen beobachtet werden. Im Gegensatz dazu sind uns psychische Phänomene immer unmittelbar gegeben, weshalb gilt, daß jeder nur seine eigenen Erlebnisse beobachten kann. Nach Weber finden in der Psychologie auch indirekte Methoden Anwendung, wie z.B. die Beobachtung anderer Personen, Lebenslaufanalysen, Kultur- und Literaturgeschichte usw. (siehe AP, S. 38f).

DER BEGRIFF DER PSYCHOLOGIE BEIM SPÄTEN WEBER

181

handen sind, beobachten kann, sowie ebenfalls diejenigen Erlebnisse, die man sich auf Grund seiner bisherigen Erfahrungen auf irgendeine Weise vorstellen kann (siehe OP, S. 21ff). In allen solchen Fällen handelt es sich also um eine unmittelbare Beobachtung des eigenen Erlebens; über fremdes Erleben haben wir dagegen nur mittelbare Kenntnisse, und zwar auf Grund der Analogie zu eigenen psychischen Tatsachen. Weber behauptet, daß die innere Wahrnehmung genau genommen einen Sonderfall der Selbstbeobachtung darstellt 11 und wesentlich mit dem Begriff der psychologischen Präsenz verbunden ist (siehe AP, S. 80). Die innere Wahrnehmung darf nicht mit sekundärem Bewußtsein im Sinne Brentanos identifiziert werden. Nach Brentano richtet sich bekanntermaßen jedes psychische Phänomen auf ein Objekt und „nebenbei“ auf sich selbst: 12 Im selben psychischen Akt, in welchem wir ein physisches Phänomen vorstellen, wird zugleich ein psychisches Phänomen vorgestellt, wobei sich dieser psychische Akt auf zwei verschiedene Objekte bezieht – auf ein primäres und auf ein sekundäres Objekt. Ein Beispiel: Wenn ich einen Ton höre, habe ich hierbei zwei verschiedene Vorstellungen, die Vorstellung vom Ton und die Vorstellung vom Hören; beide treten gleichzeitig auf, jedoch ist die Vorstellung vom Ton ihrer Natur nach die frühere. Aus der Tatsache, daß sich jeder psychische Akt auch zugleich auf sich selbst richtet, folgt nach Brentano, daß kein unbewußter psychische Akt möglich ist – er ist in dreifacher Weise im Bewußtsein gegeben, nämlich als Vorstellung, als Urteil sowie als Gefühl. 13 In Anlehnung an die Grazer Schule behauptet Weber, daß die innere Wahrnehmung (und ebenfalls die äußere) ein besonderes Erlebnis darstellt, welches zur Klasse der Gedanken gehört (siehe OP, S. 65ff): Sie ist als echter positiver bzw. negativer Gedanke anzusehen, welchem Evidenz zukommt und welcher sich auf die Existenz bzw. die Nichtexistenz des entsprechenden psychischen Phänomens richtet. Im Unterschied zur Selbstbeobachtung richtet sich innere Wahrnehmung ausschließlich auf unser gegenwärtiges Erleben; man kann seine 11 12 13

Siehe Veber 1921b, S. 88. Siehe Brentano 21924, bes. S. 179ff. Siehe Brentano 21924, S. 218ff.

182

TANJA PIHLAR

vergangenen oder zukünftigen Erlebnisse nicht innerlich wahrnehmen (siehe AP, S. 80ff). Außerdem sind der inneren Wahrnehmung nur unsere eigenen und nicht fremde Erlebnisse zugänglich. In diesem Zusammenhang ist der Begriff des Bewußtseins zu erwähnen: Weber behauptet nämlich, daß wir uns derjenigen Erlebnisse, welche in der inneren Wahrnehmung erfaßt werden, auch bewußt sind; hingegen bleiben Erlebnisse, die nicht innerlich wahrgenommen werden, unbewußt (siehe AP, S. 81ff). 14 Wie daraus ersichtlich ist, bestreitet Weber Brentanos Behauptung, daß es kein unbewußtes Bewußtsein gibt. Für ihn ist der Begriff des Bewußtseins eine konsekutive Bestimmung der Erlebnisse; Bewußtsein ist folglich als ein Verhältnis zwischen Erlebnissen anzusehen. Seiner Meinung nach stellen die bewußten Erlebnisse nur einen kleinen Teil des Psychischen dar, während das unbewußte Seelenleben einen weit größeren Teil bildet – ohne Unbewußtes könnte es auch bewußtes Seelenleben nicht geben.

2. Äußere Beobachtung als psychologische Voraussetzung alles Beobachtens Wie schon erwähnt, steht in der Spätphilosophie Webers die äußere Beobachtung im Vordergrund, das heißt die Beobachtung der Außenwelt, die er der inneren Beobachtung gegenüberstellt. Er meint nun, daß reine Selbstbeobachtung als Methode der Psychologie nicht ausreichend ist, da sie mancherlei Mängel aufweist und auf unsere eigenen Erlebnisse beschränkt bleibt. Deshalb schreibt er ihr nunmehr eine untergeordnete Rolle zu. Die Psychologie soll sich bei ihren Verfahren nicht nur innerer, sondern auch äußerer Beobachtung bedienen. Diese macht uns mit dem Leben im weitesten Sinne vertraut und ist in mehrfacher Hinsicht als grundlegend zu bezeichnen. Hier soll zunächst der Begriff der Beobachtung aus dem Buch Die Frage der Wirklichkeit 15 näher erörtert werden. 14 15

Prinzipiell unbewußt sind nach Weber psychische Dispositionen, auf deren Existenz wir auf Grund unseres Erlebens schließen. Hier abgekürzt als VS. Im Anhang des Buches befindet sich eine Zusammenfassung in deutscher Sprache: „Zusammenfassende Gedanken zur Frage der Wirklichkeit“, S. 441-488 (auch als Separatabdruck erschienen). Nachgedruckt in:

DER BEGRIFF DER PSYCHOLOGIE BEIM SPÄTEN WEBER

183

Für Weber ist Beobachtung als eine besondere Erlebnisart anzusehen, die bereits mit unseren Empfindungen, wie Sehen, Hören, Riechen usw., gegeben ist (siehe VS, S. 11). Die Empfindungen sind als niedrigste Art von Erlebnissen zu bezeichnen, auf denen alle anderen Erlebnisse notwendigerweise aufbauen. Beobachtung führt uns unmittelbar zur Wirklichkeit; ohne sie wären wir sozusagen „blind“ für die Wirklichkeit und hätten überhaupt keine unmittelbare Kenntnis von ihr: „genauso wie wir Farben ,sehen‘ oder Töne ,hören‘, ,beobachten‘ wir die Wirklichkeit“ (ebd.). Mit anderen Worten: Wir können nur etwas Wirkliches beobachten und nicht bloße Erscheinungen – diese sind nach Weber Gegenstand der Analyse, welche von der Beobachtung zu differenzieren ist, obwohl beide in einem engen Verhältnis zueinander stehen. Er behauptet, daß jede Beobachtung in der Regel von einer parallel laufenden Analyse begleitet ist; ja, sie enthält in sich einen Ansatz zur Analyse.16 Mit der Analyse bekommt das, was wir beobachten, auch einen „bestimmten Inhalt“, aufgrund dessen man die beobachtete Wirklichkeit als eine besondere Wirklichkeit mit bestimmten Qualitäten erfassen kann. Demgemäß können wir z.B. Töne nicht beobachten, sondern wir beobachten die Wirklichkeit, die „hinter“ diesen Tönen ist, mit anderen Worten: Wir beobachten das, was tönt – mag dies ein Vogel oder ein Musikinstrument sein. Nach Weber läßt sich die Tatsache der Beobachtung bereits bei Tieren feststellen, während Pflanzen zur Beobachtung unfähig sind, da sie kein Erleben im eigentlichen Sinne besitzen. Ein Löwe auf der Jagd muß seine Beute z.B. zunächst beobachten, um sich dann entsprechend seiner Beobachtung verhalten zu können und der Beute nachzujagen. Wie schon erwähnt, unterscheidet Weber zwei grundlegende Beobachtungsarten – nämlich die äußere und die innere Beobachtung –, welche sich auf durchaus verschiedene Wirklichkeiten richten, nämlich auf

16

Terstenjak (Hg.) 1972, S. 320-367. Für Weber sind Beobachtung und Analyse die Quellen all unseres Wissens. Für die Unterschiede zwischen beiden siehe VS, S. 443ff. Nach Weber ist Beobachtung ihrer Natur nach primär und bildet die unerläßliche psychologische Voraussetzung für jedwede Analyse, weshalb jede Analyse letztlich in der Beobachtung gründen soll.

184

TANJA PIHLAR

die äußere bzw. auf die innere Wirklichkeit. 17 Die äußere Beobachtung, die Weber auch „projektive“ nennt, indem sie sich auf etwas außerhalb von uns richtet, kann weiterhin von zweifacher Art sein: Wir können sowohl die unbelebte als auch die belebte äußere Wirklichkeit beobachten, was bedeutet, daß sich unsere Beobachtung auf die uns umgebende Außenwelt sowie auf andere Lebewesen und unseren eigenen Körper richtet. Zum Beispiel ist das Beobachten eines Steins verschieden vom Beobachten eines Wachhunds. Dies hängt damit zusammen, daß wir es hier mit durchaus verschiedenen Wirklichkeiten zu tun haben; die belebte Wirklichkeit weist eine besondere Dynamik auf, weshalb wir uns völlig anders verhalten, wenn wir auf einen Hund treffen, da wir in ihm eine Gefahr sehen und ihn folglich meiden wollen. Im Gegensatz dazu kann mit der inneren Beobachtung, die bei Weber auch „rejektive“ genannt wird, lediglich belebte Wirklichkeit erfaßt werden, da sie sich auf Inneres bezieht. Dieser Unterscheid zwischen belebter und unbelebter Wirklichkeit ist für die Selbsterhaltung der Lebewesen von Bedeutung: Bereits ein Alpenhase kann wohl zwischen einem Fels und einem (von ihm als gefährlich gesehenen) Adler unterscheiden. Nach Weber ist der Begriff der belebten Wirklichkeit von erheblicher Bedeutung für die Psychologie. Die belebte Wirklichkeit kann ihrerseits wieder von zweifacher Art sein. Man kann nämlich zwischen einer äußeren und einer inneren oder psychologischen Wirklichkeit differenzieren. In diesem Zusammenhang spricht Weber vom Leben im weitesten Sinne des Wortes und unterscheidet zwischen vegetativem, animalischem sowie persönlichem oder geistigem Leben (siehe VS, S. 325ff). 18 Pflanzen seien 17 18

Genauer: Nach Weber können einer Beobachtung verschiedene Richtungen zugeschrieben werden. Hier lassen sich gewisse Ähnlichkeiten mit Aristoteles’ Lehre klar erkennen. Wie bekannt ist, unterscheidet Aristoteles in seinem Buch Über die Seele drei „Teile“ oder Vermögen der Seele (siehe De an., II 3), nämlich vegetatives (wie etwa Ernährung, Fortpflanzung, Zeugung), sensitives (etwa Wahrnehmung, Begierde und örtliche Bewegung) und intellektives (etwa Erkennen und Wollen). Hier gilt, daß das höhere Vermögen auf dem jeweils niedrigeren Vermögen gründet. Aristoteles behauptet, daß Pflanzen nur vegetatives, Tieren vegetatives und sensitives Vermögen zukommt, während Menschen sowohl vegetatives als auch sensitives sowie intellektives Vermögen besitzen.

DER BEGRIFF DER PSYCHOLOGIE BEIM SPÄTEN WEBER

185

jene Lebewesen, die keine Erlebnisse besitzen, weshalb ihnen bloßes Leben ohne Erleben zukommt (unter „Leben“ sind Lebensprozesse zu verstehen, wie etwa Assimilation, Wachstum usw.), während Tieren und Menschen nicht nur bloßes Leben, sondern auch Erlebnisfähigkeit zugeschrieben werden kann. 19 Weber spricht daher vom „Leben ohne Erleben“ bzw. vom „Leben mit Erleben“, er unterscheidet in dieser Hinsicht zwischen niedrigeren und höheren Lebensstufen. Im allgemeinen gilt, daß animalisches Leben vom vegetativen abhängig ist, während geistiges Leben vom animalischen und vegetativen abhängt bzw. sie voraussetzt. Vegetatives Leben, welches sich auf der niedrigsten Stufe befindet, ist als das grundlegendste zu bezeichnen, ohne das auch keine höhere Lebensstufe möglich wäre. 20 Im allgemeinen gilt, daß uns die äußere Beobachtung zur äußeren belebten Wirklichkeit führt. Dies bedeutet, daß wir sowohl andere Lebewesen als auch andere Personen beobachten können – in diesem Fall kann unsere Beobachtung als äußere, belebte sowie als hinweisende bezeichnet werden; hinweisende, insofern wir uns auf eine uns umgebende fremde Wirklichkeit beziehen. Außerdem können wir auch unseren eigenen Körper beobachten, wobei unsere Beobachtung als äußere, belebte und possessive beschrieben werden kann. In allen diesen Fällen spricht Weber vom äußeren oder körperlichen Leben, mit welchem alle Lebewesen ausgestattet sind. Andererseits kann sich unsere Beobachtung auch auf die 19

20

Nach Weber ist es möglich, daß bei Menschen manchmal auch „Leben ohne Erleben“ verwirklicht wird, und zwar im Tiefschlaf oder im Zustand der Bewußtlosigkeit (siehe VS, S. 325). In diesem Zusammenhang gibt Weber eine neue Erklärung des Begriffes des Bewußtseins (siehe VS, S. 335ff). Er meint nun, daß dieser Begriff ein absoluter und nicht ein relativer ist, da er nicht darauf zurückzuführen ist, was durch innere Wahrnehmung erfaßt wird. Nach Weber ist „Leben ohne Erleben“, also vegetatives Leben, mit dem Unbewußten gleichzusetzen, da Pflanzen jedwedes Erleben fehlt. Hierbei gilt, daß unbewußtes Leben mit seiner besonderen „wirklichdynamischen Struktur“ auch Grundlage für animalisches und persönliches Leben bildet. Für persönliches Leben ist ein besonderes Bewußtsein charakteristisch, welches mit dem Willen gegeben ist: Eine Person ist sich genau dann einer Sache bewusst, wenn bzw. insofern sie etwas will. Wie wir sehen werden, ist der Wille nach Weber kein besonderes Erlebnis, sondern ist zur inneren Wirklichkeit der Person zu zählen.

186

TANJA PIHLAR

innere belebte Wirklichkeit beziehen, indem wir uns selbst als besondere psychologische Wirklichkeit und unser Leben beobachten – hier ist sie als innere und als possessive zu bezeichnen. In diesem Zusammenhang spricht Weber vom inneren bzw. vom persönlichen Leben, welches vom erwähnten äußeren Leben zu unterscheiden ist; es ist nur für den Menschen charakteristisch. Außerdem meint er, daß wir auch persönliches Leben von fremden Personen betrachten können, wobei wir uns nicht nur auf „ich“, sondern auch auf „du“, „er“ oder „sie“ beziehen (siehe VS, S. 282f). Im eben beschriebenen Fall ist die innere Beobachtung als „hinweisend“ zu bezeichnen. Demgemäß sei die Selbstbeobachtung nur als ein spezieller Fall der inneren Beobachtung aufzufassen; sie kommt nur dann vor, wenn wir uns selbst bzw. unsere eigenen Erlebnisse beobachten – die Beobachtung ist hier als possessiv anzusehen. Zwischen den beschriebenen Beobachtungsarten sind vielfache Verhältnisse festzustellen. So ist äußere Beobachtung der belebten Wirklichkeit von äußerer Beobachtung der unbelebten Wirklichkeit durchaus abhängig (siehe Veber VS, S. 66ff). Dies ergibt sich aus der Tatsache, daß jedes Lebewesen von seiner Umgebung abhängig ist und auf äußere Reize passend reagieren muß. Wenn ein Lebewesen nur die belebte Wirklichkeit beobachten würde, ohne gleichzeitige Beobachtung der unbelebten Wirklichkeit, könnte es sich nicht in der Außenwelt erfolgreich orientieren. Das bedeutet, daß Beobachtung der unbelebten Wirklichkeit als primär anzusehen ist, ohne sie wäre auch jedwede Beobachtung der belebten Wirklichkeit unmöglich. Mit anderen Worten: Derartige Beobachtung gründet auf der Beobachtung der unbelebten Wirklichkeit, welche hierbei weiterhin erhalten bleibt. Nach Weber ist die Beobachtung der unbelebten Wirklichkeit auch entwicklungsmäßig primär. Für Wesen auf der niedrigsten Stufe ist lediglich die unbelebte Wirklichkeit von Bedeutung; erst höher entwickelte Lebewesen können zwischen Unbelebtem und Belebtem unterscheiden. Analog gilt für die ontogenetische Entwicklung: Ein Säugling z.B. greift zunächst nach unbelebter Wirklichkeit und kann erst in einem späteren Entwicklungsstadium die belebte Wirklichkeit von dieser differenzieren. Darüber hinaus meint Weber, daß die äußere Beobachtung im Vergleich mit der inneren als grundlegende anzusehen ist und zwar in mehr-

DER BEGRIFF DER PSYCHOLOGIE BEIM SPÄTEN WEBER

187

facher Hinsicht. Sie ist für uns von praktischer Bedeutung: Jedes Lebewesen ist bei der Selbsterhaltung auf die äußere Beobachtung angewiesen; diese ermöglicht ihm, sich in seiner Umgebung erfolgreich zu orientieren. Unsere Beobachtung ist in der Regel nach außen gerichtet; die äußere Wirklichkeit steht jedem Menschen „viel ,näher‘ und ist viel ,greifbarer‘“ (VS, S. 62) als dies für die innere Wirklichkeit gilt. Deshalb schreiben wir der Beobachtung eines in der Außenwelt bestehenden Gegenstandes größeren Wirklichkeitscharakter zu als der Beobachtung eines Erlebens – die erste ist laut Weber „ausgeprägter“ und „klarer“ (ebd.) anzusehen, indem wir einen Gegenstand in der Außenwelt sozusagen unmittelbar „treffen“. Deshalb ist auch klar, daß unser Begriff der Wirklichkeit aus der Außenwelt und nicht aus der Innenwelt stammt. Im Gegensatz dazu kann reine Introspektion zu unserer Orientierung in der Außenwelt überhaupt nichts beitragen. Ein Mensch würde ohne äußere Beobachtung schlicht zugrunde gehen, auch wenn bei ihm die Fähigkeit für innere Beobachtung stark ausgeprägt wäre. Das bedeutet, daß die innere Beobachtung von der äußeren abhängig ist; zwischen ihnen besteht das Verhältnis einseitiger Abhängigkeit. Noch mehr, die innere Beobachtung muß stets von der äußeren begleitet sein. Weber resümiert, daß die äußere Beobachtung eine notwendige psychologische Voraussetzung aller Beobachtung bildet, ohne die überhaupt keine Beobachtung möglich wäre. Äußere Beobachtung führt uns zu „natürlicher“ Weltanschauung; ein realistischer Standpunkt erscheint uns in der Regel natürlicher als ein idealistischer, welcher nur die innere Wirklichkeit als die einzige wahre Wirklichkeit anerkennt (siehe VS, S. 70f). Darüber hinaus ist die äußere Beobachtung auch entwicklungsmäßig primär; sie entwickelt sich bei einem Individuum früher als seine Fähigkeit zur Introspektion. Ein Kleinkind z.B. kann seine eigenen Erlebnisse noch nicht beobachten, sondern richtet sich mehr nach außen, und ist erst in seiner späteren Entwicklung imstande, seine Aufmerksamkeit auf sich selbst zu richten. Ebenfalls behauptet Weber, daß sich bei einer Person die possessive innere Beobachtung vor der hinweisenden entwickelt: Ein Mensch beobachtet zuerst seine Erlebnisse sowie sich selbst als eine besondere innere Wirklichkeit und erst später kann er das Seelenleben bei anderen Personen beobachten.

188

TANJA PIHLAR

Der späte Weber meint, daß die Psychologie beide Beobachtungsarten, nämlich sowohl die äußere als auch die innere Beobachtung, anwenden soll. Er gibt nun der äußeren Beobachtung, welche uns mit dem Leben im beschriebenen Sinne vertraut macht, den Vorzug. Dies ist genau genommen gerade das Gegenteil von dem, was Weber in seinen Frühschriften behauptet hatte, in welchen er Selbstbeobachtung zur grundlegenden Methode deskriptiver bzw. analytischer Psychologie erklärt hat. Er kam zu der Ansicht, daß unsere Beobachtung in der Regel nach außen gerichtet ist, während die innere Beobachtung seltener möglich ist; sie kommt nur dann vor, wenn wir unsere Aufmerksamkeit auf uns selbst und unsere eigenen Erlebnisse richten. Deshalb fordert sie vom Beobachter auch besondere Anstrengung. Demgemäß ist die äußere Beobachtung als „natürlichere“ und die innere als „künstlichere“ (VS, S. 68ff) aufzufassen. Ja, nach Weber stellt die innere Beobachtung für wahre Beobachtungen sogar „ein Hindernis“ dar: So wird durch Introspektion ihr Gegenstand deformiert. Wenn z.B. jemand versucht, seinen Ärger zu beobachten, wird dieser eo ipso modifiziert und läßt nach. Weber meint, daß in der Psychologie gemeinhin der Introspektion eine allzu große Rolle zugeschrieben wird (siehe VS, S. 68). Im Gegensatz dazu sei Selbstbeobachtung im Grunde genommen als „Grenzfall“ der Beobachtung (ebd.) anzusehen, da sie nur in dem Fall vorkommt, wenn wir uns unseres Erlebens auch bewußt sind. Aufgrund des Gesagten stellt er fest, daß die psychologische Erkenntnis nicht bloß auf Introspektion beruht, sondern einen wichtigen Ursprung in der äußeren Beobachtung, in „der natürlichen Beobachtung des Lebens“ (ebd.) besitzt. Die Psychologie muß folglich bei ihren Untersuchungen auch aus dem Leben selbst schöpfen, zu welchem die äußere Beobachtung führt.

3. Phänomenale vs. wirkliche Erlebnisse In seinem Buch Die Frage der Wirklichkeit (1939) behauptet Weber, daß jeder Empfindung eine zweifache Funktion zukommt: Das Präsentieren (slow. „predoþevanje“) und das Treffen (slow. „zadevanje“), welche eng

DER BEGRIFF DER PSYCHOLOGIE BEIM SPÄTEN WEBER

189

miteinander verbunden sind. 21 Wenn wir etwas empfinden, präsentieren und treffen wir zugleich, und zwar präsentieren wir uns phänomenale Qualitäten, während das Treffen die Möglichkeit öffnet, „hinter“ die Phänomene vorzustoßen, durch ihn wird die Wirklichkeit selbst getroffen. Im Einklang damit wird zum Beispiel durch eine Farbenempfindung diese oder jene Farbe präsentiert, das „Gefärbte“ als ihr Träger, wird aber getroffen. 22 Anders ausgedrückt besteht die Aufgabe der Präsentationsfunktion in der Vermittlung von Akzidenzien, während die Treffunktion zur Substanz, zum Ding selbst „vordringt“. Hierbei gilt, daß nur die Phänomene präsentiert werden können und nicht die Wirklichkeit selbst, während die Wirklichkeit nur getroffen oder verfehlt werden kann – wie Weber das Gegenteil vom Treffen nennt. Das Treffen führt uns demnach unmittelbar zur Wirklichkeit selbst: Wenn wir etwas treffen, empfinden wir die Wirklichkeit als „eine besondere Kraft“, als das, was uns beim Treffen sozusagen „einen Widerstand“ leistet. Sie erscheint uns als „ein Hindernis“, von dem man nicht mehr weiter vordringen kann. Durch das Präsentieren, welches jedes Treffen begleitet, bekommt die Wirklichkeit „einen bestimmten Inhalt“, der sie von anderen Wirklichkeiten unterscheidet. Da jedem Erlebnis beide Funktionen gleichzeitig zukommen, könnte man sagen: Das Treffen der Wirklichkeit kann hierbei als „die Verdinglichung der Präsentierten (der Phänomene)“ (VS, S. 103) bezeichnet werden und das Präsentieren der Phänomene als „die Veranschaulichung des Getroffenen (der Wirklichkeit)“ (ebd.). Zwischen beiden Funktionen besteht weiterhin ein konträres Verhältnis: Je größer das Treffen ist, desto kleiner ist das Präsentieren, und umgekehrt. Dies läßt sich an einzelnen Empfindungsarten klar darstellen. Betrachten wir das folgende Beispiel: Wenn wir einen Stein antasten, erscheint er uns in der Regel wirklicher als wenn

21

22

Die Tatsache, daß Weber in seinem Buch über die Wirklichkeit bei Empfindungen eigentlich zwischen der Verdinglichungs- und der Veranschaulichungsfunktion unterscheidet – das Treffen ist als Kern der Verdinglichung und das Präsentieren als Kern der Veranschaulichung aufzufassen – kann hier nicht berücksichtigt werden. Trofenik spricht in diesem Fall von „Transzendieren“: „Transzendieren ist mithin der unmittelbare Übergang vom Präsentieren zum Nichtpräsentieren, vom Schein zum Sein“, Trofenik 1972, S. 145.

190

TANJA PIHLAR

wir ihn mit Augen sehen. Wenn wir aber den Stein sehen, nehmen wir vor allem seine Gestalt wahr, während wir ihn im kleineren Grade als etwas Wirkliches empfinden. Das bedeutet, daß beim Tasten das Treffen am höchsten und das Präsentieren am wenigsten ausgeprägt ist. Gerade umgekehrt ist es beim Sehen: Bei diesem hat das Treffen seinen niedrigsten Grad und das Präsentieren den höchsten. Dieser Unterschied zwischen der Wirklichkeit und der Erscheinungswelt läßt sich laut Weber auch auf dem Gebiet des Psychischen feststellen. Er behauptet folglich, daß unsere Erlebnisse, wie etwa Sehen, Hören, Denken, Hoffen usw., nichts Wirkliches darstellen, sondern als bloße Phänomene anzusehen sind – und zwar als „innere“ im Vergleich mit „äußeren“ oder physischen Phänomenen, wie Farbe, Ton, Härte usw. Wenn wir Erlebnisse als Phänomene betrachten, sind diese zeitlos und somit ohne jede Veränderung, ja, sie erscheinen uns ohne jede wirkliche Dynamik. Wir können dies mit folgendem Vergleich deutlicher machen: Wir können nach Weber phänomenale Erlebnisse als projizierte Bilder auf einer Leinwand betrachten, welche in der Tat nicht wirklich sind, sondern mit Hilfe eines Filmprojektors verursacht werden (siehe VS, S. 322). Von diesen bloß phänomenalen Erlebnissen sind wirkliche Erlebnisse zu scheiden, welche Weber als „tatsächliche Zustände unserer psychologischen Wirklichkeit“ (ebd.) bezeichnet; es geht also um Zustände einer Person als einer besonderen inneren Wirklichkeit. Daraus geht hervor, daß beide Erlebnistypen auf durchaus verschiedene Weise erfaßt werden können: Während phänomenale Erlebnisse präsentiert werden, können wirkliche Erlebnisse getroffen und nicht präsentiert werden. Im Einklang damit kann der inneren Beobachtung eine doppelte Funktion zugeschrieben werden, nämlich eine treffende und eine präsentierende. Betrachten wir das folgende Beispiel: Wenn wir Trauer erleben, können wir hierbei zweierlei unterscheiden, nämlich die Trauer als ein inneres Phänomen einerseits sowie die Trauer als etwas Wirkliches andererseits. Wenn wir uns Trauer in der inneren Wahrnehmung 23 präsentieren, erfassen wir sie als ein bloßes Phänomen, welches wir dann beschreiben und analysieren 23

Ich möchte hier darauf hinweisen, daß Weber 1939 zwischen Selbstbeobachtung und innerer Wahrnehmung nicht klar differenziert.

DER BEGRIFF DER PSYCHOLOGIE BEIM SPÄTEN WEBER

191

können. Wenn wir aber „hinter“ dieses Phänomen vorstoßen, empfinden wir Trauer als etwas Wirkliches, als unseren besonderen wirklichen Zustand. Demgemäß wird Trauer in der inneren Wahrnehmung getroffen, wir treffen hierbei die innere Wirklichkeit und empfinden ihre besondere wirkliche Dynamik. – Wie ist dies zu verstehen? Weber behauptet, daß sowohl die äußeren als auch die psychischen Phänomene als Qualitäten aufzufassen sind, welche der äußeren bzw. der inneren Wirklichkeit zukommen. Damit bekommt die Wirklichkeit „einen bestimmten Inhalt“, aufgrund dessen wir sie als besondere qualitativ bestimmte Wirklichkeit erfassen können. Diese Behauptung läßt sich analog auf das psychische Gebiet übertragen: Phänomenale Erlebnisse stellen ebenso besondere „innere“ Qualitäten dar, welche der inneren Wirklichkeit zukommen (siehe VS, S. 324). Ein Beispiel: Hoffen als Erlebnis ist als besondere Qualität jener Person anzusehen, die etwas hofft. Solche Erlebnisse können lediglich präsentiert werden. Mit anderen Worten: Sie sind als Akzidenzien aufzufassen, welche der psychischen Substanz anhaften. Anzumerken ist, daß Weber in seinem Buch von 1939 zwei Arten von Akzidenzien unterscheidet (siehe VS, S. 114): Er meint, daß Akzidenzien im üblichen Sinn, wie etwa Farbe, Härte, Größe, Temperatur usw., uns lediglich „phänomenal“ gegeben sind – sie sind das, was wir uns an Gegenständen präsentieren können. Von diesen sind Akzidenzien im „objektiven“ Sinn zu unterscheiden, zu welchen uns nur das Treffen führt: Unter wirklichen Akzidenzien sind also diejenigen Akzidenzien zu verstehen, welche nicht präsentiert, sondern getroffen werden. Für derartige Akzidenzien führt Weber folgende Beispiele an: Statisch – Dynamisch, Innerlich – Äußerlich, Belebtes – Unbelebtes usw. Nehmen wir als Beispiel das Belebte und das Unbelebte. Weber behauptet, daß wir uns an einem Ding nur seine Farbe, Ton, Härte, Geschmack sowie andere Sinnesqualitäten präsentieren können, während die Tatsache, ob dieses Ding lebendig ist oder zur unbelebten Natur gehört, dem Präsentieren als solchem unzugänglich bleibt. Deshalb ist es möglich, daß uns die gleiche Wirklichkeit, welche „dahinter“ steht, einmal als belebt und ein andermal als unbelebt erscheint. Webers Beispiel dafür (siehe VS, S. 144ff): Ein auf dem Wege liegender Gegenstand kann uns einmal als Schnur, einmal als Schlange

192

TANJA PIHLAR

erscheinen. In beiden Fällen ist das Präsentieren dasselbe, wir können einen unbelebten Gegenstand auf die gleiche Weise wie ein Lebewesen präsentieren, er erscheint uns phänomenal gleich; ein Unterschied zwischen den beiden ergibt sich erst im Treffen. Diese Differenz von Belebtem und Unbelebtem, welche in der Wirklichkeit selbst gründet, erwächst erst aus dem Treffen – in diesem Zusammenhang spricht Weber vom „blinden“ und „lebenden“ Treffen (VS, S. 147), worauf ich hier nicht näher eingehen kann. Analog können wir zwischen phänomenalen und wirklichen Akzidenzien auf dem psychischen Gebiet differenzieren. Wie erwähnt, sind phänomenale Erlebnisse als Akzidenzien im ersten Sinne aufzufassen. Es liegt nahe, daß wirkliche Erlebnisse, welche besondere Zustände der inneren Wirklichkeit darstellen, keine Substanzen sind, sondern ihre „wirklichen“ Zustände. Demgemäß können diese als wirkliche Akzidenzien klassifiziert werden, für welche gilt, daß sie ebenfalls, wie Substanzen, nur getroffen werden können. Es scheint, daß hier noch manche Fragen offen geblieben sind. Wie ist der Unterschied zwischen phänomenalen und wirklichen Erlebnissen im Grunde genommen zu verstehen? Wie wissen wir, daß wir in einem bestimmten Fall gerade mit einem phänomenalen und nicht mit einem wirklichen Erlebnis zu tun haben? Es ist nicht möglich, diese Frage durch Hinweis auf den Unterschied zwischen Präsentieren und Treffen zu beantworten, da wir auf Grund dieses Unterschiedes eben zu phänomenalen und wirklichen Erlebnissen gelangt sind. Ebenfalls stellt sich die Frage, ob man ein wirkliches Erlebnis ohne ein entsprechendes phänomenales Erlebnis besitzen kann, und umgekehrt. Weber meint, daß dies wohl möglich ist (siehe VS, S. 323): Ich selbst kann beispielsweise Freude als einen wirklichen Zustand besitzen, obwohl ich hierbei keine phänomenale Freude erlebe. Wie kann man jedoch wissen, daß man sich freut, wenn man überhaupt keine Freude erlebt? Es kann festgestellt werden, daß Weber das Verhältnis zwischen beiden Erlebnistypen nicht ausreichend erklärt hat. Zwischen der Wirklichkeit und den Erscheinungen auf dem physischen und auf dem psychischen Gebiet lassen sich noch weitere Analogien entdecken. Wie erwähnt, ist die Wirklichkeit durch Sinnesqualitäten, wie etwa Farben, Töne, Härten, Geschmäcke usw. inhaltlich bestimmt, sie

DER BEGRIFF DER PSYCHOLOGIE BEIM SPÄTEN WEBER

193

wird uns damit veranschaulicht gegeben. Nach Weber kann man dies analog für phänomenale Erlebnisse als besondere psychische Qualitäten behaupten (VS, S. 324): Wie beispielsweise die äußere Wirklichkeit mit einer Farbe veranschaulicht wird – sie bekommt damit ihr „Sosein“ –, wird auch die innere Wirklichkeit mit einem phänomenalen Erlebnis veranschaulicht. Es ist nicht ganz klar, wie diese Behauptung zu verstehen ist – wie sollte uns z.B. die belebte Wirklichkeit mit dem Hören veranschaulicht gegeben werden? Es liegt nahe, daß es sich hier nicht um Veranschaulichung im strengen Sinne handelt, wie dies bei Farben, Gestalten usw. der Fall ist, aber Weber geht auf diese Frage nicht näher ein. Außerdem meint Weber, daß die Erscheinungen sich durch unterschiedliche Grade der „Wirklichkeitsnähe“ unterscheiden. Wie ist dies zu verstehen? In der Reihenfolge: Härte, Bewegung, Wärme, Süße, Geruch, Ton, Farbe, Gestalt und Zahl (VS, S. 165) besitzen Phänomene einen unterschiedlichen Bezug zur Wirklichkeit, sie erscheinen uns mehr oder weniger wirklich, da sie sich „der Wirklichkeit selbst [...] mehr oder weniger nähern“ (VS, S. 167). Wenn wir z.B. einen Stein betasten, scheint er uns in höherem Grade wirklich als im Falle des Sehens mit den Augen, was bedeutet, daß der Härte des Steines eine größere „Wirklichkeitsnähe“ zugeschrieben werden kann als seiner Farbe. In der oben angeführten Reihenfolge hat also die Härte die größte „Wirklichkeitsnähe“, was sich damit erklären läßt, daß beim Tasten die Wirklichkeit am stärksten ausgeprägt ist. Analog kann man laut Weber auch bei Erlebnissen eine unterschiedliche „Wirklichkeitsnähe“ entdecken, und zwar seien gewisse Erlebnisse wirklicher als andere (siehe VS, S. 323). In der Reihenfolge Empfinden – Denken – Wille hat nach Weber das Denken eine größere Wirklichkeitsnähe als das Empfinden, da es näher zur inneren Wirklichkeit steht. Dem Willen kommt hierbei größte Wirklichkeitsnähe zu: Er stellt überhaupt kein Erlebnis dar, sondern ist als Bestandteil der inneren Wirklichkeit selbst aufzufassen, er ist als „unmittelbare Regung des geistig tätigen Ich“ (VS, S. 474) zu bezeichnen. Deshalb ist es nicht möglich, zwischen phänomenalem und wirklichem Willen zu unterscheiden. Weber

194

TANJA PIHLAR

hat jedoch diese Behauptung in seinem Buch von 1939 nicht näher erläutert. 24 Wie aus der Darstellung zu ersehen ist, sind Webers Analogien zwischen dem physischen und dem psychischen Gebiet nicht immer klar genug. Seine Behauptungen, welche sich auf die Wirklichkeit und die Erscheinungen auf dem physischen Gebiet beziehen, lassen sich nicht direkt auf das psychische Gebiet übertragen.

4. Genetisch-dynamische Psychologie Wie erwähnt, hat Weber in seinem Buch über die Wirklichkeit die Unterscheidung zwischen analytisch-deskriptiver und genetisch-dynamischer Psychologie eingeführt. Webers Interesse gilt nun nicht mehr der deskriptiven, sondern der genetisch-dynamischen Psychologie. Diese ist von der überkommenen genetischen Psychologie klar zu trennen. Letztere beschäftigt sich mit den physiologischen Grundlagen des Psychischen und stützt sich auf die Ergebnisse experimenteller Untersuchungen. Wie wir sehen werden, unterscheidet sich die genetisch-dynamische Psychologie von der genetischen sowohl durch ihre Methode als auch durch ihren Gegenstand. In seinem Buch von 1939 hat Weber die genetisch-dynamische Psychologie nicht im Detail entwickelt; wir finden lediglich Hinweise, wie diese neue Disziplin charakterisiert werden soll. Beim späten Weber hat der Begriff der deskriptiven Psychologie bzw. der analytisch-deskriptiven Psychologie, wie er sie nun nennt, keine wesentliche Modifizierung erfahren. Als ihr Gegenstand werden phänomenale Erlebnisse genannt, welche durch Introspektion gewonnen werden. Wie

24

Vgl. folgende Textstelle: „Diesen durchwegs einzigartigen, ausnahmsweisen Ursprungscharakter jedes wahren Wollens müssen wir klar vor Augen haben. Diesen Ursprung dürfen wir schon prinzipiell nicht in der Sphäre des menschlichen Erlebens, sondern nur im menschlichen Subjekt selbst suchen und es ist parallel damit zugleich schon im vorhinein jeder Wille unmöglich, der ein wahrer Wille wäre, zugleich aber nicht die gleiche Aktivität des zuständigen Subjektes selbst bedeuten würde: ich selbst bin aktiv oder ich will bedeuten also ein und dasselbe.” Weber 1972, S. 248f.

DER BEGRIFF DER PSYCHOLOGIE BEIM SPÄTEN WEBER

195

ausgeführt, kommt nach Weber der inneren Beobachtung eine doppelte Funktion zu, nämlich das Präsentieren und das Treffen – durch das erste werden Erlebnisse präsentiert, während das zweite zu wirklichen Erlebnissen führt. Die Hauptaufgabe der analytisch-deskriptiven Psychologie besteht für Weber in der Beschreibung und Analyse des phänomenalen Erlebens, das heißt in der Beschreibung dessen, was für ein bestimmtes Erlebnis charakteristisch ist und wodurch es sich von allen anderen Erlebnissen unterscheidet. Da sich die analytisch-deskriptive Psychologie bei ihrer Vorgehensweise auf die präsentierende Erlebnisfunktion beschränkt, bleibt ihr die wirkliche Dynamik des Erlebens nicht zugänglich. Im Gegensatz dazu beschäftigt sich die genetisch-dynamische Psychologie mit dem wirklichen Erleben bzw. mit der inneren Wirklichkeit, zu welcher wir mittels des Treffens gelangen können. Weber meint, daß auch die genetisch-dynamische Psychologie nicht völlig ohne innere Beobachtung auskommen kann, aber – wie er nun ausdrücklich betont – es wird hierbei nur ihre Treffunktion in Betracht gezogen. Der Gegenstandsbereich einer derartigen Psychologie ist aber viel größer: Sie beschäftigt sich nicht lediglich mit unseren Erlebnissen, sondern auch mit dem Leben (im weitesten Wortsinn), zu welchem uns die äußere Beobachtung führt. Wie bereits erwähnt, kann man zwischen niedrigeren und höheren Lebensstufen unterscheiden, wobei jedes Leben höherer Stufe vom jeweiligen Leben niedrigerer Stufe abhängig ist. Demgemäß ist es nicht möglich, persönliches Leben isoliert zu behandeln, sondern es muß auch sein weiterer Hintergrund, das heißt, vegetatives und animalisches Leben, berücksichtigt werden. Oder wie dies Weber zum Ausdruck bringt: „Gerade der Mensch ist die einzige konstitutive Kreuzung beider Lebenswirklichkeiten, der äußeren und der inneren, der vegetativ-animalischen und der persönlich-geistigen. Deshalb ist jede real-dynamische Auffassung des Menschen unmöglich, solange lediglich eine Seite seiner wirklichen Dynamik in Betracht gezogen wird und nicht auch die andere“ (VS, S. 341). Zusammenfassend läßt sich also feststellen, daß sich die genetischdynamische Psychologie bei ihrer Forschung sowohl auf die äußere als auch auf die innere Beobachtung stützen soll: Durch die erstere werden wir unmittelbar mit der belebten Wirklichkeit vertraut, d.h. mit dem Leben von Tieren und Pflanzen. Durch die innere Beobachtung wird uns je-

196

TANJA PIHLAR

doch unsere innere Wirklichkeit bzw. unser persönliches Leben zugänglich gemacht. Hierbei kommt der inneren Beobachtung nur eine untergeordnete Rolle zu, da sie uns nur zu einem sehr beschränkten Teil unseres Lebens führt, nämlich zu uns selbst und zu unserem eigenen Erleben. Die Hauptaufgabe der genetisch-dynamischen Psychologie sieht Weber darin, daß sie ein ganzheitliches Bild des Lebens zu vermitteln versucht, nämlich „einen organischen Blick auf alles erfahrungsmäßig gegebene Leben, auf niedriges und niedrigstes sowie auf höheres und höchstes Leben“ (VS, S. 297). Obwohl nach Weber die genetisch-dynamische Psychologie in mehrfacher Hinsicht Vorrang vor der analytisch-deskriptiven hat, muß die erstere sich letztendlich auf die Ergebnisse der Erlebnisanalysen der letzteren stützen. Nach ihm kann nur eine Psychologie, wie genetischdynamische, zwischen verschiedenen Wirklichkeiten (wie etwa innere – äußere, belebte – unbelebte usw.) unterscheiden, weshalb sie auch eine Grundlage für die moderne Ontologie bildet. In seinem Buch von 1939 hat Weber schließlich eine eigene Theorie der Wirklichkeit entwickelt, nach welcher verschiedene Abstufungen der Wirklichkeit zu postulieren sind, wie Stoff, Pflanze, Tier sowie Mensch, worauf ich hier aber nicht näher eingehen kann. Obwohl Weber die genetisch-dynamische Psychologie in Die Frage der Wirklichkeit nicht im Detail ausgearbeitet hat, kann man deutlich verfolgen, wie er seinen Standpunkt von einem „internalistischen“ zu einem mehr „externalistischen“ geändert hat. In seiner realistischen Schaffensperiode kommt solchen Begriffen wie Empfindung, äußere Beobachtung, Treffen, wirkliches Erleben, Leben, wirkliche Dynamik usw. eine Schlüsselrolle zu. 25 Tanja Pihlar [email protected]

25

Die vorliegende Publikation stützt sich auf Forschungsergebnisse der FWFProjekte M680 und M776. Für kritische Anmerkungen und sprachliche Korrekturen bedanke ich mich bei Dr. Wolfgang L. Gombocz, Dr. Johann C. Marek und Dr. Maria E. Reicher.

DER BEGRIFF DER PSYCHOLOGIE BEIM SPÄTEN WEBER

197

Literatur Antonelli, Mauro (2001), Seiendes, Bewußtsein, Intentionalität im Frühwerk von Franz Brentano, Freiburg (Breisgau)/München: Alber. Aristoteles (1995), Über die Seele [nach der Übersetzung v. W. Theiler], Hamburg: Meiner. Baumgartner, Wilhelm (1989), „Brentanos und Mills Methode der beschreibenden Analyse“, Brentano Studien, 2, S. 63-78. Brentano, Franz (1924), Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkt I [hg. v. O. Kraus], Leipzig: Meiner (erste Aufl. 1874). Brentano, Franz (1982), Deskriptive Psychologie [hg. v. R. M. Chisholm und W. Baumgartner], Hamburg: Meiner. Haller, Rudolf (1995/96), „Psychologische Grundlagen der Gegenstandstheorie Meinongs“, Brentano Studien, 6, S. 31-41. Marek, Johann Ch. (1989), „Psychognosie – Geognosie. Apriorisches und Empirisches in der deskriptiven Psychologie Brentanos“, Brentano Studien, 2, S. 53-61. Potrþ, Matjaž (1989), Intentionality and Externalism, Ljubljana: Acta Analytica Series. Trofenik, Rudolf (1972), „Franz Weber – Begründer der modernen Philosophie bei den Slowenen“, in: Anton Terstenjak, 1972, S. 139-152. Veber, France (1921a), Uvod v filozofijo, Ljubljana: Tiskovna zadruga. Veber, France (1921b), Sistem filozofije, Ljubljana: Kleinmayr & Bamberg. Veber, France (1924), Oþrt psihologije, Ljubljana: Zvezna tiskarna in knjigarna. Veber, France (1924), Analitiþna psihologija, Ljubljana: Kleinmayr & Bamberg. Veber, France (1939), Vprašanje stvarnosti, Ljubljana: Akademija znanosti in umetnosti.

198

TANJA PIHLAR

Weber, Franz (1972), „Vorlesungen über die Philosophie der Persönlichkeit“, in: Anton Terstenjak, 1972, S. 167-319. Terstenjak, Anton [Hg.] (1972), Vom Gegenstand zum Sein. Von Meinong zu Weber, München: Trofenik. Witasek, Stephan (1908), Grundlinien der Psychologie, Leipzig: Dürr.

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND IHR EINFLUSS AUF DIE GRAZER SCHULE Íngrid Vendrell Ferran

Zusammenfassung Alexius von Meinong hat eine eigene Philosophie der Emotionen entwikkelt, die mit Blick auf die heutige Debatte über Gefühle höchst aktuell erscheint. Laut Meinong zeichnen sich die Emotionen durch drei Merkmale aus: Sie sind leibliche Erfahrungen der Lust oder Unlust; sie gründen in kognitiven Akten wie Wahrnehmungen, Phantasien, Urteilen und Annahmen; und sie intendieren Werte. In diesem Aufsatz wird eine systematische Untersuchung von Meinongs Philosophie der Gefühle sowie von ihrem Einfluss auf die Grazer Schule und ihrer Bedeutung für die aktuelle Debatte unternommen. Schwerpunkte der Arbeit ist erstens die Verbindung zwischen Emotionen und Werten, die stark von den unterschiedlichen Wertkonzeptionen, die Meinong im Laufe seines Werkes vertreten hat, abhängig ist. Zweitens geht es um die exemplarische Untersuchung von zwei Gefühlsarten, die für den heutige Diskussion von besonderer Bedeutung sind, nämlich Urteilsgefühlen und Phantasiegefühlen.

1.

Philosophie und Psychologie der Grazer Schule

1.1 Meinongs Philosophie und das Erbe Brentanos Nach einer Promotion im Fach Geschichte über Arnold von Brescia und die Trennung von Religion und Philosophie fasst Alexius von Meinong 1874 den Entschluss, sich der Philosophie zu widmen. Unter der Leitung Brentanos, dessen Seminare er zwischen 1875 und 1877 besucht, schreibt Meinong seine erste systematische Untersuchung über die Philosophie

200

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

Humes, die in ihm ein lebenslanges Interesse an der angelsächsischen Tradition weckt. Es folgen zahlreiche Untersuchungen hauptsächlich über Ethik, Erkenntnistheorie und Psychologie. Besonders in den Jahren als Dozent in Graz entwickelt Meinong seine eigene Philosophie, die Schule gemacht hat. Diese Philosophie sowie der Einfluss, den sie auf die Grazer Schule ausübt, sind stark von Brentanos Lehren geprägt, obgleich Meinong sich als Autodidakt bezeichnet und von Brentano zu distanzieren versucht. Meinong erbt von Brentano das Verständnis der Philosophie, ihr Bild des Psychischen, die Überzeugung von einer ethischen Bedeutung der Gefühle – und damit verbunden: eine tief sitzende Aversion gegen Kant und den deutschen Idealismus. Dieser Einfluss Brentanos ändert aber nichts daran, dass Meinong einen sehr originellen Beitrag zur Philosophie des 20. Jahrhunderts leistet, wie in diesem Beitrag über Meinongs Philosophie der Gefühle gezeigt werden soll. Die Entwicklung Meinongs eigener Philosophie ist an die Gründung zweier Institutionen an der Universität in Graz geknüpft: die Gründung des philosophischen Seminars im Jahr 1897 und die des psychologischen Labors oder Apparats 1894. Bei letzterem handelt es sich um das erste psychologische Laboratorium Österreichs; hier werden systematische Experimente durchgeführt, welche die Grazer Gestaltpsychologie stark beeinflussen.1 Eine ganze Generation von Philosophen und Experimentalpsychologen bildet sich in dieser Zeit unter Meinongs Aufsicht und es kann insofern von einer „Grazer Schule“ gesprochen werden. Unter diese Autoren, die entweder Meinongs Schüler waren oder aus anderen Gründen unter seinem Einfluss standen, sind folgende zu rechnen: R. Ameseder, V. Benussi, W. Benussi-Liel, Ch. von Ehrenfels, A. Faist, A. Fischer, W. A. Frankl, A. Höfler, E. Mally, E. Martinak, A. Oelzelt-Newin, H. Pichler, M. Radakovic, R. Saxinger, E. Schwarz, O. Tumlirz, F. Weber, F. 1

Die Grazer Schule der Gestalt nimmt Brentanos Bild des Psychischen und seine Typologie psychischer Akte als Ausgangspunkt ihrer Forschung. Sie wird hauptsächlich von Meinong, Benussi, Witasek und Ehrenfels herangebildet. Andere Schulen der Gestalt entwickelten sich in Berlin mit Stumpf, Koffka, Kohler und Werttheim; in Würzburg mit Külpe, Ach und Bühler; und in Leipzig mit Krüger und Sander. Die Berliner Schule wurde von allen die einflussreichste und hat sich bis heute als therapeutische Richtung weiterentwickelt.

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE201

Weinhandl, St. Witasek, K. Zindler (Meinong 1923, Dölling 2001: 55).2 Meinong hatte auch Einfluss auf damalige Autoren anderer philosophischer Richtungen: Die Ähnlichkeiten und Auseinandersetzungen mit der Phänomenologie Husserls und anderer Autoren wie Scheler und Kolnai sind nicht zu übersehen, ebenso wenig wie der Dialog mit der angelsächsischen Philosophie Russells und Moores. Die zweifache Gründung des Seminars und des Labors illustriert das Verhältnis zwischen Philosophie und Psychologie Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts im deutsprachigen Raum und auch Meinongs eigene Haltung zu diesem Verhältnis. In Österreich – genauso wie in Deutschland – entsteht die Psychologie auf dem Boden der Philosophie.3 Dieser Ursprung der Psychologie impliziert, dass sie das Bild des Psychischen, den Wortschatz, die methodologischen Richtlinien und den wissenschaftlichen Diskurs der Philosophie erbt. Dies beeinflusst das Selbstverständnis der Psychologie und auch die Arbeitsteilung und mögliche Spannungen zwischen beiden Disziplinen. Es entsteht die Frage nach dem Status der Psychologie als neuer Disziplin. Diese Frage spiegelt sich dabei nicht nur auf der institutionellen Ebene wieder, wie die Kämpfe um Lehrstühle zwischen Philosophen und Psychologen offenbaren (Soldati 2000), sondern sie ist in erster Instanz eine Frage nach dem epistemischen Status: Ist die Psychologie eine neue Disziplin mit ihrem eigenen Aufgabengebiet oder ist sie bloß eine Teildisziplin der Philosophie? Meinong versteht die Philosophie als eine Art Sammlung verschiedener Wissenschaften von den psychischen Phänomenen (Meinong 1923: 102). Demnach wäre die Psychologie eine Teildisziplin der Philosophie, die sich mit den empirischen Daten beschäftigt, da die Erforschung der psychischen Phänomene laut Meinung

2

3

Die Grazer Schule teilt sich gleichsam mit der Phänomenologie, Logik und Psychoanalyse eine relativ große Anzahl an Philosophen, zum Beispiel Wilhelmine Liel (später Benussi-Liel), Auguste Fischer und Mila Radakovic. Es handelt sich um Disziplinen oder Teildisziplinen, die sich im Bruch mit der Tradition verstehen und einen neuen wissenschaftlichen Diskurs eröffnen (Vendrell Ferran 2008a). Diese Entstehung verläuft in anderen Ländern anders; in England etwa entsteht die Psychologie aus den Darwin´schen Studien und in Frankreich aus der Psychiatrie heraus (vgl. für eine detaillierte Darstellung: Leahey 2004)

202

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

vom Experimentellen nicht absehen kann. Diese Ansicht passt sich nahtlos der Forderung Brentanos an, die Dinge unvoreingenommen und ohne Belastung durch theoretische Konstrukte zu untersuchen und die Psychologie von einem empirischen Standpunkt aus zu betreiben. Obgleich aber die Philosophie von den experimentellen Daten der Psychologie nicht soll absehen können, können die psychologischen Experimente laut Meinong kein Selbstzweck sein, sondern stehen im Dienst der Theoriebildung (Meinong 1904: VII). Die experimentellen Daten der Psychologie müssen –so der Anspruch– von einer philosophischen Reflexion und Interpretation begleitet werden. Es stellt sich damit die Frage nach dem konkreten Paradigma des Psychischen, das als Ausgangspunkt der Interpretation der empirischen Daten gelten soll. Zu Meinongs Zeit werden hier im Prinzip zwei Alternativen gehandelt: die Inhaltspsychologie Wundts und die Aktpsychologie Brentanos.4 Innerhalb eines cartesianisch-dualistischen Paradigmas entwickelte Wundt in Leipzig die Inhaltspsychologie, welche das Psychische als Zusammensetzung von Teilelementen oder Inhalten versteht. Brentanos Aktpsychologie dagegen versteht das Psychische als intentional, so dass jeder psychische Akt sich auf ein Objekt bezieht. Meinong und seiner Schüler betreiben in Graz eine gegen Wundt gerichtete Psychologie und Philosophie. Sie greifen Brentanos Begriff der intentionalen Akte des Bewusstseins auf und entwickeln ihn weiter. An Brentanos Intentionalitätsbegriff interessieren Meinong und die Grazer Schule besonders die Möglichkeiten, die er für die Klassifikation des Psychischen eröffnet. Diesbezüglich sind zwei Thesen hervorzuheben, die wesentlich für die Entwicklung von Meinongs Philosophie der Gefühle sind. Zum einen ist da die These, wonach die Vorstellungen (hierunter sind hauptsächlich Wahrnehmungen zu verstehen) die einfachsten psychischen Akte sind, auf welchen jeder andere psychische Akt – sei er ein Ur-

4

Zu diesen beiden Alternativen werden später noch viele weitere hinzugefügt – etwa die Psychoanalyse, der Behaviorismus oder die Weiterentwicklungen der Gestaltpsychologie. Diese Vielzahl an möglichen Hintergrundparadigmen begleitet die Psychologie von ihren Ursprüngen an und scheint bis heute eine Art

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE203

teil oder eine Gemütsbewegung – gründen muss (Brentano 1959: 112). Diese These ist wichtig, weil sie affektive Akte von Denkakten abhängig macht. Meinong wird sie übernehmen und die Emotionen als „unvollständig“ und „unselbständig“ gegenüber Vorstellungen und Urteilen bezeichnen (Meinong 1968a: 73). Er und seine Schüler werden diese These weiterentwickeln. Zum anderen ist hier die Brentano´sche These zu nennen, wonach die „Gemütsbewegungen“ (auch „Interesse“ oder „Liebe und Hass“ genannt) eine sehr heterogene Gruppe von Phänomenen darstellen – Emotionen, Affekte, Wünsche, Entschlüsse und Absichten –, zwischen denen es bloß einen graduellen Unterschied gibt (Brentano 1959: 99). Diese These war Gegenstand der Diskussion zwischen Ehrenfels, Stumpf, den frühen Phänomenologen wie Scheler und auch Meinong. Denn alle diese Autoren meinten, dass es einen Wesensunterschied zwischen Gefühlen und Begehrungen gibt. So postulierte zum Beispiel Meinong – anders als Brentano – die Existenz von vier Hauptklassen psychischer Phänomene: „Vorstellen, Urtheilen, Fühlen, Begehren“ (Meinong 1968b: 39). Meinongs Schüler und ganz besonders Alois Höfler und Stefan Witasek werden diese Modifikation übernehmen. In seinem späteren Werk wird Meinong neue Klassifikationsschemata einführen und zwischen intellektuellen und emotionalen Erlebnissen unterscheiden (Meinong 1923: 128, Meinong 1968a: 27, 66). Zu diesem Unterschied wird er noch weitere Unterschiede zweiter Ordnung hinzufügen: passiv-aktiv und ernsthaft-schattenhaft. Jede Sorte von Erlebnisse kann sich laut Meinong als passiv oder als aktiv präsentieren und eine ernsthafte oder schattenhafte Form annehmen (damit wird eine Modifikation der Erlebnisse in der Phantasie bezeichnet). Insgesamt ergibt sich bei Meinong folgende Klassifikation der psychischen Akte:

Konstante zu sein, die häufig für ein Gefühl der Fragmentierung und Krise sorgt (Bühler 1965, Metzger 1986).

204

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

• Intellektuelle Erlebnisse: o Passiv: Vorstellung ƒ ernsthafte Erlebnisse: Wahrnehmung ƒ schattenhafte Erlebnisse: Phantasievorstellungen (Meinong 1923: 128, 1977: 376) o Aktiv: Urteile, auch Denkerlebnisse oder Gedanken genannt (Meinong 1923: 131). ƒ ernsthafte Erlebnisse: Urteile, den Glauben an die Existenz des Geurteilten beinhaltend ƒ schattenhafte Erlebnisse: Annahmen. Ihnen fehlt das besagt Moment des Glaubens (Meinong 1923: 129, Meinong 1977: 342). • Emotionale Erlebnisse: o Passiv: Gefühle ƒ ernsthafte Erlebnisse: Gefühle ƒ schattenhafte Erlebnisse: Phantasiegefühle oder Quasigefühle o Aktiv: Begehrungen ƒ ernsthafte Erlebnisse: Begehrungen ƒ schattenhafte Erlebnisse: Phantasiebegehrungen In Bezug auf diese Klassifikation des Psychischen behauptet Meinong, dass jeder intentionale Akt des Bewusstseins sich auf eine bestimmte Gegenstandsart richtet: „Den vier Hauptklassen […], dem Vorstellen, Denken, Fühlen und Begehren, stehen sonach die Gegenstandsklassen der Objekte, Objektive, Dignitative und Desiderative gegenüber, deren Eigenart aber nicht etwa erst durch die Eigenart der erfassenden Erlebnisse ausgemacht wird“ (Meinong 1923: 114-115). Wir sehen in diesem Punkt, dass Meinongs Beitrag zur Klassifikation des Psychischen und sein Intentionalitätsbegriff im Grunde genommen stark auf Brentano basieren. Seine Philosophie der Gefühle ist in dieses Bild des Psychischen mit seinem Verständnis von passiv und aktiv eingebettet. Auch die Thesen über die Gefühle, die sich unmittelbar aus diesem Bild des Psychischen ergeben, werden stark von Brentanos Psychologie der Gefühle geprägt. Das Thema der Gefühle hatte im Laufe des 19. Jahrhunderts eine neue Konjunktur erfahren. Die Gründe für dieses Interesse liegen in der vermeintlichen Einfachheit der Erforschung der Gefühle mit den damaligen Methoden, besonders im Vergleich zur Analyse anderer

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE205

psychischer Akte. Mit der Introspektion und ihren Varianten (innere Wahrnehmung, Ausfragemethode) konnten Gefühle unter künstlichen Bedingungen relativ leicht von anderen Phänomenen abgegrenzt werden. Die damaligen vorherrschenden Theorien folgten einem cartesianischen Modell, wonach die Emotionen eine Art von besonderer Wahrnehmung der Seele sind (Descartes 1984: 47). Sie fassten die Gefühle nach dem Muster der Wahrnehmung auf und verstanden sie als leibliche Erfahrung, die zwischen den Polen der Lust und Unlust schwankt. Mit der Betonung leiblicher Aspekte waren die Emotionstheorien im 19. Jahrhundert das, was man aus heutiger Perspektive als Theorien des Fühlens bezeichnen kann. Hier ist etwa die „dimensionale“ Theorie Wundts und ihre Weiterentwicklung in der strukturalistischen Theorie (Wundt 1920; Titchener 1973) zu nennen. Vor diesem Hintergrund bietet Brentanos Auffassung der Gefühle eine neue Perspektive, da er nicht die leiblichen sondern die kognitiven Aspekte der Emotionen hervorhebt. Nach Brentanos Bild des Psychischen gründen die Emotionen unbedingt auf Denkakten (Vorstellungen und Urteilen) und sie machen uns Werte zugänglich. Damit haben sie die ethische Funktion, uns zu zeigen, was wichtig ist, was wir tun sollen und wie wir uns in der Welt orientieren können. Es ist eben diese kognitivistische Theorie Brentanos, welche Meinong übernimmt und, ohne die wichtigen Elemente der Theorien des Fühlens zu vergessen, zu bearbeiten versucht. Denn Meinong macht in seinem Bild des Psychischen auch die Emotionen von Denkakten abhängig und vertritt deutlich die These, dass die Emotionen sich auf eine besondere Sorte von Objekten richten, die er als „Dignitative“ bezeichnet. Wir können insofern ohne Zweifel von einem Erbe Brentanos in Meinongs Philosophie und bei den Autoren der Grazer Schule sprechen; ein Erbe, das sich exemplarisch in dem Verständnis der Gefühle zeigt.

1.2 Meinongs allgemeine Auffassung der Gefühle Von einer einheitlichen Theorie der Gefühle kann bei Meinong nicht gesprochen werden, obgleich sich im Laufe der verschiedenen Werke so etwas wie eine allgemeine Grundauffassung mit Blick auf die Gefühle er-

206

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

kennen lässt. In Psychologisch-ethische Untersuchungen zur Werttheorie (1894), Über Werthaltung und Wert (1895), Über Annahmen (1902), Urteilsgefühle (1905) und Über emotionale Präsentation (1917) wird die allgemeine Auffassung vertreten, dass sich die Emotionen sowohl durch einen leiblichen als auch einen kognitiven Aspekt auszeichnen. Gefühle sind emotionale Erlebnisse, die als passiv charakterisiert werden. Damit meint Meinong zunächst eine leibliche Erfahrung. Gefühle werden erlebt, ja an erster Stelle gefühlt. Gefühle schwanken laut Meinong zwischen den Gegenpolen von Lust und Unlust – damit schließt er sich der Tradition des Fühlens an, die damals besonders von Wundt vertreten wurde. Lust und Unlust versteht Meinong nicht als Empfindungen, die an den psychischen Akt des Gefühls gekoppelt werden, sondern als einen Modus, sich selbst zu erfahren. Gefühle können demnach als lustvoll, positiv, angenehm oder als unlustvoll, negativ und unangenehm klassifiziert werden. Dieses Kriterium bezeichnet man heute als „hedonistische Valenz“ (Elster 1999: 279; Helm 2002: 13). Wie ist diese Dimension der Lust oder Unlust genau zu verstehen? Eine Möglichkeit bestünde darin, das Schwanken zwischen Lust und Unlust als graduell zu verstehen, so dass es eine Skala von sehr lustvollen bis hin zu sehr unlustvollen Emotionen gäbe und indifferente Gefühle damit auch möglich wären. Meinong plädiert aber für eine zweite Alternative, nach welcher die Dimension der Lust und Unlust als ein Entweder-Oder verstanden wird. Emotionen müssen demnach unbedingt als lustvoll oder unlustvoll klassifiziert werden, und die Möglichkeit indifferenter Gefühle ist ausgeschlossen: „ein indifferentes Gefühl ist nicht weniger in sich widerstreitend als ein Urteil, das weder affirmativ, noch negativ wäre“ (Meinong 1923: 132, auch in Höfler 1897: 390). Meinong scheint mit dieser starken These zu ignorieren, erstens, dass Lust und Unlust in verschiedenen Stärken kommen können, und zweitens, dass einige Gefühle manchmal indifferent bezüglich den Gegensätzen Lust und Unlust sind. Etwa die Überraschung, die lustvoll, unlustvoll oder auch indifferent sein kann. Wichtiger als dieser leibliche Aspekt ist jedoch in Meinongs Auffassung der Gefühle das kognitive Moment. In welcher Verbindung stehen Emotion und Kognition? Zum einen haben die Emotionen Kognitionen als „psychologische Voraussetzungen“ bzw. „intellektuelle Grundlagen“

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE207

(1968b: 34; 1969: 582; 1968a: 66). Als kognitive Basis der Emotionen fungieren sowohl Vorstellungen als auch Urteile, denn manchmal ist es nötig, dass man eine gewisse Einstellung und Gewissheit gewinnt oder ein Urteil über das Vorgestellte fällt, um ein Gefühl zu haben (1968b, 35). Diese Priorität der Denkakte gegenüber den Emotionen muss hier als eine logische, nicht aber als eine zeitliche Voraussetzung verstanden werden – eine Gleichzeitigkeit ist möglich (Meinong 1968a: 72). Laut Meinong gelten als kognitive Basis der Emotionen in erster Linie Wahrnehmungen, Phantasievorstellungen, Urteile und alle anderen darauf bezogenen Denkakte wie Annehmen, Glauben usw. Diese These der psychologischen Grundlagen der Emotionen stellt Meinong in die Nähe der aktuellen Positionen von Goldie, Mulligan, Stocker und Greenspan u.a. (Goldie 2002, Mulligan 1998, Stocker 1987; Greenspan 1980). Diese Autoren postulieren, dass die Emotionen eine kognitive Basis haben und dass diese Basis unterschiedlicher Natur sein kann. So meinen etwa Stocker und Greenspan, dass als kognitive Basis der Emotionen sowohl Urteile als auch Phantasievorstellungen gelten können (Stocker 1987; Greenspan 1980); Elster versteht als Basis der Emotionen sowohl Urteile als auch Wahrnehmungen (Elster 1999: 250); Mulligan postuliert als Basis der Emotionen Wahrnehmungen, Urteile und Erinnerungen (Mulligan 1998: 168), und Goldie behauptet, dass Phantasien, Urteile und Wahrnehmungen kognitive Basis der Emotionen sind (Goldie 2002: 45). Diesen Autoren gegenüber behaupten andere analytische Philosophen der Gegenwart wie etwa Anthony Kenny oder Gabrielle Taylor, dass die kognitive Basis der Emotionen lediglich Urteile sind (Kenny 1963: 195, Taylor 1985: 3) oder dass die Emotionen Kombinationen von Urteilen und anderen Elementen sind – wie in der Belief-DesireTheorie von Marks und Green (Griffiths 1998: 3) und in der Mehrkomponententheorie von Ben-ze´ev – oder sogar dass die Emotionen selbst eine besondere Art von Urteilen sind – wie Solomon und Nussbaum behaupten (Solomon 1993, Nussbaum 2005)5

5

Auf keinen Fall kann insofern Meinongs Philosophie der Gefühle als eine Belief-Desire Theorie der Gefühle verstanden werden wie etwa Reizinsen, Meyer und Schützwohl dies tun (Reisenzein, Meyer, Schützwohl, 2003: 24-26). Mei-

208

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

Die Verbindung der Emotionen mit der Kognition erschöpft sich nicht in der Tatsache, dass Emotionen in Kognitionen gründen. Emotionen als intentionale Akte richten sich unbedingt auf ein Objekt. Gefühle sind insofern nicht nur gefühlt, sondern sie sind gleichzeitig ein Fühlen von etwas. Emotionen haben demnach eine Art kognitive Funktion. Diese These der Intentionalität der Emotionen ist seit Anthony Kennys Buch Action, Emotion and Will ein Topos der analytischen Philosophie der Gefühle geworden. Was genau aber intendieren die Gefühle? Zum einen ist es hier – wie Kenny deutlich macht (Kenny 1963: 193)– zwischen materiellen und formalen Objekten der Emotionen zu unterscheiden. Das materielle Objekt der Furcht ist das wilde Tier oder das Gewitter oder das Monster, das formale Objekt ist die Eigenschaft des Bedrohlichen oder Gefährlichen. Während das materielle Objekt kulturell und sozial bedingt ist und als solches von Mensch zu Mensch variieren kann, ist das formale Objekt einer Emotion immer dasselbe: eine bestimmte Qualität oder Eigenschaft. Furcht ist immer mit der Eigenschaft des Bedrohlichen verbunden, Ekel mit der des Ekelhaften, Freude mit der des Erfreulichen usw. Wenn man über die Intentionalität der Emotionen spricht, denkt man an das formale Objekt derselben und nicht an das materielle Objekt. Meinong behauptet, dass die Emotionen sich notwendigerweise auf eine bestimmte Gegenstandsart richten: das Dignitative (Meinong 1923: 134; 1968a: 117). Darunter versteht er, dass die formalen Objekte der Emotionen Werte oder axiologische Eigenschaften sind. Auch Ronald de Sousa hat die These vertreten, dass das formale Objekt der Emotionen Werte sind (de Sousa 1987: 109). Diese These ist auch bei Tappolet und Johnston zu finden, welche behaupten, dass die Emotionen Werte erfassen (Tappolet 2000: 9). Welche ist aber die Natur dieser Werte, und wie sieht deren Verbindung mit den Emotionen aus?

nong reduziert die Gefühle nicht auf Kombinationen von Urteilen und Wünschen wie etwa Joel Marks und O.H. Green es tun, wenn auch Urteile und Wünsche wichtige Rollen bei den Emotionen spielen. Emotionen haben eine Ursprünglichkeit als Phänomen in Meinongs Philosophie, und außerdem können

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE209

2. Emotion, Intentionalität und Wert 2.1 Die doppelte Relativität der Werte und die möglichen Wertgefühle: Meinongs erste Werttheorie Die These, dass die Emotionen Werte intendieren, macht Meinongs Philosophie der Gefühle von seiner Philosophie der Werte abhängig. Die Entwicklungen von Meinongs Werttheorie im Laufe seiner philosophischen Produktion schlagen sich insofern in seiner Philosophie der Gefühle nieder. Grosso modo werde ich zwei Auffassungen der Verbindung zwischen Emotion und Wert bei Meinong unterscheiden. In einer ersten Formulierung vertritt Meinong 1894 in Psychologische ethische Untersuchungen über Werttheorie eine subjektivistische Werttheorie (Schuman 2001a: 518; 2001b: 542), nach welcher der Wert mit der Werthaltung oder dem Wertgefühl quasi identifiziert wird.6 Es ist deswegen nicht erstaunlich, dass Meinong in den folgenden Jahren diese erste Theorie revidiert und ändert. Im Jahr 1917 wird Meinong in seiner Schrift Emotionale Präsentation die erste Position als psychologistisch bezeichnen (Meinong 1923:148, Meinong 1968a: 147) und für einen Wertrealismus plädieren. In Meinongs erster diesbezüglicher Theorie von 1894 ist der Wertbegriff stark von der ökonomischen Werttheorie Mengers (Gründsätze der Volkswirthschaftstlehre, Wien 1872) und der Moralphilosophie Brentanos beeinflusst, dessen Seminar über praktische Philosophie Meinong 1875/1876 besuchte. In dieser Zeit pflegt Meinong einen stark erweiteten Wertbegriff, der ökonomische, ethische und ästhetische Werte umfasst. Seine eigene Position versucht er zunächst ex negativo zu entwickeln, in-

6

nicht nur Urteile als kognitive Basis derselben gelten, sondern auch Wahrnehmungen, Erinnerungen und Phantasievorstellungen. Der Text wurde veröffentlicht, weil Meinong sich wegen der Publikation von Ehrenfels’ „Werth-Theorie und Ethik“, in der Ehrenfels sich gegen Meinong positioniert, dazu gezwungen fühlte, Stellung zu nehmen. Allerdings weist Meinong mehrmals in diesem Werk und auch in „Werthaltung und Wert“ auf den provisorischen Charakter dieser Werttheorie hin (Meinong 1968c: 387).

210

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

dem er sich von zwei anderen Wertauffassungen abgrenzt: Wertsubjektivismus und Wertrealismus. Der Wertsubjektivismus behauptet: „Werth für mich hat, was ich werthhalte; der Wert eines Gegenstandes besteht sonach im Wertgehalten-werden.“ (Meinong 1968b: 24). Diese Position ähnelt dem heutigen Emotivismus, nach welcher die Werte Projektionen der Gemütszustände des Subjektes in die Welt sind. Gegen den Wertsubjektivismus liefert Meinong zwei Argumente: Zum einen kann man etwas Wert zuschreiben, das keinen Wert hat. Zum anderen kann etwas Wert haben und dennoch es ist möglich, dass wir es als nicht wertvoll betrachten (Meinong 1968b: 24, 67). Da wir bei einer Wertzuschreibung irren oder auch Werte übersehen können, können Werte nicht Projektionen unserer Gemütszustände in die Welt sein, und daher ist der Wertsubjektivismus keine überzeugende Alternative. Die zweite Position ist der Wertabsolutismus, wonach es „absolute Werthe“ gibt. Diese Ansicht ist laut Meinong angreifbar, weil „die Existenz eines Werthes nicht weniger an die Existenz bestimmter Eigenschaften im Subjecte als an die Existenz solcher im Objecte gebunden ist (...)“ (Meinong 1968b: 72). Das heißt, dass die Werte sich „verändern, entstehen und vergehen, so wie die „betreffenden Dispositionen“ im Subjecte sich verändern, entstehen und vergehen“ (Ebd.). In dieser Hinsicht spricht Meinong von einer doppelten Relativität der Werte: in Bezug auf ein Subjekt, das bestimmte Dispositionen zu fühlen hat (Meinong 1968b: 30, 27) und in Bezug auf ein Objekt (Ebd: 67, 71), welches bestimmte Eigenschaften besitzt, die ein Gefühl in dem Subjekt hervorrufen können. Auch der Wertabsolutismus bietet laut Meinong in der Zeit der Herausbildung seiner ersten Theorie keine gute Alternative. Den genannten Positionen gegenüber vertritt Meinong die These, dass Werte nicht mit tatsächlichen, sondern mit möglichen Werthaltungen verbunden sind. Meinong schreibt: „nicht an die actuelle Werthhaltung ist der Werth gebunden, sondern an die mögliche Werthhaltung, und auch für diese sind noch günstige Umstände, näher ausreichende Orientirtheit, sowie normaler Geistes- und Gemüthszustand in Anschlag zu bringen. Der Werth besteht sonach nicht im Werthgehalten-werden, sondern im Werthgehalten-werden-können unter Voraussetzung der erforderlichen günstigen Umstände. Ein Gegenstand hat Werth, sofern er die Fähigkeit hat, für

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE211

den ausreichend Orientierten, falls dieser normal veranlagt ist, die thatsächliche Grundlage für ein Werthgefühl abzugeben.“ (Meinong 1968b: 25). Unter möglicher Werthaltung versteht er im Prinzip eine Disposition des Fühlens. Die Werte werden in dieser Auffassung als Dispositionen des Subjektes verstanden, gewisse Eigenschaften an einem Gegenstand zu erfassen und darauf zu reagieren (Meinong 1968b: 81, 93). Als Disposition ist dieses Phänomen individuell, historisch und kulturell bedingt und sogar erlernbar (Schuman 2001a: 519). Es hängt sowohl vom Subjekt als auch vom Objekt ab und zeigt damit jene doppelte Relativität, von der wir sprachen. Fragen wir nun nach der Natur dieser „Werthaltungen.“ Meinong versteht sie selbst als Gefühle (Meinong 1968b: 15). Damit grenzt er sich von Ehrenfels ab, welcher den Wert als Begehrt-werden versteht. Meinong liefert folgende Argumente gegen die Position von Ehrenfels. Erstens führt Meinong an, dass wir häufig zunächst etwas als wertvoll betrachten und es anschließend begehren, so dass die von Ehrenfels postulierte Reihenfolge eigentlich umgekehrt ist. Zweitens weist Meinong darauf hin, dass es möglich ist, etwas als wertvoll zu betrachten, ohne es zu begehren. Drittens bemerkt er, dass das Begehren sich immer auf etwas richtet, das nicht da ist, wir aber auch vielen Dingen Wert beimessen, die uns gegenwärtig sind oder die wir bereits besitzen (Ebd: 15-16). Werthaltungen können daher nicht als Begehrungen aufgefasst werden und Meinong zieht die Interpretation der Werthaltungen als Wertgefühle vor. Zusammenfassend lautet Meinongs These in der Zeit um 1894, dass die Werte an mögliche Wertgefühle gebunden sind. Diese Verbindung ist weder eine Projektion der möglichen Wertgefühle auf die Welt noch eine Reaktion auf gegebene Werte. Werte werden eher in einer Wechselwirkung zwischen bestimmten Eigenschaften eines Objektes und entsprechenden Dispositionen eines Subjektes konstituiert. Sie werden in einer 1894 noch zu spezifizierenden Weise durch ein Wertgefühl, welches Lust oder Unlust bereiten kann, erfahren. Diese Ansicht wird nur ein Jahr später, also 1895, in der Schrift „Über Werthaltung und Wert“ revidiert. Im Wesentlichen modifiziert Meinong seine Ansicht in drei Punkten. Eine erste Modifikation betrifft die These von 1894, nach der die Höhe eines Wertes von der Stärke des

212

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

Werthaltungsgefühls abhängig ist (Meinong 1968b: 73, 1968c: 328) – sprich: Wenn mir etwas große Freude bereitet, dann hat es einen hohen Wert. Gegen diese These bringt Meinong einige Gegenbeispiele vor, die zeigen, wie die Werthöhe nicht mit der Werthaltungsstärke zusammenhängt. So kann man einer Freundschaft einen hohen Wert beimessen, ohne dass die Werthaltung mit großer Lebhaftigkeit und Intensität erfahren wird. Ein weiteres Gegenbeispiel betrifft den Wert, den ein gesunder und ein kranker Mensch auf die Gesundheit legen. Der Kranke legt größeren Wert auf die Gesundheit als der Gesunde, aber das heißt nicht, dass die Gesundheit für den Gesunden keinen Wert hat. Die Werthöhe hängt also nicht von der Intensität des Wertgefühls ab und ist eher eine Funktion derselben. Die zweite Änderung betrifft den Wertbegriff selbst. 1895 werden die Werte von Meinong wie folgt definiert: „der Wert eines Dinges ist eine Function sowohl der Intensität des an die Existenz als der des an die Nicht-Existenz geknüpften Wertgefühls.“ (Meinong 1968c: 337). Wichtig ist hierbei, dass der Wert in einen Zusammenhang mit dem Wertgefühl gebracht wird, welches sowohl die Existenz als auch die Nicht-Existenz eines Objektes betrifft (Ebd: 337). Damit wird der Wertbegriff auch auf die Nicht-Existenz von Objekten ausgedehnt. Die dritte Modifikation betrifft die Erfassung der Werte. Meinong behauptet, dass der Wert als Ganzes nicht gefühlt werden kann. Um erfasst zu werden, setzen die Werte laut Meinong immer Urteile voraus. Diese drei Änderungen sind ein Resultat der Spannungen, welche die These von den Werten als möglichen Werthaltungen mit sich bringt. Es deutet sich eine allmähliche Entkoppelung des Wertsbegriffes vom Gefühl des Subjektes an. In dem Text „Über Werthaltung und Wert“ macht Meinong den Vorschlag, den Wertbegriff aus der Sphäre des Fühlens heraus und in die Sphäre des Begehrens zu platzieren. Wert wäre demnach die Fähigkeit eines Objektes, sich als Gegenstand des Begehrens zu behaupten: „Der Wert eines Objectes repräsentiert die Motivationskraft, die diesem Object vermöge seiner eigenen Natur wie vermöge der Beschaffenheit seiner Umgebung und der des betreffenden Subjectes zukommt“ (Meinong 1968c: 341). Trotz dieser Ähnlichkeit zur vorher kritisierten Theorie von Ehrenfels meint Meinong, dass die Gefühle wesentlich für die Charakteri-

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE213

sierung des Wertes seien, und nicht die Begehrungen. (Meinong 1968c: 341). Auch dieser Ansatz macht Meinong allerdings nicht zufrieden, und er wird daher 1917 in der Schrift „Emotionale Präsentation“ noch eine weitere Lösung des Problems anbieten, in welcher Wert und Wertgefühl zwar aufeinander bezogen, nicht aber aufeinander zu reduzieren sind. Trotz der Spannungen dieser ersten Werttheorie fanden Meinongs Thesen unter seinen Schülern viel Anklang. Sie wurden von Alois Höfler, Stefan Witasek und Wilhelmine Liel übernommen. Besonders letztere Autorin entwickelte in „Gegen die voluntaristische Begründung der Werttheorie“ weitere Thesen in der Richtung von Meinongs frühen Ansätzen und gegen die „voluntaristische Theorie der Gefühle“, also gegen diejenigen Positionen, welche die Werte durch die Begriffe des Begehrens und Wollens zu erklären versuchen, wie etwa Ehrenfels und Schwarz. Liels Kritik an Ehrenfels folgt den Linien der Meinong´schen Kritik von 1894. Interessant ist aber eher Liels Auseinandersetzung mit Schwarz. Dieser Autor hatte eine ähnliche Theorie wie Ehrenfels entwickelt, welche die Werte als so genannte Wollungstatsachen zu erklären versuchte. Diese sollen eine Art von Begehren oder Wollen sein, Schwarz bezeichnet sie als „Gefallen“ (Liel 1904: 528). Nach sorgfältiger Untersuchung der Natur von Schwarzens „Gefallen“ kommt Liel zu der Überzeugung, dass das Gefallen sich kaum von den Gefühlen unterscheidet (Ebd.: 573). Darin sieht Liel ein Argument für Meinongs Thesen von 1894, nach der die Werte mit Wertgefühlen verbunden sind, und im Einklang mit Meinong behauptet sie, dass Wertgefühle ein Wissen um Werte sind, welches Lust oder Unlust bereitet.

2.2 Absolute Werte und Gefühle als Werterfassungen: Meinongs zweite Werttheorie In der Schrift Emotionale Präsentation stellt Meinong im Jahr 1917 eine Theorie der Werte auf, welche sich von den vorherigen Positionen auf-

214

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

grund ihres Wertrealismus radikal unterscheidet.7 Nach dieser neuen Auffassung werden die Werte dank emotionaler Akte zur Gegebenheit gebracht. Damit wird den Emotionen eine starke kognitive Rolle zugeschrieben, die hier näher untersucht werden soll. In dem genannten Text versucht Meinong, die Emotionen von den Begehrungen zu trennen – in der Absicht, sich von Ehrenfels und Brentanos Positionen zu distanzieren. Einige Argumente gegen die These von Ehrenfels von den Gefühlen als Begehrt-werden sind uns schon von 1894 bekannt. Meinong behauptet nun weiter, dass man nicht fühlt, weil man begehrt, sondern dass man begehrt, weil mein fühlt. Dies ist deswegen von Bedeutung, weil Meinong die Gefühle damit als zeitlich und logisch vorgängig gegenüber den Begehrungen versteht (Meinong 1923: 135). Gegen Brentano vertritt Meinong die These, dass der Unterschied zwischen Gefühl und Begehren ein grundlegender ist, wenn auch zwischen beiden eine Verbindung bestehe. Diese Abgrenzung von Ehrenfels und Brentano ist hier wichtig, weil Meinongs Position hinsichtlich der Rolle der Gefühle in Bezug auf die Begehrungen klar wird. Gefühle gehen den Begehrungen voraus, erstere motivieren letztere. Nachdem Meinong so Position bezogen hat, wendet er sich der Funktion der Gefühle zu. Emotionen haben laut Meinong eine „kognitive“ Funktion, welche darin besteht, Werte zu präsentieren (Meinong 1968a: 114). Meinong versteht diese präsentierende Funktion wie folgt: „Allgemein also: ist P der durch die Emotion p präsentierte Gegenstand, dann ist, an den Gegenstand A die Emotion p zu knüpfen, berechtigt, falls P dem A tatsächlich zukommt, somit das Urteil „A ist P“ im Rechte ist“ (Ebd: 130-131). Gefühle haben insofern eigene Gegenstände, auf die sie sich wesentlich intentional richten, und diese eigenen Gegenstände sind die Werte. Das heißt, dass ein bestimmter Wert, der an einem Gegenstand gegeben ist, uns durch die entsprechende Emotion „präsentiert“ wird. So wird etwa die axiologische Eigenschaft des Ekelhaften in der Emotion des Ekels gegeben; die axiologische Eigenschaft des Gefährlichen wird in der

7

Damit schließt sich Meinong einer Reihe von Autoren seiner Zeit an, wie Scheler und den Frühphänomenologen, die auch wertrealistische Positionen vertreten (Scheler 1954)

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE215

Emotion der Furcht präsentiert. Gefühle werden hier als Fühlen von Werten verstanden, ihre kognitive Funktion besteht eben darin Werte zu präsentieren. Eine wichtige Implikation dieser These ist die, dass die Emotionen uns Information über die Welt vermitteln. Sie sind dafür verantwortlich, dass die Welt uns nicht neutral und indifferent erscheint, sondern als ein Horizont mit bestimmten Qualitäten, ein Horizont, anhand dessen wir uns orientieren können. Diese These Meinongs ist in der heutigen analytischen Philosophie der Gefühle bei Ronald de Sousa (1987), Mark Johnston (2001) und Christine Tappolet (2000) zu finden, letztere entwickelt ihren Ansatz sogar explizit im Anschluss an Meinong. Um diese präsentierende Funktion der Gefühle zu verdeutlichen, arbeitet Meinong mit der Analogie zwischen Fühlen und Wahrnehmen (Meinong 1923: 133, auch 1968a: 32, 118, 129). Genauso wie uns in der Wahrnehmung Eigenschaften bzw. Informationen präsentiert werden, soll dasselbe mit dem Fühlen geschehen. Allerdings gibt es einen Unterschied zwischen Emotionen und Wahrnehmungen, der das Moment des Erfassens betrifft. Erfassen bedeutet, dass uns etwas vermittelt wird. In der Wahrnehmung werden Gegenstände bestimmter Art erfasst, aber bei den emotionalen Akten ist die Erfassung der Werte laut Meinong nicht vollkommen. Damit hier von einem wirklichen Erfassen gesprochen werden kann, benötigen die Gefühle intellektuelle Voraussetzungen. Die Gefühle sind – so Meinong – zu „subjektiv“, sie benötigen Urteile und Wahrnehmung als Basis, um Werte zu erfassen (Meinong 1923: 137). Diese Korrelation von Wert und Gefühl sowie die Rede von der emotionalen Fähigkeit der Werterfassung (obgleich die Erfassung immer die Hilfe einer kognitiven Basis benötigt) eröffnen die Möglichkeit, dass die Emotionen Wahrheitsbedingungen haben (Meinong 1923: 136, 1968a: 12). Kraft ihrer präsentierenden Funktion verdienen die Emotionen nach Meinongs zweiter Theorie einen Platz im Erkennen, und man kann – wenn auch im übertragenen Sinne – von berechtigten und unberechtigten Emotionen sprechen (Meinong 1968a: 129). Dies bringt die Emotionen in die Nahe von Urteilen, denn genauso wie diese richtig oder falsch sein können, können die Emotionen auch berechtigt oder unberechtigt sein. Wann ist eine Emotion berechtigt? Meinongs Antwort lautet: „Wir dürfen Emotionen für berechtigt ansehen, sofern die ihre Eigengegenstände mit

216

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

ihren Voraussetzungsgegenständen verknüpfenden Urteile berechtigt sind“ (Ebd.: 140). Es müssen also zwei Bedingungen erfüllt sein, damit eine Emotion berechtigt ist. Erstens muss sie angemessen sein in Bezug auf ihre präsentierten Gegenstände, das heißt die Furcht muss sich auf das Furchterregende richten, der Ekel auf das Ekelhafte usw. Zweitens hängt die Berechtigung einer Emotion auch von den Urteilen und Wahrnehmungen ab, die sie als Basis hat. Die Furcht muss sich also nicht nur auf Furchterregendes richten, um berechtigt zu sein, ich muss außerdem entweder das Urteil fällen, dass der Käfig mit dem eingesperrten wilden Tier vor mir schadhaft und unsicher ist; oder die Phantasievorstellung von einem Monster haben; oder die Wahrnehmung eines nahenden Gewitters; usw. Nur wenn beide Bedingungen erfüllt sind, können wir laut Meinong von berechtigten Emotionen sprechen. Auch diese These findet sich in Teilen der zeitgenössischen Debatte wieder, nämlich dann, wenn von angemessenen und unangemessenen Emotionen gesprochen wird (unter anderem Kenny 1963: 194, de Sousa 1987: 159). Ist Meinongs wertrealistische These von den Emotionen als Werterfassungen haltbar? Einige Zeitgenossen Meinongs schlossen sich ihm an – etwa der Frühphänomenologe Aurel Kolnai (Kolnai 1974, 1998) – oder vertraten ähnliche Positionen – wie Edith Stein (Stein 1917). Andere Autoren wie Scheler haben für eine Unterscheidung zwischen den Emotionen einerseits und dem Erfassen von Werten andererseits plädiert (Scheler 1954: 271). In der heutigen Debatte finden wir beide Positionen wieder. Während Tappolet und Johnston für die These von den Emotionen als Werterfassungen plädieren (Tappolet 2000, Johnston 2001), argumentiert Mulligan gegen die Gleichsetzung des Fühlens von Werten mit dem Gefühl (Mulligan 2004). Mulligans Argumente sich leicht gegen Meinong vorzubringen: So haben wir nicht jedes Mal, dass wir einen Wert erfassen, auch eine Emotion. Außerdem kann ein Wert mit verschiedenen Emotionen verbunden sein (Mulligan 2004). Die beschriebenen Thesen über die Gefühle haben einige starke ethische Implikationen. Die grundlegende Frage der Ethik ist „Was soll ich tun?“. Auf diese Frage haben der Kantismus und der Utilitarismus mit der Entwicklung eines Normsystems geantwortet. Das, was man tun soll, wird durch Normen, Verbote und Pflichten bestimmt, welche als Schran-

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE217

ken für das menschliche Handeln fungieren. Das was man tun soll, wird in diesem Modell von den Normen vorgegeben, und das Handeln wird durch das Denken bestimmt. In diesem Modell der Ethik und der menschlichen Natur werden Emotionen als Störungen des Denkens und Handelns angesehen. Im Gegensatz hierzu entwickelte Brentano eine Position, nach der das, was man tun soll, durch unsere Fähigkeit zu fühlen bestimmt wird. Es sind unsere Emotionen, welche uns zeigen, was wert hat und was nicht. Sie fungieren auch als Grundlage des Willens. Hinter dieser Ansicht steckt das Projekt einer Ethik der Werte, die in psychischen Akten ihre Grundlage haben soll: Die Psychologie soll der Ethik vorangehen. Viele jüngere Autoren in der Zeit Brentanos schließen sich diesem Projekt an, unter ihnen sind die Frühphänomenologen und auch Meinong.8 Meinongs Thesen über die Gefühle als gute Willensgründe und Motive des Handelns und über die Gefühle als Werterfassungen muss in diesem Kontext betrachtet werden. Für die Ethik behauptet Meinong, man solle nicht dem Handeln und Wollen Vorschriften zu erteilen versuchen (Meinong 1968b: 224), denn dies könne keine Ethik leisten. Das empirische Material der Ethik solle nicht das sein, was die Menschen tun und lassen, sondern die Art und Weise „wie sie dies Thun und Lassen werthhalten“ (Ebd: 225). Demnach wäre es eigenste Aufgabe der Ethik, die Natur der Werte und die Art und Weise, wie sie in den Emotionen erfasst werden, zu thematisieren.

3. Typologie der Gefühle: Grundzüge einer Klassifikation Es gibt hauptsächlich drei Achsen, um die herum Meinong eine Klassifikation der Gefühle entwickelt: Eine Achse orientiert sich an der kognitiven Basis, eine andere am Unterschied zwischen Akt und Inhalt und eine letzte an der möglichen Modifizierung der emotionalen Akte in der Phan-

8

Diese These wird später in der analytischen Philosophie bei Anscombe wieder auftauchen und zu einer neuen Hochkonjunktur der Ethik der Werte und der Tugend führen (Anscombe 2007).

218

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

tasie. Die sich daraus ergebende Klassifikation der Gefühle ist nicht nur als Taxonomie in sich selbst von Bedeutung. Meinong zeigt damit ferner, dass es bei den Gefühlen verschiedene Unterarten mit ihrer je spezifischen Struktur und Funktion gibt, wenn auch alle die beiden Charakteristika zeigen, die für die Gefühle laut Meinong wesentlich sind: Leiblichkeit (Dimension der Lust und Unlust) und Intentionalität (Gründung auf kognitiver Basis und Werterfassung).

a. Vorstellungsgefühle und Urteilsgefühle Die These, dass Gefühle psychologische Voraussetzungen haben, eröffnet die Möglichkeit einer Klassifikation der Gefühle nach ihrer kognitiven Basis. Meinong schreibt diesbezüglich: „Näher differenzieren sich nun die Gefühle nach ihren Gegenstandsvoraussetzungen in solche, die nur auf Vorstellungen, und solche, die zugleich auch auf Denkerlebnisse gegründet sind, Vorstellungs- und Denkgefühle.“ (Meinong 1923: 133, auch 1968a: 94, 86). Nach der kognitiven Basis unterscheidet Meinong also zwischen denjenigen Gefühlen, die auf Vorstellungen gründen und welche er als Vorstellungsgefühle bezeichnet, und denjenigen Gefühlen, welche auf Denkakten oder Urteilen gründen und welche er Urteilsgefühle – oder auch Denkgefühle – nennt. 1894 in der Schrift „Psychologische ethische Untersuchungen“ und 1905 in „Über Urteilsgefühle: was sie sind und was sie nicht sind“ wendet Meinong sein Interesse der Analyse letzterer Gruppe von Gefühlen zu. Er postuliert, dass Urteilsgefühle zwei wesentliche Charakteristika haben: Erstens richten sie sich auf Sachverhalte und nicht auf einzelne Dinge. Das heißt, dass diese Gefühle eine propositionale Struktur haben. Sie sind immer ein „sich freuen, dass…“. Zweitens gründen sie auf einem Urteil, welches das Bestehen des Sachverhaltes als gegeben setzt. Die Urteils- oder Denkgefühle haben ein Urteil als kognitive Voraussetzung, welches die Existenz des Sachverhalts bestätigt – daher der Name Urteilsgefühle. Gibt es auch Gefühlsgefühle und Begehrensgefühle? Diese Frage haben Meinong und Alois Höfler durchaus diskutiert. Da auch Gefühle und Begehrungen psychische Akte sind, wäre es vielleicht möglich, dass sie als Basis für die Gefühle fungieren. Meinong vertritt hier die These, dass

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE219

es sich in den Fällen eigentlich in der Regel um Unterklassen von Urteilsgefühlen handelt (Meinong 1968b: 63 und ff.). Höfler seinerseits findet es plausibel, dass Gefühle und Begehrungen neben Vorstellungen und Urteilen als „Teilvoraussetzung“ für das Zustandekommen eines Gefühls fungieren (Höfler 1897: 400-401). Trotzt dieser Möglichkeit findet Höfler es jedoch nicht nötig, eine eigene Klasse der Gefühlsgefühle aufzustellen (Ebd: 403).

b. Inhalt- oder Aktgefühle Eine weitere Klassifizierung der Gefühle ist durch den Unterschied zwischen Akten und Inhalten des Bewusstseins bedingt. Unter dem Inhalt versteht Meinong den Teil des Erlebnisses, in dem der Gegenstand erfasst wird und der mit diesem variiert. Der Akt ist hingegen dasjenige, das den Gegenstand intendiert und ihm gegenüber nicht variiert (Meinong 1968a: 63). Meinongs These lautet, dass in jedem Vorstellungs- oder Urteilsgefühl entweder die Aktseite oder die Inhaltsseite betont werden kann (Meinong 1923: 133, 1968a: 86, 94). Für eine Typologie der Gefühle ergeben sich dann folgende Möglichkeiten: - Vorstellungsaktgefühle: Als solche werden sinnliche oder hedonistische Gefühle bezeichnet, in denen der Akt des Wahrnehmens oder Phantasierens als solcher besonders präsent ist. - Vorstellungsinhaltgefühle: Sie sind ästhetische Gefühle, die den Inhalt der Vorstellung oder Wahrnehmung – also das Material derselben – betonen. - Urteilsaktgefühle: Diese werden auch logische oder Wissensgefühle genannt. Sie betonen den Akt, der dem Fühlen zugrunde liegt, also hier die Tätigkeit des Urteilens. - Urteilsinhaltgefühle: Sie werden auch als timologische oder als Wertgefühle bezeichnet. Der Akzent liegt hier auf dem Inhalt des Gefühls, also auf einer axiologischen Eigenschaft oder einem Wert, der mit dem Gefühl intendiert wird.

220

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

Im Zusammenhang mit dieser Klassifizierung spricht Meinong von vier Klassen von Gefühlsgegenständen: angenehm, schön, wahr und gut (Meinong 1968a: 102). Im Einklang mit der These, dass die Emotionen Werte erfassen, soll hierbei die Korrelation zwischen Erfahrungsgegenstand und erfassenden Erlebnissen widerspiegelt werden. Allerdings gibt es in dieser Klassifikation zwei problematische Aspekte, welche die Rolle der Annahmen betreffen. Der Status der Annahmen und der Gefühle, die auf ihnen gründen, bleibt völlig offen (Meinong 1968a: 87). Darüber hinaus ist die Klassifikation der „ästhetischen Gefühle“ als Vorstellungsinhaltgefühlen problematisch. Denn es gibt ästhetische Gefühle, welche weder in Vorstellungen noch in Urteilen, sondern in Annahmen gründen, wie etwa diejenigen, die man erlebt, wenn man einen Roman liest oder eine Theater-Aufführung anschaut.

c. Ernstgefühle und Phantasiegefühle Es gibt laut Meinong einen Unterschied zwischen Ernst und Phantasie, der den gesamten Bereich des Psychischen durchläuft. Jeder psychische Akt kann demnach in zwei Modi auftreten: als ernsthaft oder in der Modifikation in der Phantasie als schattenhaft. Vorstellungen können Ernstvorstellungen oder Phantasievorstellungen sein; auch für die Klasse der Urteile kann zwischen ernsthaften Urteilen und Phantasieurteilen – auch Annahmen genannt – unterschieden werden; und derselbe Unterschied gilt analog für die anderen beiden Klassen, so dass es Ernst- und Phantasiegefühle und Ernst- und Phantasiebegehrungen gibt (Meinong 1923: 134). In diesem Zusammenhang unterscheidet Meinong zwischen intellektueller Phantasie im Fall von Vorstellen und Denken und emotionaler Phantasie beim Fühlen und Begehren (Ebd. 135, auch 1977). Einige seiner Schüler – etwa Saxinger – werden diese zwei Sorten von Phantasien näher untersuchen. Ähnliche Thesen sind auch bei einigen Frühphänomenologen wie Pfänder, Voigtländer, Haas und Scheler (Pfänder 1922, Voigtländer 1910, Haas 1910, Scheler 1976) zu finden, mit der Besonderheit, dass die Phänomenologen nicht von ernsthaften und schattenhaften psychischen Akten sprechen, sondern von psychischer Echtheit und Unechtheit.

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE221

4. Die Struktur der Urteilsgefühle 4.1 Wertgefühle a. Gewissheitsgefühle: Freude und Leid Aus der vorangehenden Klassifikation ergibt sich, dass es zwei Arten von Urteilsgefühlen gibt: Wertgefühle und Wissensgefühle. Im Bereich der Wertgefühle kann man allerdings noch eine weitere Unterscheidung vornehmen, welche auf der Gewissheit der zugrunde liegenden Urteile basiert. Dementsprechend kann man zwischen Gewissheitsgefühlen (Freude und Leid), welche auf Überzeugungen gründen, und Ungewissheitsgefühlen (Hoffnung und Furcht) unterscheiden, welche auf Annahmen gründen.9 Um die Freude zu erklären, gibt Meinong das Beispiel eines Jungen, der sich über eine geschenkte Dampfmaschine freut. Diese Freude ist laut Meinong ein Elementargefühl und weist als solches die beiden Momente auf, die für alle Gefühle charakteristisch sind. Zum einen gibt es das leibliche Moment, wonach es zu einem Gefühl gehört, „jederzeit nach einem der beiden Gegenstände Lust und Unlust (…) charakterisiert zu sein.“ (Meinong 1969: 580). Hinsichtlich dieser Leiblichkeit ist die Freude immer ein Lustgefühl. Wenn anstatt eines Lustgefühles ein Unlustgefühl auftreten würde, sprächen wir hier dagegen von Leid (1969: 584). Zum anderen hat die Freude ein kognitives Moment. Sie gründet notwendigerweise in einem Urteil10, und der Grad der Überzeugtheit von der Wahrheit des Urteils spielt eine wichtige Rolle (1969: 582). Das Ü-

9

10

Die Gewissheitsgefühle kann man je nach dem Gegenstand des Urteils weiter unterteilen. Wenn der Gegenstand das Wohlergehen der erlebenden Person betrifft, spricht Meinong von Freude und Leid; wenn der Gegenstand sich auf das Wohlergehen einer anderen Person bezieht, spricht er von Sympathie und Antipathie. Dieser weiteren Unterscheidung werde ich hier nicht weiter nachgehen. Carl Stumpf wird eine ähnliche These vertreten, nach der man, um sich zu freuen, denken können muss (1928). Meinong selbst erkennt diese Ähnlichkeit zu Stumpfs Thesen an (Meinong 1969: 584). Allerdings ist bei Stumpf nicht jene starke Betonung des Überzeugungsmomentes zu finden.

222

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

berzeugungsmoment kann als fester Glaube auftreten oder als mehr oder weniger unsichere Vermutung, keineswegs aber kann es fehlen (Reisenzein/Meyer/Schützwohl 2003: 24). Im Fall des Jungen mit der geschenkten Dampfmaschine ist es eine Voraussetzung seiner Freude, dass er weiß, dass er das Spielzeug nun besitzt. Laut Meinong muss der Junge dabei überzeugt sein, dass dieses Wissen wahr ist, beziehungsweise wirkliches Wissen ist (und dies unabhängig davon, dass er sich bei diesem Urteil irren kann). Die Freude weist ferner Intentionalität auf. Ihr intentionales Objekt ist der Gegenstand des Urteils und wird von Meinong als „Objektiv“ bezeichnet. Meinong unterscheidet damit zwischen dem „Objekt“ der Freude – der Dampfmaschine in obigem Beispiel – und dem „Objektiv“, also dem Sachverhalt, dass etwas erfreulich ist. Diese Unterscheidung findet ihre Parallele in der seit Kenny praktizierten Unterscheidung zwischen einem materiellen und einem formalen Objekt der Emotionen. Meinong schreibt, dass „(…) beim Urteilsgefühle ganz ähnlich wie beim Urteil selbst sich neben, ja in gewissen Sinne vor dem Objekt O noch ein objektartiges Moment unserer Berücksichtigung aufdrängt, ein Moment, das am besten durch einen Satz wie: „dass O existiert“, auch wohl „Existenz des O“ oder dergleichen auszusprechen ist, und dem das Urteil nicht minder wie das Urteil selbst in erster Linie zugewendet erscheint.“ (1905, 589). Meinongs Schlussfolgerung lautet: „Mit dem Urteil, das wir als psychologische Voraussetzung jedes Urteilsgefühls haben anerkennen müssen, hat dieses Gefühl nicht nur den Gegenstand, sondern auch das Objektiv gemeint“ (Meinong 1969: 590). Das intentionale Objekt der Emotionen wird hier also als in einem starken Zusammenhang mit den Urteilen stehend verstanden, welche den Emotionen zugrunde liegen. Damit rückt Meinong in die Nähe kognitivistischer Ansätze, obgleich er das leibliche Moment der Emotionen nicht außer Acht lässt.

b. Ungewissheitsgefühle: Hoffnungs- und Furchtgefühl Die Unterscheidung zwischen Gefühlen je nach der Gewissheit des ihnen zugrunde liegenden Urteils ermöglicht die Unterscheidung zwischen Freude und Trauer einerseits und Hoffnung und Furcht andererseits: „Jene

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE223

sind die Gefühls-Reaction auf einen gewissen, diese auf einen ungewissen Sachverhalt“ (Meinong 1968b: 56). Mit seiner Analyse der von ihm so genannten Ungewissheitsgefühle will Meinong die verbreitete Ansicht bekämpfen, dass der Unterschied zwischen Freude und Leid einerseits und Hoffnung und Furcht andererseits darin liege, dass die ersteren sich auf Gegenwärtiges, die letzteren sich auf Zukünftiges richten. Gegen diese These, dass der Unterschied in dem zeitlichen Moment liegt, liefert Meinong einige Argumente. Zum einen können Hoffnung und Furcht sich sowohl auf Gegenwärtiges als auch auf Vergangenes richten. Wenn man etwa sagt: „Ich hoffe, die Dinge stehen gut“ oder „Ich fürchte, wir sind auf der falschen Fährte“, dann richten sich diese Gefühle auf etwas aktuelles; wenn man sagt: „Ich hoffe, meine Aufgabe erfüllt zu haben“ oder „Ich fürchte, es hat ein Unglück gegeben“ richten sich diese Hoffnung und diese Furcht sogar auf Vergangenes. Außerdem können sich auch Freude und Trauer nicht nur auf Gegenwärtiges, sondern auch auf Zukünftiges und Vergangenes richten. Die Freude auf das Wiedersehen nach einer Zeit der Trennung und die Trauer über den baldigen Verlust eines todkranken Freundes richten sich auf Zukünftiges (Meinong 1968b: 57). Angesichts dessen behauptet Meinong, dass beide Gruppen von Gefühlen sich aufgrund der Gewissheit oder Ungewissheit der zugrunde liegenden Urteile und nicht wegen des Zeitmoments unterscheiden. Wenn wir Gewissheit hinsichtlich eines beurteilten Sachverhalts haben, dann sprechen wir von Freude und Trauer, wenn es eine mehr oder minder große Ungewissheit gibt, treten Hoffnung und Furcht auf (Meinong 1969: 586). Wenn uns sicher ist, dass wir einen Freund wieder sehen werden, dann empfinden wir Freude auf dieses künftige Ereignis, also Vorfreude, und wenn uns nicht gewiss sind, dann erhoffen wir jenes Wiedersehen. Wenn gewiss ist, dass wir jemanden verlieren werden, trauern wir, ansonsten empfinden wir Furcht, dass dieser Verlust eintreten könnte.

224

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

4.2 Wissensgefühle In seiner Untersuchung der Urteilsgefühle hat Meinong seine Aufmerksamkeit auf eine bestimmte Unterklasse gerichtet, die ihm sehr wichtig erscheint, die aber bislang wenig Beachtung gefunden hat. Es handelt sich um Urteilsgefühle, bei denen nicht der Inhalt im Vordergrund steht, sondern der Akte des Urteilens selbst. Dies ist etwa der Fall bei dem Neugierigen, der sich über das Wissen um einen Sachverhalt freut, oder bei dem Wissbegierigen, der Freude empfindet, weil er einen Zusammenhang verstanden hat (Meinong 1968b: 37, im selben Sinne Höfler 1897: 402). Diese Unterklasse von Urteilsgefühlen nennt Meinong „Wissensgefühle“ oder „logische Gefühle“. Damit wird die Idee ausgedrückt, dass man Freude am Wissen haben kann, und dies unabhängig sowohl vom Inhalt des Wissens als auch von der Wahrheit dieses Inhaltes. Bei der Erforschung der Natur dieser Gefühle entsteht die Frage, ob sie als bloße Wertgefühle verstanden werden können. Also: Ist die Freude des Forschers oder des Wissbegierigen von derselben Art wie die Freude des Kindes über die Dampfmaschine? Meinong vertritt in seinem Werk keine durchgehende, schlüssige Position. In der Schrift Psychologischethische Untersuchungen zur Werththeorie von 1894 sieht Meinong in der Tatsache, dass beide Gefühlsarten Urteile zur psychologischen Voraussetzung haben, einen Grund dafür, die Wissensgefühle als eine Unterart der Wertgefühle zu betrachten. Diese Ansicht wird 1905 in seinem Text Über Urteilsgefühle revidiert, hier postuliert Meinong zwischen beiden Gefühlarten einen radikalen Unterschied. Bei den Wertgefühle decke sich nämlich der Inhalt des Gefühls mit dem Inhalt des Urteils: Ich freue mich über etwas, von dessen Existenz ich im Urteilen überzeugt bin. Bei den Wissensgefühlen hingegen spiele der Inhalt keine zentrale Rolle: Der Neugierige und der Wissbegierige etwa freuen sich, dass sie etwas wissen, aber in diesen Fällen ist der Inhalt des Urteils nicht derselbe wie der Inhalt des Gefühls. Der Inhalt des Urteils sind die Dinge, von denen der Betroffene weiß, während der Inhalt des Gefühls dieses Wissen selbst ist (Meinong 1968b: 37; 1969: 593). Als Beleg dafür führt Meinong an, dass man sich über ein Wissen freuen kann, selbst wenn das Gewusste in keiner Weise erfreulich ist (Meinong 1969: 594). Wenn etwa ein Forscher einen neuen

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE225

Krankheitserreger entdeckt, freut er sich über dieses Wissen, nicht aber über den Krankheitserreger als den Gegenstand desselben. Demnach sind Wertgefühle als Inhaltsgefühle und Wissensgefühle als Aktgefühle zu betrachten.11 In seiner Arbeit Emotionale Präsentation aus dem Jahre 1917 behandelt Meinong noch einmal die Frage nach der Struktur der Wissensgefühle und ihrer Stellung in Bezug auf die Wertgefühle. Meinong kommt nun zu dem Schluss, dass auch der Inhalt für die Wissensgefühle von Bedeutung ist (Meinong 1968a: 94). Der Autor stellt drei Unterschiede zwischen Wert- und Wissensgefühlen auf. Erstens soll bei den Wertgefühlen die Affirmation oder Negation der Voraussetzungsurteile wichtig sein, bei den Wissensgefühlen dagegen nicht. Zweitens spielt bei den Wertgefühlen der Gegensatz zwischen Tatsächlichkeit und Möglichkeit eine Rolle, bei den Wissensgefühlen dagegen nicht. Und drittens wird eine jede Gefühlsart mit unterschiedlichen Begehrungen assoziiert. Bei den Wertgefühlen wird das, was Wert hat, begehrt, so dass hier dasselbe Existenzurteil Voraussetzung des Wertgefühls und des Begehrens ist (Ebd.: 96). Das, worüber wir uns freuen, und das, was wir begehren, ist dasselbe. Bei den Wissensgefühlen ist das Wissen selbst die Erfüllung des Begehrens, und dies ist etwas anderes als das Urteil, dass ein vorheriges Unwissen sich in ein Wissen verwandelt hat (Ebd: 97). Trotz der hier zu beobachtenden Unschlüssigkeit Meinongs wenn es darum geht, die Wissensgefühle zu klassifizieren, scheint mir sein Beitrag wichtig, weil er auf eine Gefühlsart hinweist, die für die Forschung von großer Bedeutung sein dürfte und dennoch wenig Beachtung gefunden hat.

11

Es gibt aber zwei Tatsachen, welche diese Position mildern. Zum einen werden die Einsichten und Meinungen des Forschers immer von Gefühlen begleitet, ohne dass es dabei die Vermittlung durch ein Urteil gibt. Zum anderen kann das Wissen selbst Objekt eines Wertgefühls sein. Für diesen Fall hat Witasek den Terminus „Wissenswertgefühl“ geprägt (Meinong 1969: 595)

226

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

5. Die Natur der Phantasiegefühle Meinongs Thesen über die Leistung der Imagination bei Gefühlen und Begehrungen fanden unter seinen Schülern viel Anklang. Saxinger, Schwarz und Witasek interessierten sich für die Natur der „Phantasiegefühle“ und es entstand eine eigene Debatte zu diesem Thema. In gewisser Hinsicht ähneln diese Diskussion und die in ihr vorgebrachten Thesen der heutigen analytischen Debatte über diejenigen Emotionen, die sich auf Fiktionen beziehen. Letztere hat sich unter dem Stichwort „Paradoxon der Fiktion“ seit den 70er Jahren entwickelt. Meinong untersucht die so genannten Phantasiegefühle 1902 in dem Text „Über Annahmen“ im Zusammenhang mit der Frage nach den Gefühlen, die sich auf fiktive Entitäten richten. Damit meint Meinong zum Beispiel das Mitleid mit einer Theaterfigur oder die Furcht vor einem Wesen aus einer Gruselgeschichte (Meinong 1977: 333). Die These des Philosophen über diese Phantasiegefühle ist sehr radikal. Meinong schreibt: „In der Tat, jene „Furcht“ und jenes „Mitleid“, oder was sonst die Tragödie zu „erwecken“ die Aufgabe haben mag, was sind sie eigentlich? Eine Furcht, bei der man sich im Grunde doch gar nicht fürchtet, ein Mitleid, das näher besehen eigentlich doch gar kein Weh verspüren lässt, sind das noch „Gefühle“, wie man sie in der Psychologie zunächst zu behandeln pflegt?“ (Meinong 1977: 310). Meinong verneint diese Frage und stellt damit die These auf, dass wir in den beschriebenen Fällen gar keine realen Gefühle haben. Wären sie real, so die Mutmaßung, dann würden wir uns keine Tragödie anschauen und keinen Roman mit einen tragischen Ende lesen wollen. Um den postulierten Mangel an Realität der Phantasiegefühle zu bezeichnen, prägt Meinong den Terminus „Quasigefühle.“ In diesen Bereich gehören für ihn dabei auch die Phantasiebegehrungen. Denn wir fühlen nicht bloß mit fiktionalen Charakteren mit, wir können auch ihre Wünsche und ihren Willen teilen (Meinong 1923: 135, Meinong 1977: 314). Wie sind Phantasiegefühle genau zu verstehen? Eine Möglichkeit besteht darin, sie als vorgestellte Gefühle aufzufassen, also als bloße Einbildungen. Diese Möglichkeit ist aber ausgeschlossen, weil wir es dann mit einem intellektuellen Phänomen zu tun haben würden – schließlich gehö-

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE227

ren Vorstellungen in den Bereich der Denkakte – und uns nicht mehr im Bereich des Fühlens bewegen würden (Saxinger 1904: 581). Zwar spielt bei den Phantasiegefühlen die Phantasie eine Rolle, doch besteht sie nicht darin, sich ein Gefühl einzubilden. Wenn wir Gefühle über etwas Fiktives haben, dann fühlen wir tatsächlich etwas und stellen uns dieses Fühlen nicht vor. Eine andere Möglichkeit besteht darin, die Phantasiegefühle als Annahmegefühle aufzufassen. Alle Beispiele Meinongs von Phantasiegefühlen haben Annahmen als kognitive Grundlagen, so dass es berechtigt erscheinen kann, die Phantasiegefühle als Annahmegefühle zu verstehen. Diese Möglichkeit wurde von Witasek und Meinong selbst ausführlich diskutiert. Während Witasek die Phantasiegefühle als Annahmegefühle versteht, vertritt Meinong die These, dass nicht alle Phantasiegefühle auf Annahmegefühle reduziert werden können. Witasek unterscheidet zwischen Ernst- und Phantasiegefühlen in zweierlei Hinsicht. Während einerseits die Ernstgefühle Urteile als psychologische Voraussetzungen haben, gründen die Phantasiegefühle auf Annahmen. Nach dieser Ansicht sind Ernstgefühle unbedingt Urteilsgefühle und Phantasiegefühle unbedingt Annahmegefühle. Zum anderen richten sich Ernstgefühle auf Reales, während die Phantasiegefühle sich auf Fiktives beziehen (Witasek 1904: 115, Witasek 1907: 330). Meinongs Thesen über die Phantasiegefühle weichen von dieser Position stark ab. Erstens erkennt Meinong die Möglichkeit an, dass einige Phantasiegefühle auf Annahmen gründen, und gesteht somit ein, dass einige Phantasiegefühle zwar in der Tat Annahmegefühle sind, dass dieser Zusammenhang aber nicht für alle Phantasiegefühle zwingend ist. Die in obigen Beispielen genannten Gefühle über Fiktionen gründen laut Meinong allerdings auf Annahmen und sind damit von den Urteilsgefühlen, die auf Urteilen gründen, streng zu unterscheiden. Urteilsgefühle sind laut Meinong real; Annahmegefühle sollen hingegen keine tatsächlichen Gefühle, sondern eben jene „Quasigefühle“ sein. Es handelt sich in diesen Fällen um ein gefühlsartiges Phänomen, welches den Gefühlen ähnelt, jedoch kein echtes Gefühl ist. Meinong schreibt: „Sind die Annahmen ein Urteilsartiges, das wie Urteil aussieht und doch noch kein Urteil ist, so sind wir jetzt auf ein Gefühlsartiges geführt, das ebenfalls einigermaßen

228

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

nach Gefühl aussieht, und insbesondere die Gegensätzlichkeit von Lust und Unlust an sich trägt wie die Annahme die Gegensätzlichkeit von Affirmation und Negation, und das gleichwohl noch kein volles Gefühl ist.“ (Meinong 1977: 312). Dieselbe These ist auf die Phantasiebegehrungen zu erweitern. Meinongs Auffassung von Quasigefühlen impliziert jedenfalls, dass die Gefühle, die wir über Fiktionen beim Lesen oder beim Theaterbesuch haben, keine tatsächlichen Gefühle sind. Die Implikationen dieser These für unsere ästhetische Erfahrung sind zahlreich: Meinong verbannt letztere gänzlich in den Bereich des Scheins und stellt damit implizit auch den Wert der Erziehung durch Kunst in Frage. Die Tatsache, dass Meinong nicht alle Phantasiegefühle als Annahmegefühle versteht, zeigt noch einen weiteren Unterschied zu Witasek. Meinong macht geltend, dass auch Erinnerungen als Basis für Phantasiegefühle gelten können. So kann etwa eine Art von Schmerz (sinnliches Gefühl) entstehen, wenn ich mich an eine Zahnbehandlung erinnere, oder es kann Trauer (Wertgefühl) hervorgerufen werden, wenn ich mich eine frühere Nachricht über einen Todesfall erinnere. In diesen Fällen gibt es keine Annahmen, die als Basis des Phantasiegefühls fungieren (Meinong 1977: 317, Meinong 1968a: 101). Die Klasse der Phantasiegefühle umfasst insofern sowohl Annahmegefühle als auch andere Gefühle, die in Erinnerungen gründen. Außerdem sind laut Meinong nicht alle Ernstgefühle als Urteilsgefühle zu verstehen, womit ein weiterer Unterschied zu Witasek offenkundig wird. So gründet der Ekel nicht in einem Urteil, sondern in einer Wahrnehmung. Und die Furcht kann in einer Phantasievorstellung gründen anstatt in einem Urteil. Das Paar von Ernstgefühl und Phantasiegefühl stimmt bei Meinong nicht mit dem Paar Urteilsgefühl und Annahmegefühl überein. Dies wird bei einem summarischen Blick auf die Position des Philosophen deutlich. Wenden wir uns zunächst dem Paar Phantasie- und Ernstgefühle zu. Beide unterscheiden sich erstens hinsichtlich ihrer kognitiven Basis, zweitens hinsichtlich der Aktualität bzw. Inaktualität ihrer intentionalen Objekte und drittens hinsichtlich der Art des Erlebnisses. Phantasiegefühle haben als kognitive Basis laut Meinong sowohl Phantasievorstellungen als auch Annahmen. Charakteristisch für sie ist, dass sie keine Setzung der gegen-

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE229

wärtigen Existenz ihres intentionalen Objektes beinhalten. Sie richten sich insofern auf etwas, das nicht aktuell ist – was nebenbei nicht gleichbedeutend ist mit „fiktiv“ ist, da die Objekte von Erinnerungen zwar nicht aktuell sind, keinesfalls aber deswegen auch fiktiv. Meinong beschreibt die Phantasiegefühle als schattenhaft; damit bezeichnet er eine bestimmte Qualität, in der sie erlebt werden (Meinong 1968a: 114). Die Ernstgefühle basieren laut Meinong hingegen auf Wahrnehmungen und Urteilen. Hier besteht das Bewusstsein, dass sie sich auf Aktuelles richten. Sie werden daher gleichsam mit einem anderen Gewicht erlebt, deswegen die Bezeichnung „Ernstgefühle“. Aus diesen Unterschieden ergibt sich, dass Phantasiegefühle von Ernstgefühlen abhängig sind. Erstere spielen keine wesentliche Rolle im Bereich des Psychischen, wenn es um originäre Erfahrung geht. Während die Ernstgefühle, einmal erlebt, Spuren im Psychischen hinterlassen und Dispositionen des Fühlens begründen können, wird diese Fähigkeit den Phantasiegefühlen abgesprochen. Sie haben laut Meinong bloß eine stellvertretende Funktion für die Ernstgefühle. Um die Phantasiegefühle erleben zu können, müssen wir zuvor Ähnliches bereits erlebt haben (Meinong 1968a: 28). Das Paar Annahmegefühl und Urteilsgefühl bezeichnet nach Meinong hingegen Unterklassen von Phantasie- und Ernstgefühlen. Urteilsgefühle gründen in Urteilen. Sie gehen mit dem Glauben oder der Gewissheit einher, dass der zugrunde liegende Sachverhalt tatsächlich besteht oder bestehen kann. Die Urteilsgefühle sind daher eine Sorte von Ernstgefühlen. Annahmegefühle sind hingegen Gefühle, die auf Annahmen gründen. In diesem Fall wird Sachverhalt nicht als mit Sicherheit bestehend betrachtet. Mit Meinongs Thesen zu Phantasiegefühlen haben sich zahlreiche Autoren beschäftigt. Robert Saxinger etwa untersucht in den Abhandlungen „Über die Natur der Phantasiegefühle und Phantasiebegehrungen“ und „Beiträge zur Lehre von der emotionalen Phantasie“ die Dispositionen zu Phantasiegefühlen, um Witaseks und Meinongs Ansichten auf den Prüfstein zu stellen. Saxinger kommt dabei zu dem Schluss, dass die Position Meinongs überzeugend ist, und lehnt Witaseks Thesen ab (Saxinger 1904: 595, 603). Auch Ernst Schwarz befasst sich in seiner Arbeit „Über Phantasiegefühle“ mit dem Status der Phantasie- und Ernstgefühle. Bei-

230

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

den ist danach gemeinsam, dass sie zwischen Lust und Unlust schwanken, dass sie psychologische Voraussetzungen haben (Phantasiegefühle können – und hier schließt Schwarz ausdrücklich an Meinong an – sowohl Annahmen als auch Vorstellungen als Basis haben), und dass das Entstehen von beiden von dispositionellen Faktoren beeinflusst wird (Schwarz 1906: 84, 103). Dennoch unterscheiden sich Phantasie- und Ernstgefühle in einigen Aspekten. Für den Beobachter ist es laut Schwarz sehr schwierig, die Qualität, die Intensität und den Verlauf der Ernstgefühle zu beobachten, während man bei den Phantasiegefühlen auf diese Charakteristika deutlich achten kann (Ebd.: 101). Dies zeigt demnach schon, dass die Phantasiegefühle irgendwie leichter unter unserer Kontrolle stehen. Außerdem ist der Verlauf beider Gefühlsarten verschieden: Während die Ernstgefühle angeblich einen längeren Verlauf haben, treten die Phantasiegefühle im Zusammenhang mit den jeweiligen Phantasievorstellungen und Annahmen auf und haben einen transitorischen Charakter. Darüber hinaus brauchen die Ernstgefühle eine gewisse Zeit, bis sie eine stärkere Intensität erreichen, die Phantasiegefühle dagegen nicht. Und zuletzt, so Schwarz, können Ernstgefühle in uns eine gewisse Disposition zu ähnlichen, zukünftigen Gefühlen verursachen; Phantasiegefühle dagegen begründen keine Gefühlsdisposition (Ebd: 82, 102). Mit dieser letzten These stellt Schwarz genau wie Meinong in Frage, dass man von literarischen Gefühlen etwas lernen kann. In der aktuellen Debatte vertritt etwa Nussbaum die entgegensetzte These, der zufolge fiktionale Emotionen unsere emotionale Palette erweitern und ein Modus der Erkenntnis sind (Nussbaum 1992). Trotz dieser Unterschiede sind laut Schwarz auch Phantasiegefühle real und nicht bloß vorgestellt: „Das Phantasiegefühl verhält sich aber zum Ernstgefühle auch nicht ähnlich, wie sich etwa ein bloß gedachtes Schloss zu einem wahrgenommenen verhält. Denn auch ein Phantasiegefühl ist etwas Reales“ (Ebd.: 102). Laut Schwarz handelt es sich lediglich um eine Form von Gefühlen, welche sich in Natur, Struktur und Qualität von den Ernstgefühlen unterscheidet und etwas „Vorstellungsmäßiges“ beinhaltet (Ebd.: 103), das uns manchmal dazu bringt, die Phantasiegefühle selbst als Vorstellungen zu interpretieren. Schwarz postuliert, dass Phantasiegefühle eine Zwischenstellung zwischen Vorstellungen und Gefühlen einnehmen.

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE231

Diese Thesen und Diskussionen sind aus der Hinsicht der heutigen analytischen Philosophie der Gefühle durchaus interessant. Denn viele der damaligen Positionen finden Parallelen in der aktuellen Debatte über das „Paradoxon der Fiktion“.12 So wurde – um nur ein Beispiel zu nennen – die These von Gefühlen über Fiktionen als Quasigefühlen in den 90er Jahren in ähnlicher Weise von Kendall Walton vertreten. Walton macht einen Unterschied zwischen Urteilen erster Ordnung als solchen über etwas Reales einerseits und Urteilen zweiter Ordnung oder „make-believe“Urteilen als solchen über Fiktives andererseits. Bei Walton bedingt die Unterscheidung zwischen zwei Arten von Urteilen eine Unterscheidung zwischen zwei Arten von Emotionen, die auf den verschiedenen Urteilen gründen sollen. Die Emotionen des realen Lebens gründen auf Urteilen erster Ordnung und sind – so Waltons Terminologie – reale Emotionen. Die Emotionen über Fiktionen gründen hingegen auf Urteilen zweiter Ordnung oder auf „make-believe“-Urteilen und sind laut Walton „Makebelieve“-Emotionen oder „Quasi-Emotionen“ (Walton 1993: 196, 255, 271). Die Ähnlichkeiten der Positionen bieten nicht nur einen interessanten Vergleich, sondern belegen auch eine gewisse Kontinuität der Forschung über Emotionen.

6. Meinongs Philosophie der Gefühle und ihr Einfluss auf die Grazer Schule. Meinongs Philosophie der Gefühle wurde stark rezipiert und war Objekt lebhafter Diskussionen unter seinen Schülern. Auch andere Denker bezogen sich auf die Grazer Schule. Wie vernetzt die Debatte ist und wie stark diese Texte aufeinander referieren, haben wir anhand der Debatte über

12

Vgl. für eine detaillierte Darstellung der analytischen Thesen: Vendrell Ferran, Í. (voraus. 2009) „Emotion, Reason and Truth in Literature“, in: Universitas Philosophica 52.

232

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

Wertgefühle und Phantasiegefühle gesehen. Ein Überblick über die Autoren der Grazer Schule lässt den Einfluss Meinongs erkennen. Vittorio Benussi untersuchte mit experimentellen Methoden die Psychologie der Wahrnehmung und trug damit zur Entwicklung der Grazer Gestaltpsychologie bei. Benussis theoretischer Hintergrund wird von drei Faktoren beeinflusst: Meinongs Bild des Psychischen, die psychoanalytische Lehre des Unbewussten und die suggestiven Methoden von Walther und Gross. Experimentell hat er den Unterschied zwischen intellektuellen und emotionalen Funktionen überprüft und gezeigt, dass beide Sorten von Funktionen voneinander unabhängig sind. Es gelang Benussi, rein emotionale Zustände – wie panische Angst, Lust oder Glück – und reine intellektuelle oder pseudo-intellektuelle Zustände – wie Evidenz – voneinander unabhängig zu induzieren (Albertazzi 2001: 125). Dies widerlegt Meinongs These, welche ihren Ursprung bei Brentano hat und Höfler, Veber, Witasek und andere Autoren der Grazer Schule beeinflusste, wonach emotionale Akte unbedingt psychologische Voraussetzungen in kognitiven Akten haben müssen. Wilhelmine Liel (nach der Heirat mit Benussi: Benussi-Liel) hat in dem Grazer Labor experimentelle Untersuchungen durchgeführt. Ihr Interesse galt auch der Psychologie der Wahrnehmung (zusammen mit Benussi schrieb sie 1904 den Aufsatz „Die verschobene Schachbrettfigur“). Hinsichtlich Meinongs Philosophie der Gefühle hat sie weitere Argumente gegen die „voluntaristischen Werttheorien“ von Schwarz und Ehrenfels, welche die Werte auf Begehrungen oder Gefallen reduzieren wollten, vorgebracht und Meinongs Thesen über die Wertgefühle von 1894 gestützt (Liel 1904). Robert Saxingers Rezeption von Meinongs Philosophie der Gefühle hat zwei Schwerpunkte. Zum einen untersuchte Saxinger die Natur der Phantasiegefühle und Phantasiebegehrungen (Saxinger 1904, 1906). Zum anderen widmete er sich der Erforschung der Ernstgefühle. Das Interesse von Ernst Schwarz galt hauptsächlich der Rolle der Phantasie. Schon 1903 promovierte er mit der Schrift Über Phantasiegefühle und entwickelte seine Forschung in den Arbeiten fort (Schwarz 1906). In späteren Jahren interessierte er sich besonders für die Werttheo-

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE233

rie. Otto Tumlirz schließlich entwickelte den Begriff der Wissensbegehrungen und der zugehörigen Dispositionen (Meinong 1923: 154). Auch andere Autoren wurden von Meinongs Auffassung der Gefühle beeinflusst. Alois Höfler, der bei Brentano und Meinong studierte, widmet große Teile seiner Psychologie von 1897 den Gefühlen. In dieser Darstellung schließt er deutlich an Meinong an. Höfler versteht die Gefühle als Phänomene, welche als lust- oder unlustvoll zu sehen sind (Höfler 1897: 19), welche gleichzeitig notwendigerweise intentional sind (Ebd.: 389) und welche auf kognitiven Basen gründen. Bei der Unterscheidung der Gefühlsarten nach ihrer kognitiven Basis (Vorstellung und Urteil) folgt Höfler dezidiert dem Schema Meinongs. France Veber studierte ebenfalls in Graz bei Meinong. In Sistem filozofije (1921) unterscheidet Veber zwischen kognitiven Erlebnissen (Vorstellungen und Gedanken) und emotionalen Erlebnissen (Gefühle und Begehrungen). Damit folgt er Meinongs Bild des Psychischen. Emotionale Erlebnisse sind laut Veber von den kognitiven Erlebnissen abhängig; hier ist von einer Unilateralität der Abhängigkeit die Rede (nach Potrc 2001: 213). In einem anderen seiner Werke, Emocionalna struktura osebnosti (1928), postuliert er eine Korrelation zwischen Arten emotionaler Erfahrungen und Wertarten, welche nach Veber hedonistisch, ästhetisch, wertend oder logisch sein können. Damit schließt Veber sich Meinongs Auffassung über die Verbindung zwischen Emotionen und Werten von 1917 an. Stefan Witaseks Werk lässt den Einfluss von Meinong bei der Theorie der Gefühle erkennen. Dies betrifft das Bild des Psychischen, die Klassifikation der Gefühle (Witasek 1907) und die Behandlung einiger Fragen der Ästhetik (Witasek 1904). Die Diskussion über das Wesen der Phantasiegefühle ist ein gutes Beispiel des Einflusses, der wohl wechselseitig war. Meinongs Philosophie der Gefühle ist nicht nur für sich genommen interessant und auch nicht nur wegen des Einfluss auf Schüler und andere Denker. Sie ist besonders deshalb interessant, weil sie direkte Verbindungen zur heutigen Philosophie der Gefühle hat. Die Thesen über die Intentionalität der Gefühle, die Leiblichkeit, die Verbindung zu Werten und die

234

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

Phantasiegefühle finden Widerhall in der heutigen analytischen Debatte und geben gleichzeitig anregend andere Perspektiven. Íngrid Vendrell Ferran CISA – Université de Genève [email protected]

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE235

Literatur Albertazzi, Liliana, Jacquette, Dale, und Poli, Roberto (2001): The School of Alexius Meinong. Aldershot/Burlington USA/Singapore/ Sydney: Ashgate. Anscombe, Gertrude Elisabeth Margarete (2007): „Modern Moral Philosophy“, in: Crisp, Roger and Slote, Michael: Virtue Ethics, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Baumgartner, Wilhelm (2001): „Ernst Schwarz (1878-1938)“, In: Liliana Albertazzi, Dale Jacquette & Roberto Poli (eds.), The School of Alexius Meinong. Aldershot & Burlington: Ashgate: 205-208 Ben-ze’ev, Aaron (2000): The Subtility of Emotions, Massachusetts: MIT Press 2000. Brentano, Franz (1959) Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkt, II Band, Hamburg: Felix Meiner Bühler, Karl (1965): Krise der Psychologie, Stuttgart: Gustav Fischer. Descartes, René (1984): Die Leidenschaften der Seele (FranzösischDeutsch), Hamburg: Felix Meiner de Sousa, Ronald (1987): The Rationality of Emotion, Cambridge: Cambridge Macs. Dölling, Evelin (2001): „Alexius Meinong’ s Life and Work“, in: In: Liliana Albertazzi, Dale Jacquette & Roberto Poli (eds.), The School of Alexius Meinong. Aldershot & Burlington: Ashgate: 49-79 Elster, Jon (1999): Alchemies of the Mind, New York: Cambridge University Press Goldie, Peter (2002): The Emotions. A Philosophical Exploration, Oxford: Clarendon Press Green, O. Harvey (1992): The Emotions, Dordrecht, Boston, London: Kluwer Academic Publishers Greenspan, Patricia (1980): “A case of mixed feelings: ambivalence and the logic of emotion”, in: Rorty, Amélie O. (Hrg.), Explaining Emo-

236

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

tions, Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. S. 223-250 Griffiths, Paul E. (1998): What Emotions really are, Chicago: University Chicago Press Haas, Willy (1910): Über Echtheit und Unechtheit von Gefühlen, Nürnberg: Benedikt Hilz Helm, Benett (2002): „Felt Evaluations“, in: American Philosophical Quarterly, 39, S. 13-20 Höfler, Alois (1897): Psychologie, Wien und Prag: Tempsky Johnston, Mark (2001): “The Authority of Affect”, in: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Vol 63, nr.1. 181-214 Kenny, Anthony (1963): Action, Emotion and Will, London: Routledge & Paul Kolnai, Aurel (1974): „Der Ekel“, in: Jahrbuch für Philosophie und phänomenologische Forschung, Tübingen. S. 119-175 Kolnai, Aurel (1998): „The Standard Modes of Aversion: Fear, Disgust and Hatred“, in: Mind CVII. S. 581-595 Leahey, Thomas H. (2004): A History of Psycholoy. Main currents in psychological thought, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall Liel, Wilhelmine (1904): „Gegen eine voluntaristische Begründung der Werttheorie“, in: Meinong, A. (Hrg.): Untersuchungen zur Gegenstandstheorie und Psychologie. Leipzig: Barth. S. 527-578 Meinong, Alexius (1968-1978), Meinong Gesamtausgabe, 7 Bände und ein Ergänzungsband, ed. by R.M. Chisholm, R. Haller, R. Kindinger, Graz: Akademische Druck- und Verlagsanstalt. Meinong, Alexius (1894): „Psychologisch-ethische Untersuchungen zur Werth-Theorie“. Nachdruck in: Alexius Meinong Gesamtausgabe, Bd. III, Abh. I, Graz: 1968: 1-244 Meinong, Alexius (1895): „Über Werthaltung und Wert“. Nachdruck in: Alexius Meinong Gesamtausgabe, Bd. III, Abh. II, Graz: 1968: S. 327-346

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE237

Meinong, Alexius (1902): „Über Annahmen“. Nachdruck in: Alexius Meinong Gesamtausgabe, Bd. IV, Graz: 1977 Meinong, A. (1904): „Vorwort“, in: Meinong, Alexius (Hrg.): Untersuchungen zur Gegenstandstheorie und Psychologie. Leipzig: Barth. S. V-X Meinong, Alexius (1905): „Über Urteilsgefühle, was sie sind und was sie nicht sind“. Nachdruck in: Alexius Meinong Gesamtausgabe, Bd. I, Abh X, Graz: 1969: S. 577- 616. Meinong, Alexius (1917): „Über emotionale Präsentation“. Nachdruck in: Alexius Meinong Gesamtausgabe, Bd. III, Graz: 1968: S. 1-181 Meinong, A. (1923): „A. Meinong“, in: Schmidt, Raymond (1923): Philosophie der Gegenwart, Band I, Leipzig: Meiner. S. 100-158 Metzger, Wolfgang (1986): „Gibt es noch psychologische Schulen?“. in: Stadler, Michael und Crabus, Heinrich: Gestalt-Psychologie, Frankfurt, Kramer, S. 109-123 Mulligan, Kevin (1998): “From Appropriate Emotions to Values”, in: The Monist 81, 1. S. 161-188 Mulligan, Kevin (2004): “Husserl on the “Logic” of Valuing, Values and Norms”, in: Centi, Beatrice & Gigliotti, Gianna (Hrg.): Fenomenologia della Ragion Practica. L’Etica di Edmund Husserl, Naples: Bibliopolis. S 177-225 Nussbaum, Martha (1992): Love´s Knowledge, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Nussbaum, Martha (2005): The Upheavals of Thought. The Intelligence of Emotions, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Pfänder, Alexander (1922): Zur Psychologie der Gesinnungen, Halle: Max Niemeyer. Potrc, Matjaz (2001): „France Veber (1890-1975)“ in: Albertazzi, Liliana, Jacquette, Dale, und Poli, Roberto (2001): The School of Alexius Meinong. Aldershot/Burlington USA/Singapore/ Sydney: Ashgate. S. 209-224.

238

ÍNGRID VENDRELL FERRAN

Reisenzein, Reiner, Meyer, Wulf-Uwe., und Schützwohl, Achim. (2003): Einführung in die Emotionspsychologie. Band III, Bern : Huber Saxinger, Robert (1904): „Über die Natur der Phantasiegefühle und Phantasiebegehrungen“, in: Meinong, Alexius (Hrg.): Untersuchungen zur Gegenstandstheorie und Psychologie. Leipzig: Barth. S. 579-606. Saxinger, Robert (1906): „Beiträge zur Lehre von der emotionalen Phantasie“, in: Zeitschrift für Psychologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane, 40. Band, Hrg. Ebbinghaus, Hermann und Nagel, W.A., Leipzig: Barth. S. 145-160 Scheler, Max (1954): Der Formalismus in der Ethik und die materiale Wertethik, in: ders., Gesammelte Werke, Band 2, Bern: Francke Verlag. Scheler, Max (1976): „Idealismus-Realismus“, in: ders., Gesammelte Werke, Band IX, Bern und München: Francke. S. 183- 242 Schmidt, Raymond (1923): Philosophie der Gegenwart, Band I, Leipzig: Meiner Soldati, Gianfranco (2000): „Frühe Phänomenologie und die Ursprünge der analztischen Philosophie“, in: Zeitschrift für philosophische Forschung 54, 3. S. 313-340. Schumann, Karl (2001a): „Meinongian Aesthetics“, in: Liliana Albertazzi, Dale Jacquette & Roberto Poli (eds.), The School of Alexius Meinong. Aldershot & Burlington: Ashgate: 517-540 Schumann, Karl (2001b): „Value Theory in Ehrenfels and Meinong“, in: Liliana Albertazzi, Dale Jacquette & Roberto Poli (eds.), The School of Alexius Meinong. Aldershot & Burlington: Ashgate: 541-571 Schwarz, Ernst (1906): “Über Phantasiegefühle”, Archiv für die systematische Philosophie 12. S. 84-103. Solomon, Robert C. (1993): The Passions: Emotions and the Meaning of Life, Indianapolis: Hacket Stocker, Michael (1987): „Emotional Toughts“, in: American Philosophical Quarterly 24, 1. S. 59-69

MEINONGS PHILOSOPHIE DER GEFÜHLE UND DIE GRAZER SCHULE239

Stein, Edith (1917): Zum Problem der Einfühlung, Halle: Buchdruckerei des Waisenhauses Stumpf, Carl (1928): Gefühl und Gefühlsempfindung, Leipzig: Verlag von Johann Ambrosius Barth Tappolet, Christine (2000): Émotions et Valeurs, Paris: Presses Universitaires de France 2000. Taylor, Gabrielle (1985): Pride, Shame and Guilt. Emotions of Selfassessment. Oxford: Clarendon Press Titchener, Edward B. (1973): Lectures on the Elementary Psychology of Feeling and Attention, New York: Arno Press Vendrell Ferran, Íngrid (2008a): “Möglichkeiten von Frauen in der ersten Phase wissenschaftlicher Schulenbildung: Emotionen und Sozialität in der frühen Phänomenologie", in: Feministische Studien. Nr. 26 / 1, Stuttgart Vendrell Ferran, Íngrid (2008b): Die Emotionen. Gefühle in der realistischen Phänomenologie. Berlin: Akademie Vendrell Ferran, Íngrid (Vorauss. 2009): „Emotion, Reason and Truth in Literature“, in: Universitas Philosophica 52, 1. Voigtländer, Else (1910): Vom Selbstgefühl. Ein Beitrag zur Förderung

psychologischen Denkens. Leipzig: R.Voigtländers Verlag Walton, Kendall L. (1993): Mimesis as Make-Believe. On the Foundations of the Representational Arts, Harvard: Harvard University Press Witasek, Stephan (1904): Grundzüge der allgemeine Ästhetik, Leipzig, Barth Witasek, Stephan (1907): Grundlinien der Psycholigie, Leipzig, Meiner Wundt, Wilhelm (1920): Grundriss der Psychologie, Stuttgart: Alfred Kröner

DEFEKTE GEGENSTÄNDE UND ANDERE ASPEKTE DER ONTOLOGIE MEINONGS Ulf Höfer

Zusammenfassung Die Ontologie Meinongs wird im Laufe der Zeit immer vielfältiger und präsentiert sich zuletzt als schwer überschaubares Dickicht von Distinktionen, von denen manche bei flüchtiger Betrachtung redundant wirken. Um das zu erhellen, wird versucht, einen einigermaßen kohärenten genetischen Überblick über einige Aspekte von Meinongs Ontologie zu geben, insbesondere über die involvierten Seinsweisen und Gegenstandsarten, und abzuklären, ob und wie gut defekte Gegenstände als letzte Ergänzung in dieses Lehrgebäude integriert werden können. Dabei zeigt sich, dass Meinong zu verschiedenen Zeiten unterschiedliche, manchmal auch kaum vereinbare Positionen vertreten hat und dass die Einführung der defekten Gegenstände der Gegenstandstheorie insgesamt eher abträglich ist, indem sie mehr neue Probleme schafft als sie alte auszuräumen vermag.

Mit der Entwicklung der Gegenstandstheorie bald nach 1900, defini tiv aber 1904 in „Über Gegenstandstheorie“ unterscheidet Meinong zunächst zwischen Sein im engeren Sinne und Sosein, salopp gesprochen bezeichnet dabei Sein spezifisch das Vorkommen oder Nichtvorkommen eines Gegenstandes in der Welt, während das Sosein die jeweilige Beschaffenheit eines Gegenstandes ausdrückt. Ein Sosein ist für jeden beliebigen Gegenstand gegeben, gleichgültig ob dieser Sein im ersteren Sinne hat oder nicht. Für das Sosein gilt das Prinzip der Unabhängigkeit des Soseins vom Sein, das in Meinongs klassischer Formulierung von 1904 lautet: „Der Gegenstand als solcher, [...] der reine Gegenstand steh[t] ,jenseits von Sein und Nichtsein‘“ und weiter

242

ULF HÖFER

[Das Prinzip der Unabhängigkeit des Soseins vom Sein] sagt uns, daß dasjenige, was dem Gegenstande in keiner Weise äußerlich ist, vielmehr sein eigentliches Wesen ausmacht, in seinem Sosein besteht, das dem Gegenstande anhaftet, mag er sein oder nicht sein.1 Noch ausführlicher wird Mally: Jeder Gegenstand ist entweder oder er ist nicht. Aber jeder Gegenstand ist irgendwie beschaffen. Es hat also jeder Gegenstand, gleichviel ob seiend oder nichtseiend, ein Sosein. Das Sosein eines Gegenstandes ist unabhängig von dessen Sein. – Ein allwissender Mensch z.B. ist allwissend, auch wenn er nicht existiert; die Gerade ist eine Linie konstanter Richtung, auch wenn sie nicht existiert [...]. 2 In ontologischer Sichtweise folgt nun aus diesem Prinzip, dass alle Gegenstände, d.i. intendierte Gegenstände, genau die Eigenschaften haben, mit denen sie erfasst, vorgestellt oder angenommen werden. Das Sosein selbst ist – wie auch das Sein – ein sachverhaltsartiger Gegenstand, in Meinongs Terminologie ein Objektiv (dazu unten mehr) und wird weiter unterteilt in Wassein und Wiesein. Dabei verbindet das Wassein einen dinglichen Gegenstand mit einem anderen, z. B.: ‚Der Tisch ist ein Möbelstück‘, während das Wiesein einen dinglichen Gegenstand mit einer Eigenschaft verbindet, ‚Der Tisch ist braun‘. Diese Unterscheidung übernimmt Meinong wiederum von Mally und behält sie bis zuletzt bei 3 , wäh1 2

3

Meinong (1904), S. 8, Fn., 13. Ernst Mally hat 1903 erstmals das Prinzip explizit formuliert, das aber implizit bei Meinong schon vor 1900 vorauszusetzen ist. Meinong verweist auf eine Abhandlung Mallys, die überarbeitet 1904 zusammen mit Meinongs klassischem „Über Gegenstandstheorie“, ebd., S. 8, Fn., unter dem Titel „Zur Gegenstandstheorie des Messens“ im Sammelband Untersuchungen zur Gegenstandstheorie und Psychologie erschienen sind. In beiden Arbeiten finden sich Formulierungen des Prinzips, Meinong (1904), S. 12f.; Mally (1904), S. 126. Meinongs Ausführungen zu Gegenstand und Inhalt von psychischen Akten, in denen er erläutert, dass Vorstellungen einen immanenten Gegenstand haben können, ohne dass dieser existiert, setzt letztlich die Gültigkeit dieses Prinzips voraus, denn zweifellos ist der immanente Gegenstand, auch wenn er nicht existiert, irgendwie beschaffen, vgl. Meinong (1899), S. 382-385. Vgl. Mally (1904), S. 135f.; Meinong (1910a), S. 272, Meinong (1910b), S.

DEFEKTE GEGENSTÄNDE UND ASPEKTE DER ONTOLOGIE MEINONGS 243

rend er das Mitsein, das er zeitweilig neben dem Was- und Wiesein als dritte Untergruppe des Soseins zu betrachten scheint, ab 1915 mit Über Möglichkeit und Wahrscheinlichkeit explizit auf die gleiche Stufe mit Sein und Sosein stellt. 4 Unter Mitsein versteht er das Zusammensein von Gegenständen in einer Kausalbeziehung, wobei hier als Gegenstände keine dinglichen Gegenstände mehr auftreten dürfen, sondern nur Objektive, also Sachverhaltsartiges. Er schreibt dazu: Alle Implikation besteht […] zwischen Objektiven und tritt wohl selbst an einem Objektiv eigener Art zutage, das, wenn ich recht vermutet habe, dem Sein und Sosein als ein Drittes zur Seite steht, dessen Verwandtschaft mit Sein und Sosein ich durch den Namen ,Mitsein‘ kenntlich zu machen versucht habe. 5 Und er meint mit einem Mitsein natürlich den Sachverhalt, dass, wenn ein Sachverhalt Į tatsächlich ist, auch der Sachverhalt ȕ tatsächlich ist. Meinong fasst das aber nicht in einem dezidiert logischen Sinne auf, wonach hier nicht nur das Implikations-Verhältnis betroffen wäre, sondern zusätzlich alle aussagenlogischen Verknüpfungen, die sich mit Implikation und Negation ausdrücken lassen, als vielmehr im Sinne einer nicht näher definierten quasi vortheoretischen Folge-Beziehung. Für diese unterscheidet er dann die 4 (logisch möglichen) Fälle: ,wenn Į, dann ȕ‘, ,wenn Į, dann ¬ȕ‘, ,wenn ¬Į, dann ȕ‘ und ,wenn ¬Į, dann ¬ȕ‘ aber nicht mehr. 6 Ob diese Folge-Beziehung weiterhin einer Standard-Logik gehorcht – ob beispielsweise aus ,wenn Į, dann ȕ‘ auf ¬(Į š ¬ȕ) übergegangen werden kann – bleibt offen. Um schließlich auf das Sein im engeren Sinne zurückzukommen, ist zu bemerken, dass Meinong in seinen Schriften vor 1900, wenn er überhaupt auf Derartiges eingeht, zwei Seinsweisen unterscheidet: Existenz und Bestand, wobei Existenz den realen Gegenständen zukommt, Bestand dagegen den idealen Gegenständen, den Relationen und Komplexionen 4 5

221f., Meinong (1913), S. 254, 261, Meinong (1917/18), S. 379. Vgl. Meinong (1910b), S. 235f., Meinong (1915), S. 155, Meinong (1918a), S. 529f., Meinong (1921), S. 18. Meinong (1918a), S. 529f.

244

ULF HÖFER

und später nach deren Einführung auch den Objektiven, also sachverhaltsartigen Gegenständen. 7 Sodann, am prominentesten in „Über Gegenstandstheorie“, 8 tritt zu diesen beiden eine dritte Form, das Außersein, von der zunächst gar nicht klar ist, ob Meinong damit ernstlich eine eigene Seinsweise meint oder nicht. Meinong behauptet, dass jeder Gegenstand von Natur aus außerseiend ist und das Sein oder Nichtsein nur ein äußerliches Moment des Gegenstandes ausmachen, obwohl für diesen das entsprechende Seins- oder Nichtseinsobjektiv jederzeit besteht. Das Außersein bleibt dabei weitestgehend uncharakterisiert und es liegt für diese Periode in Meinongs Entwicklung die Interpretation nicht fern, dass er mit Außersein keine eigentliche Seinsweise gemeint haben könnte, sondern gleichsam eine Folie oder den allgemeinsten Hintergrund, vor dem sich alle unsere mentalen Aktivitäten abspielen. Bevor jedoch näher auf diese Interpretation des Außerseins eingegangen werden soll, kann die folgende vorläufige Illustration für die Seinsweisen bei Meinong gegeben werden. Fig.1 Seinallg Seinenger Außersein Bestand Existenz

Sosein Wassein

Mitsein Wiesein (Mitsein)

Wir haben hier die ursprüngliche Zweiteilung des Seins in Sein im engeren Sinn und Sosein, die später zu einer Dreiteilung wird, indem das Mitsein von einer Unterart des Soseins auf die gleiche Stufe mit Sein und Sosein gehoben wird. Die vorhin angedeutete Interpretation des Außerseins könnte für Meinong in der Zeit um 1904-06 zutreffen und besagt abweichend von Fig.1, 6 7 8

Vgl. ebd., S. 530. Vgl. z.B. Meinong (1899), S. 395. Vgl. Meinong (1904), § 4, S. 10-13.

DEFEKTE GEGENSTÄNDE UND ASPEKTE DER ONTOLOGIE MEINONGS 245

dass es sich beim Außersein nicht wirklich um eine genuine Seinsweise handelt. Der Bereich des Außerseienden umfasst vielmehr alles, was in unseren psychischen Aktivitäten an Gegenständen auftritt oder auftreten kann, es deckt das gesamte Universum der Gegenstände ab, jedes etwas ist außerseiend, ,außersein‘ bedeutet damit ganz allgemein ,etwas sein‘. Schöne Entsprechungen zu dieser Interpretation von Meinongs Außersein sind etwa R. Routleys Begriff ,being an item‘ oder G. Bergmanns ,eine Entität sein‘, d.i. ,ontologischen Status haben‘. 9 Für diese Interpretation spricht auch, dass es zum Außersein vorerst keine Negation und kein Gegenteil gibt, so wie Nichtexistenz zu Existenz.10 Und Meinong spricht in dieser Zeit eigentlich immer nur davon, dass Gegenstände außerseiend sind, und nicht dass sie Außersein haben oder dass ihnen Außersein zukommt, so wie sie Existenz oder Bestand haben, resp. ihnen zukommt. Es ist also nicht ganz abwegig, anzunehmen, dass hier nicht von einer Seinsweise, von einem Refugium für runde Quadrate und andere Gegenstände, die weder existieren noch bestehen, die Rede ist, sondern davon, dass Sein und Nichtsein für Gegenstände zunächst irrelevant sind und zugleich, dass wir in der Lage sind, uns unter Vernachlässigung allen Wirklichkeitsbezuges Beliebigem zuzuwenden, oder, wie Meinong sich ausdrückt, Beliebiges „rein kontemplativ“ zu erfassen. Seinsfrei dürften so gesehen weniger die Objekte sein als unser Zugang zu ihnen. Und zugleich steht ja selbstverständlich für jedes Objekt sein Seinsstatus fest, er ist bloß nicht in dessen Natur eingeschlossen, Meinong bemerkt in diesem Sinne, „daß im Gegenstande für sich weder Sein noch Nichtsein wesentlich gelegen sein kann“ 11 , dass aber zugleich – was oben bereits angeklungen ist – „der Gegenstand […] von Natur außerseiend [ist], obwohl von seinen beiden Seinsobjektiven, seinem Sein und seinem Nichtsein, jedenfalls eines besteht“. Wenn nun Meinong sagt, dass der Gegenstand außerseiend sei, so könnte er in dieser Phase und mit dieser Metapher eigentlich nur unsere Betrachtungsweise der Gegenstände meinen, die von Sein und Nichtsein abzusehen in der Lage ist. Manchen „heimatlosen“ 9 10 11

Vgl. Routley (1980), S. 5; Bergmann (1967), S. 3. Vgl. Meinong (1917), S. 22. Meinong (1904), S. 12, meine Hervorhebung.

246

ULF HÖFER

Gegenständen einen speziellen Bereich jenseits von Sein und Nichtsein zuzuweisen, hat er da wohl weniger im Sinn. Die Formulierung ,dass der Gegenstand außerseiend sei‘, wäre einfach als ein überspitzter, vielleicht etwas provokanter Ausfluss einer Programmschrift zu lesen, die „Über Gegenstandstheorie“ zweifellos darstellt. Dass er nicht primär ein ontologisches Asyl für heimatlose, nichtexistierende und nichtbestehende Gegenstände einrichten wollte, dafür spricht schon die Ausdrucksweise Meinongs, der an den relevanten Stellen immer ganz global „der Gegenstand“ oder „alle Gegenstände“ verwendet, und der an keiner Stelle näher spezifiziert, welche Gegenstände nun eigentlich die außerseienden wären und auch überhaupt keine Charakterisierung des ontologischen Status von Außersein gibt, sieht man einmal ab vom – was auch immer das sein mag – „Rest von Positionscharakter“, den Meinong 1921 in der „Selbstdarstellung“ dem Außsersein zubilligt. 12 Wenn also Meinong weiters schreibt, „[d]as besagt natürlich nicht, dass irgendein Gegenstand einmal weder sein noch nicht sein könnte“ 13 , dann ist ganz klar, dass alle Gegenstände auf irgendeine Weise sind, nur dass dieses Sein eben nicht ihrem Wesen eignet. Und ich denke, ein Interpret liegt nicht ganz falsch, wenn er diese Passage von 1904 so liest, dass Meinong Sein für nicht geeignet hält, als ein die Natur oder das Wesen eines Gegenstandes bestimmendes Charakteristikum aufzutreten (tendenziell im Sinne Kants: Existenz ist kein Prädikat), dass aber sehr wohl in zweiter Linie das Sein oder Nichtsein für jeden Gegenstand feststeht. 14 Obwohl Meinong letztendlich nicht wirklich eindeutig wird, so mehren sich um 1910 doch diejenigen Stellen, die es nahelegen, Außersein wie in Fig.1 als eigene Seinsweise zu betrachten. Locus classicus für diese Interpretation ist eine Passage aus der 2. Auflage von Über Annahmen, 12 13 14

Meinong (1921), S. 19. Ebd. So gesehen könnte diese frühe Stelle als eine Vorwegnahme von Meinongs späterer Einschränkung der Annahmenfreiheit bezüglich der Tatsächlichkeit (vgl. Meinong (1915), S. 718), verstanden werden, zu der er sich letztlich durch die Kritik Russells genötigt sah. Jedenfalls scheint Meinong schon 1904 eine gewisse Tendenz dahin zu zeigen, Sein oder Existenz nicht als Merkmal, Charakteristikum oder bestimmende Eigenschaft von Gegenständen betrachten zu wollen.

DEFEKTE GEGENSTÄNDE UND ASPEKTE DER ONTOLOGIE MEINONGS 247

in der Meinong vorschlägt, „der Existenz und dem Bestande das Außersein als Drittes an die Seite zu setzen“ 15 und dasselbe fordert er auch im „1. Kolleg über gegenstandstheoretische Logik“. 16 Die Interpretationslinie, das Außersein als eine eigene Seinsweise anzunehmen, ist primär von Findlay vorgezeichnet, dem einige seiner englischsprachigen Leser nicht zuletzt auch in diesem Punkt ziemlich unkritisch folgen, und findet sich insgesamt bei der klaren Mehrheit der Meinongexegeten, für die hier stellvertretend nur Haller und Reicher genannt seien. 17 Findlays Interpretation ist dabei durchaus diffiziler, er nennt das Außersein einen extraontologischen Status und nähert es insgesamt eher dem Sosein an. 18 Meinong selbst vertritt aber auch diese Position nicht ohne gewisse Schwankungen, die einerseits dahin tendieren, Außersein dem Sein im engeren Sinne kontrastierend gegenüberzustellen, andererseits aber das Außersein als allgemeinste oder dünnste Form von Sein aufzufassen, die überhaupt allen Gegenständen zukommt. Eine Identifikation von außerseiend mit nichtseiend, wie sie beispielsweise Reicher vornimmt 19 , ist graphisch folgendermaßen zu verdeutlichen: Fig.2

Gegenstände außerseiend

seiend

bestehend

existierend

Eine derartige Rekonstruktion scheint allerdings nur phasenweise und nicht global Meinongs Position – oder Positionen – angemessen wiederzugeben, besonders, wenn man Stellen, wie die folgenden in Betracht zieht: 15 16 17 18

Meinong (1910a), S. 80. Vgl. Meinong (1910b), S. 223. Vgl. Findlay (1963), S. 56ff., Haller (1966), S. 59f., Reicher (2001), S. 182. Vgl. Findlay (1963), S. 343.

248

ULF HÖFER

„[D]er Gegenstand ist von Natur außerseiend“ 20 , oder: [Außersein] ist die eigentümliche Gegebenheit, die keinem Gegenstande, wie wir sahen, fehlt. 21 Oder: Aber auch dem, was weder existiert noch besteht, eignet als etwas dem Erfassen Vorgegebenes immer ein Rest Positionscharakter, das Außersein, das [...] sonach keinem Gegenstande zu fehlen scheint.22 Nach diesen Zitaten hat jeder Gegenstand unabhängig von einer irgendgearteten anderen Seinszuschreibung Außersein. Außersein ist damit ein Merkmal, das allem zukommt, unterschiedslos ob konkret oder abstrakt, einfach oder komplex, real oder nicht real, und kann somit schwerlich eine Rolle als modale Eigenschaft spielen, was Meinong selbst auch überhaupt nicht in Betracht zieht: An keiner einzigen Stelle wird Außersein so wie Existenz oder Bestand als modale Eigenschaft von Objektiven verwendet. Und die Diskrepanz zu letzteren vergrößert sich, wenn man bedenkt, dass – jedenfalls vorläufig – dem Außersein keine negative Form gegenübersteht. Nimmt man nämlich die vorigen Zitate ernst, dann hat eben jeder Gegenstand Außersein, auch die sonst seienden. Trotz der Uneinheitlichkeit von Meinongs Äußerungen, dürfte damit eher wenig plausibel sein, Meinong zu unterstellen, er teile das, was unseren mentalen Aktivitäten an Gegenständen gegenübersteht, zuoberst in Seiendes und Außerseiendes ein. Indem nun das Außersein in der Hierarchie gewissermaßen eine Stufe nach oben klettert, nähert es sich stärker dem Sosein an, von dem ja auch gilt, dass jeder Gegenstand unabhängig von seinem Bestand oder seiner Existenz ein Sosein besitzt. Was meines Erachtens den Unterschied zwi19 20 21 22

Vgl. Reicher (2001), S. 182. Meinong (1904), S. 13. Meinong (1917/18), S. 377. Meinong (1921), S. 18f.

DEFEKTE GEGENSTÄNDE UND ASPEKTE DER ONTOLOGIE MEINONGS 249

schen Außersein und Sosein ausmacht, ist, dass das Sosein immer mit einer Eigenschaftszuschreibung einhergeht, während das Außersein als allgemeinste Seinszuschreibung nicht mehr behauptet, als dass ein Gegenstand ein Etwas für unsere mentalen Aktivitäten bildet. Eine andere seltsame Parallele zwischen Sosein und Außersein ist ebenfalls noch festzustellen: So wie es für das Außersein im Lichte der obigen Zitate kein Negativum zu geben scheint, so dürfte es, nimmt man Meinongs frühe Forderung, dass jeder Gegenstand irgendwie beschaffen sein müsse, ernst, ein negatives Sosein ebenfalls nicht geben. Meinong bestreitet das und führt Sein, Sosein und Mitsein explizit als negierbar. Für das Sein und Mitsein, scheint das durchaus annehmbar, etwas, das Nichtsein hat, ist einfach nicht, was des Weiteren mit den Begriffen von Bestand und Existenz näher zu bestimmen ist, während Nichtmitsein dann vorliegt, wenn zwischen zwei Gegenständen eben keine Folgebeziehung herrscht. Für das Sosein ist das schwieriger, denn es ist nicht klar, in welcher Weise ein Nichtsosein zu verstehen ist, wenn alles irgendwie sein muss. Aus dem Nichtsosein ¬(A ist B) – im Sinne von ,es ist nicht der Fall, dass A B ist‘ – kann offensichtlich nicht folgen, dass A dadurch überhaupt nicht bestimmt ist. Es wäre möglich zu behaupten, dass A hinsichtlich des B unbestimmt ist, was zwar dem Prinzip des ausgeschlossenen Dritten zuwiderlaufen würde, aber immerhin die Metabestimmung hinsichtlich-des-Bunbestimmt-sein abgäbe. Oder man löst die Satznegation als Prädikatnegation auf und erhält A ist ¬B. Was immer nun dieses ¬B auch sein mag, sowohl damit als auch mit der Metabestimmung landet man wieder bei einem Sosein. Es scheint also, dass ein Negativum von Sosein wie ein Negativum von Außersein schwer zu bestimmen sein dürfte und sich so eine weitere, wenn auch von Meinong nicht intendierte Gemeinsamkeit zeigt. 23 23

Das Problem scheint auch dadurch mitverschuldet zu sein, dass Meinong den Ausdruck „Negativum“ mehrdeutig verwendet, indem er hier nicht – wie an anderen Stellen – klar zwischen Satz- und Prädikatnegation unterscheidet: Nichtsein ist auf der Prädikatebene rekostruiert, x hat Bestand oder Nichtbestand, bzw. Existenz oder Nichtexistenz. Nichtmitsein funktioniert auf der Satzebene, die Folgebeziehung liegt vor oder liegt nicht vor. Für Nichtsosein ist unklar, was zutreffen soll – in Hinblick auf vollständig bestimmte Gegenstände

250

ULF HÖFER

Damit kann ein zweiter Versuch unternommen werden, eine Skizze von Meinongs Seinskonzeption zu geben, allerdings erst, nachdem noch eine späte Modifikation des Mitseins berücksichtigt wird, das zuletzt eine Unterteilung in eine Wenn- und eine Weil-Relation erfährt. 24 Fig.3 Seinallg Seinenger Außersein Bestand

Sosein

Existenz Wassein Wiesein

Mitsein Wenn-Relation Weil-Relation

Hier finden sich nun Außersein, Sosein und Mitsein auf derselben Stufe, während ihre Unterarten eine Ebene tiefer angesiedelt sind. Ob Sein im engeren Sinne eine Zwischenstufe zwischen allgemeinem Sein und Außersein einnehmen muss, mag dahingestellt bleiben, es könnte auch gut mit Außersein identifiziert werden, womit wiederum ein symmetrischer Aufbau gewonnen wäre. Bevor nun näher auf die Verhältnisse der Seinsarten zueinander eingegangen werden kann, ist es notwendig, auf die Gegenstandsarten einzugehen, die Meinong führt. Nach Meinong, der wie sein Lehrer Brentano die Intentionalitätsthese vertritt, sind alle unsere mentalen Aktivitäten mit einem Etwas verbunden, das er ganz allgemein ,Gegenstand‘ nennt. Und da in diesem Sinne alles Gegenstand ist, nimmt Gegenstand mangels Genus und Differentia als etwas Undefinierbares 25 die oberste Position in Meinongs Kategorientafel ein. Gegenstände können erfasst werden, sie

24 25

scheint die Prädikatebene zum Zug zu kommen, während bei unvollständigen mit dem Nichtvorliegen einer Bestimmung die Satzebene entscheidend ist. Vgl. ebd., S. 19. Vgl. Meinong (1913), S. 245, Meinong (1917/18), S. 358.

DEFEKTE GEGENSTÄNDE UND ASPEKTE DER ONTOLOGIE MEINONGS 251

sind nicht subjektiv und von unseren mentalen Aktivitäten unabhängig, sie stehen uns in charakteristischer Weise „entgegen“: Das Entgegenstehen am Gegenstande besteht also im Außersein, dazu im Sosein, das auch dem Außerseienden nicht fehlt und zeigt, daß auch beim Außerseienden nicht etwa Subjektivität im Sinne der Willkür eingreifen kann. Subjektiv ist nur das Erfassen und die dabei sozusagen getroffene Auswahl. […] Gegenstände lassen sich erfassen, aber nicht durch den Erfassenden erzeugen. 26 Dieses Zitat aus einer späten Vorlesung drückt eigentlich ganz genau das aus, was bereits in „Über Gegenstandstheorie“ gesagt wird, nämlich, dass Gegenstände immer irgendwie beschaffen sind, ein Sosein haben, und, indem sie ein Sosein haben, auch irgendeine ganz schwache Form von Sein, das Außersein, besitzen. Entsprechend den vier Grundklassen von erfassenden psychischen Akten, Vorstellen, Denken (bis ca. 1910 Urteilen genannt), Fühlen und Begehren, postuliert Meinong auch vier Klassen von jeweils entsprechenden Gegenständen: Die erste Untergruppe von Gegenständen bilden die Objekte und wie die Gegenstände bleiben auch sie letztlich undefiniert. Meinong bemerkt nur lapidar, dass auf eine nähere Charakterisierung der Objekte verzichtet werden müsse – abgesehen davon, dass für Objekte gewöhnlich Vorstellungen die erfassenden Erlebnisse bilden. Aber auch das ist nicht ganz zutreffend, den Selbstpräsentationen, die kein Vorstellen involvieren, führen ebenfalls zu Objekten. 27 Für Gegenstände werden nun verschiedene, fallweise einander überlappende und das Gebiet der Objekte überschreitende Distinktionen eingeführt, die die einzelnen Unterabteilungen der Objekte bewirken. Die wichtigsten dieser Distinktionen sind: einfach-komplex, absolut-relativ, Ding-Eigenschaft, real-ideal und vollständig-unvollständig und aus diesen resultieren die einzelnen Formen von Objekten. So ergibt die Distinktion einfach-komplex einerseits (Einzel-)Dinge, im Sinne von nicht weiter zerlegbaren Einsheiten, andererseits Komplexe als Gebilde, die aus mehreren Gegenständen zusammen bestehen und unter 26 27

Meinong (1917/18), S. 359. Vgl. ebd., S. 360.

252

ULF HÖFER

die Kollektive (d.i. primär Zahlen), Gestalten (Melodien), Komplexe im engeren Sinne (z.B. Verteilungs- oder Ordnungskomplexe bei der räumlich-zeitlichen Lokalisierung) und schließlich Determinationskomplexe als Verbindung von Dingen mit ihren Eigenschaften fallen. Unter die relativen Objekte fallen – wie zu erwarten – die Relationen, wobei allerdings zu den Objekten nur der sogenannte Relat kommt, z.B. ein bestimmtes Verschieden zwischen A und B, das von diesen 2 Objekten als Eigenschaft prädizierbar ist, während das Verschieden-Sein, die Verschiedenheit, den Objektiven zugeschlagen wird. 28 Zu den realen Gegenständen wird alles gerechnet, was „äußerlich real, was wirklich ist, also existiert“, alles andere ist ideal, insbesondere Komplexe, Relationen, Eigenschaften, aber auch Objektive sind ideale Gegenstände, was zeigt, dass diese Distinktion eher die Gegenstände allgemein als bloß die Objekte betrifft. 29 Die DingEigenschaft-Distinktion ist, wie Meinong selbst bemerkt, keine vollständige Disjunktion der Gegenstände und ergibt wie oben selbständige Dinge, die Eigenschaften haben können. Der Begriff der Eigenschaft bleibt dabei aber ganz vage und weist, wie vorhin bei den Relationen, durch die Nähe zu Bestimmungen und Sosein auffällig in Richtung Objektive. Immerhin schlägt Meinong in diesem Konnex eine Definition von Ding vor als etwas Selbständigem, das „Eigenschaften hat, [aber] nie selbst Eigenschaft ist, und [eine] Einsheit ist“. 30 Die vollständig-unvollständig Distinktion schließlich sprengt ebenfalls den Bereich der Objekte, doch ist soviel klar, dass alle existierenden und bestehenden Objekte vollständig sein müssen, während nichtbestehende vollständig oder unvollständig sein können. Unter die vollständigen fallen wiederum die Dinge, wogegen Abstrakta wie das Dreieck oder ein Blaues und bspw. auch Hilfsgegenstände, durch die wir die Zielgegenstände in der realen Welt erfassen, unvollständig sind. Gegenstände höherer Ordnung können vollständig oder unvollständig sein und es ist möglich, dass ein Gegenstand höherer Ordnung vollständig ist, obwohl er auf unvollständigen Inferiora aufbaut.31 28 29 30 31

Vgl. ebd., S. 360-365. Vgl. Meinong (1913), S. 252f., Meinong (1917/18), 366f. Vgl. Meinong (1913), S. 251f., Meinong (1917/18), 365f., Zitat S. 365. Vgl. Meinong (1913), S. 253-259, Meinong (1917/18), 367f.

DEFEKTE GEGENSTÄNDE UND ASPEKTE DER ONTOLOGIE MEINONGS 253

Die zweite Gruppe von Gegenständen nennt Meinong Objektive. Sie sind psychologisch charakterisiert als die Gegenstände unseres Denkens, gegenstandstheoretisch gesprochen sind sie Sein, Sosein oder Mitsein. In modernerer Terminologie könnte man Objektive cum grano salis als Sachverhalte bezeichnen. Meinong führt die Objektive 1902 in der 1. Auflage von Über Annahmen ein und verändert seit dem so gut wie nichts an ihrer Konzeption. Damit gilt von der Sache her eigentlich alles, was Meinong 1921 in der „Selbstdarstellung“ über die Objektive sagt, auch schon 1902 in Über Annahmen und umgekehrt: Objektive sind charakterisiert als ideale Gegenstände höherer Ordnung und: „Wie bei Objekten gibt es Ordnungsreihen auch bei Objektiven, und wieder sind diese Reihen nach oben offen, indes sie im Sinne des Gesetzes der obligaten Infima nach unten jederzeit ein Objekt zum Abschluß verlangen.“ 32 Objektive, nämlich die untersten in den Ordnungsreihen, bestehen also nicht per se neben den Objekten, sondern sind auf irgendeine Weise, über die Meinong uns im Dunklen lässt, aus Objekten konstituiert, die übrigen Objektive bauen selbst wiederum auf Objektiven auf. Objektive sind Sein im weitesten Sinne, das ist, wie bereits mehrfach angeklungen, in Sein im engeren Sinne (A ist), Sosein (A ist B) und Mitsein (Wenn A, dann B) unterteilt 33 ; und daraus resultieren Seins-, Soseins- und Mitseinsobjektive als Untergruppen. Als Gegenstände höherer Ordnung können Objektive nicht existieren, sondern nur bestehen. 34 Als bloß bestehende Gegenstände sind Objektive an keine Zeiteinteilung gebunden, sie sind zeitlos oder ewig. 35 Objektive werden gelegentlich als die Bedeutungen von Sätzen angesehen: „[J]eder Satz ist nicht nur Ausdruck [eines Urteils], sondern er hat auch Bedeutung, und was er bedeu-

32

33 34 35

Meinong (1921), S. 18, vgl. Meinong (1902), S. 187. Hier ist die Formulierung in der „Selbstdarstellung“ stärker, insofern hier explizit von obligaten Infima gesprochen wird, doch ist aufgrund der Einführung von Gegenständen höherer Ordnung auch in früheren Formulierungen klar, dass fundierende Objekte unabdingbar sind. Ebd. (1921). Meinong (1921), S. 18, vgl. Meinong (1902), S. 187f. Vgl. Meinong (1902), S. 188.

254

ULF HÖFER

tet, ist jederzeit sein Objectiv.“ 36 Die modalen Eigenschaften sind ein besonderes Charakteristikum von Objektiven. Möglichkeit, Notwendigkeit, Wahrscheinlichkeit und Tatsächlichkeit können nur Objektiven zukommen; bestehende Objektive werden als Tatsachen bezeichnet. 37 Die beiden letzten Gegenstandsklassen ähneln einander stark und weisen zudem eine große Nähe zu den Objektiven auf. Wie die Objektive sind beide Gegenstände höherer Ordnung, die ihrerseits auf Objekten und Objektiven aufbauen. Sie versammeln die emotionalen Gegenstände, die Werte unter sich, einerseits Wahr (im emotionalen Sinne), Gut, Schön und Angenehm, andererseits Sollen und Zweckmäßigkeit. Sie zeigen analog zur positiven und negativen Form von Objektiven eine charakteristische Polarität, z.B. angenehm – unangenehm oder nützlich – unnütz, die Objekten gänzlich fehlt. Diese Polarität bildet das Hauptindiz, auf Grund dessen Meinong Dignitative und Desiderative nicht den Objekten zurechnet, zugleich betrachtet er die Polarität der Werte doch als so stark von der Position und Negativität der Objektive abweichend, dass er darin auch einen Grund findet, Dignitative und Desiderative von den Objektiven zu trennen. Das letztlich ausschlaggebende Moment für ihre Unterscheidung von den Objektiven dürfte aber wohl sein, dass Meinong sie als verschiedenen psychischen Akten zugeordnet auffasst: Sie gehören nicht zu Vorstellungen, wie die Objekte, und nicht zum Denken/Urteilen, wie die Objektive, sondern zu emotionalen Erlebnissen. 38 (Das mag zwar Meinongs Motivation für die Einführung von Werten als neuen Gegenstandsarten ausdrücken, liefert aber kein Argument dafür, dass nicht doch Objektive den emotionalen Erlebnissen zugeordnet sein können.) Meinong bemerkt an mehreren Stellen, dass er mit dieser Vierteilung der Gegenstände keineswegs den Anspruch erhebt, eine erschöpfende Darstellung des ontologischen Inventariums unserer Welt gegeben zu haben. Vielmehr betont er, dass es keinerlei Evidenz für eine derartige Behauptung gäbe, und hält auch mögliche zukünftige Erweiterungen der 36 37 38

Meinong (1902), S. 182f. Meinong (1921), S. 19, vgl. Meinong (1902), S. 189. Vgl. Meinong (1916), S. 110-117, Meinong (1917/18), S. 399f., Meinong (1921), S. 20.

DEFEKTE GEGENSTÄNDE UND ASPEKTE DER ONTOLOGIE MEINONGS 255

Fig.4

256

ULF HÖFER

Gegenstandsklassen nicht für ausgeschlossen. 39 Dessen eingedenk und im Bewusstsein, dass sie die einander vielfach überlagernden Unterscheidungen Meinongs 2-dimensional nicht befriedigend abbilden kann, schlage ich trotzdem die in Fig.4 wiedergegebene Darstellung für Meinongs ontologische Kategorien vor, basierend auf seinen späten Vorlesungen. Selbstverständlich ist klar, dass es sich bei Fig.4 nur um eine von mehreren Möglichkeiten handelt, Meinongs Kategorien graphisch abzubilden. Eine andere könnte z.B. die Unterscheidung einfach-komplex als oberste Distinktion annehmen, damit wären Einzeldinge sauber von den anderen komplexen Gegenständen getrennt, allerdings um den Preis, dass dadurch die Kategorie Objekt auf beide Stränge aufgeteilt wäre. Beginnt man mit der vollständig-unvollständig-Distinktion, wären ebenfalls Objekte und Objektive vermischt. Fragwürdig ist in Fig.4 natürlich auch die Position von Außersein, das zum Sein oder Sosein aufsteigen könnte, und die Subsumierung von Relaten unter Objekte anstatt unter die sachverhaltsartigen Objektive lädt unverhohlen zu Widerspruch ein (worauf hier aber nicht eingegangen werden soll). Jetzt kann wieder auf die Verhältnisse der Seinsarten und Gegenstände zueinander zurückgekommen werden. Das Einzige, was in Fig.4 existieren kann, sind Dinge, die dann zugleich unter die Kategorien einfacher, realer, vollständiger und nichtrelationaler Gegenstand fallen. Alle anderen Elemente existieren nicht, sondern haben günstigenfalls Bestand. Was weder existiert noch besteht, hat allemal Außersein, ob darüber hinaus alle seienden und existierenden Gegenstände zusätzlich ebenfalls Außersein haben, ist nicht endgültig entscheidbar, doch scheint mir die Quellenlage eher dafür zu sprechen. Klar ist aber, dass alles, was existiert, auch besteht. Und wenn man diese Implikation weiterspinnt, ist es eigentlich nahe liegend, allem Bestehenden auch Außersein zuzuschreiben. D.h. die Mengen der existierenden, bestehenden und außerseienden Gegenstände sind jeweils Teilmengen voneinander, was folgendermaßen veranschaulicht werden könnte:

39

Vgl. Meinong (1917/18), S. 398.

DEFEKTE GEGENSTÄNDE UND ASPEKTE DER ONTOLOGIE MEINONGS 257

Fig.5 Außersein

Bestand

(Nichtbestand und Nichtexistenz)

Außersein

Bestand

Existenz

Existenz

Nichtbestand

Nichtexistenz

Diese Illustration stellt oben die gängige Standardinterpretation dar, nach der eben Existenz eine Teilmenge von Bestand und Bestand von Außersein ist, in dem dann die Objekte à la rundes Quadrat untergebracht werden. Sie ist aber insofern unpassend, als sie die nichtexistierenden aber bestehenden Gegenstände, z.B. tatsächliche Objektive, aber auch Kollektive als Gegenstände höherer Ordnung vernachlässigt. Die untere Abbildung wiederum geht darauf ein und sichert nichtexistierenden Gegenständen einen Bereich sowohl unter den bestehenden als auch unter den nichtbestehenden zu. Aber da es neben den nichtbestehenden und nichtexistierenden keine weiteren Gegenstände mehr gibt, die zusätzlich im Außersein auftreten könnten, muss der rechteckige Bereich außerhalb der Ellipse leer bleiben. Bestand und Nichtbestand sowie Existenz und Nichtexistenz decken den Bereich des Außerseins vollständig ab. Die Skizze kann also zu Fig.5a vereinfacht werden.

258

ULF HÖFER

Fig.5a Außersein

Bestand

Existenz

Nichtbestand

Nichtexistenz

In Fig.5a markiert die durchgehende Linie die Grenze zwischen Existenz und Nichtexistenz, die unterbrochene jene zwischen Bestand und Nichtbestand. Sowohl Bestand als auch Existenz erschöpfen mit ihren jeweiligen Negaten das Außersein zur Gänze, beide sind voneinander abweichende Unterteilungen des Außerseins. Es gibt – im Lichte der obigen Stellen – kein Außersein außerhalb von Existenz und Bestand. Im linken Bereich fänden sich hier nun die realen Dinge, im mittleren Tatsachen, Kollektive etc., und im rechten Untatsachen wie, dass Julius Caesar eine Primzahl ist, oder unmögliche Objekte wie das runde Quadrat usw. Jetzt endlich möchte ich mich Meinongs seltsamster ontologischer Errungenschaft zuwenden: den defekten Gegenständen. Dabei handelt es sich um Gegenstände, denen Meinong sogar das Außersein abspricht und die damit in unseren bisherigen Schemata von Objektkategorien und Seinsweisen überhaupt nicht unterzubringen sind. Bezeichnender Weise werden sie in der Sekundärliteratur so gut wie überhaupt nicht thematisiert, Findlay erwähnt sie ein einziges Mal mit der Bemerkung, dass ihr Status unklar sei. 40 Worum geht es dabei? Meinong führt defekte Gegenstände 1916 in Über emotionale Präsentation ein, verwendet aber die damit gewonnene neue Gegenstandskategorie überhaupt nicht, sodass man sich des Eindrucks nicht erwehren kann, sie sei nur von ganz marginaler Bedeutung für seine Philosophie, wofür auch spricht, dass es in der

40

Vgl. Findlay (1963), S. 343.

DEFEKTE GEGENSTÄNDE UND ASPEKTE DER ONTOLOGIE MEINONGS 259

acht-bändigen Meinong-Gesamtausgabe gerade 4 Stellen gibt, an denen darüber gehandelt wird. Vorläufig können defekte Gegenstände als Objektive bezeichnet werden, die einen unzulässigen Selbstbezug aufweisen. Beispiele, die Meinong dafür gibt, sind „Ich lüge“, „Was ich erfasse, ist falsch“ oder (mit Vorbehalt) auch die klassische Form der Lügner-Paradoxie. Nun muss man sich natürlich fragen, warum gerade diese Paradoxien von Meinong für so gravierend angesehen werden, dass er ihnen eine neue Kategorie widmet, während andere sehr gekünstelt – wie im Fall von Russells Menge aller Mengen, die sich selbst nicht als Element haben – wegerklärt werden 41 , oder wie die gängigen logisch-semantischen Paradoxien, z.B. „Dieser Satz (selbst) ist falsch“ überhaupt nicht beachtet werden; warum also nicht alle Paradoxien, sondern nur manche defekte Gegenstände erzeugen. Der Selbstbezug, resp. der wechselseitige Bezug, mit dem Paradoxa typischerweise einhergehen, kann nicht das ausschlaggebende Moment sein – der funktioniert in allen Fällen gleich mit den Mitteln referenzieller Bezugnahme, wie sie unsere Sprachen vorsehen. Vielmehr liegt die Antwort einmal mehr in der umfassenden psychologischen Einbettung von Meinongs philosophischem System und zwar genaugenommen in einer ontologischen Verschärfung der Intentionalitätsthese. Wie schon oben erwähnt, fordert die Intentionalitätsthese, dass alle mentalen Akte Gegenstände haben müssen. Das wird in der späten Phase von Meinong insoweit verschärft, als er feststellt, dass der intendierte Gegenstand ein logischer oder natürlicher Prius des jeweiligen Aktes ist, wobei er ,logisch‘ und ,natürlich‘ in diesem speziellen Fall offenbar synonym verwendet. Unter einem solchen Prius versteht Meinong etwas, das der davon abhängende Gegenstand, der Posterius, für sein Sein bedarf, ohne dass der Prius selbst in irgendeiner Weise auf den anderen Gegenstand angewiesen wäre. So kann z.B. ein Urteil nicht existieren, ohne eine zugrunde liegende Vorstellung, die Vorstellung aber sehr wohl ohne das Urteil, wobei diese Priorität nur die Existenz betrifft, nicht aber ein zeitliches Vorausgehen, d. h. die Vorstellung muss nicht früher als das Urteil existieren. 42 Wenn ich nun 41 42

Vgl. Meinong (1916), S. 11-14. Vgl. Meinong (1916), S. 356, Meinong (1917/18), S. 378.

260

ULF HÖFER

urteile, dass ich (jetzt) Falsches urteile, dann müsste genau dieses Urteilen als Prius für sich selbst eintreten, und das ist nach der Definition von Prius und Posterius nicht möglich. In diesem Fall würde der Posterius als sein eigener Prius auftreten, und da das ausgeschlossen ist, „hat“ er gewissermaßen einen unzulässigen Prius und damit fehlt strenggenommen dem Urteil sein Gegenstand – und deswegen ist das Objektiv ,dass ich jetzt Falsches urteile‘ ein defektes Objekt. Es zeigt sich also, dass die defekten Gegenstände nicht vorrangig am Selbstbezug hängen, der natürlich auch mitspielt, sondern vielmehr als theoretische Undinge, die Meinongs Grundannahmen zuwiderlaufen, mit dem Ausschluss aus dem Außersein bestraft werden. 43 Defekte Gegenstände sind aber nicht die einzigen, denen Meinong negatives Außersein zuschreibt. Zugleich mit der Einführung ersterer erklärt er auch unmögliche Gegenstände wie das runde Quadrat für nicht außerseiend und Superiora mit fehlenden Inferiora. 44 Für letztere bringt er als eher unglückliches Beispiel die Verschiedenheit von Schwarz zu sich selbst, was fälschlich als in die Richtung der selbstbezüglichen defekten Gegenstände weisend verstanden werden könnte. Günstiger wäre die Verschiedenheit von Schwarz, wo deutlich wird, dass hier die Relation Verschiedenheit einen Inferius zu wenig hat. Dass defekte Gegenstände und Superiora mit fehlenden Inferiora ausgeschlossen werden, weil bei ihnen sozusagen konstitutive Mängel vorliegen, ist noch durchaus nachvollziehbar. Dass aber das runde Quadrat, das bislang, jedenfalls bis Über Möglichkeit und Wahrscheinlichkeit (1915) ein Paradebeispiel für ein außerseiendes Objekt war, auf einmal und das ohne eigentliche Begründung ins Nichtaußersein abgeschoben wird, überrascht doch einigermaßen. Zumal Meinong an ebendieser Stelle explizit bemerkt, dass er von der Sache her trotz aller Einwände gegen das runde Quadrat keinen zwingenden Grund für diesen Schritt sieht, er aber als gewisses Entgegenkommen sei43

44

Analog funktioniert übrigens ein Argument, mit dem Meinong die Einschränkung der Annahmefreiheit in Bezug auf Tatsächlichkeit begründet: Diese kann nicht angenommen werden, weil damit der Bereich des Annehmens in Richtung des penetrierenden wahrheitsinvolvierenden Urteilens verlassen würde. Vgl. Meinong (1915), S. 282ff. Vgl. Meinong (1917/18), S. 377.

DEFEKTE GEGENSTÄNDE UND ASPEKTE DER ONTOLOGIE MEINONGS 261

nen Kritikern gegenüber diesen Streitpunkt ausräumen möchte. Das einzige, was als leise Rechtfertigung gelesen werden kann, ist seine rhetorische Frage: Wenn dem runden Viereck das Außersein nicht abzusprechen ist, wie sollte es von einem der in gewisser Hinsicht um so viel harmloseren defekten Gegenstände in Abrede zu stellen sein? 45 Natürlich ist das keine Begründung, und wenn auch gewisse Flurbereinigungen im Inventarium der Gegenstandstheorie nicht ohne Reiz sind und es vielleicht nahelegen könnten, unmögliche Objekte mit paradoxen Objektiven in einer Seinsweise zu vereinigen, so ist doch zu bedenken, dass das Spektrum der unmöglichen Gegenstände recht weit ist. Es erstreckt sich von explizit kontradiktorischen Objekten, wie einem roten Nichtroten, über begriffliche Unverträglichkeiten, wie dem verheirateten Junggesellen, zu ganz schwachen, meinethalben theoretisch unmöglichen Gegenständen, wie dem Beamen, dessen Unmöglichkeit gerade am Zerbröckeln ist. Während also kontradiktorische Objekte ganz gut zu defekten Gegenständen passen könnten, scheint es auf der anderen Seite nur schwer möglich, eine nicht willkürlich wirkende Grenze zu ziehen. Wie sehr sich Meinong dieser Probleme klar war, ist nicht zu entscheiden, doch vermutlich dürfte die Motivation, endlich einen Schlussstrich unter die leidige Debatte um das runde Quadrat ziehen zu können, für Meinong so stark gewesen sein, dass er diese gewagte Neuerung in seiner Theorie – vielleicht etwas übereilt – eingeführt hat . Die Situation um Meinongs Seinsweisen präsentiert sich nun folgendermaßen:

45

Meinong (1916), S. 23.

262

ULF HÖFER

Fig.6 Außersein

Bestand

Nichtbestand

(Nichtbestand) Nichtaußersein

Existenz

Nichtexistenz

(Nichtexistenz)

Hier wird das Außersein wird wie oben von den beiden Distinktionen Bestand-Nichtbestand, getrennt von der unterbrochenen Linie, und ExistenzNichtexistenz, getrennt von der durchgehenden Linie, vollständig abgedeckt. Die defekten Objekte kommen in den neuen Bereich des Nichtaußerseins, abgetrennt durch die doppelte Linie. Selbstverständlich fallen nichtaußerseiende Gegenstände auch unter Nichtbestand und Nichtexistenz. Als Mengen betrachtet bildet Nichtaußersein eine Teilmenge von Nichtbestand und Nichtbestand eine Teilmenge von Nichtexistenz. Zugleich haben Nichtbestand und Nichtexistenz auch (unterschiedliche) Schnittmengen mit Außersein. Existenz dagegen ist eine Teilmenge von Bestand und Bestand wiederum eine Teilmenge von Außersein. Welche Konsequenzen erwachsen nun aus dieser Erweiterung? Das erste, was Meinong dazu bemerkt, ist, dass jetzt auch das Außersein – wie die anderen Seinsarten – eine positive und negative Form aufweist, was von der Natur der Sache ohnehin so zu erwarten wäre. 46 Was ist aber das Nichtaußersein? Wohl nichts anderes, als dass seine Gegenstände gar nicht vorhanden sind, keinen Positionscharakter haben und endlich überhaupt keine Gegenstände mehr sind. Dazu erhebt sich sogleich die Frage, ob das in der Gegenstandstheorie überhaupt zulässig sein, wo natürlich auch defekte Gegenstände Gegenstände sein müssen. Weiters ist zu fragen, was uns davon abhalten könnte, immer weitere ontologische Ebenen einzuziehen, und ob nicht etwa die Gefahr eines Regresses droht, der da46

Vgl. Meinong (1917/18), S. 377.

DEFEKTE GEGENSTÄNDE UND ASPEKTE DER ONTOLOGIE MEINONGS 263

durch zu Stande kommt, dass man sich für das Nichtsein auf einer ontologischen Ebene, sogleich eine weitere einhandelt, die das auffängt. Also vereinfachend: Nichtexistenz verlagert sich auf die Ebene des Bestands, Nichtbestand auf die Ebene des Außerseins, Nichtaußersein auf eine Ebene tiefer als Außersein usf. Vermutlich droht die Gefahr in dieser Hinsicht nicht, wenigstens nicht auf den ersten Blick, denn so, wie Meinong die Seinsweisen eingeführt hat, gibt es dabei keinen hierarchischen Aufbau wie z.B. bei den Gegenständen höherer Ordnung, vielmehr scheinen die einzelnen Seinsweisen trotz – oder vielleicht gerade wegen – ihrer Überschneidungen gleichsam nebeneinander zu liegen. Und dabei ist, salopp gesprochen, das Nichtaußersein für die Ungegenstände oder Nichteinmalgegenstände zuständig. Evidenz dafür, dass mit der Trias Existenz, Bestand und Außersein der Bereich des Seins im engeren Sinne vollständig ausgeschöpft ist, gibt es klarerweise nicht, worauf Meinong explizit hinweist 47 , aber auch für die Notwendigkeit von weiteren Seinsweisen neben diesen gibt es keine Evidenz. Was die zusätzliche Klasse von Gegenständen betrifft, so ist festzustellen, dass Meinong ihre Verbannung nur recht halbherzig betreibt. Er erklärt sie nämlich nicht einfach zu Ungegenständen, sondern er ist bestrebt, sie trotz allem unseren mentalen Akten zugänglich zu erhalten. Zu diesem Zweck führt er eine Unterscheidung zwischen Gegenstand als Konkretum und Gegenstand als Diskonkretum ein, die eine partiell analoge Konstruktion erlaubt, wie jene von Hilfs- und Zielgegenständen beim wahr Urteilen, wo gleichsam durch den stellvertretenden Hilfsgegenstand hindurch ein Zielgegenstand in der Realität getroffen wird. 48 Angelehnt ist diese Unterscheidung an die Unterscheidung von anschaulichem und unanschaulichem Erfassen, wobei Meinong behauptet, „daß für das Erfassen unmöglicher Gegenstände zwar jederzeit das Diskonkretum, niemals aber das Konkretum zur Verfügung steht“, und so z.B. das runde Quadrat als Diskonkretum erfasst werden kann, obwohl es anschaulich als Konkretum nicht zugänglich ist. Das Diskonkretum bildet damit einen im Au47 48

Vgl. ebd. Vgl. Meinong (1916), S. 24, zu Hilfs- und Zielgegenstand vgl. Meinong (1915), S. 196-199.

264

ULF HÖFER

ßersein angesiedelten Hilfsgegenstand, der den theoretisch im Nichtaußersein angesiedelten konkreten Gegenstand vertritt, was mutmaßlich nichts anderes bedeuten kann, als dass es den nichtaußerseienden konkreten Gegenstand überhaupt nicht gibt, sondern nur den Stellvertreter. Was mit dieser Konstruktion gewonnen sein soll, ist höchst fraglich. Hatten wir früher ein außerseiendes rundes Quadrat, so haben wir nun ein außerseiendes diskonkretes rundes Quadrat, das möglicherweise nichts vertritt, oder möglicherweise etwas vertritt, von dem ganz unklar ist, was und wie es ist. Vertritt es nichts, dann ist es genau in derselben Lage wie das klassische runde Quadrat, nur mit der zusätzlichen wahrscheinlich außerkonstitutorischen Eigenschaft des Diskonkretseins. Vertritt es etwas, dann wiederholt sich das Spiel auf der nächsten Ebene, denn dieses Etwas muss nach Meinongs Grundprinzipien irgendwie beschaffen sein, also eine Art Sosein haben, wenn es aber Sosein hat, dann hat es auch irgendeine ganz rudimentäre Form von Sein und Positionscharakter, genau wie das klassische runde Quadrat auch, nur eine Ebene weiter. Selbstverständlich gestattet diese neue rudimentäre Seinsform wiederum die Forderung nach Negativität, und damit ist die Gefahr eines Regresses augenscheinlich. Um einen derartigen Regress zu vermeiden, bedarf es einer Seinsart, die keiner Negativität fähig ist – so wie es anfangs das Außersein war. Eventuell könnte das Sosein diese Rolle übernehmen: Nicht außerseiende Gegenstände hätten dann überhaupt kein Sein, aber immerhin ein Sosein, das sie wenigstens zu einem irgendwie konfigurierten Etwas macht. Aber damit befinden wir uns bereits im Bereich des Spekulativen anstelle des Exegetischen. Die Frage, ob die nichtaußerseienden Gegenstände konsistent in die Gegenstandstheorie eingebaut werden können, erfährt damit eher eine negative Antwort. Je nachdem, ob man sie irgendwie gestaltet annimmt oder nicht, sind sie entweder Undinge ohne Sosein, was den Grundannahmen der Gegenstandstheorie zuwiderläuft, oder sie haben Sosein, was im Nichtaußersein zu denselben Problemen führt wie im Außersein und zusätzlich die Gefahr eines Regresses birgt. Ebenfalls zum Spekulativen gehört die Frage, warum sich Meinong zu dieser neuen und durchaus obskuren Gegenstandskategorie durchringt, wo es doch zweifellos elegantere und weit weniger problematische Möglichkeiten gegeben hätte. Um Schwierigkeiten mit Gegenständen höherer

DEFEKTE GEGENSTÄNDE UND ASPEKTE DER ONTOLOGIE MEINONGS 265

Ordnung zu vermeiden, denen Inferiora fehlen, hätte eine einfache Regel gereicht, die besagt, dass solcherart defizitäre Komplexe als nicht wohlgeformt zu behandeln sind, keine Gegenstände bestimmen und insgesamt nichts im System verloren haben. Dagegen würde zwar sofort eingewandt werden, dass das gegen die Doktrin der Annahmefreiheit verstoßen hieße, die immerhin auch zu Meinongs fundamentalen Thesen zählt. Dem könnte man jedoch entgegenhalten, dass die Annahmenfreiheit bereits früher Einschränkungen hinsichtlich des Annehmens von Tatsächlichkeit erfahren hat 49 , weshalb weitere Beschränkungen keine prinzipielle Unmöglichkeit mehr wären. Analog zur Einschränkung der Annahmenfreiheit könnte man nun auch ein Verbot für die Selbstanwendung der vier Erfassungserlebnisse einführen. D.h. es wäre sicherzustellen, dass ein konkreter Vorstellens-, Denk- resp. Urteils-, Fühlens- oder Begehrensakt niemals sich selbst zum Gegenstand hat (wie im Fall ,dass ich jetzt Falsches urteile‘). Eine derartige Regelung scheint mir kein nennenswerter Eingriff in Meinongs Psychologie zu sein, dort kommen solche Selbstbezüge eigentlich nur bei den Paradoxien und sonst gar nicht vor. Auch die in dem Zusammenhang verdächtig wirkende Selbstpräsentation ist nicht zirkulär, sondern beinhaltet immer unterschiedliche Gegenstände. Es spricht also nichts Gravierendes gegen eine Modifikation in dieser Hinsicht. Warum Meinong nicht diesen Weg gewählt hat, sondern den zu den defekten Gegenständen und zum Nichtaußersein, ist nicht rekonstruierbar. Offensichtlich ist aber, dass er sich selber bei Einigem nicht sicher war, was sich schon an der fallweise uneinheitlichen Terminologie zeigt. Und nicht zuletzt beendet er selbst die Ausführungen zu den defekten Gegenständen im „Vierten Kolleg über Erkenntnistheorie“ mit der Feststellung „Immerhin hier noch viel Dunkelheit“ 50 , der man sich als Exeget nur anschließen kann. Ulf Höfer Forschungsstelle und Dokumentationszentrum für österreichische Philosophie [email protected]

49 50

Vgl. Meinong (1915), S. 282ff., 718. Meinong (1917/18), S. 378.

266

ULF HÖFER

Abgekürzt zitierte Literatur: Findlay, J.N. (1963): Meinong’s Theory of Objects and Values, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2. Auflage, 1963. Haller, Rudolf (1966): „Meinongs Gegenstandstheorie und Ontologie“, Journal of the History of Philosophy, Bd. 4, 1966, S. 313-324, wiederabgedruckt in Haller, Rudolf: Studien zur Österreichischen Philosophie, Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1979, S. 49-65. Mally, Ernst (1904): „Zur Gegenstandstheorie des Messens“ in A. Meinong (Hg.): Untersuchungen zur Gegenstandstheorie und Psychologie, Leipzig: Barth, 1904, S. 121-262. Meinong, Alexius (1899): „Über Gegenstände höherer Ordnung und deren Verhältnis zur inneren Wahrnehmung“, in Zeitschrift für Psychologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane, Bd. 21, S. 181-271. Zit. nach R. Haller, R. Kindinger (Hg.): Alexius Meinong. Gesamtausgabe, Bd. 2, Graz: ADVA, 1972, S. 379-480. Meinong, Alexius (1903): „Sachindex zur Logik und Erkenntnistheorie“. Zit. nach R. Haller, R. Kindinger (Hg.): Alexius Meinong. Gesamtausgabe, Ergänzungsband, Graz: ADVA, 1978, S. 25-128. Meinong, Alexius (1904): „Über Gegenstandstheorie“, (1904), in R. Haller, R. Kindinger (Hg.): Alexius Meinong. Gesamtausgabe, Bd. 2, Graz: ADVA, 1972, S. 481-531. Meinong, Alexius (1906): Über die Erfahrungsgrundlagen unseres Wissens. In: Abhandlungen zur Didaktik und Philosophie der Naturwissenschaft, Bd. 1, H. 6, Berlin: Springer, 1906, S. 1-113. Zit nach R. Haller, R. Kindinger (Hg.): Alexius Meinong. Gesamtausgabe, Bd. 5, Graz: ADVA, 1972, S. 370-481. Meinong, Alexius (1907): Über die Stellung der Gegenstandstheorie im System der Wissenschaften, (1907), in R. Haller, R. Kindinger (Hg.): Alexius Meinong. Gesamtausgabe, Bd. 5, Graz: ADVA, 1972. Meinong, Alexius (1910a): Über Annahmen, 2. Auflage (1910), in R. Haller, R. Kindinger (Hg.): Alexius Meinong. Gesamtausgabe, Bd. 4, Graz: ADVA, 1972.

DEFEKTE GEGENSTÄNDE UND ASPEKTE DER ONTOLOGIE MEINONGS 267

Meinong, A. (1910b): „Erstes Kolleg über gegenstandstheoretische Logik“. Zit. nach R. Haller, R. Kindinger (Hg.): Alexius Meinong. Gesamtausgabe, Ergänzungsband, Graz: ADVA, 1978, S. 209-236. Meinong, Alexius (1913): „Zweites Kolleg über gegenstandstheoretische Logik“. Zit. nach R. Haller, R. Kindinger (Hg.): Alexius Meinong. Gesamtausgabe, Ergänzungsband, Graz: ADVA, 1978, S. 237-272. Meinong, Alexius (1913/14): „Bemerkungen zu E. Husserls ‚Ideen zu einer reinen Phänomenologie und phänomenologischen Philosophie‘“. Zit. nach R. Haller, R. Kindinger (Hg.): Alexius Meinong. Gesamtausgabe, Ergänzungsband, Graz: ADVA, 1978, S. 287-323. Meinong, Alexius (1917/18): „Viertes Kolleg über Erkenntnistheorie“. Zit. nach R. Haller, R. Kindinger (Hg.): Alexius Meinong. Gesamtausgabe, Ergänzungsband, S. 337-401. Meinong, Alexius (1918a): „Zum Erweise des allgemeinen Kausalgesetzes“, Sitzungsberichte der kaiserlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Philosophisch-historische Klasse, Bd. 189, 4. Abhandlung, zit. nach R. Haller, R. Kindinger (Hg.): Alexius Meinong. Gesamtausgabe, Bd. 5, Graz: ADVA, 1969, S. 485-602. Meinong, Alexius (1918b): „Abstrahieren und Vergleichen“. In Zeitschrift für Psychologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane, Bd. 24, 1900, S. 34-82, zit. nach R. Haller, R. Kindinger (Hg.): Alexius Meinong. Gesamtausgabe, Bd. 1, Graz: ADVA, 1969, S. 443-494. Reicher, Maria (2001): „Die Grazer Schule der Gegenstandstheorie“, in: Binder / Fabian / Höfer / Valent (Hg.): Bausteine zu einer Geschichte der Philosophie an der Universität Graz, Amsterdam / New York, Rodopi, S. 173-207. Routley, Richard (1980): Exploring Meinong’s Jungle and Beyond, Canberra: Department Monograph #3, Philosophy Department, Australian National University.